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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Tue. Jul. 29 - 7:45 am
07/28/14
Update #2: Fatal Traffic Crash - Interstate 84 west of Baker City (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/28/14
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UPDATE: Investigators confirmed following an examination of the pickup and follow up interview with a passenger that the pickup struck and elk causing the operator to lose control before crashing in the center median.

***

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of Saturday night's single vehicle fatal traffic crash that occurred along Interstate 84 west of Baker City in Baker County. The crash resulted in the death of an adult female and serious injury to three other adults.

According to Sergeant Kyle Hove, on July 26, 2014 at approximately 10:38 p.m., a 2010 Ford F350 pickup driven by TODD B. PRATT, age 30, from Blackfoot, Idaho, was traveling eastbound on Interstate 84 near milepost 294 when it traveled off the freeway lanes into the median. The pickup and 2001 Xtreme camper trailer rolled into the median where both vehicles came to rest.

The vehicle's four occupants, all from Idaho, were seriously injured. TODD PRATT and rear passenger JOE L. PRATT, age 61, from Blackfoot, Idaho, were transported by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. Right front passenger AUSTIN B. PARKER, age 23, from Pocatello, Idaho, and rear passenger TANDA KAY PRATT, age 60, from Blackfoot, Idaho, were transported by ground ambulance to St. Alphonsus Medical Center in Baker City. TANDA PRATT was later pronounced deceased at the hospital.

OSP troopers from the La Grande Area Command office, with the assistance of OSP Baker City troopers, are continuing the investigation. Recruit Trooper Tim Schuette is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Baker County Sheriff's Office, Baker City Police Department, Baker City Fire Department, Baker Rural Fire/Rescue, Haines Fire Protection District, LifeFlight, and ODOT.

The westbound lanes were closed temporarily for emergency ground and air transported response.

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76337/072614.fatal.i84_mp295.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76337/072614.fatal.i84_mp295.2.jpg
Update: Victim Identified, Photos - Driver Arrested for Allegedly Causing Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 6 in Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/28/14
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Oregon State Police (OSP), with the assistance of the Tillamook County District Attorney's Office, is continuing the investigation into Sunday afternoon's fatal traffic crash that occurred on Highway 6 east of Lees Camp in Tillamook County. The initial investigation led the arrest of a Portland woman located and stopped in Washington County whose vehicle was identified by witnesses as causing the crash.

On July 27, 2014 at approximately 4:00 p.m., a 2001 Chrysler Sebring driven by RUSSEL JOHN FALOTICO, age 56, from Beaverton, was eastbound on Highway 6 near milepost 27 when a 2009 Hyundai Santa Fe sport utility vehicle attempted to pass the Chrysler in a no passing zone. A witness traveling westbound said the Hyundai attempted to move back into the eastbound lane to avoid a collision with an oncoming vehicle, forcing the Chrysler off the roadway into a gravel pullout. The Chrysler's driver lost control, slid into the westbound lane and collided with a westbound 2004 Jeep Wrangler driven by SHILO MARIE WALTERS, age 36, from Newberg.

The Hyundai continued eastbound from the scene without stopping.

Upon arrival of emergency responders, the Chrysler's driver was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The passenger in the Jeep Wrangler identified as RICHARD R. WALTERS, age 43, from Newberg, was transported by LifeFlight to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center with serious, non-life threatening injuries. SHILO WALTERS was transported by ground ambulance to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center with non-life threatening injuries.

Investigators received information from witnesses at the scene that prior to the crash the operators of the Chrysler and Hyundai were involved in "road rage" behavior. This information led OSP to request law enforcement agencies to be on the lookout for the Hyundai.

At approximately 5:04 p.m., information from Washington County Sheriff's Office and Beaverton Police Department led to the driver being stopped by Beaverton police eastbound on Highway 26 near Cedar Hills Boulevard. An OSP trooper responded from the crash scene as part of the ongoing investigation and subsequently arrested the Hyundai's driver, TRISHA JO HOMAN, age 45, from Portland, on the following charges:

* Criminally Negligent Homicide
* Assault in the Third Degree
* Reckless Driving
* Recklessly Endangering Another Person
* Felony Hit & Run

The trooper transported HOMAN to Tillamook County Jail where she was lodged on the charges. According to jail staff, she posted bail and was released to appear at a date and time to be set.

OSP troopers from the Tillamook office are continuing the investigation. Trooper Sarah Reding is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene and during the initial investigation by Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Tillamook Regional Medical Center Ambulance, Tillamook Fire Department, Department of Forestry, Washington County Sheriff's Office, Beaverton Police Department, and ODOT. The highway was closed approximately 4 hours.

Homan Photograph - Tillamook County Sheriff's Office
Crash Scene Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76346/Homan.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76346/072714.fatal.hwy6_mp27.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76346/072714.fatal.hwy6_mp27.2.jpg
Oregon Students Compete in National History Day Competition in Washington, D.C. (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 07/28/14
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Portland, OR - After months of intensive research and success at the state level competition, Olivia Winter, a student who is home schooled in Timber, Oregon, presented her project at the annual National History Day competition, held at the University of Maryland College Park Campus in the Washington, D.C. area June 11-15.

"I was proud to be one of the finalists at National History Day," stated Olivia. "I think National History Day is a valuable experience because I can test my skills against many other people. It helped me to become more confident when presenting, gave me the chance to study the things that fascinate me, and to study them in more depth than I would have otherwise. Researching my project this year helped me to understand my world better.

Continued Olivia, "I think that students benefit from National History Day because it helps kids to see a story in history, and to learn from it. It makes history relevant and important."

Along with Olivia, twenty other students representing Jefferson, Washington, and Multnomah counties traveled across the country to compete in the 25th annual National History Day contest. Although no Oregonians took home cash awards, Olivia's entry, a documentary on the infamous Tillamook Burn of 1933-1951 entitled, "Out of the Ashes: The Inferno That Changed the Heart of Oregon" won honorable mention.

The Oregon Historical Society offers cash prizes to three students at the local Oregon History Day competition, which took place at Concordia University on April 12, 2014. All students between the ages of 12-17 across our state are encouraged to enter the competition for the 2014-15 school year, where the theme will be "Leadership and Legacy in History." Oregon History Day will take place this coming year at the Oregon Historical Society on Saturday, April 18. Those who qualify will be invited to the national competition June 14-18 in Washington, D.C.

For more information on how to get involved in Oregon History Day, as well as the access materials for students and teacher, visit http://www.ohs.org/education/oregon-history-day.cfm.


About the Oregon Historical Society
Since 1898, the Society has served as Oregon's primary research collection and museum about Oregon history. OHS has an extensive collection of historical pieces, including over 85,000 artifacts and 3 million photographs and films. It safeguards and presents Oregon's history through a museum, research library, academic journal, school programs, and website content.

About National History Day
National History Day (NHD) is a highly regarded academic program for elementary and secondary school students. Each year, more than half a million students, encouraged by thousands of teachers nationwide, participate in the NHD contest. Students choose historical topics related to a theme and conduct extensive primary and secondary research through libraries, archives, museums, oral history interviews and historic sites. After analyzing and interpreting their sources and drawing conclusions about their topics' significance in history, students present their work in original papers, websites, exhibits, performances and documentaries. These products are entered into competitions in the spring at local, state and national levels where they are evaluated by professional historians and educators. The program culminates in the Kenneth E. Behring National Contest each June held at the University of Maryland at College Park.


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/2861/76347/Group_Shot_4.JPG , 2014-07/2861/76347/IMG_1881.JPG , 2014-07/2861/76347/IMG_2112.JPG , 2014-07/2861/76347/IMG_1904.JPG , 2014-07/2861/76347/IMG_1832.JPG
Crowd-sourced survey seeks African American historic sites
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/28/14
A crowd-sourced project to identify Oregon's African American historic sites and places has uncovered locations in Pendleton, Hayesville, Salem, Westport, Portland and other communities. Project leaders are asking the public to continue submitting information about potential sites.

"These places can be buildings anywhere in Oregon where African Americans worked, sites where important events happened, or objects created, installed, or inspired by African Americans," said project manager Kim S. Moreland.

The Oregon Black Pioneers, in partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office, launched the property survey project "Preserving Oregon's African American Historic Places" in May. Working with community partners and volunteers, the organizations want to protect and preserve Oregon's African American historic sites and places from 1844 to 1984.

Preserving Oregon African American Historic Places project is a crowd-sourced project that encourages the public to contribute information online that pertains to existing structures with any African American association in their histories and cemeteries with African American burials.

The discoveries so far include black pioneer burials in the historic Hayesville, Salem Pioneer, Westport, and Lone Fir cemeteries are just a few of the data submissions we already received. Additional data has been submitted on two Pendleton structures: one is related to the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion (the "Triple Nickles") and the other with George Fletcher, the Pendleton Round Up rodeo champion. Other recent documentation includes a 114-year-old wooden structure which served as the residence of suffrage and civic leader Kathryn Gray. Another building, commonly referred to as the Burger Barn, is associated with the infamous "possum Incident" in Portland.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 28. You may submit your information online at www.makeoregonhistory.com or at www.oregonblackpioneers.org. Provide as much information as you can, but it is OK to leave blanks if you do not know the particular information requested. Go to www.makeoregonhistory.com to submit online. The information will be added to the collections of the Oregon Black Pioneers and the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

"Our ultimate goal is to create a multiple property document that identifies sites for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places," said Moreland.

If you have any questions about the survey project you may email Moreland at historic_places@qwestoffice.net or Kuri Gill, Oregon Heritage, Grants and Outreach Coordinator at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.


Attached Media Files: News release
Portland to host national health care ergonomics conference
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/28/14
(Salem) - Best practices around ergonomics in the health care field will be highlighted at the fifth National HealthCare Ergonomics Conference in Portland. The event is scheduled for Sept. 8-11, 2014, at the Oregon Convention Center and will highlight a variety of evidence-based topics for health care workers.

On Tuesday, Sept. 9, keynote speaker William Marras, a professor at Ohio State University, will present "Low Back Pain Causation and Prevention in Patient Handling Activities."

"Patient handling represents one of the greatest occupational threats to back health in the U.S.," said Marras. "Through an understanding of the process of disc degeneration, we can associate specific patient handling activities and tasks with an elevated risk of accelerating this process. It turns out that these risks are more than just physical and we are beginning to understand how these risks interact."

On Wednesday, keynote Casey Chosewood, director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, Total Worker Health program, will share his presentation "Healthier, Safer, and More Engaged: Unlocking the Potential of Total Worker Health."

"Increasingly, today's workers face challenges to their health and well-being both on and off the job," said Chosewood. "Addressing them comprehensively is critical if we want to maintain healthier communities and families - and sustain a thriving personal and national economy. A total worker health perspective integrates health protection and health promotion interventions to address these challenges."

Other conference topics include:
* The link between patient and worker safety featuring panelists from the Joint Commission, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the American Nurses Association
* Safe patient handling (equipment, technology, and program development)
* Designing safe and lean workplaces using ergonomics
* Effective workplace wellness programs
* Tours of Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) hospital and Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center

The event will also include exhibits showcasing the latest in ergonomics, safe patient handling, and safety and wellness products and services.

Conference registration is $250, which includes session handouts and lunch. Pre-conference workshops and post-conference tours are available. For more information about the conference or to register, call Oregon OSHA's Conference Section, 503-378-3272 or 888-292-5247, then select option one or visit the Conferences webpage at www.orosha.org/conferences.

The conference is a joint effort of the Oregon Coalition for HealthCare Ergonomics, Oregon OSHA, and the American Association for Safe Patient Handling and Movement.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.orosha.org. The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency.
07/27/14
Preliminary Information: Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 6 east of Lees Camp in Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 07/27/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is beginning an investigation into Sunday afternoon's fatal traffic crash that occurred along Highway 6 about two miles east of Lees Camp in Tillamook County. The crash has the highway blocked with detours being established for traffic. Travelers are urged to use alternative routes for travel to and from the north Oregon coast.

Preliminary information indicates on July 27, 2014 at approximately 4:19 p.m., a report was received of a two-vehicle head-on crash with injuries on Highway 6 near milepost 27. When emergency responders arrived, they confirmed one person was deceased and others were injured. Two people reportedly have been transported by air ambulance to an unknown hospital with serious injuries.

The highway will be closed for several hours for the investigation into the cause of the crash. ODOT is responding with personnel and traffic updates can be monitored on ODOT's website TripCheck.com.

Information will be released later tonight when available. No photographs for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 27, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/27/14
Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update - July 27, 2014



FIRES
Large fires currently burning within ODF's protection jurisdiction include:


Ferguson Fire - Currently 200 acres in size and 50 percent contained, the fire is burning on private lands 30 miles east of the community of Klamath Falls. Two structures have been lost. There are six structures still threatened, but the evacuation status was reduced earlier to Level 1 ("ready"). Hand crews will continue to work at the fire line to bring it to a minimum of 100 feet into the fire's interior and 300 feet around structures. Thunderstorms are forecast for today and throughout the week. Today's storm will be dry with moisture increasing through Friday. Resources assigned to the fire include: five hand crews, 15 fire engines, five water tenders, three bulldozers and four helicopters. Total Personnel at the fire: 225. The South Central fire Management Partnership Incident Management Team 3 is leading the firefighting effort. The Ferguson Fire was reported July 25. Cause is under investigation.


Waterman Complex - Consists of multiple lightning-caused fires totaling 12,520 acres burning near the community of Mitchell in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District. Reported July 14, the complex is now 100 percent contained and in full mop-up. No spread is expected. A total of 400 personnel remain at the complex. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 3 is leading the firefighting effort.


Pine Creek Fire - Includes 1,954 acres of ODF-protected lands. The lightning-caused fire is currently 97 percent contained. Fire activity has been reduced to hot spots and interior smoldering. The Northern Rockies Incident Management Team transferred command to a Type 3 team this morning.


Sunflower Fire - The lightning-caused fire is 7,175 acres and 90 percent contained. It is burning on Umatilla National Forest, and on Bureau of Land Management-Prineville lands protected by ODF. The fire has also burned 250 acres of private land. Firefighters continue to secure fire lines and complete restoration work. Command was transferred to a Type 3 team on July 26.


Rye Valley Fire - The lightning-started fire is 1,434 acres and 75 percent contained. Reported July 24 burning on Bureau of Land Management lands near the community of Huntington, Oregon, near the Idaho border, the fire soon spread to private lands. ODF Incident Management Team 3 is leading the firefighting effort. Today firefighters will complete direct fire line where possible and burn out unburned fuels where indirect line is constructed. Mop-up and rehabilitation work will continue.


Fires on other jurisdictions in Oregon

(More information on the following fires can be found at: http://nwccweb.us/index.aspx and http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/.)


Kitten Complex - 22,685 acres, 45 percent contained.


Camp Creek Fire - 6,274 acres, 95 percent contained.


Pine Creek Fire - 30,245 acres, 97 percent contained.


Black Rock Fire - 35,938 acres, 95 percent contained.


Donnybrook Fire - 22,763 acres, 97 percent contained.


Bridge 99 Complex - 5,084 acres, 81 percent contained.


Ochoco Complex - 10,004 acres, 79 percent contained.


Bingham Complex - 452 acres, 50 percent contained.


Hurricane Creek Fire - 645 acres, 20 percent contained.


Buzzard Complex - 395,747 acres, 95 percent contained.


Center Fire - 2,515 acres, 75 percent contained.


Logging Unit Fires - 10,480 acres, 80 percent contained.


Shaniko Butte Fire - 42,044 acres, 90 percent contained.


Gumboot Fire - 4,420 acres, 90 percent contained.
07/26/14
Rye Valley Fire update - July 26, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/26/14
Rye Valley Fire - Update July 26, 2014



Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander

Fire crews assigned to the Rye Valley Fire are beginning to prepare for their next assignment as the status of the fire continues to improve. The fire now stands at 1,434 acres and is 75 percent contained.

Mop-up objectives are beginning to be realized and suppression rehabilitation efforts are in full swing.

Rehabilitating the landscape from fire suppression activities includes breaking up and smoothing berms back into line, constructing water bars or trenches as needed to prevent future soil erosion and repairing damaged fences.

Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Dan Thorpe) would like to thank everyone in the Huntington community for their tremendous hospitality. Special thanks to the landowners we serve and the many cooperating agencies.

Cooperators include BLM, Baker County Emergency Management, Burnt River Rangeland Protection Association, Huntington School District and the City of Huntington.

FIRE AT A GLANCE
Size: 1,434 acres
Location: 15 miles NW of Huntington
Containment: 75 percent
Cause: Lightning
Fuels: Grass, brush, timber

FIREFIGHTING RESOURCES
Personnel: 230
Air Tankers: None
Helicopters: 1
Fire engines: 10
Water Tenders: 2
Bulldozers: 3

Estimated Cost: $976,776


For More Information: (503) 983-8897
Update: Serious Injury Motorcycle-Involved Traffic Crash - Highway 30 west end of The Dalles (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/26/14
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday morning's serious crash involving a motorcycle and a bus in the west end of The Dalles along Highway 30. The motorcyclist's name is released in this update.

According to Senior Trooper Scott Rector, on July 26, 2014 at approximately 7:17 a.m., a motorcycle operated by LARRY M. DEW, age 57, was eastbound on Highway 30 near Division Street when it collided into the front of an International bus driven by PATRICK PRESTON, age 55, from The Dalles. The bus was turning left from Highway 30 into a gas station/convenience store lot when the collision occurred.

DEW was seriously injured and transported by LifeFlight to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center where he is in critical condition. His motorcycle is registered in Colorado but he reportedly may be currently living in Wisconsin. He was wearing a protective helmet.

PRESTON was not injured. The bus belongs to Oregon Child Development Coalition and had no passengers.

OSP troopers from The Dalles Area Command office are continuing the investigation. No citations have been issued at this time.

OSP was assisted at the scene by The Dalles City Police Police Department and Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue.

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76330/072614.hwy30_thedalles.2.JPG , 2014-07/1002/76330/072614.hwy30_thedalles.1.JPG
Update: Name & Photo Released - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 126W east of Mapleton in Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/26/14
2014-07/1002/76325/072614.fatal.hwy126w_mp22.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into an early Saturday morning single vehicle fatal traffic crash that occurred along Highway 126W east of Mapleton. The crash resulted in the death of an adult male whose name is released in this update.

On July 26, 2014, at approximately 3:09 a.m., a Ford Escape driven by RAYMOND H. MOSLEY, age 68, from Florence, was traveling westbound on Highway 126W near milepost 22. For an unknown reason, the vehicle left the roadway across the eastbound lane and crashed head-on into a tree. The tree broke at the middle and landed in the highway, blocking the eastbound lane.

Emergency crews arrived and declared the MOSLEY deceased at the scene.

OSP troopers from the Springfield Area Command office are continuing the investigation.

The eastbound lane was blocked approximately 4 hours while emergency personnel were on scene. OSP was assisted by the Lane Fire Authority and ODOT.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76325/072614.fatal.hwy126w_mp22.jpg
Update: Name Released - Fatal Motorcycle Crash - Interstate 5 in Salem
Oregon State Police - 07/26/14
A 53-year old male motorcyclist died Friday night when he was involved in a high speed crash on the northbound lanes of Interstate 5 in Salem. Witnesses included an Oregon State Police (OSP) trooper on patrol. The victim's name is released in this update.

On July 25, 2014 at approximately 10:07 p.m., an OSP trooper patrolling on Interstate 5 near milepost 261 witnessed the operator of a 2009 Harley Davidson lose control while passing other vehicles at an estimated 90 - 95 mph in the northbound lanes. The operator was ejected from the motorcycle as it crashed in the center northbound lane.

The trooper initiated emergency medical care and CPR at the scene until paramedics arrived. DAVID LEARY SCHNELLER, age 53, from Tualatin, was pronounced deceased at the scene. He was wearing a protective helmet.

OSP troopers from Salem, Albany, and Springfield were involved with the investigation at the scene.

OSP was assisted by Marion County Sheriff's Office, Salem Fire Department, and ODOT. The left and center northbound lanes were closed about five hours during incident response and investigation.

No photographs available for this release.

According to ODOT statistics, motorcycle-involved fatalities are up 44% this year in comparison to the same period last year. A recent news release regarding motorcycle safety was provided with reminders and tips for everyone traveling on our roads:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/COMM/Pages/nr14062401.aspx

OSP joins ODOT in urging all travelers to stay focused on safety and Drive Safely to Save Lives.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Update #2: Victim's Name & Added Photo - Fatal Traffic Crash - Interstate 5 northbound south of Wilsonville (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/26/14
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Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are on scene investigating Friday's single vehicle fatal traffic crash off the northbound shoulder of Interstate 5 about three miles south of Wilsonville. The victim's name is released in this update.

Updated information indicates on July 25, 2014 at approximately 11:55 a.m., a 1993 Buick Regal four-door driven by EMUEL JAMES SMOTHERS, age 48, from Dallas, Oregon, was northbound on Interstate 5 near milepost 281 in the far right lane. For an unknown reason, the car traveled off the right shoulder, through grass for about 200 feet and then collided head-on into a tree. The car's interior caught fire and was eventually extinguished by firefighters from Aurora Rural Fire Protection District.

SMOTHERS was deceased at the scene. Investigators believe he was using safety restraints.

OSP troopers and collision reconstructionists from the Portland Area Command office are investigating. ODOT assisted with traffic. Trooper Mac Marshall is the lead investigator.

Any witnesses to the cause of the crash who have not spoken to investigating troopers are asked to call OSP Northern Command Center dispatch at 800-452-7888.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76309/072514.fatal.i5_mp281.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76309/072514.fatal.i5_mp281.2.jpg
07/25/14
Rye Valley Fire Evening Update; Friday, July 25, 2014 @ 7 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/25/14
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander


Rye Valley Fire
Evening Update
July 25, 2014


Note: This will be the final day of a morning and evening news release. Beginning tomorrow, one news release will be produced in the late afternoon.


The Rye Valley Fire is holding at 1,392 acres and is now 35 percent contained. Firefighters' primary objectives include strengthening established containment lines and mopping up hot spots along the perimeter of the fire to prevent future spread. They are also beginning the important task of rehabilitation in areas affected by fire suppression efforts.

Several islands of unburned vegetation remain within the perimeter of the fire. Crews will continue to isolate these areas with additional containment lines and cooling hot spots.

The fire is burning in grass, brush and juniper on public and private lands within the Bureau of Land Management's Vale District and Oregon Department of Forestry's Northeast Oregon District. Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team #3 is directing the suppression effort.

Cooperating agencies include BLM, Baker County Emergency Management, Burnt River Rangeland Protection Association and the City of Huntington.


###

Fire-At-A-Glance

Size: 1,392 acres
Location: 15 miles NW of Huntington
Containment: 35%
Cause: Lightning
Fuels: Grass, brush, timber
Personnel: 159
Air Tankers:
Helicopters: 1
Engines: 8
Water Tenders: 2
Dozers: 3
Estimated Cost: $400,000
Evacuations: None
Structures: 0
Closures/Restrictions:
Announcements: None
For More Information: (503) 983-8897
Update #3: Victim ID - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 30 east of Astoria in Clatsop County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/25/14
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning's two-vehicle fatal traffic crash that resulted in the death of one person and injuries to two other people along Highway 30 about three miles east of Astoria. The victim's name is released in this update.

According to Sergeant Dennis Thomas, on July 25, 2014 at approximately 6:49 a.m., a report was received of a serious injury crash involving two vehicles on Highway 30 near Liberty Lane.

Initial investigation indicates a 1999 Toyota Tacoma pickup driven by MICHELLE LYNN FLETCHER, age 38, from Longview, Washington, was westbound near milepost 94 when it crossed the double solid centerline and sideswiped an eastbound 1993 Ford pickup with two occupants.

The westbound vehicle had three occupants. FLETCHER was seriously injured and extricated by firefighters. She was taken by LifeFlight from Columbia Memorial Hospital to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center and is in critical condition. Right front passenger ARTHUR ROMINE JR, age 51, from Warrenton, was not injured. Both were using safety restraint and the pickup's airbags deployed.

The pickup's left rear passenger, BRYCE WILLIAM SARANPAA, age 43, from Warrenton, was pronounced deceased at the scene. He was not using safety restraints.

The Ford's driver, DANIEL BECERRA CAMPOS, age 33, from Seaside, received non-life threatening injuries and was transported by ambulance to Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria. Right front passenger SAMUEL BECERRA VELASQUEZ, age 28, from Seaside, was not injured. Both were using safety restraints.

OSP troopers from the Astoria Area Command office are continuing the investigation into the cause of the crash. OSP was assisted at the scene by Astoria Police Department, Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, Astoria Fire Department, and ODOT.

One lane was opened to traffic at approximately 10:10 a.m. The other lane was opened before noon.

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76308/072514.fatal.hwy30_mp94.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76308/072514.fatal.hwy30_mp94.2.jpg
Workgroup of Future of Public Health Task Force meets July 29
Oregon Health Authority - 07/25/14
July 25, 2014

What: A workgroup of the Task Force on the Future of Public Health will meet to discuss and develop options for governance structure and criteria in implementing the current draft straw model of governmental public health services being considered by the full task force. Options developed during the workgroup meeting will be brought to the August 20 task force meeting for consideration.

When: Tuesday, July 29, 1:30- 3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St.

Who: This workgroup is made up of four members of the Future of Public Health Task Force. The task force was created by Oregon HB 2348 to study the regionalization and consolidation of public health services, and the future of public health services in Oregon, to make recommendations for legislation.

The task force is made up of 15 members appointed by the Legislature, the Governor, and the directors of the Oregon Health Authority and the Department of Human Services.

Details: Space is limited. For more information about the meeting, contact Michael Tynan at 971-673-1282.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Friday, July 25, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/25/14
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Friday, July 25, 2014
FIRES
Large fires currently burning within ODF's protection jurisdiction include:

Rye Valley Fire: This fire was reported approximately 15 miles northwest of Huntington on July 23, caused by lightning, burning on BLM lands in the Vale district. It posed a threat to ODF Northeast Oregon District's protected lands, so ODF Incident Management Team 3 was dispatched yesterday and assumed command of the fire at 7 p.m. PDT. Reports this morning indicate excellent progress on fire operations overnight, with containment lines now completely surrounding the 1392-acre fire. More information on this fire is available on the fire's Incwieb site at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4002/.

Waterman Complex - Consists of multiple fires totaling 12,520 acres burning near the community of Mitchell in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District. Reported July 14, the lightning-caused complex is currently 90 percent contained and in full mop-up. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 3 is leading the firefighting effort. Inciweb site: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3961/.

Pine Creek Fire - Includes 1,954 acres of ODF-protected lands. It is currently 88 percent contained. Fire activity has been reduced to hot spots and interior smoldering. Today firefighters will work on any hot spots that could threaten fire lines, and will continue mop-up. Resources include: 16 hand crews, 33 fire engines, eight water tenders and a total of 612 personnel. The Western Montana Incident Management Team [Fry] will transition management of this fire to a local team on July 26. Unless something unanticipated occurs, this will be the last report on this fire and the remainder of the fires within the Pine Creek Complex. Inciweb site: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3969/.

Sunflower Fire - The fire is 7,170 acres and 80 percent contained. It is burning on Umatilla National Forest, and on Bureau of Land Management-Prineville lands protected by ODF. The fire has also burned 250 acres of private land. On Saturday, the large fire Incident Management Team (IC Wilde) will transition to a local management team. This will be the last report on this fire unless something unanticipated occurs. Inciweb site: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3964/.

Fires on other jurisdictions in Oregon
(More information on the following fires can be found at: http://nwccweb.us/index.aspx and http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/. As new fires start, and older ones are contained and turned over to local control, they will be added to and dropped from the following list.)

Camp Creek Fire [11 miles SE of Juntura, lightning start detected on 7/23/14] - 5,300 acres, 40 percent contained
Kitten Complex [Kitten Canyon, Brogan Hill, North Juniper, and Stemler Fires; all lightning starts detected on July 25th. Northern Rockies National Incident Management Team (Greg Poncin) assumed command on July 25th] - 20,664 total acres, 0 percent contained
Pine Creek Complex - Total acres: 102,209 [will transition from the Type !! Western Montana IMT (IC Fry) to a local fire management team on July 26th. Last Update.]
--Pine Creek Fire - 30,245 acres, 95 percent contained
--Black Rock Fire -35,039 acres, 95 percent contained
--Donnybrook Fire - 22,763 acres, 97 percent contained
--Jack Knife Fire - 13,263 acres, 100 percent contained
Bridge 99 Complex - 5,960 acres, 67 percent contained
Ochoco Complex - 10,195 acres, 59 percent contained
--Lava Fire - 191 acres, 95 percent contained
--Antelope Fire - 21 acres, 100 percent contained
-Broadway Fire - 5 acres, 100 percent contained
--Fox/Oscar Canyon Fire - 9,978 acres, 29 percent contained
Bingham Complex - 452 acres, 50 percent contained [will transition from the Washington Interagency IMT 4 (IC Larry Nickey) to a local team out of Detroit Ranger Station on Sunday, July, 27th . Last update]
--Bingham Ridge Fire - 275 acres
--Lizard Fire - 175 acres
Pittsburg Fire - 8,288 acres, 100 percent contained [transitioned from Washington Interagency IMT 1 to a local team out of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Last update.]
Hurricane Creek Fire - 645 acres, 20 percent contained
Buzzard Complex - 395,747 acres, 95 percent contained
Center Fire - 2,515 acres, 50 percent contained.
Logging Unit Fires - 10,488 acres, 60 percent contained.
--Skyline Fire - 116 acres
--Haily Butte Fire - 108 acres
--Logging Unit Fire - 313 acres
--Camas Prairie Fire - 6,379 acres
--Bear Butte 2 - North - 3,884 acres
Shaniko Butte Fire - 42,044 acres, 85 percent contained.
Gumboot Fire - 4,420 acres, 90 percent contained [Last update]

FIRE STATISTICS
Due to heavy firefighting activity our fire statistics have not been updated. They will return when the database has been made current.

Statewide air quality index readings are available at http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
ODF maintains a blog at http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/, which includes breaking news on wildfires statewide, along with current fire statistics, and a frequently updated Twitter feed at https://twitter.com/ORDeptForestry.

For information on wildfires in other jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, http://www.nwccweb.us/ and to the national Incident Information System website at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/.

Statewide air quality index readings are available at http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, (see below), 24/7 for fire information or page the duty officer at 503-370-0403. The duty officer will call back/return pages promptly. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

Rod Nichols | Public Information Officer
Fire Program | General Media Contact
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310

Desk 503.945.7425
Cell 503.508.0574
rnichols@odf.state.or.us
Fatal Pedestrian-Involved Traffic Crash - Highway 26 north of Madras in Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 07/25/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Thursday night's fatal pedestrian-involved traffic crash that occurred on Highway 26 about two miles north of Madras.

On July 24, 2014 at approximately 9:12 p.m., a 2004 Saturn passenger car driven by ROBERT C. TOWLER, age 78, from Madras, was westbound on Highway 26 near milepost 114 when it encountered a man walking in the darkness in the traffic lane. TOWLER attempted to avoid the man but his car struck him.

The pedestrian, identified as MICHAEL D. THOMPSON, age 52, from Madras, was transported by ambulance to St. Charles Medical Center in Madras where he died after arrival.

TOWLER was not injured.

OSP troopers from the Bend and Madras offices are continuing the investigation. Trooper Derreck Ellena is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Jefferson County Fire District #1, and ODOT.

No photographs for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Health advisory lifted for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/25/14
Beach Advisory Lifted

Media contacts: Susan Wickstrom, Oregon Public Health Division, 971-673-0892, phd.communications@state.or.us; Robert Smith, Oregon Parks and Recreation, 503-390-0639, ext. 227
Technical questions: Tara Chetock, Oregon Public Health Division; 971-673-1496, tara.a.chetock@state.or.us; Aaron Borisenko, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, 503-693-5723; aaron.n.borisenko@state.or.us
Health advisory lifted for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

A public health advisory for contact with marine water at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, located in Coos County, and Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach, both located in Curry County was lifted today by the Oregon Health Authority. The advisory was issued July 24 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from subsequent samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided, and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools and runoff from water frequented by birds, because this can be an indication of increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are Oregon Public Health, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, contact the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program at 971-673-0400 or www.healthoregon.org/beach; also contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.
Oregon Stroke Care Committee meets August 14
Oregon Health Authority - 07/25/14
July 25, 2014

What: The second public meeting of the Oregon Stroke Care Committee. Agenda items include reviewing Oregon stroke data sources.

When: Thursday, August 14, 7-8:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Suite 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

Who: The Oregon Stroke Care Committee was created by Oregon SB 375 (2013) to achieve continuous improvement in the quality of stroke care in Oregon. The committee is made up of 10 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority.

Details: Space is limited. To participate by phone, call 1-877-336-1831, participant code 559758.

For more information about the meeting, contact Kirsten Aird, the Public Health Division's Chronic Disease Programs manager, at 971-673-1053.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
2014 Hospital Community Report highlights financial and utilization trends within Oregon's community hospitals
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 07/25/14
July 25, 2014 --- Apprise Health Insights, a data subsidiary of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, has released its 2014 Oregon Hospital Community Report, detailing utilization and financial trends for the state's acute care hospitals.

Now in its fifth year, the report provides a transparent look at the operations of one of our state's most valuable assets, our community hospitals.

"This report from Apprise illustrates the unique challenges our hospitals face as health care transformation and the Affordable Care Act begin to take shape," said Andy Van Pelt, chief operating officer of OAHHS. "As we continue to understand the impacts of health care transformation, our state's hospitals are seeing increasing financial pressures and a dramatically shifting patient mix. Simultaneously, they are radically changing the way they do business. It is still too early to see what the long-term impacts of transformation will be on providers."

The data show that in 2013, Medicare paid only 78 cents for each dollar hospitals spent caring for Medicare patients; and Medicaid paid, on average, only 67 cents for each dollar hospitals spent caring for Medicaid patients. More than 60% of services provided in our state's hospitals are for Medicare and Medicaid patients. The overall operating margin for the Oregon's hospitals was 3.6% in 2013. This is the lowest the state's average operating margin has been since 2008.

Despite these financial challenges, hospitals provided inpatient care to approximately 336,000 patients. Additionally, the report shows:

* More than 9.9 million patients received outpatient care at acute care hospitals.
* Nearly 44,000 babies were delivered at Oregon's hospitals.
* More than 1.2 million patients received care in hospital emergency departments.
* The top five reasons for hospital inpatient stays included births, knee joint replacements, septicemia (blood infection), mental health issues, and digestive disorders.

The report details Oregon's 58 community hospitals, located in 36 counties. They represent a mix of general (also called acute care), pediatric, long-term acute care, and behavioral health. In 2013, Oregon had more than 6,500 staffed hospitals beds. The state has 44 designated trauma centers with two being designated as Level I.

More than half of all Oregon hospitals (52 percent) are in rural areas, with the remaining facilities located in urban parts of the state. Oregon has 25 critical access hospitals, which have a federal designation allowing them to receive 101 percent of Medicare cost reimbursement.

To read the entire report, visit www.apprisehealthinsights.com/2014-report.
Rye Valley Fire Morning Update, Friday, July 25, 2014 @ 8 a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/25/14
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander


Rye Valley Fire
Morning Update
July 25, 2014, 8:00 a.m.


Favorable weather conditions allowed fire crews to make substantial progress on the Rye Valley Fire near Huntington in eastern Oregon.

Crews and bulldozers have constructed containment lines completely around the 1,392 acre fire. A Type II helicopter (medium size), a large air tanker and three Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs) provided air support to the crews on the ground. Today's actions call for strengthening those lines and beginning mop up operations from the perimeter towards the interior. The fire is currently 20 percent contained.

The fire is burning in grass, brush and juniper on public and private lands within the Bureau of Land Management's Vale District and Oregon Department of Forestry's Northeast Oregon District. Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team #3 is directing the suppression effort.

Cooperating agencies include BLM, Baker County Emergency Management, Burnt River Rangeland Protection Association and the City of Huntington.


###


Fire-at-Glance

Size: 1,392 acres

Location: 15 miles NW of Huntington

Containment: 20%

Cause: Lightning

Fuels: Grass, brush, timber

Personnel: 159
Air Tankers: 3 SEATs
Helicopters: 1
Engines: 8
Water Tenders: 2
Dozers: 3

Estimated Cost:

Evacuations: None

Structures: 0

Closures/Restrictions:

Announcements: None

For More Information:
Public comments period opens on proposed rule to restrict smoking on Oregon beaches
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/25/14
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 25, 2014

Media Contacts:
Richard Walkoski, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Desk: 503-986-0748, Cell: 503-510-9956
Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Desk: 503-986-0722, Cell: 503-931-2590

Salem OR - Proposed rules that would restrict smoking of tobacco products on the ocean shore recreation area will be open for public comment through August 29, 2014. Comments will be taken by email, and through a series of four public hearings in August.

Rules that restrict smoking on Oregon state park properties were approved in February by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Education about the new rule is taking place through 2014, and enforcement will begin in 2015. Previous public comments related to the state park rule asked the department to undertake a similar effort on the ocean shore, which is adjacent to many state parks. Citing environmental issues as a primary concern--plastic cigarette butts can persist for years, even in the harsh beach environment--the commission approved a staff request to consider a smoking rule for the ocean shore.

After listening to public comment between now and August 29, the department plans to present information to the Commission on September 17 at its meeting near Silverton, and return November 19 with a final recommendation at the Astoria meeting.

Public comment will play a key role in the decision to create a rule. Comments can be sent to the department through regular mail (OPRD Beach Smoking, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301), by e-mail (oprd.publiccomment@oregon.gov), or in person at one of four public hearings scheduled in August. All hearings begin at 7 p.m. at the locations listed below.

* 8/20/2014 - Seaside Public Library, 1131 Broadway, Seaside OR
* 8/21/2014 - Central Lincoln PUD, 2129 N Coast Highway, Newport OR
* 8/26/2014 - Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson Ave, Coos Bay OR
* 8/28/2014 - North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street NE, Salem OR

# # #
07/24/14
Rye Valley Fire Evening Update, July 24, 2014 @ 9 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/24/14
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander


Rye Valley Fire
Evening Update
July 24, 2014, 9:00 p.m.


The Rye Valley Fire, located 15 miles northwest of Huntington, is one of about a dozen fires that resulted from lightning activity that passed through central and eastern Oregon Tuesday and Wednesday.

Driven by strong winds and light fuels, the fire has burned 1,392 acres. No residences or other buildings have been lost thanks in large part to structure protection provided by the Baker County Structural Task Force.

Three Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATS) and a Type II (medium size) helicopter supported fire crews and equipment on the ground to establish containment lines around the fire. The fire is currently 20 percent contained.

The Blue Mountain Interagency Type III Incident Management Team (IMT) made considerable progress Thursday and handed the assignment over to Oregon Department of Forestry's Type II IMT #3 (Incident Commander Dan Thorpe) Thursday evening.

Favorable weather is expected over the next two days that will help firefighters in the suppression effort.

###

Fire-at-a-Glance

Size: 1,392 acres

Location: 15 miles NW of Huntington

Containment: 20%

Cause: Lightning

Personnel:
Air Tankers: 3 SEATS
Helicopters: 1
Engines: 9
Water Tenders:
Dozers: 5

Estimated Cost:

Evacuations: None

Structures: 0

Closures/Restrictions:

Announcements: None
State Housing Council Meeting
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/24/14
OREGON STATE HOUSING COUNCIL
Meeting Agenda

Date: August 1st, 2014
Time: 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Location: North Mall Office Building
725 Summer Street NE, Salem OR 97301 | Conference Room 124a/b
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202; Room Number: 4978330

1. Call to Order and Roll Call
2. Public Comment

3. Draft Meeting Minutes for Approval
July 11, 2014

4. Portfolio Refinance for Approval
Revera Portfolio

5. 4% LIHTC Award for Approval
Erickson Fritz Apartments
Erickson 5-23 NW Second Ave. | Portland 97209
Fritz 4-10 NW Third Ave. | Portland 97209

6. Subsequent NOFA Awards
a. HOME Grant Award for Approval
East Lake Village II TBD: Bellevue Drive | Bend
Aspen Villas 815 NW Canal Blvd |Redmond

b. Other Awards for Presentation and Informational Purposes
Village East Apartments 6330 Main St. | Springfield
NAYA Generations 5205 SE 86th Avenue | Portland


7. Report of the Director

8. Report of the Chair

Adjourn State Housing Council Meeting


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1810/76290/OSHC_8-1-14_Meeting_Agenda.pdf
Health advisory issued for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/24/14
Media contacts: Susan Wickstrom, Oregon Public Health Division, 971-673-0892, phd.communications@state.or.us; Robert Smith, Oregon Parks and Recreation, 503-390-0639, ext. 227
Technical questions: Tara Chetock, Oregon Public Health Division; 971-673-1496, tara.a.chetock@state.or.us; Aaron Borisenko, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, 503-693-5723; aaron.n.borisenko@state.or.us

Health advisory issued for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach

Public health advisories were issued today due to higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, located in Coos County, and Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach, both located in Curry County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the surf or water running into the surf in this area should be avoided until the advisory is lifted, especially for children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources, such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Hubbard Creek Beach and Mill Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 toll-free.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on these beaches because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003, state officials have used a federal Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
Walla Walla School District Executive Session & Public Work Session: July 28, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 07/24/14
Walla Walla School District Executive Session & Public Work Session: July 28, 2014
as per the attached media memo ~


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1288/76281/07.28.14_SB_00_MEDIA_MEMO_Exec_Session__and__Work_Session.pdf
Death Investigation: Road Construction Worker Dies at Work Site - Interstate 84 west of Boardman in Morrow County
Oregon State Police - 07/24/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the death of a road construction worker Wednesday night at a work site on Interstate 84 about seven miles west of Boardman in Morrow County.

Preliminary information indicates on July 23, 2014 at approximately 11:12 p.m., OSP, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Boardman Police Department, Boardman Fire Department, and Boardman Ambulance were dispatched to a reported highway construction work site accident in the westbound lanes of Interstate 84 near milepost 158. Upon arrival, emergency responders found an adult male fatally injured.

The deceased male victim, identified as GLEN WARREN McCOY, age 64, from Sparks, Nevada, was a member of a construction company (Diversified Concrete Cutting out of Sparks, Nevada) contracted with ODOT to install rumble strips at a paving project site. He was working outside of a 1999 Dodge pickup operated by another employee when the pickup, which had a piece of equipment in tow, began to slowly move forward and he was run over by the rear dual tires.

One westbound lane was closed during the investigation. ODOT responded to the scene to assist with the investigation and traffic control.

Oregon OSHA was notified.

No photographs for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 24, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/24/14
FIRES
Large fires currently burning within ODF's protection jurisdiction include:

Waterman Complex - Consists of multiple fires totaling 12,520 acres burning near the community of Mitchell in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District. Reported July 14, the lightning-caused complex is currently 90 percent contained and in full mop-up. Lightning Tuesday evening produced three new fire starts. Firefighters performed initial attack Wednesday, and one of the fires will require additional action today. As the weather warms, firefighters will be on the lookout for sleeper fires from previous lightning strikes. The Oregon Dept. of Transportation is doing maintenance on Highway 26 today, to include clearing plugged culverts, clearing ditch lines, and removing rocks from the roadway. Resources at the fire include: one hand crew, one helicopter, 34 fire engines and a total of 781 personnel. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 3 is leading the firefighting effort.

Pine Creek Fire - Includes 1,954 acres of ODF-protected lands. It is currently 88 percent contained. Fire activity has been reduced to hot spots and interior smoldering. Today firefighters will work on any hot spots that could threaten fire lines, and will continue mop-up. Resources include: 16 hand crews, 33 fire engines, eight water tenders and a total of 612 personnel. The Northern Rockies Incident Management Team is leading the firefighting effort.

Sunflower Fire - The fire is 7,170 acres and 70 percent contained. It is burning on Umatilla National Forest, and on Bureau of Land Management-Prineville lands protected by ODF. The fire has also burned 250 acres of private land. Today firefighters are continuing to secure completed fire line, mop up hot spots, and rehabilitate fire line. Resources include 14 hand crews, 22 fire engines and 520 total personnel.

Fires on other jurisdictions in Oregon
(More information on the following fires can be found at: http://nwccweb.us/index.aspx and http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/.)

Pine Creek Fire - 30,245 acres, 88 percent contained.

Black Rock Fire -35,731 acres, 90 percent contained.

Donnybrook Fire - 22,763 acres, 87 percent contained.

Bridge 99 Complex - 5,917 acres, 50 percent contained.

Ochoco Complex - 10,195 acres, 32 percent contained.

Bingham Complex - 452 acres, 50 percent contained.

Pittsburg Fire - 8,288 acres, 100 percent contained.

Hurricane Creek Fire - 645 acres, 20 percent contained.

Buzzard Complex - 395,747 acres, 95 percent contained.

Center Fire - 2,515 acres, 41 percent contained.

Logging Unit Fires - 10,350 acres, 30 percent contained.

Shaniko Butte Fire - 40,575 acres, 80 percent contained.

Gumboot Fire - 4,420 acres, 90 percent contained.

FIRE STATISTICS
Due to heavy firefighting activity our fire statistics have not been updated. They will return when the database has been made current.

Statewide air quality index readings are available at http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx.
Update: Investigation into ODOT Employee Death During Work Project - Highway 320 near Echo
Oregon State Police - 07/24/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the death of an Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) employee at a work site Tuesday afternoon along OR Highway 320 south of Interstate 84 near Echo.

According to Lieutenant Mike Turner, on July 22, 2014 at approximately 1:15 p.m., Donald Kendall, age 54, was part of an ODOT maintenance crews working at a chip seal paving operation work site on OR Highway 320 near milepost 35. Kendall was standing behind an ODOT dump truck operated by another ODOT employee when it began to slowly back up, struck Kendall and ran over him.

After their fellow crew member was run over, ODOT employees immediately began providing numerous lifesaving efforts until relieved by emergency responders.

Additional interviews are pending. No other information for release at this time.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Go FREE or Go VIP: Daily Headlining Concerts Feature Rock, Country and Comedy at the Oregon State Fair
Amber Lindsey PR - 07/24/14
- NEW THIS YEAR: Concerts at L.B. Day Amphitheater are FREE with paid fair admission;
VIP Experience tickets on sale now -

SALEM, Ore. July 23, 2014 - Music legends Joan Jett, Charlie Daniels and The Beach Boys will join Ziggy Marley and comedian David Spade at the Oregon State Fair this summer, rocking the fairgrounds alongside the ultimate Beatles tribute band, The Fab Four, plus Buckcherry, Emblem 3, the NEWSBOYS and Chris Young.

Limited VIP Experience concert tickets - available now at www.oregonstatefair.org - include premium reserved seating, fair admission, preferred access to concessions and a chance to win backstage access if purchased prior to the day of the show. Limited general admission concert seating is free with paid fair entry, which is reduced this year to just $8 (ages 12 and up) and $6 (ages 6 to 11 and 62 and over).

Concerts are held at the L.B. Day Amphitheatre on the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem and are subject to change without notice.


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/4844/76253/2014_Oregon_State_Fair_concert_lineup_FOR_FLASHALERT.pdf
State health care-acquired infections report shows continued improvement toward patient safety
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 07/24/14
July 24, 2014 --- Oregon does better than the national average on health care-acquired infections, according to the latest report of infections released today by the Oregon Health Authority. State officials say this is a good sign, but also shows that work can be done to reduce even more incidents of infections that people sometimes contract after being treated by health care providers.

The Oregon Health Authority's annual Hospital-Acquired Infections Report shows marked improvement in several areas:

* Central-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in adult intensive care units has decreased 65% over the last five years and remain statistically better than the national average.
* CLABSI in neonatal ICUs decreased by 29% over the last three years. In 2013 there were a total of six CLABSIs in NICUs in contrast to 20.3 predicted by NHSN.
* Surgical Site Infections decreased by 7% in the last five years, which is statistically better than the national baseline.
* Hospital onset Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections increased by 10% from 2012; however it remains below the national baseline.

"Health care-acquired infections can be serious and costly. They are also largely preventable," said Zintars Beldavs, coordinator of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Program at the Oregon Health Authority's Public Health Division. "This information shows how hospitals have improved patient safety over time. We are working closely with our partners in the health care community, as well as patient advocates, with the goal of eliminating these infections entirely."

Health care-acquired infections are among the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States and cost upwards of $33 billion per year nationally. In Oregon, the cost per stay for patients that experience health care-acquired infections increases an average of $32,000. Preventing these infections has become a key element to improve patient care and lower costs in the health care system.

"Addressing the issue takes effort on two fronts: improving patient care and improving patient education," Beldavs said. "Health care providers are increasing improvement and awareness of the issue."

In an effort to spread a culture of safety, Oregon health care providers participate in initiatives that address accountability and improved practices. The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) coordinates several patient safety-related clinical projects to specifically address hospital infections.

Fifty-two of Oregon's 62 hospitals are part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Partnership for Patients initiative, which aims to reduce preventable harm by 40% and readmissions by 20%. Since beginning their Partnership for Patients work, hospitals working with OAHHS have achieved a 40% or greater reduction in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), Central Line-Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI), surgical site infections, ventilator-associated complications, and early elective deliveries. To learn more about the program, visit www.oahhs.org/pfp.

Additionally, in 2013 clinical staff from hospitals across the state received Yellow Belt and Green Belt certification in Lean, a quality improvement methodology that streamlines processes, reduces cost, and improves quality and patient safety. Following the success of the program last year, even more hospital staff are once again participating in training for Yellow Belt, Green Belt and Black Belt Certification.

"Oregon's hospitals are committed to working in a transparent way to eliminate all health care-acquired infections in our state. Patient safety is our number-one responsibility," said Manny Berman, chair of the OAHHS Quality Committee and President & CEO of Tuality Healthcare. "This report illustrates that, although Oregon is ahead of national averages in terms of reducing infections, there is work to be done. Addressing HAI is a top priority of every hospital in this state."

Patients can reduce the risk of infection by taking all the pre-hospitalization infection prevention steps their doctors recommend, such as pre-surgical chlorhexidine baths, not shaving before surgery, and stopping smoking. They should also take antibiotics and other medications exactly as directed by their doctors, and ask their visitors to stay home if they are sick.

The Oregon Healthcare Acquired Infections Report stems from legislation passed in 2007 to create a mandatory reporting program to raise awareness, promote transparency for health care consumers, and motivate health care providers to prioritize prevention.

The report, completed by the Oregon Health Authority's Office of Health Policy Research, is available at http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Pages/index.aspx.
Marine Board Urges Boaters to Keep a Sharp Lookout on Area Rivers and Lakes (Higher-res Photo) (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/24/14
North Santiam River - Linn County Marine Deputies assessing obstructions and placing boating safety signage at nearby launch ramps.
North Santiam River - Linn County Marine Deputies assessing obstructions and placing boating safety signage at nearby launch ramps.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/4139/76261/thumb_NSantiam.jpg
As a result of less snow pack and lower rainfall amounts this winter, many Oregon lakes and rivers will be reaching historically low levels which will expose previously unseen hazards to boaters this summer. Stumps, rocks, logs and other obstructions could be just below the surface, resulting in hull or prop damage in areas that are normally navigable. These obstructions also impact the water dynamics and the currents in rivers, which can increase the difficulty to navigate safely, especially for paddlecraft. The Marine Board urges boaters to plan ahead and take the time to scout area waterways before launching your boat.

"No matter where you boat, most of our rivers and lakes will have obstructions that may not have been a problem earlier in the summer." says Ashley Massey, Public Information Officer at the Oregon State Marine Board. "Water levels are changing quickly, so boaters need to assess the waterway each time they go boating." Boaters can check the Marine Board website to see what's been previously reported, but that does not take the place of scouting ahead once at the river, and having a plan if you do encounter an obstruction you cannot safely navigate or portage around.

Trees, root wads and other natural debris are a common part of Oregon's rivers and streams, providing important ecological benefits such as fish habitat, sediment removal, etc. and can be very dangerous to boaters. Deadheads (old pilings or logged tree stumps) may lie just below the surface, so keep a close watch for subtle changes in the water's surface. Strainers (trees hanging out from the bank) can trap a boat and the current could force it underwater. Keep a sharp look out downstream and use a quick-release anchor system for just such emergencies. Motorized boaters should operate carefully and pay particular attention to the surface dynamics ahead of where they're headed, especially while on-plane.

If paddling on rivers with whitewater rapids, any rapids designated as a Class III or higher, boaters are required to wear a properly fitting, U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket.

Not sure where to put in or take out? Visit the Marine Board's Boating Access Map to help plan your trip at http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/pages/access/access.aspx#Where_to_Launch_in_Oregon.

For reported navigation obstructions, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/safety/navigation_hazards.aspx.
###


Attached Media Files: Waterway Obstructions Audio , North Santiam River - Linn County Marine Deputies assessing obstructions and placing boating safety signage at nearby launch ramps.
07/23/14
It's not too late to make plans to attend an upcoming DHS Town Hall Meeting: Portland, Bend, Eugene, Medford, Online Webinar
OR Department of Human Services - 07/23/14
Oregon Department of Human Services -- Planning for Safety, Health and Independence in Your Community

You are invited to provide input and feedback to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on our priorities and strategic direction for 2015-17 and beyond in the following areas: Child Welfare, Aging and People with Disabilities, Intellectual/Developmental Disability Services, Self Sufficiency Programs (SNAP, TANF, ERDC), Vocational Rehabilitation, DHS agency operations, and other human services issues. Our community outreach this summer has two goals: first, to report on progress toward our long-term goals and strategic efforts as an organization; and second, get your thoughts and ideas as we plan for the next two years of work. Join DHS Director Erinn Kelley-Siel and members of the DHS Executive Team for an informative presentation and lively discussion about where the agency is today and where we are going in the next two years and beyond. Please forward this message to others who may be interested.

Wednesday, July 30
Portland - Portland Community College (Cascade Campus, Moriarty Arts & Humanities Building)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Portland

Friday, August 1
Bend - Central Oregon Community College (Hitchcock Auditorium)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Bend

Monday, August 4
Eugene - Lane Community College (Center for Meeting & Learning)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Eugene

Tuesday, August 5
Medford - Rogue Community College (RCC/SOU Higher Education Center)
10:00 am - 12:00 noon
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Medford

Thursday, August 7 (special online meeting for those unable to attend in person)
Statewide -- Web-based interactive meeting, sign-up info & other details to come later.
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Web

NEW!! We are also working on setting up a meeting for folks in eastern Oregon for Mid-August! Let us know if you'd like information. Send an e-mail to DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Eastern Oregon Meeting

Questions? Please contact DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us
Ore. State Fair Homebrew Beer & Amateur Wine Competitions call for entries
Amber Lindsey PR - 07/23/14
Calling all DIY beverage makers! Oregon State Fair's Homebrewed Beer and Amateur Wine competitions are officially open. Competition handbooks describing more than 80 total beer and wine categories are available online.

Important dates:
Homebrew entries due July 31
Amateur wine entries due July 25 (registration due July 24)

*******************

OREGON STATE FAIR HOMEBREW BEER AND AMATEUR WINE COMPETITIONS CALL FOR ENTRIES

SALEM, OR - July 8, 2014 - The 149th Oregon State Fair is officially accepting entries for its Homebrew Beer and Amateur Wine competitions, raising a pint and a wine glass in honor of Oregon's best DIY beverage makers.

Are you ready for the ultimate homebrewed beverage challenge? Here's how to enter.

Homebrew Beer Competition

*Entries due: Thursday, July 31 at 5pm if submitting at one of several designated drop off locations across the state, or Friday, August 1 at 5pm if delivering to the Oregon State Fairgrounds

*Entry fee: $8 per entry

*Categories: Enter your homebrewed best in 29 beer categories or the non-alcoholic soft drink category (categories details are available online).

*Award Presentation: Friday August 22 at 7pm at the Jackman-Long Stage

The Homebrew Beer competition is sanctioned by the American Homebrewers Association and the Beer Judge Certification Program.
Amateur Wine Competition

*Entries due: online entry forms and fees must be submitted online by Thursday, July 24; entries are due by 4pm on Friday, July 25

*Entry fee: $10 per entry

*Categories: Enter your amateur wine in one of 55 categories (details are available online).

*Award Presentation: Blue, red and white ribbons are presented on Friday, August 15. Blue ribbon best of show winners will also be honored Friday, August 15 at a special fair preview event: Pairings! A Celebration of Oregon Wine, Cuisine and Music.

The Amateur Wine Competition is sponsored by Chemeketa Community College's Northwest Wine Studies Center.

Excepting the soft drink category, all participants must be age 21 and over to enter.

Additional details - including required online registration links and category descriptions - are available online:

Homebrew Beer Competition: http://oregonstatefair.org/competitions/home-brew/

Amateur Wine Competition: http://oregonstatefair.org/competitions/amateur-wine/


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/4844/76217/Amateur_wine__homebrew_release_FINAL.pdf
Walla Walla School District Special Board Meeting: July 25, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 07/23/14
Walla Walla School District Special Board Meeting: July 25, 2014
as per the attached agenda ~


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1288/76231/07.25.14_SB_00_AGENDA.pdf
2nd Annual NW Farmers Fighting Hunger Campaign Brings 85,000 lbs. to Food Banks in Oregon and Washington: Oregon Wins Trophy for Most Donations (Photo)
Dairy Farmers of Oregon - 07/23/14
Food banks in Washington and Oregon received the equivalent of more than 85,000 pounds of food from the 2nd Annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger Cash/Food Drive – nearly 50 percent more than the 58,000 pounds donated in 2013.
Food banks in Washington and Oregon received the equivalent of more than 85,000 pounds of food from the 2nd Annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger Cash/Food Drive – nearly 50 percent more than the 58,000 pounds donated in 2013.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/4131/76229/thumb_NWFFH_logo.jpg
PORTLAND, Ore. - (July 23, 2014) -- Food banks in Washington and Oregon received the equivalent of more than 85,000 pounds of food from the 2nd Annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger Cash/Food Drive - nearly 50 percent more than the 58,000 pounds donated in 2013.

The campaign, a joint effort between the states' Dairy Products Commissions, Departments of Agriculture, food banks and Fred Meyer, ran throughout June Dairy Month to raise awareness of the increased need for food and donations during the summer, when children have less access to school breakfast and lunch programs.

Oregon Department of Agriculture Director, Katy Coba, and Washington State Department of Agriculture Director, Bud Hover, supported the campaign with a friendly competition to see which state could generate the most food and funds.

Oregon won the competition and will take the Director's Trophy with $9,000 raised and 10,500 pounds of donated food. Pacific Foods in Tualatin, Ore., donated nearly half the total raised, with 500 gallons of shelf stable milk for families in need.

"We appreciate the efforts of the Dairy Farmers of Oregon to raise food and funds for Oregon Food Bank," said Susannah Morgan, CEO of Oregon Food Bank. "Milk, yogurt and cheese are key components in healthy meals, especially for children."

Cash donations were emphasized in order to take full advantage of the purchasing power of the Oregon Food Bank Network. Funds raised from Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger will help get more nutrient-rich dairy foods, such as milk, cheese and yogurt into emergency food boxes.

The campaign included collection barrels throughout Fred Meyer stores, as well as events at selected stores in Oregon and Washington throughout the month. Kickoff events were held for the respective states in downtown Portland and at the Washington State Capitol. Contributions were also accepted at the campaign website.

"Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger draws attention to the need for food during summer months when school breakfast and lunch programs are not operating," said Oregon Ag- Director Coba, noting that Northwest farmers show their commitment to fight hunger by donating more than 13.5 million pounds of food to the states' food banks each year. "We hope the partnership will grow and strengthen so that, together, we can make sure no one in the Northwest goes to bed hungry."

"Partnering with Washington and Oregon dairy farmers in a combined effort to fight childhood hunger means a lot to our entire employee team," said Melinda Merrill, Manager of Community Affairs for Fred Meyer. "The annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger program is one step toward combating hunger."


###
About Dairy Farmers of Oregon
Dairy Farmers of Oregon is a program of the Oregon Dairy Products Commission. The Commission works on behalf of Oregon's dairy farm families who, with the help of 123,000 dairy cows and Oregon dairy processors, provide award-winning cheeses, milk, butter, and an extensive line of premium ice cream, sour cream and yogurt. Milk is the official state beverage of Oregon, and Oregon is recognized nationwide as a leader for milk quality. The Oregon dairy industry is a community-conscious, caring business that contributes to nearly $1 billion to Oregon's economic well-being each year. Oregon dairymen and women care about their cows, their communities, and the land, air and water of Oregon. www.dairyfarmersor.com. The Commission also provides nutrition education through its program of the Oregon Dairy Council. www.oregondairycouncil.org

About Oregon Food Bank
Oregon Food Bank's mission: to eliminate hunger and its root causes ... because no one should be hungry. With sufficient public will and support of the entire community, we believe it is possible to eliminate hunger and its root causes. Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. The Oregon Food Bank Network helps nearly 1 in 5 households fend off hunger. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through advocacy, nutrition education, garden education, and helping communities strengthen local food systems.


Attached Media Files: Food banks in Washington and Oregon received the equivalent of more than 85,000 pounds of food from the 2nd Annual Northwest Farmers Fighting Hunger Cash/Food Drive – nearly 50 percent more than the 58,000 pounds donated in 2013.
(Video and photos) Oregon Army National Guard assists wild fire suppression efforts
Oregon Military Department - 07/23/14
The Oregon Army National Guard continues to assist with fire suppression efforts at the Logging Unit fire west of Madras, Ore. Approximately 40 Soldiers are providing flight crews, refueling crews and communications for the four aircraft - two HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters and two CH-47 Chinook helicopters - assisting local authorities with containing the fire.

High-resolution photos are available for download at the following link:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/sets/72157645435953557/

Video is available for download at the following links:
http://www.dvidshub.net/video/350837/oregon-army-national-guard-aviators-assist-civilian-fire-suppression-agencies

http://www.dvidshub.net/video/350484/oregon-army-national-guard-aviators-assist-fire-suppression

http://www.dvidshub.net/video/350428/oregon-army-national-guard-aviators-support-local-responders-fire-suppression-efforts
NW's best-known cake contest returns to Oregon State Fair
Amber Lindsey PR - 07/23/14
The Gerry Frank Chocolate Layer Cake Contest returns! The popular baking contest (all made from scratch, no mixes allowed!) returns for its 55th consecutive year, with cakes judged solely by its namesake - Oregon's resident chocolate cake gourmand. More than 2,400 cakes later, Gerry Frank shares his tips about what makes a really great chocolate cake: http://bit.ly/1nm6Uf6.

********************

NORTHWEST'S BEST-KNOWN CAKE CONTEST RETURNS TO OREGON STATE FAIR
55th Annual Gerry Frank Chocolate Layer Cake Contest is sponsored by Macy's

SALEM, OR - July 23, 2014 - This August marks the 55th year of the Gerry Frank Chocolate Layer Cake Contest at the Oregon State Fair. Regarded as the Northwest's best-known cake contest, entries are judged solely by Gerry Frank based on just two bites of each decadent, made-from-scratch creation.

Frank has tasted more than 2,400 cakes as judge of the contest created in his honor in 1959 by newly inaugurated Governor Mark Hatfield. His is a palate ideally suited for the job: he is also proprietor of the gourmet cake shop and café Gerry Frank's Konditorei.

2014 entrants are invited to bring their cakes to the Creative & Artistic Stage in the Jackman-Long Building at the Oregon State Fairgrounds by no later than 1pm on Sunday, August 31. The first place winner will be awarded a $250 Macy's Gift Card and a party for six people at Gerry Frank's Konditorei. Additional details about how to enter are available online (oregonstatefair.org/competitions/sponsored/gerry-frank-chocolate-layer-cake-contest/).

Frank's preferences for deeply chocolate, moist, visually appealing cakes are what inspired 2013 first place winners Russell and Brenda Read, who used Godiva Chocolate Liqueur to distinguish their winning entry. First time baker and 2012 winner Meghan Loftus, a high school student at the time, catered her entry to Frank's love of dark chocolate cakes.

Heir to the Meier and Frank department stores and Senator Mark Hatfield's Chief of Staff for 25 years, Frank is also known for his Oregonian travel columns, available in a new second edition of "Gerry Frank's Oregon." His best-selling guidebook, "Where to Find It, Buy It, Eat It in New York" has sold over one million copies. Immediately following the 55th Gerry Frank Chocolate Layer Cake Contest, the judge and author will remain at the fairgrounds for a book signing.

# # #

About the Oregon State Fair
The 149th Oregon State Fair takes place August 22 through September 1, 2014. Fair admission is reduced this year to $8 per person (ages 12 and up) and $6 (ages 6 to 11 and 62 and over). Oregon State Fair thanks its sponsors: Chemeketa Community College, NW Chevy Dealers, CHS Nutrition, Columbia Distributing, Comcast, Dairy Farmers of Oregon, Green Acres Landscape, Inc., Les Schwab, National Guard, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Oregon Lottery, Ricoh, Safeway, Sleep Country USA, and Wilco. Additional information about the fair is available at www.oregonstatefair.org.
07/22/14
Title Correction to Listed Highway - OSP Investigating Death of ODOT Employee During Work Project - OR Highway 320 near Echo (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/22/14
2014-07/1002/76213/072214.odot_hwy320_echo.jpg
2014-07/1002/76213/072214.odot_hwy320_echo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76213/thumb_072214.odot_hwy320_echo.jpg
Title Corrected to Reflect Location as "OR Highway 320"

***

Oregon State Police (OSP) is investigating the death of an Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) employee at a work site Tuesday afternoon along OR Highway 320 south of Interstate 84 near Echo. The victim's name and other related information will be released shortly by ODOT in a separate news release.

On July 22, 2014 at approximately 1:15 p.m., OSP and Umatilla County Sheriff's Office were notified of an accidental death at a chip seal paving operation work site on OR Highway 320 near milepost 35. OSP troopers are on scene and are the lead investigating agency.

Highway 320 is closed at the scene for the duration of the investigation. Oregon OSHA was notified and is on scene. No other information to be released by OSP at this time.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76213/072214.odot_hwy320_echo.jpg
Update: Name Released - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 95 north of Oregon/Nevada Border in Malheur County
Oregon State Police - 07/22/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Monday night's fatal traffic crash involving a passenger car and commercial truck along Highway 95 about seventeen miles north of the Oregon/Nevada border in southern Malheur County. The crash occurred during heavy rain and high water, resulting in the death of a California man. The victim's name is released in this update.

On July 21, 2014 at approximately 9:55 p.m., OSP Southern Command Center dispatch was contacted by Ontario 9-1-1 regarding a reported head-on traffic crash on Highway 95 near milepost 104. Emergency responders from Nevada responded and arrived on scene first. Due to the extensive distance to the scene, OSP arrived about two hours after the report was received.

A deputy from Humboldt County, Nevada Sheriff's Office arrived on scene first and encountered a scene of high water that was described as approximately 3 - 4 feet deep covering the highway. One of the involved vehicles, a 1999 Acura four-door with California license plates, had significant damage and was unoccupied. The deputy waded into the water and found a deceased adult male who was determined to be the registered owner of the car. The truck driver was not injured.

Preliminary investigation indicates at approximately 9:48 p.m., the Acura driven by STEVEN RICHARD HORNING, age 57, from Elk Grove, California, was traveling southbound on Highway 95 as a 2011 Freightliner truck pulling a semi-trailer driven by TIMOTHY DALE LONGHOFER, age 55, from Wilder, Idaho, was traveling northbound. In the darkness, both vehicles traveled into a dip on the highway where heavy rains caused high water to cover the roadway. As the Acura went into the high water, it tossed up a wall of water into the air and traveled into the northbound side of the highway where it collided head-on into the commercial truck.

OSP investigators believe the Acura's driver was not using safety restraints and was ejected from the car.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Humboldt County, Nevada Sheriff's Office, McDermitt, Nevada EMS, and ODOT. Elk Grove, California Police Department assisted with next of kin notification.

The highway was closed for over 8 hours before one lane was open.

No photographs available for release at this time.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
OSP Pendleton Lieutenant Receives Department's "Holly V. Holcomb" Award For Actions During Potentially Deadly Encounter Near Madras (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/22/14
2014-07/1002/76208/072214.Turner_Holcombaward.jpg
2014-07/1002/76208/072214.Turner_Holcombaward.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76208/thumb_072214.Turner_Holcombaward.jpg
An Oregon State Police (OSP) lieutenant was presented Tuesday with the Department's "Holly V. Holcomb Award" in recognition of his professional response last year during a potentially deadly confrontation with an armed and dangerous suspect near Madras.

On July 22, 2014, OSP Major Travis Hampton presented the special recognition award to Lieutenant Michael Turner in front of family, friends and co-workers at the Pendleton Area Command office. The "Holly V. Holcomb Award" is presented to sworn employees who react to a situation in a heroic and professional manner, reducing the risk or loss of life or injury to citizens or another officer. The award is named after former Superintendent Holly V. Holcomb who died November 25, 1975, when he was shot and killed by an assailant in front of the OSP General Headquarters in Salem.

On April 26, 2013, a 56-year old fugitive wanted on an out-of-state warrant was being sought by OSP, Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Madras Police Department, and Warm Springs Police Department after eluding officers in a remote, wooded area. Jefferson County Sheriff's Office also activated an airplane to assist with the search from the air after the suspect fled from a vehicle on foot.

During the two-hour search, Turner took charge of a rapidly escalating situation. The man, who was armed with a firearm, was spotted in the area east of Highway 97 northeast of Madras. During the encounter with the armed suspect, Turner shot and injured the man. After the shooting, Turner and assisting troopers rendered emergency medical care until relieved by paramedics and the wanted suspect was transported to a hospital.

"Mike's courage and leadership displayed in the line of duty during this potentially volatile situation may have prevented injury or death to his fellow officers and citizens who were in the area," said Superintendent Richard Evans.

Turner, age 37, joined OSP in 1999. At the time of the incident, he was working as a patrol sergeant at the Bend Area Command office. He was later promoted to lieutenant and his current assignment as the Area Commander at the Pendleton office.

Photograph (Left to right: Major Hampton & Lieutenant Turner)

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76208/072214.Turner_Holcombaward.jpg
MEDIA ALERT - Registration Ends Soon for the Starting Strong Institute
ESD 123 - 07/22/14
PASCO, WA - The 6th Annual Starting Strong P-3 Institute welcomes early learning professionals, child care providers, Kindergarten through 3rd grade teachers, school superintendents, principals, parents, and community partners focused on helping children start strong from pre-school to third grade. Educational Service District (ESD) 123 is proud to present the 2014 Starting Strong Institute and Full-day Kindergarten Symposium, August 4-6, at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, WA.

This special three-day event begins on August 4 with a Full-day Kindergarten Symposium, which will provide valuable information to kindergarten teachers, elementary school principals, and school district staff on how to structure classroom environments and use what we currently know about child development to provide developmentally appropriate practices in full-day kindergarten classrooms.

Following the Symposium, the two-day Starting Strong Institute will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday, August 5 and 6. ESD 123 and partners are hosting this conference featuring keynote speakers Dr. John Medina and Doug Clements, along with numerous breakout sessions and early learning vendors.

For those interested in learning how the brain develops and its impact on early learning, there is still time to register for Dr. John Medina's Brain Rules seminar on August 4. Author of the New York Times bestseller "Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School," Dr. Medina shares what brain scientists have uncovered about how we learn, how sleep and stress affect our brains, and how the brain sciences influence the way we teach our children and the way we work.

The 6th Annual Starting Strong P-3 Institute and Full-day Kindergarten Symposium take place August 4-6 at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, WA. Registration and conference information is available at www.esd123.org/startingstrong. For more information on the conference, contact Tracy Ulrich at tracyulrich@frontier.com.

###

The Institute is sponsored by the Gates Foundation, Boeing, Child Care Aware, Thrive by Five Washington, and other partners.


Attached Media Files: Medina Flyer
American Red Cross issues urgent call for blood and platelet donors
American Red Cross Blood Services - 07/22/14
Blood donations needed now to prevent emergency situation

PORTLAND, OR (July 22, 2014) - The American Red Cross is facing a looming blood shortage, leading to an urgent need for donors of all blood types to roll up a sleeve and give.

Donations through the Red Cross are down approximately 8 percent over the last 11 weeks, resulting in about 80,000 fewer donations than expected. The number of donors continues to decline, and the shortfall is significant enough that the Red Cross could experience an emergency situation in the coming weeks.

In addition, the Independence Day holiday falling on Friday reduced the number of blood drives scheduled in early July. Many sponsors did not host drives because people took vacations either over the long weekend or for the entire week. In an average summer week, about 4,400 Red Cross blood drives are scheduled, compared to Independence Day week when only 3,450 drives occurred.

"Hospital patients continue to need lifesaving blood this summer, and they're relying on the generosity of volunteer donors to give them hope in the days and weeks ahead," said Jeff Allen, CEO for the Red Cross Pacific Northwest Blood Services Region. "Please, consider giving the gift of life. Each day donations come up short, less blood is available for patients in need - and you never know when it could be your loved one needing blood."

Eligible donors with types O negative, B negative and A negative blood are especially needed at this time. Type O negative is the universal blood type and can be transfused to anyone who needs blood. Types A negative and B negative can be transfused to Rh positive or negative patients.

There is also an urgent need for platelet donations. Platelets - a key clotting component of blood often needed by cancer patients, burn victims and bone marrow recipients - must be transfused within five days of donation, so it's important to have a steady supply of platelets on hand.

The summer can be among the most challenging times of the year for blood and platelet donations as regular donors delay giving while they take vacations and participate in summer activities. When school is out of session for summer break, donations from those who normally give on campus tend to drop by more than 80 percent.

Every day this summer is a chance to give hope to patients in need and their network of family and friends. July 13 marked the half-way point for the Red Cross campaign "100 Days of Summer. 100 Days of Hope." Blood and platelet donations are needed now and for the rest of the summer. Individuals who donated blood earlier this summer may now be eligible to donate again and help patients such as accident victims, heart surgery patients and children with blood disorders.

Local Blood Donation Opportunities
See downloadable list of local blood donation centers and mobile blood drives for July 22 through August 10.

How to Donate Blood
Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver's license, or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental permission in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1812/76187/American_Red_Cross_Blood_Drives_(July_22_-_Aug_10)_5.docx
07/21/14
Update: Photo - Madras High School Track & Field Coach Arrested on Allegation Related to Unlawful Relationship With Team Member (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/21/14
2014-07/1002/76181/Bowerman.jpg
2014-07/1002/76181/Bowerman.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76181/thumb_Bowerman.jpg
Note: Questions regarding this investigation should be directed to the Jefferson County District Attorney's Office at (541) 475-4452.

Photograph Source - Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

***

The head track and field coach at Madras High School was arrested Monday by Oregon State Police (OSP) related to an investigation into an alleged unlawful relationship with a 17-year old male member of the high school track team. OSP is continuing the investigation and requesting contact from anyone with information or who may have been a victim related to this investigation.

On July 21, 2014, OSP troopers and detectives arrested MELISSA BOWERMAN, age 43, at her residence in Fossil, Oregon. BOWERMAN was transported by OSP to the Jefferson County Jail in Madras and lodged on the following charges:

* Sexual Abuse in the Second Degree (class C felony)
* Luring a Minor (class C felony)
* Online Sexual Corruption of a Child in the Second Degree (class C felony)
* Contributing to the Sexual Delinquency of a Minor (class A misdemeanor)

Earlier this month, OSP received a tip that BOWERMAN, who has been coaching at Madras High School for two years, was involved in an inappropriate relationship with a juvenile male. Subsequent investigation, in cooperation with the Jefferson County District Attorney's Office, identified the juvenile male and developed evidence that led to her arrest related to alleged unlawful conduct since May 2014.

OSP investigators are concerned there may possibly have been other victims. Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to call OSP Northern Command Center dispatch at 800-452-7888. Tips will be forwarded to the lead investigator for follow up.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76181/Bowerman.jpg
Open burning banned on lands protected by ODF in Wallowa County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/21/14
The Oregon Department of Forestry, in conjunction with fire departments from Wallowa, Joseph, Enterprise and Wallowa Lake, is restricting all open burning on lands within their protection area in Wallowa County. Any burn permits that were previously issued have been suspended. Recent hot, dry weather has elevated the fire danger throughout the county.

"We have seen an increase in human caused fires over the last week and with many firefighters already battling fires in the region we need to reduce the potential of additional starts and let fire fighters focus on those ignited by lightning," states Wallowa County Fire Chief Paul Karvoski. Thunderstorms are predicted to pass through Wallowa County over the next few days.

The Northeast Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry remains in a Regulated-Use Closure. Reducing human-caused fires within the Northeast Oregon District is the objective of the closure, which includes the following restrictions:

* Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except at designated locations. Designated locations within the Regulated Use Closure area include but are not limited to the following Oregon State Parks: Emigrant Springs, Ukiah Dale, Catherine Creek, Hilgard Junction, Red Bridge, Wallowa Lake, Minam and Unity Lake. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed.

* Debris burning is prohibited.

* Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads, in boats on the water, or at a cleared area free of flammable vegetation.

* Non-Industrial chain saw use is prohibited, between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. Chainsaw use is permitted at all other hours, if the following firefighting equipment is present with each operating saw: one ax, one shovel, and one 8-ounce or larger fire extinguisher. In addition, a fire watch is required at least one 1 hour following the use of each saw.

* Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is prohibited, between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is permitted at all other hours, if conducted in a cleared area and if a water supply is present.

* Mowing of dried and cured grass with power-driven equipment is prohibited between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m., except for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops.

* Any electric fence controller in use shall be: 1) Listed by a nationally recognized testing laboratory or be certified by the Department of Consumer and Business Services; and 2 ) Operated in compliance with manufacturer's instructions.

* Use of fireworks is prohibited.

* Use of sky lanterns is prohibited.

* Use of exploding targets is prohibited.

* Use of tracer ammunition or any bullet with a pyrotechnic charge in its base is prohibited.

* Possession of the following firefighting equipment is required while traveling, except on state highways, county roads and driveways: one shovel and one gallon of water or one 2?1/2 pound or larger fire extinguisher.

The Regulated Use Closure for ODF's Northeast Oregon District affects private, state, county, municipal, and tribal lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry in seven counties: Union, Baker, Wallowa, Umatilla, and small portions of Malheur, Morrow and Grant. The Regulated Use Closure is intended to protect natural resources and public health and safety.

Visit our website at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/northeastoregon/Pages/index.aspx or contact a local Oregon Department of Forestry office for more complete information on ODF Restrictions:

La Grande Unit (541) 963-3168
Baker City Sub-Unit (541) 523-5831
Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881
Pendleton Unit (541) 276-3491

To report a fire, contact:
Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center, (541) 963-7171,
or call 9-1-1.

Follow ODF on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OrDeptForestry
and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry

Please check with your local Forest Service office for fire regulations on National Forest land. Information on Public-Use Restrictions on the Oregon Department of Forestry, Umatilla National Forest and Wallowa Whitman National Forest can be found at http://bmidc.org/index.shtml under Current Information: Fire Restrictions.
Truck Fire Partially Closes Interstate 84 WB Lanes west of Pendleton (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/21/14
2014-07/1002/76168/072114.i84_mp198wb_fire.jpg
2014-07/1002/76168/072114.i84_mp198wb_fire.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76168/thumb_072114.i84_mp198wb_fire.jpg
Firefighters are working a fully engulfed commercial truck fire along the westbound lanes of Interstate 84 near milepost 198 west of Pendleton. The westbound lanes are closed to traffic and updates for travelers can be monitored on TripCheck.com.

Preliminary information indicates on July 21, 2014 at approximately 12:13 p.m., a report was received of a truck fire westbound on Interstate 84 near milepost 198. The trailer was transporting produce and the driver got out uninjured. A grass fire also started but was extinguished by responding firefighters.

No other information available at this time.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76168/072114.i84_mp198wb_fire.jpg , 2014-07/1002/76168/072114.i84_mp198wb_fire_odotcam.jpg
Update: Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 101 north of Cannon Beach in Clatsop County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/21/14
2014-07/1002/76162/072014.fatal.hwy101_mp28.jpg
2014-07/1002/76162/072014.fatal.hwy101_mp28.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of a fatal traffic crash found Sunday evening by a hitchhiker along Highway 101 about one mile north of Cannon Beach. The vehicle was spotted approximately 40 feet down a heavily wooded embankment where the passenger was deceased and the driver injured.

On July 20, 2014 at approximately 8:30 p.m., OSP and local emergency responders were notified that a male hitchhiker spotted a crashed vehicle after hearing cries for help from down an embankment along Highway 101 near milepost 28. Cannon Beach Police Department and Cannon Beach Fire & Rescue arrived first and confirmed one person was deceased and another with serious injuries.

Preliminary investigation indicates a 2004 Chevrolet four-door driven by GABRIELA RAYON, age 21, from Vancouver, Washington, was traveling southbound on Highway 101 with a passenger identified as RUTH A. DELGADO, age 23, from Los Angeles, California. For an unconfirmed reason, the car left the roadway down the embankment where the passenger side struck a tree. The car then came to rest on the ground in heavy brush amongst the trees and was not visible from the roadway.

It appears the crash occurred at least 12 hours before the vehicle was spotted by the hitchhiker.

DELGADO was pronounced deceased at the scene.

RAYON was seriously injured and transported initially by Medix Ambulance Service to Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria. She was later transferred to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland where she is listed in fair condition.

Both occupants were using safety restraints.

OSP troopers and detectives from the Astoria Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Trooper Greg Schuerger is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, Cannon Beach Police Department, Cannon Beach Fire & Rescue, Medix, and ODOT.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76162/072014.fatal.hwy101_mp28.jpg
Health advisory issued for Odell Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 07/21/14
July 21, 2014

High toxin levels found at Klamath County lake

A health advisory is being issued today due to high levels of blue-green algae in Odell Lake, located off Highway 58 in Klamath County, about 31 miles southeast of the Lane County city of Oakridge.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of very high levels of cyanotoxins produced by blue-green algae. These dangerous toxin concentrations in the water can be harmful to humans and animals.

Swallowing or inhaling water droplets, as well as skin contact with water, should be avoided. Drinking water directly from Odell Lake is especially dangerous.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from Odell Lake are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues.

Public health officials also advise that people not eat freshwater clams or mussels from affected water, and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Odell Lake and enjoy activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, fishing and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For local information about water quality or blue-green algae sampling, contact the U.S. Forest Service at 541-433-3200.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. Also contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories," for information regarding advisories issued or lifted for the season.

# # #
07/20/14
Fatal Motorcycle Crash - Highway 234 near Gold Hill in Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/20/14
2014-07/1002/76142/072014.fatal.mtc.hwy234_mp9.1.jpg
2014-07/1002/76142/072014.fatal.mtc.hwy234_mp9.1.jpg
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A 31-year old Lakeview man died Sunday morning after losing control of his motorcycle and crashing into a field along Highway 234 near Gold Hill in Jackson County. Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation.

On July 20, 2014 at approximately 10:45 a.m., a 2014 Suzuki motorcycle operated by NOLAN RAYCE RINGULET, age 31, from Lakeview, was traveling westbound on Highway 234 near milepost 9 with two other people, one on a motorcycle and another driving a pickup. RINGULET reportedly passed the pickup at a high rate of speed and as he moved back into the westbound lane he lost control. The motorcycle traveled onto the gravel shoulder and left the highway into a field where RINGULET was ejected. The motorcycle came to rest several hundred feet away from its operator.

RINGULET was pronounced deceased at the scene. He was wearing a protective helmet. Next of kin were notified.

OSP troopers from the Central Point Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Senior Trooper Jeff Walker is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Jackson County Sheriff's Office, Jackson County Fire District 3, and ODOT.

ODOT recently sent a news release regarding motorcycle safety with reminders and tips for everyone traveling on our roads:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/COMM/Pages/nr14062401.aspx

OSP joins ODOT in urging all travelers to stay focused on safety and Drive Safely to Save Lives.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76142/072014.fatal.mtc.hwy234_mp9.1.jpg
Update: Named Released - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 126E east of Vida in Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/20/14
2014-07/1002/76139/072014.fatal.hwy126e_mp30.jpg
2014-07/1002/76139/072014.fatal.hwy126e_mp30.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76139/thumb_072014.fatal.hwy126e_mp30.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into an early Sunday morning single vehicle traffic crash that resulted in the death of a 40-year old woman along Highway 126E about four miles east of Vida. The victim's name is released in this update.

On July 20, 2014 at approximately 2:00 a.m., OSP was notified of a single vehicle traffic crash on Highway 126E near milepost 30. McKenzie Fire and Rescue personnel arrived on scene and confirmed an adult female, later identified as JENNIFER ROSE COACH, age 40, from Blue River, was deceased.

Preliminary investigation indicates the white 1993 Toyota Camry driven by JENNIFER COACH was traveling eastbound negotiating a right curve when it crossed the centerline. The driver over-corrected and the car began to spin, crossing the highway and crashing into a ditch on the north side of the road.

There are no known witnesses other than the person who spotted the crash at 1:45 a.m. after it happened. OSP confirmed the driver got off work in Springfield at midnight.

OSP troopers from the Springfield Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Trooper Evan Sether is the lead investigator. Anyone who saw the vehicle traveling between Springfield and Vida between midnight and 1:45 a.m. is asked to contact Trooper Sether at (541) 726-2536 ext 439.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76139/072014.fatal.hwy126e_mp30.jpg
07/19/14
Update #2: Victim Identified - Fatal Pedestrian-Involved Traffic Crash - Highway 211 between Molalla and Woodburn (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/19/14
2014-07/1002/76121/071914.fatal.ped.hwy211_mp6.JPG
2014-07/1002/76121/071914.fatal.ped.hwy211_mp6.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76121/thumb_071914.fatal.ped.hwy211_mp6.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday morning's fatal pedestrian-involved traffic crash that occurred along Highway 211 about five miles east of Woodburn. A 36-year old female died after being struck by a vehicle. Her name is released in this update.

According to Sergeant Jason Lindland, on July 19, 2014 at approximately 4:35 a.m., two adult females were walking eastbound on the eastbound shoulder of Highway 211 near Rock Creek Bridge between S. Barlow Road and S. Needy Road. The two women decided to cross the highway in the darkness to walk on the westbound side. One of the women safely made it across but the second woman was struck by a westbound 1982 Volvo four-door station wagon driven by ABEL GUZMAN CALDERON, age 20, from St. Paul.

The severely injured woman came to rest along the side of the roadway and was later pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency responders. She was identified as AMANDA ALICE HOCKETT, age 36, from Beaverton.

GUZMAN CALDERON remained at the scene and was not injured. He is cooperating fully with the investigation and there is no indication of fault on his part.

OSP troopers from the Portland and Salem offices are on scene investigation the crash. Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Canby Police Department, Monitor Rural Fire Protection District #58, Clackamas County Medical Examiner and ODOT are assisting.

The highway was closed until about 10:00 a.m. during the scene investigation.

Pedestrian-related safety tips and information is available on ODOT's Transportation Safety website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/TS/pages/pedestrian.aspx.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76121/071914.fatal.ped.hwy211_mp6.JPG
Update: Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 101 north of Oregon/California Border (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/19/14
2014-07/1002/76122/071914.fatal.hwy101_mp362.jpg
2014-07/1002/76122/071914.fatal.hwy101_mp362.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76122/thumb_071914.fatal.hwy101_mp362.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday morning's single vehicle fatal traffic crash that resulted in the death of an off-duty California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation corrections officer as he was returning home from work along Highway 101 about one mile north of the Oregon/California border. The victim's name is released in this update.

On July 19, 2014 at approximately 7:15 a.m., OSP and local emergency responders were notified of a single vehicle traffic crash off Highway 101 near milepost 362. Upon arrival, a deceased adult male driver was located at the scene.

Preliminary investigation indicates a 2007 Dodge Caliber driven by JOEL RAMOS, age 29, from Brookings, Oregon was traveling northbound when it crossed the southbound lane and went off the highway. The car struck a large stump and then crashed head-on into a tree where it came to rest. RAMOS was using safety restraints and the car's airbags deployed.

Troopers confirmed RAMOS had gotten off work at Pelican Bay State Prison and was returning home when the crash occurred. Driver fatigue is being investigated as a possible contributing factor. Next of kin and prison officials were notified of his death.

OSP troopers from the Gold Beach office are investigating the cause of the crash. OSP was assisted by Brookings Police Department, local fire personnel and ODOT.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76122/071914.fatal.hwy101_mp362.jpg
Moccasin Hill Fire FINAL News Release, Saturday, July 19, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/19/14
Following is the FINAL news release for the Moccasin Hill Fire.

Moccasin Hill Fire

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2, IC Cline

July 19, 2014 8:00 a.m.

THIS IS THE FINAL NEWS RELEASE FOR THIS INCIDENT



Current Situation

"Today was a seek and destroy mission" began Operations Chief Joe Hessel's report of yesterday's day shift progress as crews continued to extinguish all smokes within 300 feet of the fireline and structures. More of the same is planned for today, as crews dig out all remaining hotspots that the infra-red crews located and marked during last night.

Team 2 will transfer the command of the ODF Moccasin Hill Fire to an ODF Type 3 Transition Team working out of the Oregon Department of Forestry Klamath District Office. This will occur on Saturday, July 19 at 12:00 noon. The Transition Team (IC Pellissier) will work to extinguish any remaining smokes and recover equipment. The local ODF fire staff will patrol the fire and monitor for smokes frequently throughout fire season. 100% containment is expected at noon today.

Smokes will remain visible in the interior portions of the fire. If residents spot smokes near structures or fire edges, they are advised to call 911.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire until 8:00 am Sunday morning. The Red Cross Center is now closed.

This is the final news release from the Incident Command Post. All media and public inquiries should contact the ODF office in Klamath Falls at 541-883-5681.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information, which will end on 7-19-14.

Fire at a Glance (07/19/14)

Size: 2535 acres
Cause: under investigation
Current Containment: 95%
Containment Date: 7-19-14
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 12
Helicopters: 3
Engines: 21
Dozers: 3
Water Tenders: 6
Total personnel: 365

Estimated Costs to Date: $ 3.1 M

For More Information:

South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership
Twitter - www.twitter.com/scofmpfireinfo
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/
NW Large Fires Information -http://www.nwccinfo.blogspot.com
07/18/14
Business Oregon Director Sean Robbins Statement on Daimler Trucks North America Headquarters Groundbreaking
Business Oregon (Ore. Business Development Dept.) - 07/18/14
PORTLAND - Business Oregon Director Sean Robbins issued the following statement today at Daimler Trucks North America's Headquarters groundbreaking event on Portland's Swan Island:

"Daimler Trucks North America's commitment to stay and expand its corporate headquarters here in Oregon is an enormous vote of confidence in our state's economic future. Our highly-trained workforce and high quality of life continues to make us globally competitive as we develop foreign partnerships and attract investment from around the world. We're an international player, and Oregon will continue to attract foreign direct investment and work to grow companies like Daimler here."


###

Business Oregon works to create, retain, expand and attract businesses that provide sustainable, living-wage jobs for Oregonians through public-private partnerships, leveraged funding, and support of economic opportunities for Oregon companies and entrepreneurs. Visit www.oregon4biz.com for more information on doing business in Oregon.
White River Fire Morning News Release, Friday, July 18, 2014 @ 9 a.m. FINAL
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/18/14
July 18, 2014 9:00 a.m.

NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE

OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1

WHITE RIVER FIRE FULLY CONTAINED

Most of the firefighters who have been mopping up the 652-acre White River Fire this week are hitting the road this morning. The fire was declared 100 percent contained today by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry incident management team, which took supervisory control of the fire's suppression on Sunday, July 13.

The direction of further mop-up operations on the White River Fire has been returned to The Dalles Unit of the Oregon Department of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Several crews, engines and other equipment remain to ensure the fire stays inside its containment line.

But one hundred percent contained does not mean the fire is 100 percent out.

The incident management team's objectives were to complete a fire line around the blaze's perimeter, then mop-up (fully extinguish) all hot spots within 500 feet of the fire line (300 feet inside the White River Canyon, a wilderness area).

The cost of containing the White River Fire is $2 million. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Some of the incident management team's members have already been assigned to other wildfires, as have many of the crews that helped to contain the White River Fire. Dozens of blazes east of the Cascade Range in Oregon are scrambling for fire suppression resources - crews, engines, bulldozers, helicopters - and an unwritten objective of the incident management team on the White River Fire was to complete its tasks quickly and completely so much-needed help could be sent to fire managers in other parts of the state.

For further information about the White River Fire, please contact:
Oregon Dept. of Forestry
The Dalles Unit, (541) 296-4626
###
Oregon State Medical Examiner Receives Eye Bank Association of America's "Gift of Sight Award" (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/18/14
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The Oregon State Medical Examiner recently received special recognition by the Eye Bank Association of America for her advocacy and support of eye and corneal donation when she was presented with the association's "Gift of Sight Award".

Dr. Karen Gunson has worked for the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office for over 28 years and has been the Chief Medical Examiner since 1999. Dr. Gunson is a strong advocate and supporter of organ and eye donations and was intimately involved in developing Oregon's 9-1-1 referral system to the eye bank to give families an opportunity to authorize donations whenever possible.

The "Gift of Sight Award" is presented by the Eye Bank Association of America to a professional who works closely with the eye banking community and whose efforts have demonstrated significant support of eye and corneal donation.

Corrina Patzer, Director of Business Development for Lions VisionGift, submitted the nomination leading to Dr. Gunson's award.

"Dr. Gunson makes a difference and creates a positive impact on the field of eye donation and transplantation. Her dedication, energy and leadership provide a direct and lasting benefit to donor families, people in need of transplantation, and transplant recipients. Her steadfast support for donation translates into saved lives and enhanced living for many others," said Patzer.

Dr. Gunson graduated from Oregon Health & Science University in 1981 and is board certified in Anatomic & Clinical Pathology and Forensic Pathology. In 2009, she was the first ever medical examiner to win the "Regional Champion Award" from the Health Resources Services Administration for outstanding contributions on behalf of organ donors, donor families and transplant patients.

***

About the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Division:
The purpose of the Medical Examiner Division is to provide direction and support to the state death investigation program. The Medical Examiner manages all aspects of the state medical examiner program and has responsibility for technical supervision of county offices in each of the 36 counties of Oregon. The division is staffed by four full??'time forensic pathologists, supported by four staff personnel located in the Portland Metropolitan area. Further administrative support and oversight are provided by the Department of Oregon State Police. The main activity of the division is to certify the cause and manner of a death requiring investigation within the authority of ORS Chapter 146. This activity includes post mortem examination and alcohol and drug analyses. The division also maintains appropriate records and provides lectures and training on legal medicine and death investigation to medical school physicians and students, attorneys, law students, police officers, emergency medical technicians, and other persons associated with the death investigation system.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76093/GiftofSight_award_plaque.jpg
Oregon Business Development Commission Meeting - July 25
Business Oregon (Ore. Business Development Dept.) - 07/18/14
The Oregon Business Development Commission will hold a regular meeting from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on Friday, July 25 at 2 World Trade Center, Flags Conference Room, 121 S.W. Salmon St., in Portland.

The meeting's agenda is available at: http://www.oregon4biz.com/Contact-us/Oregon-Business-Development-Commission/2014meetings.php
Advisory: Wheeler County SO & OSP Urge Highway Travelers To Slow Down, Drive Safely as Firefighting Efforts Continue
Oregon State Police - 07/18/14
The Wheeler County Sheriff's Office and Oregon State Police are urging all travelers in the vicinity of Highway 26 and Highway 19 to slow down and drive safely. A wildfire in the area has closed Highway 26 between milepost 35 and 53 east of Prineville. ODOT's TripCheck.com notes due to hazardous debris and weather, there is no current estimated time for opening.

Law enforcement is concerned that limited visibility, increased traffic on secondary roads, and firefighting efforts/movements may affect highway safety in the Mitchell and Spray areas. Motorists using alternate routes are asked to slow down, drive alert and be watchful for others using the area roads.

Traffic updates on state roads in the area can be monitored on ODOT's TripCheck.com website.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
07/17/14
Update: Name Released - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 153 (SE Amity Road) east of Amity in Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/17/14
2014-07/1002/76077/071714.fatal.amityhwy.2.jpg
2014-07/1002/76077/071714.fatal.amityhwy.2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76077/thumb_071714.fatal.amityhwy.2.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of Thursday morning's single vehicle fatal traffic crash that occurred along Highway 153 (SE Amity Road) east of Amity near SE Burch Hill Road in Yamhill County. The crash resulted in the death of a 19-year old female whose name is released in this update.

According to Sergeant Brad Hessel, on July 17, 2014 at approximately 10:20 a.m., a 1999 Toyota Camry four-door driven by ARIEL DAWN DUMLER, age 19, from Amity, was traveling eastbound on Highway 153 when, for an unconfirmed reason, the driver lost control on a slight left curve. The vehicle traveled off the highway and down an embankment where its top collided into a tree.

The crash was not witnessed but a local resident heard it and called 9-1-1. Local emergency responders arrived on scene and confirmed the female driver was deceased.

OSP troopers from the McMinnville Area Command office are investigating. The victim was using safety restraints.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, Amity Fire District, McMinnville Fire Department, and ODOT. The highway was closed with a detour in place during the scene investigation.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76077/071714.fatal.amityhwy.2.jpg
Recreating Around Water? Wear a Life Jacket (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/17/14
Collage of people wearing their life jackets
Collage of people wearing their life jackets
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/4139/76065/thumb_AwearNess.jpg
Most boaters already know they're required to have a properly fitting, U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket on board for every passenger on their boat and that it needs to be "readily accessible." But what keeps people from actually wearing one? It's surprising when you ask adults why they don't put one on when they're boating:

"I won't fall overboard."
"I've been boating my entire life."
"I've been out on this same lake for decades and nothing's ever happened."
"I'm a good swimmer."

When the temperature outside gets hot, the lure of the water can be hard to resist. But most waterways, especially rivers, are fed by snow melt and remain cold through most of the year -well into summer. Cold water and hot surface temperatures can lead to muscle cramping with just a minutes of exposure. For people floating in single inner tubes, even though they aren't considered a boat and are exempt from state life jacket requirements, are even more prone to muscle cramping. Many rivers have a strong undercurrent, and if a person falls out of their inner tube, the tube will float downstream faster than they can grab it. Add muscle cramping and cold water, and that could mean trouble.

The Oregon State Marine Board and other boating safety advocates recommend that all boaters and passengers not only have a life jacket, but "Wear It!" at all times while boating. Why? Because accidents on the water happen too fast to realistically put one on in an emergency. U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in 77 percent of recreational boating fatalities in 2013, and that 84 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets. That's why boating safety advocates continue to push for increased and consistent life jacket wear on the water.

The good news is that today's life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight and stylish than the old, bulky orange horse collar styles from decades ago. Life jackets that use inflatable technologies are lightweight, keep the wearer cool, are extremely comfortable and resemble a pair of suspenders or a belt pack.

Other life jacket styles are available for almost any boating activity:

For fishing: Vest-style life jackets come with features such as pockets and clips that can replace a fishing vest and keep the angler safe.

For personal watercraft and water sports: Inherently buoyant, lighter-weight life jackets are rugged, with multiple buckles and clasps to keep them secure after impact with the water.

For paddling: Special life jackets are designed with large openings for arms to allow ease of movement. For Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP), many paddlers are opting for the inflatable belt-pack style. This type of life jacket is worn in the front, not the back, because once the pack is deployed, the life jacket will inflate forward, and allow the person to easily slip it over their head.

For children: There are specifically-designed, inherently buoyant life jackets that come in a wide variety of styles, colors, and types. Many styles include straps attached to a head cushion that make pulling a child from the water much easier and ensures a child's head can remain face-up when they're in the water.

For pets: Life jackets are even available for our four-legged friends. It's helpful to purchase one with a handle on top to easily pull your pet out of the water, if needed.

No matter what the activity or style chosen, the most important thing is: remember to select a life jacket that you like, is designed for the activity you're doing and to "Wear It!"

How to Choose the Right Life Jacket

Try It On -It's a must
* To get started, check the manufacturer's ratings for your size and weight.
* Make sure the life jacket is zipped or buckled.
* Do the "Touch-Down Test," by raising your arms straight up over your head with the life jacket on. Grab the jacket from the shoulders and lift up. The shoulder straps should not come up past your ear lobes. Try tightening the buckles once again, and repeat. If the jacket still rises above the ears, go down a size.
* If the buckles overlap once they're connected, then the jacket is too big, so go down a size.
* Many life jacket styles are short-waisted, so don't go by the length to determine proper fit. The most important factor is how the jacket rises because this is how it will float you in the water.
* If the life jacket rides up over your chin or face, it does NOT fit properly. A snug fit, not a restrictive one, signals a properly fitting life jacket.

Important Reminders:
* Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard-approved.
* Double check that your life jacket is appropriate for your favorite boating activities.
* Take the time to ensure a proper fit.
* Life jackets designed for adults do not work for children. If you are boating with children, make sure they are wearing properly fitted, child-sized life jackets. Do not buy a life jacket for your child to "grow into." There are life jacket exchange events held by many boating safety advocates throughout the year. Consider exchanging a outgrown life jackets for ones that will currently fit your children.

In Oregon, children under 13 years old must wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket on recreational vessels that are underway, unless they are below decks or in an enclosed cabin. Boaters who recreate on whitewater rivers rated with Class III or higher rapids are also required to wear a properly fitting, U. S. Coast Guard approved life jacket.

For more information about life jackets and boating and water safety in Oregon, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/pages/safety/lifejacket.aspx.


Attached Media Files: Collage of people wearing their life jackets
Waterman Complex fires update - July 17, 2014, a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/17/14
Waterman Complex - Mitchell, Oregon
Information Center - 541-462-3140 (Will be routed through the school switchboard)
Incident Commander Doug Johnson


Current Situation:.
A Level III Evacuation Notice for the Marks Creek Estates has been issued from the Crook County Sheriff's Office. Residents have been asked to leave their homes due to the fire threat.

Highway 26 remains closed on the south end beginning at Mount Bachelor Academy. The road will remain closed due active fire behavior on both sides of the road, hazard trees, and smoky conditions.

The Complex consists of three fires: Bailey Butte, Toney Butte, and Junction Springs. Firefighting resources continue to arrive to assist in suppression efforts. Suppression actions of the day include: providing structure protection on the West Branch Road, and Marks Creek area; constructing and holding fire line, mopping-up hot spots, scouting new fire line locations, and prepping existing roads. Aviation assets will be utilized to assist in containment efforts. Firefighters are challenged with steep terrain, and a Red Flag Warning for high temperatures, low relative humidity's, and terrain driven winds.

Bailey Butte Fire - 2,105 acres, 5% contained. Additional crews have been reassigned to work the southern portion where the fire is most active. The northern portion, the origin, will have crews working the perimeter and cooling down hotspots. Firefighters working the east, west and southern flanks will continue to construct and hold lines. The Resource Natural Area (RNA) on the south end has been impacted by the fire. No suppression tactics are planned within the RNA. Crews will work to reduce fuels and prep the Forest Service 2630 Road to create a fuel break.

Toney Butte Fire - 2,194 acres, 50% contained. Crews will cold trail and mop up any hot spots.

Junction Springs Fire- 20 acres, 90% contained. This fire is in patrol status and monitored by air.

Ochoco National Forest Closure Area:
This closure has been enacted due to firefighting activities taking place within the closure area and for the protection of public and employees safety. The Bailey Butte Fire Closure Area is established within boundary lines on its north side by the Forest boundary and it's south side following a system of closed Forest roads which include:
Forest Roads 450, 2630, 150, 2200, 2210, 300, 2610, Buck Creek Road to its intersection with the east edge of the Mill Creek Wilderness and Forest Roads 650, 27, 2745, 010 and the 2750.

All roads and trails within the bounds of the Forest Closure are closed. All campgrounds within the Forest Closure area including Walton Lake, Round Mountain, Crystal Springs, Wildwood, Ochoco Divide, and Whistle are closed. Persons or their invitees who live or own property within the closure area, permitees who have a legitimate need to access their permitted allotments, escorted or approved by the Incident Management Team may be allowed into the closure area.

Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR): Two TFRs are in place over the Complex. One is located over the Bailey Butte Fire and the other over the Toney Butte Fire. Please check the NOTAM for current information.

FIRE FACTS AT A GLANCE
Start date: July 11-12, 2014
Cause: Lightning
Total acres: 4,319
Containment: 28 percent
Hand crews: 17
Fire engines: 24
Water tenders: 6
Helicopters: 6
Bulldozers: 6
Total personnel: 502

For more information on the Waterman Complex visit:

Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3961/

Look us up on Facebook Waterman Complex

Find us on Twitter @watermancmplx
Family forestlands, fire season update on Forestry Board's July 25 agenda; tour planned for July 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/17/14
July 16, 2014

Contact:
Rod Nichols, (503) 945-7425, rnichols@odf.state.or.us
Dan Postrel, (503) 945-7420, dpostrel@odf.state.or.us

The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in the Forest Grove area on July 24-25 for a tour and regular business meeting that will include an update on the busy 2014 fire season, and a review of key issues and opportunities facing Oregon's 70,000 family forestland owners.

Thursday, July 24 Tour
On Thursday, July 24, the Board of Forestry will tour multiple forestland ownerships that are part of the Trask Paired Watershed Study. Begun in 2006, the study is enabling side-by-side examination of managed and unmanaged watersheds. The tour will depart from the Forest Grove Community Auditorium at 8 a.m. and conclude about 5 p.m. Members of the public may accompany the tour. For safety in the forest, tour participants are advised to wear long pants and footwear with good traction and ankle support. Hardhats and additional safety gear will be provided. Participants are asked to bring their own lunch, and to have their own transportation in case van seating is unavailable. Following the July 24 tour, the Board will host a community social at McMenamins Grand Lodge in Forest Grove at 6 p.m.

Friday, July 25 Meeting
The board meeting will be held Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Forest Grove Community Auditorium, 1915 Main St., in Forest Grove. A general public comment period is scheduled near the start of the meeting. Public comment on specific agenda items will be received as the board takes them up. Agenda materials are available at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx, (2014 meeting link).

AGENDA ITEMS TO BE TAKEN UP JULY 25 INCLUDE:

Committee for Family Forestlands annual report
The Committee for Family Forestlands will submit its annual report to the board, which describes the citizen advisory panel's activities over the past year, discusses progress on key issues, and offers recommendations on policy topics affecting family forestlands.


2014 Fire Season update
Fire Protection program staff will provide an update on wildfire activity this summer, the weather outlook, and the readiness of firefighting resources.

Rulemaking for the changed status of bald eagles
The removal of the bald eagle in 2012 from the state's list of threatened and endangered species necessitated an update to Oregon's forest practice rules. Private Forests program staff will seek the board's approval to begin administrative rulemaking.

Subcommittee on alternative forest management plans
A board subcommittee assigned to identify alternative plans for managing the NW Oregon State Forests will describe its progress to date. The subcommittee was formed in June of last year and has met five times, most recently to review the science assessment phase of the process.

Subcommittee on federal forests
A board subcommittee on federal forests will provide an update on its work. The subcommittee focuses on federal forest policy issues, with an aim to help the board interact with the governor's office, the Oregon congressional delegation, the Legislature and other stakeholders on management of the 18 million acres of federally owned forestland in the state.

Oregon Department of Forestry budget
The board will consider the Oregon Department of Forestry's (ODF) request budget for the 2015-17 biennium. If approved, the proposed budget will then be submitted to the Department of Administrative Services.

Special needs
Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance, at 503-945-7200.

About the board
The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information on the board is available at www.oregonforestry.gov.

ODF is on Facebook and other social media sites, accessible at www.oregon.gov/odf.

###
White River Fire Morning News Release, Thursday, July 17, 2014 @ 6:45 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/17/14
July 17, 2014 6:45 a.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1

Contact: Brian Ballou, public information officer, (541) 621-4156

DEMOBILIZATION OF WHITE RIVER FIRE BEGINS

Nearly 460 firefighters and support personnel awoke in the White River Fire Camp this morning but many of them will hit the road today and tomorrow, either to another fire suppression assignment or to return to their home units. The 652-acre wildfire, which burned in a portion of the White River Wild and Scenic area 12 miles west of Tygh Valley, is 95 percent contained. Full containment is expected by Friday morning.

Day shift crews will focus on mopping up interior hot spots on the south side of the White River Fire; the north side of the fire will be patrolled by engine crews. Tonight, there will not be a full night shift operation; engines will patrol the perimeter and use hand-held infrared devices to detect heat.

Firefighters, engines and helicopters assigned to the White River Fire are also poised to respond to new fires, should any occur, in support of the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's protection unit in The Dalles.

A Red Flag Warning is in effect today across the region for westerly winds to 10-20 mph, gusts to 30 mph, and relative humidity below 20 percent.

The cause of the White River Fire, which started July 12, is being investigated.

Fire suppression equipment available to the crews today include:
* One Type II (medium) helicopter
* One Type III (light) helicopter
* Eight engines
* Two bulldozers
* One water tender

Costs so far have reached $1.8 million.

The White River Fire is on land protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Much of the land is wilderness inside the White River Wild and Scenic Area, under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife administers other lands inside the fire area for wildlife conservation purposes.

Fire suppression operations are run by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander John Buckman. Crews and support personnel from across the state have been running the fire suppression operation out of an incident command post at Wasco County Fairgrounds in Tygh Valley.

###
Make plans to attend one of these DHS Town Hall Meetings: Planning for Safety, Health and Independence in Your Community
OR Department of Human Services - 07/17/14
You are invited to provide input and feedback to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on our priorities and strategic direction for 2015-17 and beyond in the following areas: Child Welfare, Aging and People with Disabilities, Intellectual/Developmental Disability Services, Self Sufficiency Programs (SNAP, TANF, ERDC), Vocational Rehabilitation, DHS agency operations, and other human services issues. Our community outreach this summer has two goals: first, to report on progress toward our long-term goals and strategic efforts as an organization; and second, get your thoughts and ideas as we plan for the next two years of work. Your input and participation is extremely valuable to us. Please make plans to attend a meeting in your local area -- or to log on for a statewide web-based meeting (if you are unable to attend in person). We need your help and ideas to ensure the safety, health and independence of all Oregonians!

Wednesday, July 30
Portland - Portland Community College (Cascade Campus, Moriarty Arts & Humanities Building)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Portland

Friday, August 1
Bend - Central Oregon Community College (Hitchcock Auditorium)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Bend

Monday, August 4
Eugene - Lane Community College (Center for Meeting & Learning)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Eugene

Tuesday, August 5
Medford - Rogue Community College (RCC/SOU Higher Education Center)
10:00 am - 12:00 noon
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Medford

Thursday, August 7 (special online meeting for those unable to attend in person)
Statewide -- Web-based interactive meeting, sign-up info & other details to come later.
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RSVP to: DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us subject line Web

Join DHS Director Erinn Kelley-Siel and members of the DHS Executive Team for an informative presentation and lively discussion about where the agency is today and where we are going in the next two years and beyond. Additional information will be coming soon - please forward this message to others who may be interested.

Thank you!

Questions?
Please contact DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us
Moccasin Hill Fire - update July 17, a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/17/14
Moccasin Hill Fire

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2, IC Cline

July 17, 2014 8:00 a.m.

Recorded Fire Information Line: 541-947-6223

CURRENT SITUATION

Firefighters on the Moccasin Hill Fire continued to make excellent progress with mop-up and line reinforcement on Wednesday. The Incident Management Team has received excellent cooperation and support from the local community, partner agencies, and the local fire service.

"We have shifted from catching and holding the fire to securing the fire," said Operations Chief Joe Hessel. "With a good mop-up effort, we will be able to turn this fire over to a local team in a few days". Mop-up work will continue today, as crews use hand-held infrared devices that can show hot spots that may hold heat but not visible flame or smoke. Yesterday's mop-up activities revealed two additional small outbuildings had burned on Sunday, bringing the total number of structures lost to 35.

As the fire threat decreases, the Incident Management Team will be issuing only one news release per day. With the reduction in fire activity and multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in Oregon, the process of demobilizing resources is underway. A new website providing updates on all active large files in the Pacific Northwest is available at: http://www.nwccinfo.blogspot.com/.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center in Sprague River is transitioning today to a Recovery Center, processing affected families and referring them to partner agencies for possible assistance. Thursday hours for the Red Cross Recovery Center will be 9 am to 8 pm.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information.


FIRE AT A GLANCE

Size: 2535 acres

Cause: under investigation

Containment: 55%

Expected Containment: 7-19-14

Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 21
Air Tankers: 2
Helicopters: 10
Engines: 33
Dozers: 5
Water Tenders: 9
Total personnel: 662

Estimated Costs to Date: $2.4 mil

For More Information:

South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership
Twitter - www.twitter.com/scofmpfireinfo
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/
NW Large Fires Information -http://www.nwccinfo.blogspot.com
07/16/14
Moccasin Hill Fire - update July 16, evening
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/14
Moccasin Hill Fire

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2, IC Cline

July 16, 2014 6:00 p.m.

Recorded Fire Information Line: 541-947-6223


Afternoon Update

Firefighters had a good day on the fire lines of the Moccasin Hill Fire Wednesday, as they focused on mop-up activities and reinforcing portions of the line. Most of the flame and smoke activity is limited to the eastern flank of the fire. In addition to mop-up work along the entire fire perimeter, crews will continue to extinguish all smokes within the residential area.

Due to decreased fire activity, this will be the last afternoon update from the Incident Management Team. A morning news release will still be issued daily for the remainder of the week.

With multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in the state, the process of demobilizing resources has begun, with the fire releasing some crews to transition to one of the many other active large fire incidents in Oregon. A new website providing updates on all active large files in the Northwest is available at: http://www.nwccinfo.blogspot.com/.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center remains open at the Sprague Community Center.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information.

###


FIRE AT A GLANCE (07/16/14)

Size: 2535 acres

Cause: under investigation

Containment: 35%

Expected Containment: 7-19-14

Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 24
Air Tankers: 2
Helicopters: 10
Engines: 23
Dozers: 6
Water Tenders: 9
Total personnel: 748

Estimated Costs to Date: $1.6 M

For More Information:

South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership
Twitter - www.twitter.com/scofmpfireinfo
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/
NW Large Fires Information -http://www.nwccinfo.blogspot.com
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 18 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/14
July 16, 2014

What: The Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee will meet in Wilsonville Friday, July 18. The primary business of the meeting will be review of the final 2013 performance and quality pool payout and assessment of the 17 incentive measures for 2015. Public testimony will be heard at 12:45 p.m.

When: Friday, July 18, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 211, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. Directions and parking information are available on the college's website at www.clackamas.edu/Wilsonville/.

Interested persons can also attend through a listen-only telephone conference line at 1-888-808-6929; the participant code is 915042.

Agenda:

-- Select depression screening and follow-up plan benchmark for 2014

-- Review final 2013 performance and quality pool payout

-- Assess 17 current incentive measures for 2015

-- Process to review proposed new measures for 2015

-- Public testimony

For more information, please visit the committee's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/metrix.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Correction: Extensive OSP F&W Division Investigation Into Central Oregon Illegal Guiding & Hunting Activities Leading to Multiple Convictions (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/16/14
2014-07/1002/76018/Wheeler_poaching.3.jpg
2014-07/1002/76018/Wheeler_poaching.3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76018/thumb_Wheeler_poaching.3.jpg
Correction to paragraph six clarifying Emily Aronson pled no contest.

***

In perhaps one of the most extensive investigations involving troopers of the Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division, a Bend area man was recently sentenced after pleading guilty to multiple misdemeanor and felony charges related to illegal guiding and hunting activities in central Oregon. In total, 23 people have been charged for more than 200 counts/charges filed in Wheeler County and 15 additional charges were filed in Deschutes County. Ten of those individuals pled guilty or no contest; and cases are pending adjudication for 13 other people.

In October 2012, an OSP Fish & Wildlife trooper received an anonymous tip about alleged illegal guiding and hunting activities in Wheeler County. The initial tip only provided a first name of a suspect. As the investigation progressed, the trooper identified the primary suspect as ALAN ROY ARONSON, age 43, from Bend, who was alleged to be conducting illegal guided hunts, primarily for elk and buffalo, on another person's ranch property without the owner's consent.

During the investigation, OSP Fish & Wildlife troopers across the state were involved in a coordinated effort and interviewed over a hundred people. Information indicated ARONSON was performing guided fee hunts, to hunters on private lands, whether or not they had valid hunting licenses or tags. Between 2010 and 2012, hunters accompanying ARONSON killed dozens of elk, including several large trophy elk that were shot and killed by persons without valid tags, and at least 9 buffalo from a neighboring ranch without the ranch owner's consent. Oregon State Marine Board records revealed that ARONSON was not a registered hunting guide in the State of Oregon during the time of the unlawful activities and was operating on land he did not own and therefore was illegally guiding hunters without an outfitter/guide registration.

Investigators also found evidence that a 6x7 bull elk was unlawfully shot and killed by his wife, EMILY ARONSON, age 34.

Search warrants were served at two different locations tied to the ARONSON's in Deschutes and Wheeler County. Subsequent to searching the properties, evidence seized included documents, a computer, untagged trophy elk and deer mounts, vehicles, a rifle, and three freshly skinned buffalo hides.

Both ALAN ARONSON and EMILY ARONSON were sentenced in Wheeler County Circuit Court on June 20, 2014. ALAN ARONSON pled guilty to three misdemeanor counts of failure to register as an outfitter and guide, and two felony counts of theft in the first degree. ALAN ARONSON was sentenced to 30 days in jail, a lifetime hunting license suspension and approximately $66,050 in fines and restitution, in addition to forfeiture of property to include a 2005 Ford pick-up and two UTV's vehicles that were determined to be used in the illegal guiding operation. EMILY ARONSON pled no contest to one misdemeanor count of hunting wildlife without a valid tag, was sentenced to a three year hunting license suspension and ordered to pay fines and restitution of $15,350 for the illegal taking of a 6x7 bull elk.

The global resolution for the 10 adjudicated persons to date, have resulted in the following cumulative sanctions:
* 180 days in jail (all jail sentences suspended except for the 30 days levied against ALAN ARONSON)
* 34 years in hunting license suspensions, plus the lifetime suspension for ALAN ARONSON
* Over $152,000 in fines, fees, restitution, and forfeitures
* 140 hours of community service* 222 months of probation

"The case resolution was successful in part from the great efforts and investigative skills of the lead investigator and team members whom worked tirelessly on this extensive and complex case, along with assistance from other Fish and Wildlife troopers from across the state," said Captain Jeff Samuels, OSP Fish & Wildlife Division director.

OSP Fish & Wildlife Division was assisted in this investigation and prosecution by Wheeler County District Attorney's Office, Deschutes County District Attorney's Office, and Oregon Department of Justice.

Questions regarding this investigation and court matters should be directed to the Wheeler County District Attorney Daniel Ousley at (541) 763-4207.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76018/Wheeler_poaching.3.jpg
Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Wednesday, July 16, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/14
*Sunflower Fire
The lightning-caused Sunflower Fire was reported burning in timber and grass approximately 10 miles north of Monument yesterday. The fire is currently estimated at 400 acres with running, spotting and torching. Growth potential is high.
Resources currently assigned: 4 engines, 1 crew, 1 water tender. 6 structures threatened.

*Waterman Complex
This lightning-caused complex of fires near Mitchell, Service Creek and Kimberly, was reported Monday evening. It includes the Bailey Butte, Toney Butte and Junction Springs Fires.

The Bailey Butte Fire, burning in timber, is located approximately 10 miles west of the town of Mitchell. It is estimated at 2,105 acres and is 0% contained.
The fire has moved south onto the Ochoco National Forest into very heavy timber. Plans include using managed stands to suppress the fire's forward movement.

Firefighters will be working diligently to minimize acres burned on ODF protected private timber and range lands. Coordination with private landowner and Ochoco National Forest will continue.

The Wheeler County Sheriff reduced the evacuation notice to Level 1 on the West Branch Road area. Home owners have been advised to remain on alert. Highway 26 remains closed due to very active fire behavior and hazardous falling trees. Two developed campgrounds (Ochoco Divide and Wildwood), and one trailhead (Cougar East) have been evacuated.

The Toney Butte Fire was reported Monday burning in grass, brush, juniper, sage and timber approximately 6 miles southwest of the town of Spray. The fire is estimated at 2,194 acres and is 0% contained.
Firefighters will be coordinating with landowners and working diligently to minimize acres burned on ODF protected private lands by establishing fire line to aid containment.

The Junction Springs Fire is 20 acres, 0% contained. Engines were able to access the top of the fire to apply water directly holding the fire. Efforts are to improve, hold and mop-up hot spots on existing line, construct and hold new line, and identify potential spot fires.

Resources assigned to the Waterman Complex: 15 engines, 20 crews, 3 water tenders, 6 bulldozers and 1 helicopter are assigned to this fire, along with 482 personnel.

Fire information: 541-462-3140.

*Moccasin Hill Fire
The Moccasin Hill Fire, reported Sunday burning 4 miles north of Sprague River and northeast of Klamath Falls, is now estimated at 2,535 acres.

Firefighters continue to make significant gains in efforts to contain the fire. Late yesterday fire officials reported the entire fire is lined with approximately 85% dozer lines, 5% roads, and 10% hand lines. Spot fires outside the main perimeter have been lined, and crews are reinforcing lines along steep bluffs on the eastern side of the fire.

Yesterday, fire officials and Red Cross personnel were able to enter the burned area to conduct a detailed assessment of structures lost during the initial fire run on Sunday afternoon. This assessment has revealed that 17 primary structures and 16 other structures were lost for a total of 33 structures destroyed, up from the previous estimate of 20 total. No additional structures have been lost since Sunday.

Today, firefighters will focus on mop-up activities on several portions of the fire line. In addition to mop-up work along the entire fire perimeter, crews will continue to extinguish all smokes within the residential area.

Safety officers are encouraging the crews to pace themselves appropriately to deal with the warm and dry weather conditions. The weather forecast for today calls for a chance of thunderstorms late in the day.

With multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in the state, the Incident Management Team will begin releasing some crews to transition to other incidents.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center remains open at the Sprague Community Center.

The fire is 35 percent contained and cause of the fire is under investigation.

Resources assigned: 24 crews, 2 air tankers, 10 helicopters, 23 engines, 6 bulldozers, 9 water tenders. Estimated costs to date: $1.6 M.

Fire information: Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for fire information, or follow the incident's website.

*White River Fire
Despite withering heat, fire crews working to extinguish the 652-acre White River Fire located 12 miles west of Tygh Valley significantly expanded their mop-up operation, bringing the containment level to 80 percent today. Full containment is expected by the end of the week.

Firefighters today will be working under Red Flag Warning conditions: 100-degree heat, humidity below 20 percent and stronger winds. This will raise the likelihood of increased fire activity deep inside the fire line where there are scattered unburned fuels and numerous hot spots. Hose lines and portable water ponds have been set up to stretch mop-up capabilities deep into the White River Canyon.

Night shift firefighters have been using hand-held infrared devices to detect buried pockets of heat.

The White River Fire is on land protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Much of the land is wilderness inside the White River Wild and Scenic Area, under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife administers other lands inside the fire area for wildlife conservation purposes.

Fire suppression operations are run by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander John Buckman. Crews and support personnel from across the state have been running the fire suppression operation out of an incident command post at Wasco County Fairgrounds in Tygh Valley.

Some resources, mostly personnel, will be released from the White River Fire today. It is likely that firefighters and equipment will get reassigned to other fires burning in the region.

Resources assigned: 2 Type II (medium) helicopters, 2 Type III (light) helicopters, 10 engines, 2 bulldozers, 1 water tender and 458 personnel. Fire costs to date: approximately $1.5 million. Cause is under investigation.
The cause of the fire, which started July 12, is being investigated.

For more information, please follow the incident's website.

*Log Springs Fire
The Log Springs fire was reported Monday burning in timber and grass approximately 4 ?1/2 miles northwest of Ukiah. The fire is estimated at 10 acres, is 90 percent contained and is in mop up.

*Bear Claw Fire
The Bear Claw Fire was reported yesterday burning in timber and grass approximately 6 miles northwest of the Log Springs Fire and 10 miles northwest of Ukiah. The fire is estimated at 26 acres, is 80 percent contained and is in mop up.

*Service Creek Fire
The Service Creek Fire, located approximately 11 miles west of Spray, Oregon, is estimated at 385 acres. This fire was 100% contained at 9 a.m. yesterday.
2 crews are still assigned to the fire, which is in mop-up.

Over the weekend, lightning strikes across the state have started a number of smaller sized fires in various jurisdictions, including on the Malheur National Forest, and in the Willamette National Forest (contained, and called the Bingham Complex).
Additional fire information is shared in real time on ODF and other web and social media platforms as it becomes available.


ABOUT THIS UPDATE
ODF is responsible for fire protection on about 16 million acres of private and state-owned forest and grazing land, and on certain other public forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Fires may cross ownerships, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger in size or of other significance. It also reports on ODF's major actions as a partner with other agencies.

FIRE PREVENTION
A word about fire prevention: Several of our larger fires this year have been human-caused. With fire activity across the state and warmer-than-usual July temps, please be extra-careful with fire.
White River Fire Morning Update, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 @ 7:30 a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/14
July 16, 2014 7:30 a.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1

Contact: Brian Ballou, public information officer, (541) 621-4156

WHITE RIVER FIRE NEARS CONTAINMENT

Despite withering heat, fire crews working to extinguish the 652-acre White River Fire significantly expanded their mop-up operation, bringing the containment level to 80 percent today. Full containment is expected by the end of the week.
The cause of the fire, which started July 12, is being investigated.
Resources assigned to the White River Fire suppression effort include:
* 458 personnel
* Two Type II (medium) helicopters
* Two Type III (light) helicopters
* Ten engines
* Two bulldozers
* One water tender

Costs so far have reached $1.5 million.

Some resources, mostly personnel, will be released from the White River Fire today. It is likely that firefighters and equipment will get reassigned to other fires burning in the region.

Firefighters today will be working under Red Flag Warning conditions: 100-degree heat, humidity below 20 percent and stronger winds. This will raise the likelihood of increased fire activity deep inside the fire line where there are scattered unburned fuels and numerous hot spots. Hose lines and portable water ponds have been set up to stretch mop-up capabilities deep into the White River Canyon.

Night shift firefighters have been using hand-held infrared devices to detect buried pockets of heat.

The White River Fire is on land protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Much of the land is wilderness inside the White River Wild and Scenic Area, under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife administers other lands inside the fire area for wildlife conservation purposes.

Fire suppression operations are run by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander John Buckman. Crews and support personnel from across the state have been running the fire suppression operation out of an incident command post at Wasco County Fairgrounds in Tygh Valley.

###
Waterman Complex fires update - July 16, 2014, a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/14
Waterman Complex - Mitchell, Oregon

Information Center - 541-462-3140 (Will be routed through the school switchboard)

Start date: July 11-12, 2014

Cause: Lightning

Total acres: 4,319

Containment: 0%

Hand crews: 20

Fire engines: 15

Water tenders: 3

Helicopters: 1

Bulldozers: 6

Total personnel: 682



Location: Three fires near Mitchell, Service Creek, and Kimberly, Oregon.


Current situation: Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 3, Incident Commander Doug Johnson, assumed command of the Waterman Complex last evening. The incident command post is located at the Mitchell High School in Mitchell, Oregon. A telephone number is now available at the information center 541-462-3140. An infra-red radar flight was completed last night and updated acres reflect the results. Fire fighting resources continue to arrive to assist in suppression efforts. Operational plans for the day include: providing structure protection on the West Branch Road, constructing and holding fire line, mopping-up hot spots, scouting new fire line locations, and falling snags along Hwy 26. Aviation assets will be utilized to assist in containment efforts.


The Complex consists of three fires:


Bailey Butte Fire - 2,105 acres, 0% contained. The fire has moved south onto the Ochoco National Forest into very heavy timber. Plans include using managed stands to suppress the fire's forward movement. Firefighters will be working diligently to minimize acres burned on ODF protected private timber and range lands. Coordination with private landowner and Ochoco National Forest will continue. The Wheeler County Sheriff reduced the evacuation notice to Level 1 on the West Branch Road area. Home owners have been advised to remain on alert. Highway 26 remains closed due to very active fire behavior and hazardous falling trees. Two developed campgrounds (Ochoco Divide and Wildwood), and one trailhead (Cougar East) have been evacuated.


Toney Butte Fire - 2,194 acres, 0% contained. Firefighters will be coordinating with landowners and working diligently to minimize acres burned on ODF protected private lands by establishing fire line to aid containment.


Junction Springs Fire- 20 acres, 0% contained. Engines were able to access the top of the fire to apply water directly holding the fire. Efforts to improve, hold, mop-up hot spots on existing line; construct and hold new line, and identify potential spot fires.


For more information on the Waterman Complex visit:


Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3961/


Look us up on Facebook Waterman Complex


Look us up on Twitter @watermancmplx
Businesses Report Largest Number of Vacancies in Six Years
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/16/14
Oregon businesses reported 11,700 more job vacancies in the spring of 2014 than they did the prior year. Businesses had approximately 46,900 job vacancies in the spring months of 2014, according to a Job Vacancy Survey recently completed by the Oregon Employment Department.

The last time vacancies were at this level was in 2008, before the Great Recession did its damage. In the spring of 2008, Oregon had 47,900 vacancies.

While vacancies rose this spring, the number of unemployed Oregonians declined to 131,000 in April. As a result, Oregon had 3 unemployed people per vacancy. That's still above the 2 unemployed per private-sector vacancy nationwide, but below Oregon's 4-to-1 ratio one year ago.

Vacancies were recorded across a wide range of education levels - from jobs requiring a high school education (about 22,000), to positions in need of postsecondary-trained workers (just over 8,000), and jobs requiring a bachelor's or advanced degree (also about 8,000). The largest increase since last spring occurred in vacancies requiring a high school diploma, which doubled. Common jobs requiring high school include cashiers, janitors and cleaners, home health aides, waiters and waitresses, and retail salespersons.

Average wages increased along with educational requirements. Vacancies that required some training beyond high school had an average wage $4 per hour above those that needed a high school diploma. The average wage for vacancies with bachelor or advanced degree requirements paid $13 per hour above those with postsecondary training.

Overall, the average wage offered for vacancies this spring, $14.69, was lower than the $15.09 average in the spring of 2013. The number of high-wage vacancies (those paying $25 per hour or more) hasn't changed. But, the number of vacancies paying less than $15 per hour is well above the level at this time last year.

This reflects a growing need for seasonal part-time workers, concentrated in jobs that tend to pay low wages, such as sales, food preparation, and building and grounds cleaning and maintenance. These occupations, along with office and administrative support
vacancies, each recorded more than 4,000 openings in the spring.
Vacancies increased significantly over the year in Eastern Oregon, the Portland area, and Central Oregon. Eastern Oregon saw the largest rate of increase, with sizeable gains in farming, production, and transportation related vacancies. Total vacancies declined slightly over the year in Northwest Oregon
and the Willamette Valley.

About the Survey
The Oregon Employment Department conducts the Oregon Job Vacancy Survey and estimates the number of job vacancies each quarter based on responses from private-sector businesses with at least two employees. Estimates for summer 2014 will be released in October. For more details on recent Oregon job vacancies, visit the "publications" tab on QualityInfo.org and scroll down to the section titled "Quarterly Job Vacancies Snapshots."


Attached Media Files: Press Release PDF , Interview Sound Bite 5 , Interview Sound Bite 4 , Interview Sound Bite 3 , Interview Sound Bite 2 , Interview Sound Bite 1 , Produced Radio Story
Moccasin Hill Fire update - July 16, a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/14
Moccasin Hill Fire

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2, IC Cline

July 16, 2014 8:00 a.m.

Recorded Fire Information Line: 541-947-6223

Current Situation:

Firefighters continue to make significant gains in efforts to contain the Moccasin Hill fire. Late yesterday fire officials reported that the entire fire is lined with approximately 85% dozer lines, 5% roads, and 10% hand lines. Spot fires outside the main perimeter have been lined, and crews are reinforcing lines along steep bluffs on the eastern side of the fire.

Yesterday, fire officials and Red Cross personnel were able to enter the burned area to conduct a detailed assessment of structures lost during the initial fire run on Sunday afternoon. This assessment has revealed that 17 primary structures and 16 other structures were lost for a total of 33 structures destroyed, up from the previous estimate of 20 total. No additional structures have been lost since Sunday.

Today, firefighters will focus on mop-up activities on several portions of the fire line. In addition to mop-up work along the entire fire perimeter, crews will continue to extinguish all smokes within the residential area.

Safety officers are encouraging the crews to pace themselves appropriately to deal with the warm and dry weather conditions. The weather forecast for today calls for a chance of thunderstorms late in the day.

With multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in the state, the Incident Management Team will begin releasing some crews to transition to other incidents.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center remains open at the Sprague Community Center.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information.

###


FIRE AT A GLANDCE (07/16/14)

Size: 2535 acres

Cause: under investigation

Containment: 35%

Expected Containment: 7-19-14

Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 24
Air Tankers: 2
Helicopters: 10
Engines: 23
Dozers: 6
Water Tenders: 9
Total personnel: 748

Estimated Costs to Date: $1.6 M

For More Information:

South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership
Twitter - www.twitter.com/scofmpfireinfo
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/
Update #2: Photo - Fatal Motorcycle-Involved Crash - Highway 395 near Ukiah (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/16/14
2014-07/1002/76001/071514.fatal.mtc.hwy395_mp53.jpg
2014-07/1002/76001/071514.fatal.mtc.hwy395_mp53.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/76001/thumb_071514.fatal.mtc.hwy395_mp53.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Tuesday's fatal motorcycle-involved traffic crash found by a citizen who had stopped along Highway 395 near Ukiah. The victim's name is released in this update.

According to Sergeant Sterling Hall, on July 15, 2014 at approximately 12:48 p.m., a citizen had stopped along the side of Highway 395 near milepost 53B when he saw a motorcycle over the edge of the roadway. Emergency responders arriving on scene confirmed there was an adult male lying near the motorcycle who was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Preliminary investigation indicates a 2009 Buel motorcycle operated by MARK HALL PFENNING, age 57, from Bend, was traveling northbound when PFENNING lost control in a left curve. The motorcycle slid on its side across the turnout on the shoulder where it went down an embankment off the highway. The estimated time of the crash is not confirmed.

OSP troopers from the Pendleton Area Command office are continuing the investigation. OSP was assisted at the scene by Ukiah Quick Response Team, Pendleton Fire and Ambulance Department, LifeFlight, and ODOT.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

ODOT recently sent a news release regarding motorcycle safety with reminders and tips for everyone traveling on our roads:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/COMM/Pages/nr14062401.aspx

OSP joins ODOT in urging all travelers to stay focused on safety and Drive Safely to Save Lives.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/76001/071514.fatal.mtc.hwy395_mp53.jpg
07/15/14
Moccasin Hill Fire - July 15, p.m. update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/14
Moccasin Hill Fire

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2, IC Cline

July 15, 2014 6:00 p.m.

Recorded Fire Information Line: 541-947-6223
Will be updated as needed.

Current Situation:

Fire crews made excellent progress on the Moccasin Hill fire this afternoon, significantly strengthening containment lines and focusing on hot spots within the fire perimeter. By the end of the day today, fire officials expect to have the entire fire lined with approximately 85% dozer lines, 5% roads, and 10% hand lines. Spot fires outside the main fire perimeter have been lined, and crews are continuing to reinforce lines along steep bluffs on the eastern side of the fire.

Firefighters have already initiated mop-up activities on several portions of the fire line. Safety officers are encouraging the crews to pace themselves appropriately to deal with the warm and dry weather conditions.

With multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in the state, the Incident Management Team will begin releasing some crews to transition to other incidents. Two Hot Shot Crew will be released today to join other firefighting efforts.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center remains open at the Sprague Community Center.

Tomorrow's morning news release will contain additional information on the containment progress and the results of the burned area assessment work completed today.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information.

###

Current Situation:

Fire crews made excellent progress on the Moccasin Hill fire this afternoon, significantly strengthening containment lines and focusing on hot spots within the fire perimeter. By the end of the day today, fire officials expect to have the entire fire lined with approximately 85% dozer lines, 5% roads, and 10% hand lines. Spot fires outside the main fire perimeter have been lined, and crews are continuing to reinforce lines along steep bluffs on the eastern side of the fire.

Firefighters have already initiated mop-up activities on several portions of the fire line. Safety officers are encouraging the crews to pace themselves appropriately to deal with the warm and dry weather conditions.

With multiple additional large fires being managed elsewhere in the state, the Incident Management Team will begin releasing some crews to transition to other incidents. Two Hot Shot Crew will be released today to join other firefighting efforts.

The level 1 evacuation status remains in effect for subdivisions near the fire. The Red Cross Evacuation Center remains open at the Sprague Community Center.

Tomorrow's morning news release will contain additional information on the containment progress and the results of the burned area assessment work completed today.

Visit our social media sites, Inciweb page, or call the SCOFMP recorded Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for the latest information.

###

Fire at a Glance (07/15/14)

Size: 2500 acres

Cause: under investigation

Containment: 15%

Expected Containment: unknown

Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 14
Air Tankers: 2
Helicopters: 10
Engines: 33
Dozers: 8
Water Tenders: 7
Total personnel: 441

Estimated Costs to Date: $1.25 M

For More Information:

South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership
Twitter - www.twitter.com/scofmpfireinfo
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/
Bilingual education leader named Edison Elementary principal (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 07/15/14
2014-07/1288/75995/Jennifer_Cowgill_071514.jpg
2014-07/1288/75995/Jennifer_Cowgill_071514.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1288/75995/thumb_Jennifer_Cowgill_071514.jpg
WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools named Dr. Jennifer Cowgill its new principal of Edison Elementary School. Cowgill succeeds Josh Wolcott who accepted a principal position in the Central Valley School district near Spokane.

Cowgill has spent the past eight years as a Teacher-Leader for the Pullman School District. She was also a Principal Intern at Franklin Elementary for the Pullman School District. Cowgill began her career in the Walla Walla School District in 1992 as Coordinator of K-8 Bilingual and English as a Second Language Services. She also taught Spanish literacy at Green Park Elementary, bilingual kindergarten at Sharpstein and summer school during her three year tenure in Walla Walla. Cowgill was employed by the Santa Cruz Valley Unified School District from 1996 to 2002 teaching in various bilingual education positions.

Cowgill earned her Doctor of Philosophy, Language and Literacy Education from the Washington State University. She also completed her Master of Arts, Foreign Languages and Literature (Spanish) and Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education (K-12 Bilingual/ESL and K-12 Spanish Endorsements) from Washington State University.

Professional Affiliations
- Washington Association of Bilingual Educators (WABE)
- Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER)

Ron Higgins transfers to Pioneer Middle School; Connie Taylor-Randall transfers to Wa-Hi
Walla Walla High School Assistant Principal Ron Higgins is transferring to Pioneer Middle School as the school's assistant principal. Higgins replaces Jack Mehn, who earlier this year transferred to Wa-Hi to serve as assistant principal in charge of athletics. Homelink Principal Connie Taylor-Randall is transferring to Walla Walla High School as a Principal on Special Assignment. Berney Principal Christy Krutulis will lead the Homelink Program.

###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1288/75995/Jennifer_Cowgill_071514.jpg
Oregon timber harvest above four billion board feet for the first time since 2006
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/14
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
July 15, 2014

Contacts Brandon Kaetzel, ODF Principal Economist, 503-945-7413; bkaetzel@odf.state.or.us
Jeri Chase, Oregon Department of Forestry Public Information Officer
503-945-7201 (office), 503-931-2721 (cell), or jchase@odf.state.or.us


In 2013, Oregon's timber harvest rose to 4.2 billion board feet, marking four consecutive years of increase from the recession low of 2.72 billion board feet in 2009. "This was the first harvest above four billion board feet in seven years," said ODF principal economist Brandon Kaetzel, "and represents a 12 percent increase over the 2012 harvest of 3.75 billion board feet."

Approximately 49 percent, or 30.2 million acres, of Oregon is forested. Federal forestlands account for 60 percent of these forestlands, industrial forestlands for 19 percent, family forestland owners own 15 percent, state-owned forests comprise three percent, and all other forestland owners (counties, Tribal, etc.), three percent.

Timber harvest increases can be attributed to a strong export market for Oregon logs in 2013, coupled with a domestic market recovery, particularly in housing. Whether this trend will continue for the 2014 harvest is uncertain due to housing forecasts being revised to lower numbers and a sudden cool-down in the export market that occurred during the second quarter of 2014.

The largest increase in harvest came from non-industrial private forestlands where harvests increased 61 percent to 511 million board feet from the 2012 total of 318 million board feet. "This is most likely due to small forestland owners taking advantage of higher prices as a result of a still strong export market in 2013," Kaetzel said. The harvest on industrial forestlands rose from 2.56 billion board feet in 2012 to 2.75 billion board feet in 2013, for an eight percent increase in harvest.

Harvests on Native American forestlands increased five percent from 2012 to 2013, rising from 63 million board feet in 2012 to a total of 66 million board feet in 2013.

On Oregon's west site, federal forestland posted modest increases in harvests; an 11.5 percent increase on Bureau of Land Management lands (for a 2013 total of 165 million board feet) and a six percent increase in harvests on U.S. Forest Service lands (totaling 392 million board feet in 2013). State public lands, which include Common School Fund and Board of Forestry forestlands, posted a slight increase from 251 to 252 million board feet.

Klamath County continued to lead in eastern Oregon with a 2013 harvest of 124 million board feet. Even with a diminished infrastructure, harvests on the east side rose approximately four percent due to increases on tribal, private, and other public (e.g. county) forestland. There was a marked decrease in federal timber harvest on the east side for 2013. In western Oregon, Lane County continued to lead with a 2013 harvest of 620 million board feet.

A link to the 2013 report, as well as links to previous years' annual reports, is available on the department's website at www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/STATE_FORESTS/FRP/annual_Reports.aspx.



NOTE: One board foot of lumber is one foot wide, one foot long, and one inch thick, or the equivalent in volume. Construction of an approximately 1,800-square-foot house requires about 10,000 board feet.

###
Oregon National Guard's 1-186 Infantry prepares to mobilize Soldiers to Afghanistan (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/15/14
2014-07/962/75975/130309-Z-AH721-013.jpg
2014-07/962/75975/130309-Z-AH721-013.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/962/75975/thumb_130309-Z-AH721-013.jpg
The Oregon Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, is scheduled to mobilize approximately 275 Soldiers to Afghanistan in a ceremony, July 18, at 10:00 a.m. at the Southern Oregon University's McNeal Pavilion.

The public and media are invited to attend. The address is 1465 Webster St., in Ashland, Ore. For parking, take I-5 Exit 14, head west on Ashland St. and turn right on Walker Ave.

The deployment is part of the regular rotational cycle of forces to provide security missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

The battalion is headquartered in Ashland, with companies also based in Coos Bay, Grants Pass, Medford, Roseburg, and St. Helens. The unit is under the command of Lt. Col. Noel Hoback and Command Sgt. Maj. Brad Huppunen.

The unit will complete deployment processing and training at Fort Hood, Texas, prior to departure for Afghanistan. The units will provide security and support for military facilities in Kabul and southwestern Afghanistan.

The history of the 41st Brigade can be traced back to 1917 when the 41st Infantry Division was created for service in World War I primarily from National Guard units from Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana. The 41st Infantry Division was the longest deployed division during WWII, serving in the Pacific.

Elements of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team have served in Saudia Arabia, The Sinai, Kuwait, Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan. The brigade deployed a large contingent known as Task Force Phoenix to Afghanistan in 2006 and again deployed the entire brigade to Iraq in 2009.

"The Oregon National Guard today is the best equipped, best trained, best led we've ever been due to experience gained through supporting overseas contingency operations over the last decade," said Maj. Stephen Bomar, director of Public Affairs for the Oregon Military Department. "Mobilizations such as this help the Oregon National Guard maintain a ready and reliable operational force."


To see still photos, stories and video of the unit's Soldiers' training, visit the following links:
http://www.dvidshub.net/video/347734/1-186-infantry-battalion-mobilization-training#.U8V0_ZRdV8E

http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1438538/oregon-army-national-guard-infantry-unit-prepares-deployment#.U8V1JJRdV8E

http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1438537/oregon-army-national-guard-infantry-unit-prepares-deployment#.U8V1NJRdV8E

Photo captions:
130309-Z-9135B-353: Oregon Army National Guard Capt. Mark Timmons (right), commander of Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, surveys the situation and gives instructions to Soldiers following a simulated battle during a full-scale infantry training exercise at Fairview Training Center in Salem, Ore., March 9. (Photo by Sgt. Betty Boyce, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

130309-Z-7541B-003: Oregon Army National Guard 1st Sgt. Scott Bagdan, with Bravo Company 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, gives instructions to Soldiers during a simulated casualty evacuation at the Fairview Training Center in Salem, Ore., March 9. Infantry units, based out of Coos Bay and St. Helens, Ore., met in Salem to conduct a full-scale training exercise simulating battlefield scenarios. (Photo by Spc. Matthew Burnett, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

130309-Z-AH721-013: Oregon Army National Guard Cpl. Andrew J. Miller, with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, provides roadside security in the blackberry bushes as the sun rises through the trees during a training exercise, March 9, at Fairview Training Center in Salem, Ore. (Photo by Spc. Erin J. Quirke, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/962/75975/130309-Z-AH721-013.jpg , 2014-07/962/75975/130309-Z-9135B-353.jpg , 2014-07/962/75975/130309-Z-7541B-003.jpg
Oregon Dept of Forestry Fire Update for Tuesday, July 15, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/14
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Several new fires were reported to Salem Coordination Center in the last 24-hours.

John Day-Watermen Complex
This lightning-caused complex of fires in central Oregon was reported yesterday evening. It includes the Baily Butte and Toney Butte Fires.

The Baily Butte Fire, reported burning in timber, is located approximately 10 miles west of the town of Mitchell. Size of the fire is estimated at 800-1,000 acres.

The Toney Butte Fire was reported yesterday burning in grass, brush, juniper, sage and timber approximately 6 miles southwest of the town of Spray. Size is estimated at 2,000+ acres.
An interagency Incident Management Team has been assigned to the Watermen Complex.

Stage 2 evacuations were issued last night in the west branch road area near Mitchell. The Crystal Springs Campground on the Ochoco National Forest was also evacuated last night.

Resources assigned: 20 engines, 4 crews and multiple dozers are assigned to this fire.

Fire information: 541-575-1321.

Log Springs Fire
The Log Springs fire was reported yesterday burning in timber and grass approximately 4 ?1/2 miles northwest of Ukiah. The fire is estimated at 10 acres and is in mop up.

Bear Claw Fire
The Bear Claw Fire was reported yesterday burning in timber and grass approximately 6 miles northwest of the Log Springs Fire and 10 miles northwest of Ukiah. The fire is estimated at 26 acres and is in mop up.

Moccasin Hill Fire
The Moccasin Hill Fire, reported Sunday burning 4 miles north of Sprague River and northeast of Klamath Falls, is now estimated at 2500 acres. The fire has destroyed a total of 20 structures including six homes in and around the Moccasin Hill subdivision.
ODF IMT 2 assumed command of the Moccasin Hill fire yesterday afternoon. The fire made a 50-60 acre run yesterday, but the winds pushed the fire back into itself so no additional structures were lost. The flames were quickly extinguished by 6 helicopters along with 3 air tankers. By late afternoon, most of the smoke had cleared. Last night crews were focused on completing a secure line around the fire. A heat seeking infra-red flight last night produced a more accurate acreage estimate and map.

The mandatory evacuation (Level III) order issued for the Sprague River Drive area was downgraded to Level 1 Monday afternoon.

The fire is 15 percent contained and cause of the fire is under investigation.

Resources assigned: 14 crews, 2 air tankers, 10 helicopters, 33 engines, 8 bulldozers, 7 water tenders. Estimated costs to date: $1.25 M.

A Red Cross Center has been set up at the Sprague Community Center. This continues to be a gathering place for local residents to get the latest fire information updates. Currently 100 structures remain threatened. To date, only one non-firefighter injury has been reported. The Moccasin Hill Fire camp is located at 21910 Sprague River Road, Chiloquin.

Fire information: Until phone lines are available at the Incident Command Post, please call the ODF office in Klamath Falls at 541-883-5681, or the SCOFMP Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223 for fire information, or follow the incident's website.

White River Fire
The 570-acre White River Fire 12 miles west of Tygh Valley reported Saturday afternoon is now estimated at 65 percent contained. Significant progress was made overnight by crews mopping up the fire, increasing the number of acres inside the fire line that are fully extinguished. The increase in acreage is due to more accurate information.

Day shift crews will work to hold the recently completed fire lines on the east and west sides of the White River Canyon and run hoselays deeper into the canyon. Mop-up also continues on the high ground on the north and south sides of the canyon. Cause is under investigation.

The White River Fire is on land protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Much of the land is wilderness inside the White River Wild and Scenic Area under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife administers other lands inside the fire area for wildlife conservation purposes. Fire suppression operations are run by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander John Buckman. Crews and support personnel from across the state have been running the fire suppression operation out of an incident command post at Wasco County Fairgrounds in Tygh Valley.

Resources assigned: 3 Type 2 (medium) helicopters, 2 Type 3 (light) helicopters, 8 engines, 3 bulldozers, 4 water tenders. Fire costs to date: approximately $1.1 million. Cause is under investigation.

For more information, please follow the incident's website.

Service Creek Fire
The Service Creek Fire, located approximately 11 miles west of Spray, Oregon, is estimated at 385 acres. This fire was 100% contained at 9 a.m. today.
2 crews are still assigned to the fire, which is in mop-up.

Over the weekend, lightning strikes across the state have started a number of smaller sized fires in various jurisdictions, including in the Willamette National Forest (contained, and called the Bingham Complex).

Additional fire information is shared in real time on ODF and other web and social media platforms as it becomes available.
White River Fire Morning News Release, Tuesday, July 15, 2014
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/14
July 15, 2014 7:30 a.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1
Contact: Brian Ballou, public information officer, (541) 621-4156

MOP-UP OPERATIONS WIDEN ON WHITE RIVER FIRE

Significant progress was made overnight by crews mopping up the 652-acre White River Fire, located 12 miles west of Tygh Valley, increasing the number of acres inside the fire line that are fully extinguished.

The increase in acreage is due to more accurate information and not to further spread of the fire. The fire is 65 percent contained.

Day shift crews will work to hold the recently completed fire lines on the east and west sides of the White River Canyon and run hoselays deeper into the canyon. Mop-up also continues on the high ground on the north and south sides of canyon.

Nearly 460 personnel are assigned to the White River Fire, and crews have the following equipment available to assist them in fire suppression:
* Three Type II (medium) helicopters
* Two Type III (light) helicopters
* Eight engines
* Three bulldozers
* Four water tenders

The cost of suppression so far is estimated at $1.1 million.

Crews heading for the fire lines have been reminded to keep hydrated as a defense against working in 100-degree temperatures on blackened ground. Yesterday, a firefighter was treated for a heat-related injury. Firefighters were also cautioned to watch for and avoid rattlesnakes and poison oak. Other hazards to firefighters include falling trees and snags, rolling rocks, and poor footing on the steep slopes inside the river canyon.

The White River Fire is on land protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. Much of the land is wilderness inside the White River Wild and Scenic Area, under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife administers other lands inside the fire area for wildlife conservation purposes.

Fire suppression operations are run by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 led by Incident Commander John Buckman. Crews and support personnel from across the state have been running the fire suppression operation out of an incident command post at Wasco County Fairgrounds in Tygh Valley.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oregon June 2014 Statewide Unemployment Rate Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/15/14
June Job Losses Offset May's Gains as the Unemployment Rate Remained at 6.8%

Industry Payroll Employment (Establishment Survey Data)
After adding almost 44,000 jobs in 11 straight months of growth, Oregon's payroll employment dropped by 4,300 in June, as several industries trimmed payrolls. Construction dropped by 3,600 jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis, while the following major industries each cut more than 1,000: manufacturing ( 1,300 jobs), professional and business services ( 1,100), leisure and hospitality ( 1,100) and government ( 1,500). These losses were partially offset by gains in private educational services (+1,700 jobs) and health care and social assistance (+1,800).

June Labor Market Highlights
*Payroll employment dropped 4,300 in June, following a gain of 3,900 in May.

*Construction slipped by 3,600 jobs in June but is still up 4,200 jobs, or 5.7 percent, since June 2013.

*Oregon's unemployment rate was 6.8 in June, the same as in April and May.

*The long-term unemployed dropped to 40,700, the lowest since 2008.

The June change in construction employment was weaker than normal. Most of its component industries failed to add jobs at the robust rate that is typical in June.

Construction's weak June followed rapid gains in prior months. In fact, on a seasonally adjusted basis, construction was still up by 4,200 jobs, or 5.7 percent, since June 2013.

Several industries had a lackluster June following rapid gains in prior months. These industries include retail trade; manufacturing; leisure and hospitality; and professional and business services. All of these are still up strongly over the year.

In June, health care and social assistance continued its strong growth, with a seasonally adjusted job gain of 1,800. Since June 2013 it has been one of the fastest growing industries, adding 7,800 jobs, or 3.8 percent.

Unemployment
(Household Survey Data)
Oregon's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.8 percent in June and 6.8 percent, as revised, in May. Oregon's unemployment rate has been between 6.8 and 7.0 percent for each of the first six months of the year.

The number of long-term unemployed continued to drop. In June, roughly 40,700 Oregonians were unemployed for six months or more, the fewest since December 2008. Since reaching a peak of more than 100,000 in mid 2010, the number of long-term unemployed has trended downward.

In June, 28 percent of unemployed Oregonians were unemployed for six months or more, the smallest share since July 2009.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Monday, July 21st and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 12th.


The Oregon Employment Department is responsible for releasing Oregon's monthly payroll employment and labor force data. The data are prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The BLS estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other inputs.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this official Oregon series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the October, November and December 2013 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS and are revised annually.

For the complete version of the news release, including tables and graphs, visit: www.QualityInfo.org/pressrelease.

If you need this release in the Spanish language, please contact Eric Villegas at 503-947-1794.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities


Attached Media Files: Oregon June 2014 Statewide Unemployment Rate Release
American Red Cross calls on eligible donors with all blood types to help maintain a sufficient blood supply this summer
American Red Cross Blood Services - 07/15/14
(see downloaded file for a list of upcoming blood donation opportunities in the area)

PORTLAND, OR (July 15, 2014) -- The American Red Cross encourages all eligible blood donors to make an appointment to donate blood soon to help prevent a shortage.

During the summer months, on average, about two fewer donors give blood at each Red Cross blood drive than what is needed to meet the needs of patients. Vacations and summer activities are among the reasons regular donors may not find the time to give. But, patients don't get a vacation from needing blood - the need is constant.

As a national network, the Red Cross has a unique responsibility to help ensure blood is available for patients whenever and wherever it is needed. By donating blood or platelets through the Red Cross, donors may be helping patients in their community or patients across the nation.

Red blood cells have a shelf life of only 42 days and platelets just five days, so they must constantly be replenished.

To learn more and make an appointment to donate blood, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS.

How to donate blood
Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver's license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1812/75963/American_Red_Cross_Blood_Drives_(Aug_1_-_Aug_15)_5.docx
Smokey Bear Awaits Movie Release
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/14
The anticipation is mounting as movie-goers await the newest Disney adventure, "Planes: Fire and Rescue." The animated feature, which will hit theatres July 18, captures the essence of wildland firefighting and will remind all audiences of the devastation fire brings. Smokey Bear, the Ad Council and the National Association of State Foresters have teamed up with Disney to raise fire prevention awareness encouraging folks to take the proper steps when putting their campfire out.

Check out the fire prevention message at: www.psacentral.org/campaign/Wildfire_Prevention/asset/Smokey_Bear$Planes-_Wingman/189280004 .
The 2014 fire season is already proving to be a challenge. Drought conditions persist throughout the region and fire danger has already begun reaching record highs during these early summer months. Fire officials throughout Oregon and Washington are reminding everyone to be extra vigilant throughout the remainder of the summer. By practicing simple fire prevention measures, human-caused fires can be prevented.

If you want to have a campfire, check and see if campfires are allowed where you will be staying. If so, build the fire in a safe area free of vegetation and away from overhanging limbs. The best place for a campfire is in a well-maintained campground complete with established fire pits. Have a bucket of water and shovel nearby at all times. Never leave a campfire unattended and put the fire out before going to bed or leaving the site.

Leave fireworks, exploding targets, tracer ammunition and sky lanterns at home. These items are not only notorious for sparking fires, they are illegal in most areas.

Finally, keep your vehicle on gravel or paved roads free of vegetation. Never leave your car or truck idling along the side of the road over dry grass. When traveling on forest roads, carry a shovel and a gallon of water or charged fire extinguisher.

Let's all be part of the solution in protecting our forests and grasslands from the next human-caused fire.
Refund money awaiting Oregon taxpayers
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 07/15/14
SALEM - Thousands of taxpayers across Oregon have tax refund money awaiting them - all they need to do is cash a check.

The Oregon Department of Revenue has mailed letters to taxpayers in possession of refund checks that haven't been cashed as a reminder to redeem these checks prior to October. "Annually, Revenue sends notices of outstanding refund checks to the taxpayer's last known address," explained Jan Hunt, Revenue's Budget and Finance Manager. "Our goal is to ensure each taxpayer gets their money."

Checks are considered void after two years and are then sent to the Department of State Lands.

If a letter is received, cash the check immediately. If the check has been lost or was never received, the taxpayer should sign the notification letter and return it to Revenue to have the check reissued.

Last year, Oregon taxpayers were notified of $1,850,779 in refund checks that hadn't been cashed. This year, 1,000-2,000 notification letters were mailed. Hunt said the most common reasons for not cashing a refund check are misplacement of the check or having an incorrect mailing address on file with Revenue. She said taxpayers should notify Revenue of any address changes to ensure receipt of all tax-related correspondence.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; or call 1-800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email, questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 1-800-886-7204.
CCB Sweeps Central, Eastern Oregon for Unlicensed Contractors
Construction Contractors Board - 07/15/14
Salem - Construction Contractors Board (CCB) investigators recently showed up unannounced at more than 200 jobsites in Central and Eastern Oregon as part of an ongoing campaign targeting unlicensed contractors.

Six investigators visited nearly 40 communities in late June. They turned up 43 potential violations of construction contractor law in communities ranging from Hood River and The Dalles east to Pendleton and from the Bend area east to Ontario.

The single-largest number of cases, 17 total, involved people working without a license. Another six cases involve contractors who hired an unlicensed subcontractor.

Other violations included contractors who lacked workers' compensation coverage, contractors who neglected to include their CCB number on advertising and contractors who lacked a license to handle lead-based paint.

Anyone who repairs or remodels, as well as those who build new homes or businesses, must be licensed with the CCB. Contractors working on homes built before 1978 need special licensing to handle lead-based paint.

In May, investigators turned up 30 similar violations after random visits to more than 200 coastal job sites.

"We will root out unlicensed contractors," CCB Interim Administrator Berri Leslie said. "Penalizing contractors who work on the fringe of the law levels the playing field for hard-working, legitimate contractors and protects the public."

Licensed contractors must carry a surety bond as well as liability and workers' compensation insurance. Also, homeowners may be able to get help from the CCB to resolve construction-related disputes if they use properly licensed contractors.

Salem staff now decide whether to issue warnings or fines based on the facts of the case and whether it is a first-time violation. A typical first-offense penalty for working without a license is $1,000 with subsequent violations resulting in fines of up to $5,000. Working without a license is also a misdemeanor crime.

Contractors and consumers can report unlicensed contractors and other illegal activity or verify licenses on the CCB's website or by calling 503-378-4621.
###

About the CCB
The CCB is the state agency licensing 33,000 contractors. Anyone who is paid to repair, improve or build a home must be licensed. Learn more about how to have a successful project at www.oregon.gov/ccb.
07/14/14
White River Fire Evening News Release, Monday, July 14, 2014 @ 7:20 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/14/14
Here's the evening news release from ODF Incident Management Team 1 for the White River Fire. Note that this will be the last evening news release for this fire unless something unanticipated occurs. Regularly scheduled news releases will be issued and distributed in the mornings.

****

July 14, 2014 7:20 p.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1
Contact: Brian Ballou, public information officer, (541) 621-4156

-- THIS IS THE LAST EVENING UPDATE FROM THE WHITE RIVER FIRE -
UNLESS SIGNIFICANT CHANGES OCCUR

WHITE RIVER FIRE 65% CONTAINED
Crews working in the steep White River Canyon completed the two remaining segments of fire line around the 570-acre White River Fire early this afternoon. The fire line completely encircles the fire and mop-up is proceeding satisfactorily inside the fire line, prompting Incident Commander John Buckman to declare the fire 65 percent contained tonight.

More than 90 firefighters are assigned to night shift. Their objectives are to continue mopping up inside the north and south fire lines. Night shift crews do not work inside the White River Canyon due to safety concerns. The crews are supported by two engines and one bulldozer.

Tonight, crews will also be adding to or moving existing hose lines so the mop-up operation can proceed deeper into the fire's interior.

A firefighter working inside the canyon on the fire's northeast side suffered a heat-related illness during the afternoon and was transported by helicopter to a hospital in The Dalles for treatment. The firefighter responded quickly to treatment and was released.

As wildfire activity picks up in central Oregon, the incident management team in charge of the White River Fire's suppression has agreed to support the local Oregon Department of Forestry unit, located in The Dalles, with initial attack fire suppression resources should new fires break out inside the unit's protection area. Assistance could include engines, helicopters and firefighters to keep newly reported fires from escaping initial attack.

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Monday, July 14, 2014 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/14/14
The Moccasin Hill fire burns north of Sprague River on July 13, 2014. Photo credit Dennis Lee, ODF.
The Moccasin Hill fire burns north of Sprague River on July 13, 2014. Photo credit Dennis Lee, ODF.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1072/75944/thumb_MoccasinHillFire1_DennisLee_071314PM.jpg
This is an Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Monday, July 14, 2014.

We are posting a number of press releases and photos to our Facebook page, so please check back regularly via ODF social media (Facebook and Twitter @ORDeptForestry) to stay current (http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx).

>FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Two of three ODF Incident Management Teams are deployed on the Moccasin Hill and White River fires.

>Moccasin Hill Fire
The Moccasin Hill Fire, burning just north of Sprague River and northeast of Klamath Falls, is 2508 acres. First reported yesterday at 2 p.m., the fire has destroyed a total of 20 structures, including six homes in and around the Moccasin Hill subdivision. As of yesterday evening, the Klamath County Sherriff Department has evacuated over 100 people from Sprague River Drive and North Arrowhead Lane. The Red Cross has set up to care for evacuees at the Sprague River Community Center. Crews continue to fight the blaze as it burns through heavy timber and brush, with lots of air attack (helicopters) underway, and 231 structures currently threatened. Cause is under investigation. For more information, please follow the incident's website (http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3946/). The Moccasin Hill Fire camp is located at 21910 Sprague River Road, Chiloquin. We're here to help in Salem, and available for all media inquiries, but if you'd like direct local information, you can call the Klamath Falls ODF Office at 541-883-5681 or the SCOFMP Fire Information Line at 541-947-6223.

>White River Fire
Starting Saturday afternoon, firefighters working night and day on the 570-acre White River Fire 12 miles west of Tygh Valley, extinguished remaining hot spots inside the fire's perimeter. Now reported at 45% contained, crews are currently improving fire lines, tightening protection barriers around the blaze, and setting hoses deeper into the area, among many other efforts. The White River Canyon includes very steep terrain, and safety is a top priority for ODF and crew. Fire costs to date: approximately $800,000. Cause is under investigation. For more information, please follow the incident's website (http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3945/).

>Service Creek Fire
The Service Creek Fire, located approximately 11 miles west of Spray, Oregon, burned off of ODF protected-lands on to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) jurisdiction lands, and under BLM protection and responsibility. BLM provided a Type 3 team. Two outbuilding structures have burned.

Lightning strikes across the state have started a number of smaller sized fires in various jurisdictions, including in the Willamette National Forest (contained, and called the Bingham Complex).

Additional fire information is shared in real time on ODF and other web and social media platforms (http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx) as it becomes available.

>OTHER FIRE INFORMATION & LINKS

Oregon Department of Forestry social media
Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr (http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx)

>Other Department of Forestry links
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Pages/fire/fire.aspx#Fire_Weather (Fire Weather)
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/FIRE/fire.shtml#Smoke_Management_Information (Wildfire smoke forecasts)

>Other links
http://www.nwccweb.us/ (Northwest Interagency Coordination Center overview)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov (Sortable nationwide information)
http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx (Statewide air quality index readings)
http://wildfirelessons.net/uploads/6mfs/home.html (Safety tips)
http://www.keeporegongreen.org/ (Keep Oregon Green)

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer pager, 503-370-0403, 24/7 for fire information. The duty officer will call back promptly. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
ODF is responsible for fire protection on about 16 million acres of private and state-owned forest and grazing land, and on certain other public forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Fires may cross ownerships, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger in size or of other significance. It also reports on ODF's major actions as a partner with other agencies.

###


Attached Media Files: The Moccasin Hill fire burns north of Sprague River on July 13, 2014. Photo credit Dennis Lee, ODF.
Media Advisory: Oregon Statewide Unemployment Rate to be Released Tomorrow
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/14/14
Salem - The Oregon statewide unemployment rate for June 2014 will be released tomorrow, July 15, at 10 am.

The Oregon Employment Department will hold a press conference at the Oregon Employment Department Central Office in Salem. The event will take place in the building's auditorium, 875 Union Street NE, Salem, Oregon 97311.

The press conference will be moderated by Employment Department Public Information Officer Craig Spivey and will feature state employment economist Nick Belieciks.

The conference will be video streamed live. Reporters unable to attend the conference in person may submit questions by e-mail at: worksourcecommunications@gmail.com prior to, or during the news conference.

The press conference may be viewed live at the following websites:
http://www.qualityinfo.org
http://www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/COMM/Pages/livevideostream.aspx
ODF News Release - White River Fire Morning Update, Monday, July 14, 2014 @ 9 a.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/14/14
July 14, 2014 9:00 a.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1
Contact: Brian Ballou, public information officer, (541) 621-4156
CREWS REPORT GOOD PROGRESS OVERNIGHT ON WHITE RIVER FIRE
Firefighters working night shift on the 570-acre White River Fire, which started Saturday afternoon in the White River Wild & Scenic Area 12 miles west of Tygh Valley, extinguished remaining hot spots inside of the fire's perimeter. Most of the night shift's work was on the fire's south end and the north end above the canyon.
Crews today continue to improve fire lines, tightening the protective barrier around the blaze, and stringing hoses deeper into the burned area. Teams of fallers are working with firefighters on felling hazardous trees where crews are working.
Hazards are numerous in the White River Canyon - it's very steep and footing is poor, burned trees fall with little warning, and rattlesnakes must always be watched for.
Firefighters working in the Wild & Scenic Area are employing light-on-the-land suppression tactics, which includes felling only the burned trees and snags (dead trees) that pose a risk to firefighters' safety. After fire suppression operations are finished, fire lines will be rehabilitated so they're less visible and more unlikely to cause erosion problems in the fall and winter.
The fire is 45 percent contained, and the suppression cost thus far is $767,428. The cause of the fire is being investigated.
The fire suppression operations are being conducted under the oversight of an Oregon Department of Forestry incident management team. Cooperators include the Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.
Fire suppression resources assigned to the White River Fire include 451 personnel, six helicopters, eight engines, four bulldozers and one water tender.
No structures are immediately threatened by the fire, but there are widely scattered homes, cabins and other structures around the fire's fringe. The nearest community is Pine Grove, approximately 2.5 miles south of the fire.
The Mt. Hood National Forest, Barlow Ranger District, is working with Oregon Department of Forestry to ensure public safety while recreating on the White River. Because the White River Fire is burning on both sides of the river, making the riverbank unsafe and causing visibility problems due to smoke, the Mt. Hood National Forest is asking kayakers to hold off using the Keeps Mill Campground launch site and others on the Forest until river passage is safe.
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July 18 last day for public comments on 2015 health rates
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/14/14
Salem - Oregon consumers have until Friday, July 18, at midnight, to provide comments on proposed 2015 health insurance rates.

The rate requests are available for review and comment at http://www.oregonhealthrates.org/. The proposed rates are for plans for businesses with fewer than 50 employees and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer, which affects about 10 percent of Oregonians. The Department of Consumer and Business Services, Insurance Division must approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders. The division's actuaries conduct a thorough review of the rates to ensure they are reasonable and justified.

"The input we receive from the public is valuable and a key part of our review process," said Laura Cali, Oregon Insurance Commissioner. "We encourage consumers to take advantage of these last few days to weigh in on proposed rates."

Over the past two weeks, the Insurance Division held public hearings for each company's rate request. The hearings are available to watch online at http://www.oregonhealthrates.org/?pg=archived_2015.html.

The division will make decisions on rates by early August with consumer-friendly documents that describe the decisions by mid-August. Plans will be available starting Nov. 15, 2014, to purchase through the federal marketplace, agents, and insurers.

Consumers can sign up for email notifications to be alerted of rate decisions and future filings at https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORDCBS/subscriber/new?qsp=276.
Contractor board finds new administrator at architect agency
Construction Contractors Board - 07/14/14
Salem - James Denno, the top executive at the state Board of Architect Examiners, will become the Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB) administrator on Aug. 11.

The contractor board selected Denno this week after receiving input from staff and stakeholder groups. Denno replaces Craig Smith, who served as the agency's top executive for 13 years before retiring in February. Berri Leslie, deputy administrator of the Oregon Insurance Division, served for six months after Smith left.

Denno has experience in local and state government working in housing, building codes, building energy conservation, and professional licensing regulation. He has served as the administrator of the State Board of Architect Examiners for nearly three years.

At the CCB, Denno will lead an agency that regulates more than 34,000 licensed construction contractors with about 60 employees and a $15.1 million 2013-15 budget. His annual salary is $101,400.

"I will miss the outstanding team at the Architect Board, but I have been very impressed by the CCB staff and board members," Denno said. "They are energized about the future of the CCB and I am excited to be joining them. It is an honor to be chosen to lead their team."

The CCB protects consumers by preventing and resolving construction contracting problems. In addition to licensing contractors and investigating complaints against licensees, the agency educates the public about how to avoid problems on construction projects and mediates disputes between homeowners and licensed contractors.

"In a field of strong candidates, Jim Denno stood out," Board Chair Rob Yorke said. "He has the people skills, regulatory acumen and innovative thinking to propel the agency forward.

"I have every expectation that he will advance the positive momentum started at the agency by Interim Director Berri Leslie," Yorke added. "In his prior roles, Jim has done much for the citizens of Oregon. There will be more to come as he leads the CCB."

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About the CCB
The CCB is the state agency licensing 34,000 contractors. Anyone who is paid to repair, improve or build a home must be licensed. Learn more about how to have a successful project at www.oregon.gov/ccb.
07/13/14
ODF News Release - White River Fire Evening Update, Sunday, July 13, 2014 @ 6 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/13/14
White River Fire Evening Update, Sunday, July 13, 2014

Incident: White River Fire Wildfire
Released: 1:19 hrs. ago

July 13, 2014 6:00 p.m.
NEWS RELEASE
WHITE RIVER FIRE
OREGON DEPT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 1
Contact: Brian Ballou, Public Information Officer, (541) 621-4156

FIREFIGHTERS HOLD WHITE RIVER FIRE AT 570 ACRES
The White River Fire has burned approximately 570 acres of mixed conifer forests, oak woodland, and grass savannahs in the White River Canyon, 12 miles west of Tygh Valley. (The acreage change is due to better mapping.) No structures are immediately threatened by the fire, but there are widely scattered homes, cabins, and other structures around the fire's fringe. The nearest community is Pine Grove, approximately 2.5 miles south of the fire.

There were 380 firefighters assigned to day shift today, and 65 firefighters will be working overnight. The fire did now grow larger today, and is 15 percent contained.

The cause of the fire, which started Saturday, is being investigated.

White River Canyon is designated as a wilderness, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and is steep and extremely hazardous. Suppression tactics inside the wilderness must be conducted to minimize impact on natural resources.

Hotshot crews are working inside the canyon to construct fireline and fell dangerous snags. The south end of the fire will be hit hard tonight by crews doing mop-up.

Helicopters supported firefighters today by delivering buckets of water onto hot spots. However, persistent thunderstorm activity limited their flying time. Five Type II (medium) helicopters will be assigned to the fire on Monday, as well as two Type III (light) helicopters.

The fire is being fought by an Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team led by John Buckman. Much of the land inside the fire area is managed by the Bureau of Land Management as a wilderness area. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has some wildlife conservation land inside the burned area, and several tracts of private land are affected by the fire.

The Mt. Hood National Forest, Barlow Ranger District, is working with Oregon Department of Forestry to ensure public safety while recreating on the White River. Because the White River Fire is burning on both sides of the river, making the riverbank unsafe and causing visibility problems due to smoke, the Mt. Hood National Forest is asking kayakers to hold off using the Keeps Mill Campground launch site and others on the Forest until river passage is safe.

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07/11/14
Health advisory lifted for water contact at D River, Heceta beaches
Oregon Health Authority - 07/11/14
July 11, 2014

Health advisory lifted for water contact at D River, Heceta beaches

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

A public health advisory for contact with marine water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County, and Heceta Beach in Lane County was lifted today by the Oregon Health Authority. The advisory was issued July 10 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from subsequent samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided, and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools and runoff from water frequented by birds, because this can be an indication of increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are Oregon Public Health, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, contact the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program at 971-673-0400 or www.healthoregon.org/beach; also contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Five ways to beat the heat
Pacific Power - 07/11/14
Pacific Power media hotline: July 11, 2014
1-800-570-5838 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Five ways to beat the heat
Tips from Pacific Power to stay cool, use less energy and save money

PORTLAND, Ore. --With forecasts predicting triple-digit temperatures throughout the Northwest over the next week, Pacific Power wants to remind customers to stay safe and use these tips to beat the heat, use less energy and save money.

1. Be air conditioner smart
* Set your thermostat at 78 degrees. This will keep you comfortable and cooling your house below that temperature can increase your air conditioning bill as much as 8 percent.
* Don't turn off the air conditioner when you're gone; instead set it higher, at 85 degrees. That setting allows your air conditioner to use less electricity to cool the house than if the air conditioning has been off all day, but doesn't shut down altogether.
* Use an air conditioner timer; set it to start bringing your home's temperature from 85 degrees down to 78 degrees no more than 30 minutes before you get home.
* Replace air conditioner filters now, then once a month.
* Don't place lamps or televisions near the thermostat; they will impact its accuracy.
* Your air conditioner will operate most efficiently if you trim nearby foliage to allow adequate air flow around the unit.
* Don't block inside distribution vents with furniture or other objects.

2. Don't let the sun shine in
* On warm days, close blinds and drapes, especially in south-facing windows which allow in the most heat.

3. Open windows in the evening and circulate cool air
* Open windows in evening and early morning to let in cool air. Be aware, however, of any safety or security issues.
* Use fans to bring in and circulate cool air. Ceiling and window fans use less electricity than an air conditioner when the compressor is engaged. Running an air conditioner in fan-only mode can also be effective as outside temperature drop.

4. Reduce the heat inside
* Use heat-producing appliances like ovens, dishwashers and dryers in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler.
* Grill outside or use a microwave or toaster oven. A toaster oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a regular oven and releases less heat into the home.
* Turn off heat-generating devices when not in use, including lamps, televisions and computers.

5. Think for the long term
* Plant deciduous trees to shade the south side of your house. Well-placed trees can reduce cooling needs as much as 20 percent, and an air conditioner operating in the shade can use as much as 10 percent less electricity.
* Insulate floors, walls and attics to keep cooler in summer and warmer in winter. Seal and insulate air conditioning ducts that run through unconditioned spaces.
* Get your air conditioner tuned up annually.
* Consider a new air conditioner and other appliances -- new models are more efficient and may lower your electric bill. Look for ENERGY STAR appliances.

For more information and tips, visit bewattsmart.com.

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.
Recreational Boaters Sought for Boat Oregon Advisory Teams
Oregon Marine Board - 07/11/14
The Oregon State Marine Board is seeking interested boaters to sit on one of four boating advisory teams to provide guidance to the agency on a variety of boating related issues. The Boar Oregon Advisory Teams (BOATs) will be comprised of 10-15 members from around the state, and will meet approximately twice a year and occasionally via teleconference/webinar depending on the volume of issues being discussed.

"Agency staff are routinely dealing with issues where we are seeking boater input to determine the range of options and select the best course of action to recommend to the Board," said Scott Brewen, Director of the Marine Board. "These ad hoc committees provide great input, and are particularly useful for geographic-specific issues, but for ongoing statewide topics, these are often difficult to set up and generally meet only once or twice for a specific issue. By having designated teams of interested boaters, we can have an ongoing dialogue about statewide boating issues as they develop and as we attempt to deal with them," Brewen added.

"These teams are informal in nature with the purpose of providing input and advice to staff. The teams are not decision-making bodies, and do not take the place of any Board deliberations or any formal hearings required for rulemaking," said Brewen. "Our goal is that the Boat Oregon Advisory Teams will represent recreational boaters who can tell us what they're experiencing out on the water and then provide agency staff with ideas on how the agency can best address their concerns."

The Marine Board is recruiting for members for the following Boat Oregon Advisory Teams:
* Cruising (includes yachting, sailing, and runabouts)
* Watersports (includes wakeboarding, waterskiing, towed devices, PWCs, sailboarding, and motorboat racing)
* Outdoor Sportsmen (anglers and hunters who use a boat for their activities)
* Paddlesports (team currently exists, however; new member recruitment will being in the summer of 2015)

Meeting timeframes may vary between two to four hours with the following structure:
* Topics will include boating trend analysis, potential safety issues, boater conflict discussions, national trends, and local issues relating to law enforcement, education and access
* Current issues -OSMB staff will provide updates on issues previously identified by boaters
* New issues identified by team members
* New issues identified by OSMB staff
* Each issue will be given a name and number for use as a tracking tool and to establish goals for team members and agency staff.

Meetings are open to the public and public interaction will be encouraged. Additionally, members will be asked to serve a two year term with the option of an additional two years if desired.

All of the meeting agendas, materials and minutes will be posted on the agency website (www.boatoregon.com) and public meetings calendar at www.data.oregon.gov.

If being a member of a Boat Oregon Advisory Team floats your boat, the Marine Board has an online application form available at www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/BoatOregonAdvisoryTeams.aspx.
The digital application deadline is July 31, 2014 by 5 pm.
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State fire marshal encourages fire safety with outdoor cooking (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/11/14
Grill safely
Grill safely
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1062/75858/thumb_Grill1.jpg
With the onset of warmer weather many people will be taking their cooking outdoors prompting Interim State Fire Marshal Jim Walker to urge Oregonians to be fire safe during barbecues and cookouts to avoid tragedy during summer activities. From 2009 through 2013, there were 215 outdoor cooking-related fires in Oregon, resulting in 11 injuries and more than $3.8 million in property loss.

"Cooking outdoors is a nice way to enjoy Oregon's wonderful summers with family and friends, and following a few basic outdoor cooking fire safety tips will help keep it safe," says Walker.

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal offers the following safety tips:
* Only use barbecue grills, smokers and turkey fryers outdoors. Using them indoors or in any enclosed space (e.g. garage) poses a fire hazard and exposes you and your family to deadly gases.
* Keep the grill, smoker, or turkey fryer away from siding, deck railings, and out from under eaves or overhanging branches according to the manufacturer's instructions.
* Grills, smokers, and turkey fryers should never be used on a porch or balcony; including any porch or balcony on an upper level of a building.
* Keep three-foot safe zone around your grill. This will keep kids and pets safe.
* Periodically remove grease or fat buildup from catch trays to prevent it from being ignited by a hot grill.
* Never leave the grill, smoker, or turkey fryer unattended.
* For propane grills, make sure to check the propane cylinder hose for leaks. A light soap and water solution applied to the hose will reveal escaping propane quickly by releasing bubbles.
* Only use proper starter fluid for charcoal grills. Store the charcoal starter fluid out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.
* Never add charcoal starter fluid to coals or kindling that has already been ignited.

"Also, make sure you dispose of ashes properly," says Walker. "Even though ashes may feel cool to the touch, treat them as if they are hot. Soak them with water and place them in a metal container with a tight fitting lid. Store the container away from things that can burn and do not leave it on a wooden deck."

You can download the OSFM grilling safety card on our website at: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/docs/Comm_Ed/2012_SA/1141361_outdoor_cooking_WEB.pdf

There are more resources such as a grilling safety infographic, tip sheet, video, and national data on grill related fires available on the NFPA website at: http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/outdoors/grilling

Follow the OSFM on Facebook and Twitter @OSFM


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Attached Media Files: Grill safely
07/10/14
Walla Walla School District Executive Session No. 1, Public Work Session, Regular Board Meeting, Executive Session No. 2: July 15, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 07/10/14
Walla Walla School District Executive Session No. 1, Public Work Session, Regular Board Meeting, Executive Session No. 2: July 15, 2014 as per the attached agenda


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1288/75849/07.15.14_SB_00_AGENDA.pdf
Correction: Health advisory lifted for water contact at Harris State Park Beach and Mill Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/14
July 10, 2014

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, Oregon Public Health Division, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us; Robert Smith, Oregon Parks and Recreation, 503-390-0639, ext. 227

Technical questions: Tara Chetock, Oregon Public Health Division; 971-673-1496, tara.a.chetock@state.or.us; Aaron Borisenko, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, 503-693-5723; aaron.n.borisenko@state.or.us

Health advisory lifted for water contact at Harris State Park Beach and Mill Beach

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

A public health advisory for contact with marine water at Harris State Park Beach and Mill Beach, both located in Curry County, was lifted today by the Oregon Health Authority. The advisory was issued June 26 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from subsequent samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk for water contact. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools and runoff from water frequented by birds, because this can be an indication of increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, contact the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program at 971-673-0400 or the program's website at www.healthoregon.org/beach; also contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

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$200,000 in Arts Learning grants awarded to 24 arts organizations; Grants support residencies, teacher training and classes
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/10/14
A total of 24 Oregon arts organizations have received $200,000 in 2015 Arts Learning grants to support arts education projects across the state. The grants were approved at the June 27 Oregon Arts Commission meeting, held at Newberg's Chehalem Cultural Center.

The grants range from $4,200, to Columbia Gorge Arts in Education for a year-long fashion and sports equipment design class at Hood River Valley High School, to $12,000, for "The Geography of We: Humans, Wildlife and The Habitats We Share," a Caldera project providing 430 underserved students with intensive, year-long instruction in transmedia arts. Other grant projects include $5,100 to the Ross Ragland Theatre to restore performing arts instruction for second through fourth graders in the Klamath County School District and $7,700 to the Portland Children's Museum to expand its arts learning partnership with the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization.

"The variety of grant requests and projects demonstrates the capacity of art to help students learn," said Deborah Vaughn, the Arts Commission's arts education coordinator. "We applaud the creativity and collaboration behind this year's applications, and are confident that the lives of thousands of students will be enriched as a result."

Arts Learning grants are designed to: support projects that expand opportunities for K-12 students to learn in and through the arts; respond to an arts education issue; provide professional development opportunities to teaching artists, teachers and administrators; promote the arts as integral to a comprehensive education; embed meaningful evaluation practices in the project design; and include sustained and substantive interactions with students over time.
Grant applications are evaluated based on project quality and scope, project preparation and evaluation of student learning.
Organizations receiving 2015 Arts Learning grants, and their project descriptions, are:
Architecture Foundation of Oregon, Portland - $5,700
To support an architects-in-residence program for third through fifth grade students comprised of teacher/architect training and residency preparation, six-weeks of professional architect involvement in the classroom and a public exhibit of student work.

Caldera, Portland - $12,000
To support "The Geography of We: Humans, Wildlife, and The Habitats We Share," providing 430 underserved students with intensive, year-long instruction in transmedia arts. Students will receive instruction in storytelling techniques that range from traditional forms to cutting-edge digital media.

Columbia Gorge Arts in Education, Hood River - $4,200
To support the Design Arts Project, bringing professional artists in the field of fashion and sports equipment design into Hood River Valley High School to work directly with students during a year-long design class.

Eugene Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene - $8,800
To support an after-school, sequential music program that includes in-school enrichment activities, a curriculum aligned with in-school initiatives and intensity of instruction.

High Desert Museum, Bend - $11,500
To support a year-long arts education program culminating in an exhibition at the Museum. An art educator will work in the schools, providing curriculum, materials and instruction.

Hollywood Theatre, Portland - $11,500
To support an increase of the capacity of education programs at Open Meadow Middle school (OMMS) by building out an unused classroom at OMMS to create a state-of-the-art, mobile media studio.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene - $10,000
To support revision of existing teacher resources, curriculum and lesson plans to meet new National Standards for the Visual Arts, Common Core and Oregon Visual Arts Standards.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene - $7,900
To support multidisciplinary arts programs for Oaklea Middle School's sixth grade students including development of ArtCore modules, teacher training, a sustainable, school-wide strategy for the arts, increased capacity to replicate this model and understanding the impact of ArtCore on students' abilities and 21st Century Learning Skills.

Literary Arts, Portland - $11,500To support 44 semester-long in-school creative writing residencies as part of the Writers in the Schools program across Multnomah County.

Majestic Theatre Management, Inc., Corvallis - $9,700
To support an arts enrichment project in partnership with the Boys & Girls Club of Corvallis, Oak Creek Youth Correctional Facility & Organización de Latinas Unidas (OLU), during which stories of young women and girls will be expressed through playwrighting and performing.

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland - $5,100
To support a year-long strategy with Evergreen Middle School in Hillsboro to create a bilingual experiential arts integrated approach for improving learning and teaching, including a teacher in-service, assemblies of bilingual theatre performances, and quarterly bilingual arts instruction.

My Voice Music Incorporated, Portland - $5,200
To support teaching music and songwriting lessons to 103 middle and high school students at three alternative schools: Mt. Scott Learning Center, Elevate Oregon and Ackerman Academy.

Northwest Film Center, Portland - $8,500
To support the GLOBAL CLASSROOM program, bringing the Portland International Film Festival to high school students and expanding professional development offerings.

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland - $6,700
To support OBT L.A.B. (Learn About Ballet) at four schools, providing dance and integrated arts learning through six sessions over a three-week residency period, field trips to OBT studios and in-theatre performances.

Oregon Children's Theatre, Portland - $4,700
To support the Loud and Clear program using theatrical performance techniques to teach public speaking. Teaching artists work with students through four in-school workshops and provide teachers with professional development training.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland - $12,000
To support three-year School Visit Partnerships in providing professional development opportunities, curricula and in-school residencies by OSF actors that include classroom workshops, assemblies and evening performances. Partnerships culminate in a three-year visit to Ashland with travel subsidies, free play tickets and free ancillary programming.

Portland Center Stage, Portland - $12,000
To support youth education programs: Visions & Voices playwriting classes in area high schools, Stage Door matinees and workshops, and the new Alls Fair In Love And Shakespeare outreach program.

Portland Children's Museum, Portland - $7,700
To support an expansion of the arts learning partnership between Portland Children's Museum and the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization through family-focused arts programming such as Family Art Engagement workshops, a Family Art Night at the Museum, and museum access through family passes and a community membership.

Portland Playhouse, Portland - $4,800
To support a Fall Festival of Shakespeare, an after-school storytelling program for middle school students.

Portland Taiko, Portland - $8,300
To support a school residency program using the art of taiko drumming to support teaching in the classroom.

Regional Arts & Culture Council, Portland - $12,000
To support the Right Brain Initiative, a systemic and equitable approach to arts education for K-8 students with direct connections to other core curriculum.

Rogue Gallery & Art Center, Medford - $4,600
To support Elementary Arts Outreach in presenting visual arts education in collaboration with the Medford School District throughout the school year including art lessons in the classroom and on field trips, an exhibition of their art and art kits to take home.

Ross Ragland Theatre, Klamath Falls - $5,100
To support the StARTS Early Learning Initiative, a collaboration with Klamath County School District to restore performing arts to grades 2-4 through residencies in classrooms.

Young Audiences of Oregon, Inc., Portland - $10,500
To support implementation of the Teaching Artist (TA) Studio, a training program to build teaching and evaluation skills for teaching artists in Oregon.

? ? ? ? ?
The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities.
The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.
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Health advisories issued for water contact at D River Beach and Heceta Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/14
July 10, 2014

Health advisories issued for water contact at D River Beach and Heceta Beach

Public health advisories were issued today due to higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County, and Heceta Beach in Lane County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the surf or water running into the surf in this area should be avoided until the advisories are lifted, especially for children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources, such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While these advisories are in effect at D River Beach and Heceta Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 toll-free.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on these beaches because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by these advisories.

Since 2003, state officials have used a federal Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

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Save the date, make plans to attend a Department of Human Services Town Hall Meeting this summer
OR Department of Human Services - 07/10/14
Save the date and make plans to attend a DHS Town Hall Meeting: Planning for Safety, Health and Independence in Your Community.

You are invited to provide input and feedback to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on our priorities and strategic direction for 2015-17 and beyond in the following areas: Child Welfare, Aging and People with Disabilities, Intellectual/Developmental Disability Services, Self Sufficiency Programs (SNAP, TANF, ERDC), Vocational Rehabilitation, and DHS agency operations.

Our community outreach this summer has two goals: first, to report on progress toward our long-term goals and strategic efforts as an organization; and second, get your thoughts and ideas as we plan for the next two years of work. Your input and participation is extremely valuable to us. Please make plans to attend a meeting in your local area -- or to log on for a statewide web-based meeting (if you are unable to attend in person). We need your help and ideas to ensure the safety, health and independence of all Oregonians!

Wednesday, July 30
Portland - Portland Community College - Cascade Campus (room to be announced)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Friday, August 1
Bend - Central Oregon Community College (room to be announced)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Monday, August 4
Eugene - Lane Community College (room to be announced)
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Tuesday, August 5
Medford - Rogue Valley Community College (room to be announced)
10:00 am - 12:00 noon

Thursday, August 7
Statewide -- Web-based interactive meeting, sign-up info & other details to come later.
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Join DHS Director Erinn Kelley-Siel and members of the DHS Executive Team for an informative presentation and lively discussion about where the agency is today and where we are going in the next two years and beyond. Additional information will be coming soon - please forward this message to others who may be interested.

Thank you!

Questions? Please contact DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us
Affordable Care Act Allows Former Foster Care Youth to Remain on Medicaid/OHP until Age 26
OR Department of Human Services - 07/10/14
On January 1, 2014, Oregon began providing Medicaid/Oregon Health Plan (OHP) benefits to former foster care youth under the age of 26. Oregon's program is called the Former Foster Care Youth (FFCY) Medical Program. It is estimated that there are 3,329 former foster care youth in Oregon eligible for the program.

A provision in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allows children/dependents under the age of 26 to stay on their parent's health insurance. Recognizing that children who are discharged from the foster care system as an adult (18-20) do not always have that option, the ACA includes a provision allowing former foster care youth to remain on Medicaid until age 26, regardless of income.

"We are working with our caseworkers, community partners and stakeholder networks to help us get the word out, so these young adults can get enrolled in health care coverage" said Sherril Kuhns, Federal Compliance Manager for the Oregon Office of Child Welfare. "Since January 2014, we have enrolled 544 youth under the age of 26 into the Former Foster Care Youth Medical Program."

Youth can request a FFCY application from their DHS caseworker, Independent Living Program (ILP) provider or FosterClub Dedicated Outreach Representative. Other options include:

* Phone: The DHS Children's Medical Unit (CMED) can take applications over the phone, please call 503-945-5720 or 503-947-2598.

* Email: Applications can be requested or submitted via email 5508.c-med@state.or.us.

* Mail: Applications are also available online on the DHS Independent Living Program website; look for FFCY Medical Program Referral Form. To submit application print, complete and mail application to CMED, 500 Summer Street NE, E-69, Salem, Oregon 97301

* Fax: Completed applications can be faxed to 503-945-7032

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07/09/14
Oregon Air National Guard general retires in ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/09/14
2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-041.jpg
2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-041.jpg
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SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Air National Guard Brig. Gen. Bruce W. Prunk, Special Assistant to the Director of the Air National Guard, retired in a ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9.

Prunk retired after more than 30 years of service. In his most recent position, he was responsible for strategy development, state and federal liaisons, inter-agency coordination, and special duties supporting the 105,000 Air National Guard members nationwide.

He was commissioned in 1983 through the Air National Guard's Academy of Military Science. Prior to receiving his commission, he was an enlisted member of the 142nd Combat Support Squadron of the Oregon Air National Guard. He has served as a social actions officer at both the wing and state levels, and was the 142nd Fighter Wing's Inspector General. In 1996 he was selected to command the 142nd Security Forces Squadron; further proceeding as the 142nd Mission Support Group commander and the vice commander of 142nd Fighter Wing.

In 2006, he became the Director of Staff of the Oregon Air National Guard for Oregon Joint Force Headquarters. He deployed in 2007 to Iraq as the deputy commander of the 732nd Air Expeditionary Group, 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing. Prior to his most recent assignment, he served as the Assistant Adjutant General-Air for the Oregon National Guard; responsible for staff oversight within state joint force headquarters and support to the commander.

Photo Captions:
140709-Z-CH590-016:
Maj. Gen. Daniel Hokanson (left), Adjutant General, Oregon, returns a salute from Brig. Gen. Bruce Prunk (right) during his retirement ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

140709-Z-CH590-020:
Maj. Gen. Daniel Hokanson (left) Adjutant General, Oregon, presents both the Oregon Distinguished Service Medal and the Oregon Thirty Year Faithful Service Medal to Brig. Gen. Bruce Prunk (right) during his retirement ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

140709-Z-CH590-025:
Maj. Gen. Daniel Hokanson (left), Adjutant General, Oregon, presents Brig. Gen. Bruce Prunk (right) with a Certificate of Retirement from the U.S. Air Force during his retirement ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

140709-Z-CH590-031:
Brig. Gen. Bruce Prunk (right) poses with his wife, Janice Prunk, as they hold the Certificate of Appreciation that was presented to her from the Sec. of the Air Force on the occasion of her husband's retirement in a ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

140709-Z-CH590-041:
Col. Rick Wedan (left), 142nd Fighter Wing Commander, presents a lithograph with an F-15 Eagle to Brig. Gen. Bruce Prunk (right) during his retirement ceremony at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Ore., July 9. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-041.jpg , 2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-031.jpg , 2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-020.jpg , 2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-016.jpg , 2014-07/962/75796/140709-Z-CH590-025.jpg
Future of Public Health Task Force meets July 23
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/14
July 9, 2014

What: The eighth public meeting of the Task Force on the Future of Public Health. Agenda items include:

-- Finalize straw model.

-- Discuss workgroup options for implementation.

-- Public comment period.

When: Wednesday, July 23, 1:30-5 p.m.

Where: Association of Oregon Counties Building, 1201 Court St. NE, Suite 300, Salem

Who: The Task Force on the Future of Public Health was created by Oregon HB 2348 to study the regionalization and consolidation of public health services, and the future of public health services in Oregon to make recommendations for legislation.

The task force is made up of 15 members appointed by the Oregon Legislature, the Governor, and the directors of the Oregon Health Authority and the Department of Human Services.

Details: Space is limited. To participate by phone, call 1-888-363-4734, and use code 295577.

Future meeting dates currently scheduled:

-- Aug. 20,Portland, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

-- Sept. 10, Portland, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information about the meeting, contact Michael Tynan at 971-673-1282.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Update: Victim's Name Released: Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 58 east of Pleasant Hill (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/09/14
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Tuesday afternoon's fatal traffic crash that occurred on Highway 58 twelve miles east of Pleasant Hill. The crash involved a pickup and commercial truck, resulting in the death of the pickup's adult male and minor injuries to the truck's two occupants. The victim's name is released in this update.

According to Lieutenant Robert Edwards, on July 8, 2014 at approximately 5:15 p.m., a Dodge pickup driven by TIMOTHY DAVID FINE, age 55, from Oakridge, was eastbound on Highway 58 near milepost 16 when it crossed the centerline and collided with a westbound commercial truck pulling a semi-trailer loaded with computers and tires. The truck and trailer caught fire and was fully engulfed when emergency responders started arriving. The fire spread to brush on both sides of the highway.

The truck's two occupants escaped the commercial truck with minor injuries. Both were transported by ground ambulance to Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend for treatment. Their names are not available at this time and both were released from the hospital.

FINE was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The highway was completely closed while firefighters controlled the fire. One lane was opened after 8:00 p.m. The other lane was closed for several hours while ODOT and a tow company work with heavy equipment to remove the burned truck and semi-trailer, and the pickup. The highway was fully re-opened after midnight.

OSP troopers and a collision reconstructionist from the Springfield Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Trooper Kyle Bachmeier is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by fire personnel from Dexter, Lowell, Oakridge, and Goshen. Additional assisted provided by ODOT, Department of Forestry and Northwest Hazmat, Inc.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75764/070814.fatal.hwy58_mp16.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75764/070814.fatal.hwy58_mp16.3.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75764/070814.fatal.hwy58_mp16.4.jpg
Business Oregon Leads Delegation of Five Oregon Outdoor Gear Companies to OutDoor Friedrichshafen 2014
Business Oregon (Ore. Business Development Dept.) - 07/09/14
SALEM - Business Oregon will lead an Oregon delegation of five outdoor gear and apparel companies to the OutDoor Friedrichshafen 2014 trade show in Germany this week.

Another 13 Oregon outdoor firms will also either appear at the show or promote themselves in the Oregon Outdoor booth. The OutDoor Friedrichshafen show takes place July 10-13 and is considered Europe's premier outdoor industry event. It features more than 900 exhibitors from 40 countries showcasing their products and services.

"Nike and Columbia Sportswear aren't here by accident. Oregon has emerged as a global leader in the outdoor gear and apparel industry, in part because we are the place where customers come to play and to push their gear to the limit," said Business Oregon Director Sean Robbins. "That is why we work hard every day to help Oregon's outdoor gear designers and manufacturers find customers all around the world so they can grow back here in Oregon."

Business Oregon will provide export assistance grants to five firms to help defray their costs of attending the show. Those companies include Oregon City's FixnZip, climbing pack maker CiloGear, climbing apparel maker NW Alpine, stainless steel bottle maker Hydro Flask and ultralight equipment maker Six Moon Designs of Beaverton.

Business Oregon offers matching grants of up to $5,000 to Oregon companies to help defray the expense of traveling to trade shows around the world, and can also provide technical assistance and expertise to Oregon companies seeking export markets for their products.

Since 2012, Business Oregon has awarded 240 Grants totaling $804,303 to 222 different Oregon companies. As a result, these Oregon firms report an estimated $29 million in immediate sales, and another $105 million in projected future sales as a result of the trade shows appearances.

###

Business Oregon works to create, retain, expand and attract businesses that provide sustainable, living-wage jobs for Oregonians through public-private partnerships, leveraged funding, and support of economic opportunities for Oregon companies and entrepreneurs. Visit www.oregon4biz.com for more information on doing business in Oregon.
07/08/14
Oregon crude oil reports now on the web
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/08/14
The Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal, acting in its role as the State Emergency Response Commission, announced today that reports received from railroad companies on the movement of Bakken crude oil through Oregon are now available to the public. The agency announced last week that it would provide the reports through the OSFM website.

The OSFM has previously provided copies of these reports to local emergency response agencies in areas where trains carrying crude oil travel.

Railroad companies are required by federal law to notify counties prior to making any material changes in the estimated volumes or frequencies of trains traveling through a county. The United States Department of Transportation considers an increase or decrease of 25 percent or more in the number of implicated trains per week to be a material change.

The railroad reports are available at:
http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/Pages/SERC/CrudeOilReports.aspx
Consider a New Career as an Adult Foster Home Provider - Pendleton and Surrounding (Photo)
OR Department of Human Services - 07/08/14
Dorothy Jones, Mary Alva
Dorothy Jones, Mary Alva
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/973/75752/thumb_Mary_Alva_AFH.jpg
Becoming an adult foster home provider is an opportunity to open your home to help others. When elderly people or adults with physical disabilities are no longer able to care for themselves in their own homes, adult foster care is an option.

Adult foster homes are single-family residences that offer 24-hour care in a home-like setting. The goal of an adult foster home is to provide necessary care in a home-like setting while emphasizing the residents' independence, choice and decision making.

Adult foster homes provide meals and help with eating, dressing, personal care, walking and/or getting out of a bed or a chair, social needs, and medication assistance. Being an Adult Foster Care provider allows you to make a difference in the lives of others while making a living in your own home. Adult Foster Care providers have the satisfaction of operating their own business.

Mary Alva has been an adult foster home provider in The Dalles since June of 2000. She owns and operates two adult foster homes, Mary Alva Senior Class I, and Mary Alva Senior Class II. She says she "just happened to run into the person who was putting the homes together" after moving to Oregon in 2000. "The person who was supposed to open the homes ended up not being able to. There was an adult foster home training in The Dalles at that time, so I thought I guess this is a good time to open my own business."

Mary came from a medical background and had worked in the medical field in Seattle since 1976. She says her favorite part about being an adult foster home provider is "the satisfaction of knowing we are creating a good home for our community's elders, and it is very satisfying. The residents and their families really appreciate the nice home we provide them. I also enjoy getting to know the residents and their families and learning about the contributions they've made to the community."

Becoming an adult foster care provider offers personal and financial benefits, as you and your family experience the joys of a multi-generational household. Providing adult foster care is ideal for those who wish to work from home, own their own business and provide personal care and services outside of an institutional setting. On-going training is available to help providers grow in their chosen field.

If you are interested in becoming an adult foster home provider, or would like more information, please contact your local Aging and People with Disabilities office.
Within Umatilla and Morrow counties please contact:

The Pendleton APD Office
1555 Southgate Place, Pendleton OR 97801
541-278-4161


Attached Media Files: Dorothy Jones, Mary Alva
Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders....again
Pacific Power - 07/08/14
Contact:
Tom Gauntt
503-813-7291
Tom.Gauntt@pacificorp.com
Follow: @TomGauntt1

Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders....again
Blue Sky is a top 5 utility green power program for 11th year

PORTLAND, Ore.--Pacific Power's Blue Sky renewable energy program has once again received national recognition for its leadership and impact. For the 11th year, the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory ranked PacifiCorp--which includes Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power--in the top five utility green power programs in the entire country.

For 2013, Blue Sky ranks second for total number of participating customers and third for total renewable energy sales through a voluntary program.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Top 10 Utility Green Power Programs for 2013

"Our Blue Sky customers have helped build a market for renewable energy for more than a decade and have helped fund the construction of more than 70 renewable energy projects in our customer communities," said Pat Reiten, Pacific Power president and CEO. "For our customers who choose to voluntarily support the continued growth of renewable energy, Blue Sky is a smart choice that makes a real difference for the environment, sustainability and individual communities.."

At the end of last year, there were nearly 95,000 Blue Sky customers in PacifiCorp's six states. These customers make a difference by supporting more than 634 million kilowatt-hours of renewable energy during 2013, with environmental benefits equivalent to 395,844 tons of carbon dioxide avoided. That's like taking 74,169 cars off the road or planting 9.3 million trees. Blue Sky customers also helped fund dozens of new community-based renewable energy projects. Their participation continues to make a difference today.

In 2013, Blue Sky participation by Pacific Power customers increased by more than 9 percent and Blue Sky funding was awarded to 15 new community-based renewable energy projects. There are currently more than 52,000 Blue Sky customers in Pacific Power's service area in Oregon, Washington and California. A Blue Sky challenge in Medford, Oregon, in 2013 had a goal of increasing participation by 25 percent in that community. The challenge handily exceeded that goal and the heightened awareness continues to spread the word. As of July 1, 2014 Medford enrollment is up 50 percent from before the challenge. A similar community challenge is underway in Roseburg, Oregon this summer.

The Blue Sky program provides an easy and convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy in the region beyond the company's cost-effective renewable resource investments to serve all customers. Blue Sky is Green-e Energy certified by the non-profit Center for Resource Solutions and customers can participate in the program for as little as $1.95 each month. For more information or to sign up, visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll free at 800-769-3717.
###
Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission to meet by phone July 21, 2014 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/08/14
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // July 8, 2014

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Desk: 503-986-0722 // Cell: 503-931-2590

Salem OR - Salem OR - The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will hold a special meeting by phone on July 21, 2014 at 11:30 a.m. The public venue for the meeting is the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department headquarters office at 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301.

The Commission is meeting to act on recommendations to award community recreation grants funded by Oregon Lottery and federal funding sources. The full meeting agenda is available online at http://tinyurl.com/9vy72bo .

Those needing special accommodations to attend should contact OPRD at 503-986-0719 to make arrangements at least three days in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state. Additional information, including minutes from previous Commission meetings, is available online at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/pages/commission.aspx.

# # #
07/07/14
Update #2: Traffic Fatality Count Increased to 4 - Post-Fourth of July Holiday Reporting Period Information (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/07/14
2014-07/1002/75707/OSPBadge.jpg
2014-07/1002/75707/OSPBadge.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/75707/thumb_OSPBadge.jpg
(Updated) Preliminary information now indicates 4 people died in four separate traffic crashes in Oregon during the 78-hour 2014 Fourth of July holiday period between 6:00 p.m., July 3, and 11:59 p.m., July 6. Information regarding a fourth fatal crash was received by ODOT's Fatality Analysist Reporting System (FARS) from Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

The following is a brief overview of the four confirmed reported fatal traffic crashes:

* On July 4, 2014 at approximately 8:31 p.m., an off-road motorcycle operated by a 21-year old Reedsport man crashed in the Loon Lake area off Highway 38 in Douglas County. The victim was not wearing a protective helmet. Douglas County Sheriff's Office is the lead investigating agency.

* On July 5, 2014 at approximately 10:03 p.m., a pickup driven by a 48-year old Madras man rolled off NE Clark Drive near NE Dogwood Lane north of Madras. The driver was ejected and transported to an area hospital where he died later that night from injuries sustained in the crash. Jefferson County Sheriff's Office is the lead investigating agency and reports alcohol appears to be a contributing factor.

* On July 6, 2014 at approximately 12:55 a.m., a passenger car driven by a 16-year old St. Helens girl was eastbound on Highway 30 near milepost 53 west of Rainier. For an unconfirmed reason, the car traveled off the highway and rolled numerous times before coming to rest on its top. The female driver was pronounced deceased at the scene and her 16-year old male passenger had minor injuries. Both were using safety restraints. Oregon State Police is the lead investigating agency.

* On July 6, 2014 at approximately 4:36 p.m., a 92-year old female from Hines died in a single vehicle rollover crash on Steens Mountain Loop Road in Harney County. The driver was using safety restraints. Additional details of the fatal crash on not available. Harney County Sheriff's Office is the lead investigating agency.

During the 2013 Fourth of July 102-hour holiday period, four people died in 4 separate traffic crashes. The deadliest Fourth of July holiday period occurred in 1980 when there were 19 reported deaths during a 78-hour period. Since 1970, a total of 306 people have died in traffic crashes in Oregon during the Fourth of July holiday reporting periods.

OSP troopers reported 50 DUII arrests statewide during this year's holiday period. Last year, troopers reported 60 DUII arrests. Prior to each holiday period, OSP encourages citizens to report possible DUII drivers they spot on the road so troopers or other agency police officers can get into position to stop the vehicle and determine if the driver is impaired. Of this year's 50 reported DUII arrests, eight were the direct results of citizen driving complaint reports to OSP dispatch centers helping troopers get in position to stop the vehicle. Six DUII arrests were connected to injury and non-injury traffic crashes investigated by troopers.

The following OSP offices reported three or more DUII arrests during the holiday period:

* Springfield Area Command office - 11 DUII arrests
* Bend Area Command office - 5 DUII arrests
* The Dalles Area Command office - 5 DUII arrests
* Portland Area Command office - 4 DUII arrests
* North Plains Work Site office - 4 DUII arrests
* Coos Bay Area Command office - 3 DUII arrests

OSP troopers on patrol and fish & wildlife troopers in field also reported arresting 25 people during the holiday period who were wanted on outstanding arrest warrants.

(Note: OSP does not track DUII arrests statistics made by other law enforcement agencies)

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75707/OSPBadge.jpg
Historic cemetery and marker repair workshop to be in Toledo
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/07/14
The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will offer a historic cemetery and marker repair workshop July 26 in Toledo. All of the events are free and open to the public.

The workshop will be at the Toledo Cemetery near the intersection of Skyline Drive and Arcadia Drive from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The free workshop will address marker assessment, cleaning, leveling and repair.

Participants should bring their lunch, snacks, water to drink, a stool or folding chair to sit on, gloves to wear, a hat, sunscreen, appropriate clothing as this is a hands on workshop, comfortable shoes, a pen and note pad and camera if they want to take photos during the workshop.

In conjunction with the workshop, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will also meet in Newport on July 25.

State law established the seven-member commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn about the workshop or to get more information on historic cemeteries visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

###
Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/07/14
The amount paid to people filing for unemployment insurance benefits has increased slightly. The maximum weekly benefit amount an individual can receive will increase to $549, while the minimum amount will be $128.

The change affects new unemployment insurance claims effective on or after June 29, 2014. Those with existing unemployment claims will continue to receive the same weekly amount.

Under Oregon law, each year the Employment Department recalculates the maximum and minimum amounts paid weekly to those filing for unemployment benefits. The amounts are set as percentages of the average weekly wage earned by Oregonians. The minimum unemployment figure is 15% of average weekly wage, and the maximum amount is 64%. Both dollar amounts are rounded down to the nearest dollar as required by law.

The new maximum and minimum payments represent a 2 and 1.6 percent increase respectively from benefits paid over the past year. Over the past 12 months the maximum payment has been $538, while the minimum was $126.
07/06/14
Update #2: Photos - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 30 west of Rainier in Columbia County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/06/14
2014-07/1002/75694/070614.fatal.hwy30_mp53.1.JPG
2014-07/1002/75694/070614.fatal.hwy30_mp53.1.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/75694/thumb_070614.fatal.hwy30_mp53.1.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of Sunday morning's single vehicle fatal traffic crash on Highway 30 west of Rainier that resulted in the death of a 16-year old female and minor injury to the teenage passenger. Both names are released in this update.

On July 6, 2014 at approximately 12:55 a.m., a 1993 Subaru driven by SEEAIRA D. HICKS, age 16, was eastbound on Highway 30 near milepost 53. For an unconfirmed reason, the car traveled off the eastbound shoulder and rolled several times before coming to rest on its top.

HICKS was pronounced deceased at the scene. Passenger SCOTT A. HAMLIN, age 16, received minor injury and was transported by ambulance to PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in Longview, Washington. Both occupants are from St. Helens and were using safety restraints. The car's airbags deployed.

OSP troopers from St. Helens and Astoria offices responded to the scene to investigate. There is no evidence that alcohol or drugs were contributing factors. OSP is looking at driver fatigue as a possible contributing factor. Trooper Billy Bush is the lead investigator.

OSP, Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA), and Oregon Association Chiefs of Police (OACP) remind everyone that while death and injury are of course the most serious of possible consequences of drunk driving, there are other consequences that can affect lives for many years, including loss of a driver license, vehicle impoundment, jail time, lawyer and court costs, and insurance hikes, just to name a few.

OSP, OSSA, OACP, and ODOT offer the following safety reminders to help keep your holiday travels safe:

* Get rested before you are tested. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Be patient and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
* Pay attention. An inattentive driver is a growing safety concern on our roads and an increasing factor in traffic crashes.
* Know before you go: Stay up to date on road conditions by visiting TripCheck.com or calling 5-1-1. Don't use your cell phone to check on this non-emergency information while driving.
* Even when workers are not present, all work zone speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the roadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert.
* Share the road. Don't tailgate and be sure to check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes.
* Be on the lookout for bicyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable users of our roads.
* Always use safety restraints and child safety seats correctly (see www.childsafetyseat.org for free safety seat clinics and proper buckling tips).
* Don't drink and drive; don't be impaired and drive. These can be deadly combinations.
* MOVE OVER if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated.

OSP, OSSA, OACP and ODOT remind every traveling person - bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcyclists and motorists alike - that we all have individual responsibility for keeping our roads safe. Immediately report aggressive, dangerous and intoxicated drivers to 9-1-1 or call OSP at 1-800-24DRUNK (800-243-7865).

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75694/070614.fatal.hwy30_mp53.1.JPG , 2014-07/1002/75694/070614.fatal.hwy30_mp53.2.JPG
Umatilla Man Arrested After DUII-Involved Serious Injury Crash - Highway 207 east of Hermiston (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/06/14
2014-07/1002/75693/070514.hwy207.1.jpg
2014-07/1002/75693/070514.hwy207.1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/75693/thumb_070514.hwy207.1.jpg
A 39-year old Umatilla man was arrested by Oregon State Police (OSP) Saturday evening following a two-vehicle serious injury traffic crash on Highway 207 at E. Punkin Center Road east of Hermiston in Umatilla County.

On July 5, 2014 at approximately 6:15 p.m., a 2007 Chevrolet Silverado pickup driven by ALBERTO PEREZ, age 39, from Umatilla, was involved in a collision at the Highway 207 / E. Punkin Center Road intersection with a 1992 Geo Metro driven by BALDOMERO VALENCIA GARCIA, age 46, from Hermiston.

VALENCIA GARCIA was extricated from his car by Hermiston Fire Department personnel and then taken by air ambulance to Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. His injuries are not believed to be life-threatening.

PEREZ was not injured. Subsequent initial investigation led to his arrest for DUII and he was lodged in Umatilla County Jail. Investigation continuing. Trooper Mark Amos is the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Umatilla County Sheriff's Office, Stanfield Police Department, and ODOT.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75693/070514.hwy207.1.jpg
07/05/14
Oregon State Penitentiary resumes visiting
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/05/14
Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) is slowly returning to normal operations following an incident that occurred Thursday. Regular visiting will resume on Sunday, July 6.

OSP was placed on lockdown Thursday, July 3, following a large fight between inmates in the institution's dining room. An ongoing investigation is being conducted to determine the cause of the incident.

OSP is Oregon's oldest correctional institution. It houses approximately 2,000 adults in custody and is the state's only maximum security prison.


###
07/04/14
State Housing Council Meeting and Executive Session
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/04/14
Date: July 11, 2014
Time: 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Location: North Mall Office Building
725 Summer Street NE, Salem OR 97301 | Conference Room 124a/b
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202; Room Number: 4978330

1. Call to Order and Roll Call
2. Public Comment

3. Draft Meeting Minutes for Approval
May 2, 2014

EXECUTIVE SESSION:
Adjourn public meeting; convene Executive Session; see attached public notice.
Resume Public Meeting [estimated time 10:00 a.m.]

4. Refinance and Restructure Approval
Columbia Knoll

5. GHAP/HOME Grant Awards for Approval
a. Cove Avenue: 1906 Cove Ave | La Grande
b. Quail Run: 20 Erickson Ave | Shady Cove
c. Cypress: 700 NW Cypress St | McMinnville
d. Quartz: TBD Quartz Ave | Redmond
e. New Meadows: 8701 N Dana Street | Portland
f. Spruce Terrace: 840-858 Pershing Street and 641-831 Spruce Street | Mount Angel
g. Andrea Place: 7621 N. Portsmouth | Portland

6. OHCS Agency Requested Budget Briefing

7. Report of the Director

8. Report of the Chair

Adjourn State Housing Council Meeting


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1810/75682/1-2__SHC_ES_Public_Meeting_Notice_7-11-14.pdf
Updated: Name Released - Death Investigation - Drowning off Lincoln City Beach
Oregon State Police - 07/04/14
Note: The victim was reportedly wearing a wet suit and life jacket vest. Information provided also indicates he was an experienced kitesurfer.

***

A 49 year old male died Thursday afternoon after being transported to a Lincoln City hospital following an apparent accident while kitesurfing in the ocean off the beach at Roads End State Park. The victim was identified as an off-duty member of Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVFR).

On July 3, 2014 at approximately 5:00 p.m., Oregon State Police was notified that an adult male was being taken to a hospital in Lincoln City after he was found by a friend unresponsive in the water while kitesurfing. When OSP arrived at the hospital, medical staff had pronounced him deceased after lifesaving efforts at the beach by the victim's friend, responding fire personnel, and hospital emergency room staff.

The victim is identified as WYLIE DALE JOHNSON JR, age 49, from Dundee. According to TVFR, JOHNSON was a firefighter for 19 yrs with TVFR and, most recently, was assigned as a lieutenant at Fire Station 35 in King City.

North Lincoln Fire & Rescue and Pac West ambulance were involved in initial response and transport to the hospitals. Lincoln City police also assisted.

Questions regarding Lieutenant JOHNSON's service with TVFR should be directed to their department.

No other details available at this time.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Driver Arrested After Collision With Parked Police Car Blocking Intersection at Fire Response Scene in Ontario
Oregon State Police - 07/04/14
A 25-year old Ontario man was arrested Thursday night by Oregon State Police (OSP) for DUII and other charges after he collided with a parked Ontario police car that was blocking an intersection where firefighters were handling a fire-related call.

On July 3, 2014 at approximately 10:48 p.m., an OSP trooper was dispatched to investigate a non-injury traffic crash involving an Ontario Police Department (OPD) patrol vehicle at the intersection of SE 7th Avenue and SE 3rd Street. The OPD vehicle was parked with emergency lights activated blocking an intersection when it was struck by 2014 Chevrolet Impala four-door traveling westbound on SE 7th Street.

When the trooper arrived on scene he found the Chevrolet's driver, JAIME MORENO JR, age 25, from Ontario, visibly intoxicated, belligerent and aggressive toward those present at the scene. Subsequent investigation indicated MORENO had taken the car without the owner's permission. MORENO was arrested and lodged in the Malheur County Jail on the following charges:

* DUII
* Reckless Driving
* Recklessly Endangering Another Person (11 counts)
* Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle

The eleven recklessly endangering counts are for the alleged endangerment of 2 police officers, 2 firefighters, 2 passengers in the car, and 5 citizen bystanders who were present when the collision occurred.

He was also cited for No Operators License and Refusing a Breath Test.

The damage to the police car did not require towing from the scene.

No photographs provided for release.

OSP, Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA), and Oregon Association Chiefs of Police (OACP) remind everyone that while death and injury are of course the most serious of possible consequences of drunk driving, there are other consequences that can affect lives for many years, including loss of a driver license, vehicle impoundment, jail time, lawyer and court costs, and insurance hikes, just to name a few.

OSP, OSSA, OACP, and ODOT offer the following safety reminders to help keep your holiday travels safe:

* Get rested before you are tested. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Be patient and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
* Pay attention. An inattentive driver is a growing safety concern on our roads and an increasing factor in traffic crashes.
* Know before you go: Stay up to date on road conditions by visiting TripCheck.com or calling 5-1-1. Don't use your cell phone to check on this non-emergency information while driving.
* Even when workers are not present, all work zone speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the roadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert.
* Share the road. Don't tailgate and be sure to check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes.
* Be on the lookout for bicyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable users of our roads.
* Always use safety restraints and child safety seats correctly (see www.childsafetyseat.org for free safety seat clinics and proper buckling tips).
* Don't drink and drive; don't be impaired and drive. These can be deadly combinations.
* MOVE OVER if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated.

OSP, OSSA, OACP and ODOT remind every traveling person - bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcyclists and motorists alike - that we all have individual responsibility for keeping our roads safe. Immediately report aggressive, dangerous and intoxicated drivers to 9-1-1 or call OSP at 1-800-24DRUNK (800-243-7865).

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
07/03/14
The Oregon National Guard Army Band announces its Summer Concert Series schedule
Oregon Military Department - 07/03/14
The Oregon National Guard Band, the 234th Army Band, is scheduled to perform at a number of venues throughout the state this summer.

The Army Band is Oregon's own National Guard Band and will present "Heroes and Villains," a free public performance for the entire family, featuring:

* Superman March

* Music from Frozen

* Highlights from the Incredibles

* Godzilla Eats Las Vegas

* Selections from Les Miserables

* Marches, Patriotic Selections & More

No tickets are necessary to attend the performances, but arrive early to ensure the best seats in the house.

July 6, 2pm - Liberty Theater, Astoria

July 7, 7pm - Newport Performing Arts Center, Newport

July 9, 7pm - Egyptian Theatre, Coos Bay

July 11, 7 pm - North Medford HS Auditorium, Medford

July 12, 7 pm - Rose Auditorium, Roseburg

July 15, 7pm - Grand Theatre, Salem.

For more information, check the Army Band Facebook page at: facebook.com/234tharmy band.
Oregon State Penitentiary placed on lockdown
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/03/14
Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) was placed on lockdown Thursday, July 3, following a large fight between inmates. Visiting is canceled until further notice.

At 12:20 p.m., approximately 30 inmates were involved in an altercation in the dining room, prompting OSP officials to place the institution on lockdown. No one required outside medical treatment. An investigation is being conducted to determine the cause of the incident.

OSP is Oregon's oldest correctional institution. It houses approximately 2,000 adults in custody and is the state's only maximum security prison.

###
Two Wanted Subjects Arrested After Attempt to Elude on Interstate 84 Between Cascade Locks and The Dalles (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/03/14
2014-07/1002/75661/070314.i84_elude.2.jpg
2014-07/1002/75661/070314.i84_elude.2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/75661/thumb_070314.i84_elude.2.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP), with the assistance of several law enforcement partners in Hood River and Wasco counties, arrested two wanted persons following Thursday morning's high speed attempt to elude along Interstate 84. The attempt to elude concluded without further incident along the eastbound lanes in The Dalles after officers had successfully deployed spike strips on the vehicle that was confirmed stolen from Gresham.

On July 3, 2014 at approximately 9:49 a.m., OSP and Hood River County Sheriff's Office were notified of a white sports car eastbound on Interstate 84 in east Multnomah County traveling at a high rate of speed. The car reportedly had stolen license plates displayed.

At approximately 10:00 a.m., the white 2011 Subaru Legacy four-door was spotted eastbound by Hood River County Sheriff's Office (HRSO) and OSP west of Hood River. The vehicle attempted to elude eastbound at high speeds as other officers from OSP and HRSO moved into position to try and stop the vehicle as it approached Hood River. The eluding vehicle reportedly struck a guardrail near milepost 62 and an officer successfully deployed spike strips near milepost 64. Despite the right front tire being deflated, the vehicle continued eastbound at speeds near 100 mph as other troopers and officers from Wasco County Sheriff's Office and The Dalles Police Department (TDPD) positioned themselves to assist with stopping the eluding vehicle.

Traveling through The Dalles on Interstate 84, TDPD deployed spike strips and deflated the left front tire. The right front tire shredded off earlier and the vehicle was running on one of its rims.

At approximately 10:30 a.m., the driver stopped near milepost 87 in the left lane. Officers stopped traffic in both directions while the two occupants were removed at gunpoint and taken into custody.

The two occupants were identified as driver PATRICIA MARIE MOTLEY, age 30, from Gresham, and passenger AARON JOSEPH SMITH, age 28, from Rosamond, California. Both were wanted on outstanding felony warrants issued out of Clackamas and Multnomah counties. They were lodged at the Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility in The Dalles.

MOTLEY was arrested the following six warrants:
* Fail to Appear - Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle / Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance - Methamphetamine (Clackamas County warrant)
* Theft in the Second Degree (two separate Clackamas County warrants)
* Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance (Multnomah County warrant)
* Fail to Appear - Possession of Burglar Tools, Theft in the Second Degree (Multnomah County warrant)
* Fail to Appear - Theft in the Third Degree (Multnomah County warrant)

She also lodged for the following local charges to be filed in both Hood River and Wasco counties related to the incident:
* Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle
* Reckless Driving
* Recklessly Endangering Another Person
* Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance - Methamphetamine
* Kidnapping in the Second Degree
* Theft in the Third Degree

SMITH was arrested for Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance - Methamphetamine and the following three warrants:
* Dangerous Drugs (Multnomah County)
* Parole Violation (Multnomah County)
* Fail to Appear - Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle, ID Theft, and Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance - Methamphetamine (Clackamas County)

The displayed license plates were reported stolen July 2nd to Beaverton Police Department and had been placed on the stolen car.

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75661/070314.i84_elude.2.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75661/070314.i84_elude.1.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75661/Patricia_Motley.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75661/Aaron_Smith.jpg
15 Oregon arts groups receive $200,000 in Arts Services grants; Grants provide operating support to fund ongoing services
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/03/14
Fifteen Oregon arts groups that provide services to broad populations have been awarded $200,000 in 2015 Arts Services grants to fund ongoing operations. The grants, ranging from $3,000 for Baker City's Crossroads Carnegie Arts Center, Inc. to $33,000 for Portland's Regional Arts and Culture Council, were approved at the Oregon Arts Commission's June 27 meeting, held at Newberg's Chehalem Arts and Culture Center.

Awarded to arts councils and organizations serving diverse geographical areas of the state - including Hood River, Newport and La Grande - the grants recognize groups that encourage all people to participate in arts activities while enhancing the capacity of artists to contribute to the economic, social and cultural wellbeing of their communities. Applications are evaluated based on quality of services and outcomes; organizational capacity and sustainability; and community impact.

"Part of our mission is to empower the groups who are transforming their communities through the arts," said Commission Vice Chair Libby Tower, who chaired the grant panel. "These organizations offer ongoing, high quality artistic programming, outreach programs in the community and opportunities for arts learning,"

The organizations receiving 2015 Arts Services grants are (alphabetically by community):

Baker City: Crossroads Carnegie Arts Center, Inc. - $3,000
The mission of the Crossroads Carnegie Art Center, Inc. is to create opportunities for the entire community to be engaged, inspired and transformed by the arts through participation in classes, workshops, exhibits, mentorships and partnerships - A welcoming place where people meet and the arts speak. The organization's philosophy is "Art for Everyone," which speaks to the motivation and core of their services.

Bend: Arts Central - $10,300
Arts Central was founded in 1976 with the intention of building participation in the arts in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties through arts education programs and arts advocacy. The need for these services continues today and to address them the Arts Center developed and operates a number of arts education programs, most notably the Art Station, Artists in Schools and VanGo. As an arts advocacy provider, Arts Central manages the Deschutes Cultural Coalition and recently initiated the Arts & Culture Alliance and Cultural Byways projects.

Corvallis: The Arts Center - $14, 700
The Arts Center's mission is to integrate the arts into daily life by providing audiences in Benton and Linn counties with a diverse range of services including: thought-provoking exhibitions and events; youth art education programs on-site, in schools and for at-risk youth; and one-on-one art experiences for patients in local medical facilities. These programs work to enrich the lives of a broad cross section of people, leading to increased community livability and cultural vibrancy.

Eugene: Lane Arts Council - $17,300
Lane Arts Council's mission is to strengthen and support the arts in Lane County. Founded in 1976 by a group of artists and arts activists who identified the need for a centralized arts agency in Lane County, the Council is a service-based organization with a commitment to increased access to the arts and serving as a resource for the arts community through three main arts services focus areas: Arts Learning in Schools (artist residencies, arts integration, after-school programs and performance assemblies); Capacity Building for Arts Professionals (professional development workshops, re-granting of city arts funding, fiscal sponsorship and local arts advocacy); and a monthly First Friday ArtWalk in downtown Eugene.

Hood River: Columbia Arts - $14,150
Columbia Center for the Arts' mission is to cultivate the arts in the Columbia Gorge by providing experiences that touch the heart, challenge the intellect and spark conversation. The Center is located in Hood River and serves residents and visitors of every age throughout the Mid-Columbia. Their services advance the mission through: community access to a wide range of arts experiences; the transformative nature of the arts; providing a home for the arts with access for all; lifelong learning through the arts; and artist development opportunities.

La Grande: Eastern Oregon Regional Arts Council - $3,000
ArtsEast's mission is to facilitate and serve the arts, and artists, and to strengthen arts education in Eastern Oregon by coordinating with schools, developing and providing study guides and hiring professional teaching artists to travel to remote schools and teach the arts. The work is motivated by a belief that bringing arts to the classroom affords students a glimpse of the wider world. Using a broad array of partnerships, ArtsEast has been providing support for the arts and artists in La Grande and eastern Oregon for more than 37 years.

Lake Oswego: Lakewood Theatre Company/Lakewood Center for the Arts - $9,000
Lakewood Theatre Company/Lakewood Center for the Arts is a professional theatre company, arts education and arts services provider in Lake Oswego. Their mission is to inspire and nurture a love of theatre and the arts. Their vision is to be the theatre and visual arts provider of choice in the region. Programs include Lakewood Theatre Company, Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts, Lakewood Gallery and Arts Education Classes. Lakewood Center for the Arts' goals include: 1) creation, hosting and presenting high quality programming in theatre and visual arts; 2) producing and hosting cultural community events; and 3) maintenance of its facility. Established in 1952, it is the largest arts provider in Clackamas County and strives to create accessibility, inclusivity and opportunity for all.

Newport: Oregon Coast Council for the Arts - $16,400
The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts manages the Newport Performing Arts Center and the Newport Visual Arts Center. It celebrates, promotes and develops community arts from Astoria to Brookings as a regional arts council. Their services support community arts through technical assistance to arts organizations and artists, the creation of art exhibitions, delivery of youth arts learning, performances, capacity building workshops, marketing and advocacy programs.

Oregon City: Clackamas County Arts Alliance - $10,600
The Clackamas County Arts Alliance's mission is to keep arts and culture central to life in Clackamas County by providing information, training, public art and capacity-building services for organizations, artists in all disciplines, youth at risk, business partners and civic leaders. Their work demonstrates how the arts and creative practitioners support local business, jobs and cultural tourism; build vibrant downtowns and rural centers; and knit people together in community. They attract the people and resources needed to support creative activity all across the county.

Pendleton: Arts Council of Pendleton - $18,200
The Arts Council of Pendleton's mission strives to enrich the cultural climate of the region by fostering opportunities in the arts, with emphasis on youth education, and by providing stewardship for the Pendleton Center for the Arts which was incorporated in 1974. Their facility opened in 2001 following a $1.8 million capital campaign and renovation and is located on Main Street in a 1912 Carnegie Library building. Dedicated to expanding the arts ecology of Eastern Oregon by providing services to people of all ages from all economic levels, most services are offered at no cost to the visitor, student or artist.

Portland: Business for Culture & the Arts - $9,650
Business for Culture & the Arts connects business and the arts to strengthen Greater Portland's culture and economy. The organization's vision is to engage every business in the arts by providing programs to inspire employee engagement in the arts, develop arts leaders and spur increased public and private giving to arts and culture. They enlist business people to advocate for arts and culture; take leadership roles on arts and culture boards; share business skills to advance arts and culture nonprofits; and participate in the region's rich and diverse arts scene. Their efforts result in new patrons, new relationships between arts and business, a diverse pipeline of individuals ready for boards, management assistance and momentum to spur corporate support for arts and culture.

Portland: Regional Arts & Culture Council - $33,000
The Regional Arts & Culture Council's mission is to enrich communities through arts and culture in the Portland metropolitan region by providing grants and services for 50 schools, 250 arts organizations and countless artists of every discipline in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties. RACC is working to realize a vision and environment in which the arts and culture of the region flourish and prosper. RACC provides grants; manages an internationally acclaimed public art collection; raises money and awareness for the arts; convenes forums, networking events and other community gatherings; provides workshops and other forms of technical assistance; and helps teachers integrate the arts into other subjects for K-8 students.

Portland: Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington - $7,200
Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington's mission is to inspire young people and expand their learning through the arts. They serve students by building bridges from professional artists and arts organizations to schools and local communities. They engage a roster of 153 professional teaching artists who bring diverse in-school residencies, workshops and performances to young people. They support the infrastructure that makes arts learning possible with planning, consultation services and fundraising support, including the annual Run for the Arts jog-a-thon. They teach classroom teachers how to incorporate arts lessons into every subject area and school day and offer trainings to improve teaching artists' teaching and evaluation skills and boost student learning outcomes.

Roseburg: Umpqua Valley Arts Association - $14,000
Umpqua Valley Arts Association's mission is to create and foster a climate that supports arts appreciation, participation and education. They host 30 gallery exhibits each year to establish standards of excellence through juried shows and assure local artists the opportunity to show their work. Their educational programs provide 18,000 individual art experiences for K-12 students annually. The organization works closely with stakeholders in the community to establish programs which respond to identified needs. UVAA's core identity is as a community center in Roseburg, but it engages all of Douglas County through outreach. UVAA also hosts the major summer Arts Festival in the region, now in its 46th year, and is the custodian of the historic landmark which is the home for its galleries and classrooms.

Salem: Salem Art Association - $19,500
The Salem Art Association envisions a vibrant and connected community that harnesses the power of the arts and heritage to expand creativity and improve lives. Its mission is to actively engage the community in the appreciation of the arts through contemporary art exhibitions and events, arts education for youth and adults, and the preservation and interpretation of our shared cultural heritage. The Association advances its mission by providing a variety of arts services to Mid-Valley residents, including: (1) Artists in the Schools, which annually serves more than 12,000 K-12 students, teachers, and administrators; (2) High School Art Apprenticeship Program; (2) Hillcrest Art and Literacy Project; (3) Artists' Services initiatives; (4) Salem Art Fair & Festival; and (5) Bush Barn Art Galleries.

? ? ? ? ?
The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities.
The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

? 30 ?
Workgroup of Future of Public Health Task Force meets July 8, 15
Oregon Health Authority - 07/03/14
July 3, 2014

What: A workgroup of the Task Force on the Future of Public Health will meet to discuss and develop options for putting into operation a draft straw model of governmental public health services. The model is being considered by the full task force. Options developed during the workgroup meetings will be brought to the task force's meeting July 23 for consideration.

When: July 8 and July 15, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St.

Who: The Task Force on the Future of Public Health was created by Oregon HB 2348 to study the regionalization and consolidation of public health services, and the future of public health services in Oregon, to make recommendations for legislation.

The task force is made up of 15 members appointed by the Legislature, the Governor, and the directors of the Oregon Health Authority and the Department of Human Services.

Details: Space is limited. For more information about the meeting, contact Michael Tynan, Public Health Division, at 971-673-1282.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Update: Name Released & Photos - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 38 east of Reedsport in Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/03/14
2014-07/1002/75636/070214.fatal.hwy38_mp6.2.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of Wednesday afternoon's fatal crash after a sport utility vehicle went into the Umpqua River as it traveled along Highway 38 about six miles east of Reedsport in Douglas County. The victim's name is released in this update along with previously provided information and safety tips for the upcoming Fourth of July holiday period.

According to Lieutenant Steve Mitchell, on July 2, 2014 at approximately 3:49 p.m., a 1991 Ford Explorer driven by KENNETH RAY RICHARDS, agea 54, from Coos Bay, was traveling westbound on Highway 38 near milepost 6. For an unknown reason, it traveled off the highway into the Umpqua River where it became submerged. ODOT employees came across the crash scene and reported it to law enforcement and local emergency responders.

Douglas County Sheriff's Office and ODOT personnel went into the river and confirmed the driver was deceased. US Coast Guard personnel responded to the scene with a boat and helicopter, and along with OSP Fish & Wildlife Division troopers in a second boat, they searched the river for any other possible occupants. Emergency responders determined the driver was alone in the vehicle at the time of the crash.

OSP troopers from the Coos Bay Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Senior Trooper Dave Timm is the lead investigator. RICHARDS was not using safety restraints.

OSP was assisted at the scene by ODOT, Lower Umpqua Ambulance, Reedsport Police Department, Lakeside Fire Department Dive Team, Douglas County Sheriff's Office / Medical Examiner, and US Coast Guard.

The highway was restricted to one lane for the duration of scene investigation and victim recovery which lasted about 5 hours.

OSP and ODOT remind everyone traveling on our roads that this year's Fourth of July holiday 78-hour period starts 6:00 p.m., Thursday, July 3, and concludes 11:59 p.m., Sunday, July 6. Last year in Oregon, four people died in 4 separate traffic crashes during the 102-hour Fourth of July holiday period. The following safety reminders can help keep your holiday travels safe:

* Get rested before you are tested. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Be patient and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
* Pay attention. An inattentive driver is a growing safety concern on our roads and an increasing factor in traffic crashes.
* Know before you go: Stay up to date on road conditions by visiting TripCheck.com or calling 5-1-1. Don't use your cell phone to check on this non-emergency information while driving.
* Even when workers are not present, all work zone speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the roadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert.
* Share the road. Don't tailgate and be sure to check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes.
* Be on the lookout for bicyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable users of our roads.
* Always use safety restraints and child safety seats correctly (see www.childsafetyseat.org for free safety seat clinics and proper buckling tips).
* Don't drink and drive; don't be impaired and drive. These can be deadly combinations.
* MOVE OVER if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated.

Motorists, bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorcyclists should remember that we all have individual responsibility for keeping our roads safe. Immediately report aggressive, dangerous and intoxicated drivers to 9-1-1 or call OSP at 1-800-24DRUNK (800-243-7865).

Photographs - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75636/070214.fatal.hwy38_mp6.2.jpg , 2014-07/1002/75636/070214.fatal.hwy38_mp6.1.jpg
American Red Cross to hold annual Celebrate Freedom Blood Drive
American Red Cross Blood Services - 07/03/14
All presenting donors at participating centers will receive a T-shirt and whole apple pie

PORTLAND, Oregon (July 3, 2014) -- The American Red Cross is hosting its annual Celebrate Freedom Blood Drive on the Fourth of July at participating blood centers in Oregon and Washington. All presenting blood donors will receive a free T-shirt and a whole apple pie (while supplies last).

Celebrate Freedom - one of the most popular drives of the year - helps to bolster the community blood supply during a time of year when it can be difficult to collect blood. Many families are on vacation during the summertime or busy with Fourth of July barbecues and parties. This event encourages people to make time to donate blood and gives the Red Cross an opportunity to "thank" donors for supporting patients in need throughout the year.

WHO: American Red Cross and local blood donors

WHAT: Celebrate Freedom Blood Drive

WHEN: July 4, 2014

WHERE: Participating Red Cross blood centers include Bend, Medford, Portland, Richland, Roseburg, Salem, Vancouver and Yakima.

MEDIA: For more information, please contact Jared Schultzman at (503) 407-3642
or jared.schultzman@redcross.org.

How to donate blood
Simply call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver's license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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07/02/14
Public comments being taken on proposed Supported Employment Policy
OR Department of Human Services - 07/02/14
Public comments will be taken until 5 p.m. on July 11, 2014 on a proposed Supported Employment Policy for the Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Comments can be presented during a series of public hearings or in writing. The proposed policy can be viewed online at http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/vr.

The policy is being updated to align with the Governor's Executive Order 13-04 and the Oregon Department of Human Services' Employment First Policy. The Executive Order and Employment First Policy seek to increase integrated employment of persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

There are three options for submitting comments:
* By attending one of the public hearings held around the state to provide testimony. It is recommended that you bring a written copy of your oral testimony to the public hearing. The public hearing schedule is listed below.
* By sending an e-mail to vr.info@state.or.us
* By sending your comments by U.S. Mail to:

Robin Brandt, Policy Analyst
Vocational Rehabilitation Program
Oregon Department of Human Services
500 Summer Street NE, E-87
Salem, Oregon 97310-1018

The public hearing schedule is as follows:


July 7, 2014
Medford
8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
JCLS Medford Library
Adams Room
205 South Central Avenue
Medford, OR 97501

July 7, 2014
Bend
10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Vocational Rehabilitation Office
1230 NE 3rd St., Suite A-152
OSHA Room
Bend, OR 97701

July 7, 2014
La Grande
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Department of Human Services
Mt. Emily Room
1607 Gekeler Lane
La Grande, OR 97850

July 9, 2014
Salem
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Barbara Roberts Human Services Building
Rooms 137 B and C
500 Summer Street NE
Salem, OR 97301


ASL Sign Language Interpreters and other auxiliary aids or accommodations are available by making a request in advance by contacting the Vocational Rehabilitation Program at 503-945-5880 or toll-free at 877-277-0513 (TTY users use 711 or other relay service).
Forestry Board panel on federal forests to meet July 8 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/02/14
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
July 2, 2014

Contact: Dan Postrel
503-945-7420
dpostrel@odf.state.or.us


The Board of Forestry's Subcommittee on Federal Forests will meet July 8 in Salem to continue reviewing and prioritizing draft work plan actions.

The meeting will be held from 9 a.m.-11:00 p.m. in the Tillamook Room - Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Salem Headquarters, 2600 State Street. Members of the subcommittee may attend by conference call; the public is invited to attend in person.

Meeting materials are available at www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/BOF_Subc_Fed_Forests.aspx.

Oregon has 30 million acres of forestland, of which more than 18 million acres are federally owned. The subcommittee was formed in January 2013 to explore means of ongoing board engagement in federal forest management issues, in concert with Gov. John Kitzhaber and other public policy leaders.

About the board
The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information about the board is available at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx.

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ODVA Now Accepting Donations Online
Oregon Dept. of Veterans' Affairs - 07/02/14
SALEM - The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs (ODVA) is now accepting online donations to support four funds aimed at improving programs and supporting efforts that benefit Oregon veterans.

One of the funds, the Veteran Suicide Awareness and Prevention Fund, was established in 2013 when the Oregon Legislature passed SB 762 creating a public information campaign to raise awareness and prevent suicide by veterans in Oregon. Part of the awareness effort partnered ODVA with the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles and the Oregon Charitable Checkoff Commission to raise money for this effort.

Federal US efforts have also turned to raising awareness about suicides by veterans. In 2007, a law required the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to increase its suicide prevention efforts by educating the public about suicide risk factors, providing additional mental health resources for veterans and tracking veteran suicides in each state.

In Oregon, between 2008 and 2012, suicide rates among veterans were significantly higher compared to non-veterans. According to the Suicide Among Oregon Veterans report published by the Oregon Health Authority in May 2014, more than 150 Oregon veterans or service members took their lives in 2012. Nationally, it is estimated that there are 22 veteran suicides per day, nearly one every 65 minutes.

ODVA Director Cameron Smith said, "These men and women are proud, proven, committed patriotic citizens who deserve nothing less than the best in care, resources, and opportunities from our state - not as a charity, but as an investment. When they are struggling, we need to be sure they know that they are not alone and that there are resources available."

Besides the Suicide Awareness and Prevention Fund, donors can choose to support other funds including the Oregon Veterans Homes, the Oregon Veteran Support Fund, and Oregon Women Veterans.

"For the first time in ODVA's history, we are striving to serve veterans spanning four generations and five major wars. With more than 320,000 veterans in Oregon, we are serving an increasingly diverse veterans' population that has significant needs," Smith said. "For those most impacted by their military service, we must understand their tenacious spirit and respond to their changing needs. Donations to ODVA help make that possible"

To make a tax deductible donation online to any of these programs, go to: www.oregon.gov/odva
Update: Deceased Driver Identified Related to June 23, 2014 Fatal Crash - Highway 18 east of Otis in Polk County
Oregon State Police - 07/02/14
The Polk County Medical Examiner confirmed positive identification of a driver killed in a June 23, 2014, on Highway 18 about seventeen miles east of Otis. Both vehicles caught fire following impact and the deceased's identity was confirmed using dental records.

The deceased driver was identified as JASON E. MACHADO, age 22, from Salem.

On June 23, 2014 at approximately 11:16 p.m., a 1997 Ford Escort driven by MACHADO was traveling eastbound on Highway 18 near milepost 18. For an unconfirmed reason, the Ford Escort crossed the centerline and collided with a westbound Mercedes sport utility vehicle occupied by two people. The Ford Escort was split into two sections and both vehicles caught fire.

The two occupants of the Mercedes got out of the Mercedes on their own and were later transported by ground ambulance to Salem Hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries. MACHADO was deceased at the scene.

The fire also spread to the side of the highway. The fire to both vehicles and along the highway was extinguished by responding firefighters.

OSP troopers from the Newport Area Command office are continuing the investigation.

Previously released information available at: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/NEWSRL/Pages/news/06_24_2014_fatal_hwy18_mp18.aspx

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
07/01/14
Replica of Lincoln's Second Inaugural Coat Added to Exhibit at the Oregon History Museum (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 07/01/14
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Portland, OR - To kick off the Fourth of July weekend, the Oregon History Museum has announced a new addition to its original exhibition, 2 Years, 1 Month: Lincoln's Legacy. Thanks to local collector and philanthropist Pete Mark, the Oregon History Museum has secured from Brooks Brothers the replica of the embroidered "Great Coat" the retailer made for Abraham Lincoln for his second inauguration, which he was also wearing when he was assassinated just six weeks later. The Great Coat will be on display for a limited time only through July 31, 2014.

Working in conjunction with Ford's Theater, Brooks analyzed each component of the original coat to maintain authenticity when recreating the garment they first created in 1864. A special feature of the coat's quilted lining is an embroidered eagle with a pennant in its beak bearing the inscription "One Country, One Destiny." This coat was made in Brooks Brothers' workrooms, just as the original was almost 150 years ago.

The Oregon History Museum will be closed on Friday, July 4 in observance of the holiday, but will reopen on Saturday, July 5. Regular museum hours are Monday - Friday from 10 AM - 5 PM and Sunday from Noon - 5 PM, and admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.

About 2 Years, 1 Month: Lincoln's Legacy
The exhibit features extremely rare documents and artifacts from the Mark Family Collection, the Shapell Manuscript Foundation, and the holdings of the Oregon Historical Society. Visitors to the exhibit have the opportunity to see a first printing of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln; a House of Representatives official copy of the Thirteenth Amendment, personally signed by the then members of Congress and United States Senators; military uniform shoulder straps worn by General William T. Sherman, the actual pen that President Lincoln used in 1862 to sign the Act of Emancipation for the Territories , and pieces of fabric from both the coat that Lincoln was wearing and the seat in which he was sitting the night he was assassinated at Ford's Theater. In addition, the exhibit includes numerous Civil War-era costumes that were worn by actors in director Steven Spielberg's Academy Award winning movie, Lincoln.

The exhibit also features a touch-screen video game, "Lincoln's Challenge," which allows visitors to test their knowledge of America's 16th President and the Civil War. 2 Years, 1 Month will be on display until October 6.



About the Oregon History Museum at the Oregon Historical Society
Since 1898, the Society has served as Oregon's primary research collection and museum about Oregon history. OHS has an extensive collection of historical pieces, including over 85,000 artifacts and 3 million photographs and films. It safeguards and presents Oregon's history through a museum, research library, academic journal, school programs, and website content.
The Oregon History Museum is located at 1200 SW Park Avenue in downtown Portland. Museum hours are Monday - Saturday from 10 AM - 5 PM and Sunday from Noon - 5 PM. Admission is always free for Multnomah County residents. Visitor information and a list of current exhibits can be found at WWW.OHS.ORG.


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/2861/75587/Lincoln_Coat_005.jpg
County advisory group for state forestry to meet July 8 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/01/14
A group of county commissioners representing Oregon counties that, in the past, deeded forestland to the state for management will meet on Tuesday, July 8, in Salem.

Items on the Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee's (FTLAC) agenda include an alternative forest management plan update, including discussion on the science team review process and the July Board of Forestry state forests tour in northwest Oregon. The committee will also look at State Forests Division policy option packages, proposed for the 2015 legislative session.

The meeting will be held from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters in the Santiam Room - Building D, 2600 State St., in Salem.

FTLAC meetings are open to the public, and an opportunity for public comment will be provided around 1:15 p.m.

The FTLAC is a legally mandated committee of county commissioners representing counties that deeded lands to the state. The committee advises the Board of Forestry on matters in which counties may have a responsibility related to forestland managed by ODF.

Counties depend on revenue generated from management activities on these lands. The revenue is used primarily for local schools and also helps fund county government and local taxing districts.

The FTLAC is made up of seven members representing the 15 counties that have state forest land within their county boundaries. The trust counties include: Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Douglas, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Washington.

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Update #2: Photo - Double Fatal Crash Highway 101 north of Bandon in Coos County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/01/14
2014-07/1002/75562/063014.fatal.hwy101_mp253.1.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-07/1002/75562/thumb_063014.fatal.hwy101_mp253.1.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the double fatal crash that occurred on Highway 101 in Coos County north of Bandon. The crash resulted in the death of a San Francisco woman and the death of a Bandon man. Names of the deceased are provided in this update.

On June 30, 2014, at about 3:30 p.m., a Honda Accord driven by DONALD WILLIAM DODGE, age 80, from Bandon, was southbound on Highway 101 near milepost 253. A Honda Element driven by VIRGINIA SIMPSON WOODSON, age 64, from San Francisco, California, was northbound at the same location. For unknown reasons, the Honda Accord crossed into the northbound lane and crashed nearly head-on into the Honda Element. Both the drivers died from their injuries at the scene of the crash.

OSP troopers from the Coos Bay Area Command are continuing their investigation into the cause of the crash. Seat belt usage is still being determined by investigators. Highway 101 was closed for about 3 hours and was restricted to one lane for about an hour during the investigation. Trooper Josh Mullins in the lead investigator.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Bandon Fire Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Coos County District Attorney's Office, Coos County Medical Examiner's Office, Bandon Police Department, Myrtle Point Police Department, and North Bend Police Department.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-07/1002/75562/063014.fatal.hwy101_mp253.1.jpg
06/30/14
Take geology on the trail with mobile maps
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/30/14
PORTLAND, Ore. - New mobile maps put the geology of Oregon's volcanic peaks into the hands of hikers.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is offering its geologic guide and recreation map series as mobile maps through the PDF Maps app for Apple and Android. The series, available for Mount Hood, Crater Lake, and Three Sisters, offers trailside geology along with must-have details like distance, elevation and amenities.

"Hiking is an amazing way to experience Oregon's geology," says Daniel E. Coe, the maps' cartographer. "With mobile maps, you can capture that experience, from exactly where you took that lava flow photo to marking the best viewpoints."

The mobile maps get a boost with features like tracking location on the map, measuring distance, adding geotagged photos, and dropping placemarks at points of interest. Maps are also downloaded to the mobile device, making multiple maps easy to access.

The map series features new-generation maps created with lidar technology for the ultimate in outdoor exploration. The Mount Hood and Three Sisters maps include distances and elevations for 70-plus trails, including the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Crater Lake map shows distances and elevations for all park trails, including the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. Maps also include features like highways, service roads, wilderness areas, and recreation spots.

To get the maps, download the free PDF Maps app from Apple or Android app stores, then search the in-app Map Store for DOGAMI. Two map sides are available for each destination; each side is 99 cents. The series is also available as a double-sided folding map on water-resistant paper for $6 from the Nature of the Northwest Information Center, www.naturenw.org.

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Editorial note: Review copies of the mobile maps are available as geo-referenced PDFs that can be uploaded into the PDF Maps app.
OMSI Update: July-August Exhibits, Events and Shows
OMSI - 06/30/14
OMSI EXHIBITS, EVENTS & SHOWS UPDATE
July & August 2014

OMSI HOURS
Monday - Sunday; 9:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

FEATURED EXHIBITIONS

Dinosaurs Unearthed
In OMSI's Featured Hall
On View May 23 - September 2

Stare the mighty T. rex in the eye this summer at OMSI--and it might just blink back. Featuring animatronic dinosaurs and complete skeletons, Dinosaurs Unearthed uses the latest in fossil evidence to take a captivating look at the dinosaurs' fascinating--and feathered--history. Set amongst naturalistic indoor landscapes, fifteen animatronic models will challenge guests' understanding of how their favorite dinosaurs lived and looked during prehistoric times. Dinosaurs Unearthed is designed to appeal to guests of all ages.

Local Supporting Sponsors of Dinosaurs Unearthed includes Chevron, Baird Private Wealth Management and in memory of Judy Forster, OMSI Trustee 1955-1959.

Tickets:
Adult $13; Free to Members
Youth (3-13)/Senior (63+) $9.50
Prices include admission to the museum.

EXHIBITIONS

Mind to Hand: Art, Science, and Creative Collision!
In Turbine Hall
On view through September 28
What sparks creativity? What does art have to tell us about science? How does science inspire artistic decisions? In the hands of eleven talented master artists 60+ years old, materials become objects of beauty, whimsy and wit. Mind to Hand explores the benefits, exciting outcomes and new ways to see our world when art and science collide!

NEW INFO
Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science.
In the Earth Hall
On view through December 8
Native American and native Hawaiian communities face many challenges to their ecosystems and their health. By drawing from traditional knowledge and science, native communities are developing innovative solutions to tackle current ecological and health challenges. Roots of Wisdom is the result of collaboration between OMSI, Indigenous Education Institute (IEI), and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) with four native community partners.

EVENTS

Reel Science
Watch and learn at the Empirical Theater as OMSI brings the science of your favorite movies to life on the big screen. Perfect for science and film lovers alike, this series combines the best of Science Pub with the fun of movie night, bringing in experts to amplify your movie-watching experience.
Cost: $7 for non-members & $6 for members.

NEW INFO
July 9, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Reel Science: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
With Jose Vazquez-Bello, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy and Physics at Washington State University, Vancouver

NEW INFO
July 22, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Reel Science: Fed Up
Speaker information coming soon.

NEW INFO
August 13, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Reel Science: Jaws
Speaker information coming soon.

June 30, 7 - 9:30 p.m.
Science on Screen: Short Circuit
At the Hollywood Theater
Featuring Dave Shinsel, creator of 70-lb. humanoid robot, Loki
Science on Screen is a popular nationwide program funded by the Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to expand film and scientific literacy. This ongoing series will creatively pair screenings of classic, cult and documentary films with lively presentations by notable science and technology experts. Each film is used as a jumping-off point for the speaker to introduce current research or technological advances in a manner that engages popular culture audiences.

NEW INFO
OMSI Star Party: Lunar Viewing
Saturday, July 12, at approx. 9:00 p.m. at Rooster Rock State Park and L.L. "Stub" Stewart State Park
Cost: FREE with $5 parking per vehicle fee
Because Earth's moon will be in a perfect position for viewing, OMSI, the Rose City Astronomers and Vancouver Sidewalk Astronomers have organized free Star Parties at Rooster Rock State Park and Stub Stewart State Park starting at 9:00 pm. From beginners to experts of all ages, here's your opportunity to view the moon, stars and other celestial objects up close and personal through telescopes. On the scheduled day of each OMSI Star Party, it is suggested that interested visitors call the OMSI Star Parties Hotline, (503) 797-4000 #3 then #5, or check the OMSI website for possible weather-related cancellations.

July 19, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Drive Revolution: The Future of Transportation
OMSI Parking Lot
Drive Revolution showcases the latest in sustainable transportation options in bikes, cars, public transportation and more. Audiences will have hands-on opportunities to learn about the newest engineering techniques and sustainable choices for the future. OMSI is dedicated to inspiring learners of all ages to gain a deeper knowledge of the science around them, in fun and informal educational settings. Drive Revolution is helping us take new steps in public education around alternative transportation and the innovation and engineering around them!

NEW INFO
OMSI Star Party: Perseid Meteor Shower Watch
Tuesday, August 12, at approx. 9:00 p.m. at Rooster Rock State Park and L.L. "Stub" Stewart State Park
Cost: FREE with $5 parking per vehicle fee
Hundreds of star lovers from across the Pacific Northwest will be meeting at both Rooster Rock State Park and Stub Stewart State Park to watch and enjoy the wonder of the Perseid Meteor Shower. The event, also sponsored by Rose City Astronomers and Vancouver Sidewalk Astronomers, will have telescopes set up for attendees to use. OMSI staff will be presenting informal talks about the meteor shower, constellations and the summer sky. On the scheduled day of each OMSI Star Party, it is suggested that interested visitors call the OMSI Star Parties Hotline, (503) 797-4000 #3 then #5, or check the OMSI website for possible weather-related cancellations.

Theory Eatery

NEW INFO
Better Bites
An evening to spark your thoughts and ignite your taste buds--sound appetizing? OMSI is offering Better Bites, a series of seasonal, health-centered cooking demonstrations by local chefs addressing the latest culinary topics and trends. With a focus on cooking for specific health solutions, Better Bites includes health and nutritional trips from a naturopathic physician from National College of Natural Medicine.
Cost: $25

Tuesday, July 29, 6 - 8 p.m.
Better Bites: Grain-Free Cooking
We're talking grain-free cooking. Enjoy a small-plate, four-course meal with cooking demonstrations by Chef Abby Fammartino of Abby's Table and nutritional information from Dr. July Briley, ND of NCNM.
Food will be 100% gluten free, but will not be prepared in a gluten-free kitchen.

Food Luminary
Foodies and science lovers, dinner is served! Taste the best of the PDX food scene without the lines, but with the science, of course. From the delectable four-course meal to the food-science demonstrations, Food Luminary puts a twist on your typical restaurant experience. 21+ years only.
Cost: $60 (includes dinner, beverages and gratuity)
NEW INFO
Thursday, August 21, 6 - 9 p.m.
Food Luminary Dinner: Crown Paella
Executive Chef Scott Ketterman
Stir things up for dinner--with a giant wok on the Theory patio! Learn the secrets behind this challenging and delicious dish.

NEW INFO
August 28, 6 - 9 p.m.
Blind Tasting Bingo
In partnership with Ecotrust and Edible Portland, OMSI is hosting Blind Tasting Bingo, a game of sensory deprivation and heightened exploration. Players--eyes covered--will try to match the flavors from 14 small plates with the ingredients listed on a bingo board that includes both correct and false answers. A few lucky winners will receive a prize!

OMSI After Dark
Enjoy child-free, brain-building science fun featuring live demos, new exhibitions and old favorites! Guests can indulge in tasty snacks, sweets and beer and wine from regional food and beverage artisans. 21+ only, IDs required. OMSI.edu/afterdark

OMSI After Dark is held the last Wednesday of every month.
Cost: $13 regular admission; $6.50 for OMSI members; FREE for OMSI After Dark members.

Get a head start on the science fun--drink up at happy hour starting at 5 p.m. in OMSI's eatery, Theory! The event takes place before OMSI After Dark each month and features a special menu including stone hearth pizza and local beer and wine.

July 30, 7 - 11 p.m.
Out of This World: Astronomy
Look up this summer and glimpse into the study of the stars with OMSI.

NEW INFO
August 27, 7 - 11 p.m.
Under the Sea
Getting to the bottom of the ocean with OMSI.

OMSI Science Pub
Science Pub is a monthly event held in multiple locations throughout the state and is open ages 21+ or minor with adult. No RSVP or scientific background is required. Just bring your curiosity, sense of humor, and appetite for food, drinks and knowledge!

Science Pub Portland - Hollywood Theater
The Hollywood Theater, 4122 NE Sandy Blvd, Portland
Cost: $5.00 suggested cover charge
omsi.edu/sciencepubportland


July 7, 7 - 9 p.m.
The Inevitable Robot Uprising
With Daniel Wilson, Ph.D., author and robotics engineer

NEW INFO
August 4, 7 - 9 p.m.
Drones, Big Data, and the Next Agricultural Revolution
With Ryan Jenson, MS, mechanical engineer, CEO & Co-Founder, HoneyComb Corporation

Science Pub Portland - Crystal Ballroom
Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St, Portland
Note: Due to programming changes at the Mission Theater, this series of Science Pub relocated to the Crystal Ballroom starting in June.
Cost: $5.00 suggested cover charge
omsi.edu/sciencepubportland.

July 15, 7 - 9 p.m.
House of Wisdom: The Influence of Islamic Science on Western Culture
With Jonathan Lyons, Ph.D., author

NEW INFO
August 19, 7 - 9 p.m.
Creating Digital Worlds: The Tech Behind the Pixels
With Cooper Johnson (Cardboard Castle), Damon Redmond CCC DMC), and J Bills (VFX/PDX)

Science Pub Hillsboro
Venetian Theatre & Bistro, 253 E. Main Street, Hillsboro, Oregon 97123
Cost: $5.00 suggested cover charge
omsi.edu/sciencepubhillsboro.

July 28, 7 - 9 p.m.
Dynamic Geology of Oregon
With Scott Burns, Professor Emeritus of Geology at Portland State University

NEW INFO
August 25, 7 - 9 p.m.
Winemaking: Art Versus Science
With James Frey, winemaker and owner at Trisaeturn Winery

Science Pub Eugene
Cozmic Pizza, 199 W 8th Ave., Eugene, OR (Inside The Strand at 8th and Charnelton)
Co-presenters of Science Pub Eugene are OMSI (omsi.edu), The Science Factory (sciencefactory.org) and the University of Oregon's College of Arts & Sciences (cas.uoregon.edu).
Cost: $5.00 suggested cover charge.
omsi.edu/sciencepubeugene.


July 10, 7 - 9 p.m.
Origin of Life in Soil
With Greg Retallack, Ph.D., Professor of Geology, University of Oregon

NEW INFO
August 14, 7 - 9 p.m.
Astronomy in Oregon: Boldly Going Where Few Astronomers Dare to Tread
With Scott Fisher, Ph.D., astronomy lecturer in the Department of Physics, U of O

$2 DAYS AT OMSI
Explore the museum for only $2 per person the first Sunday of every month. Support comes from local sponsor Spirit Mountain Community Fund.

July 6
August 3

THE EMPIRICAL THEATER AT OMSI
For more information, visit: omsi.edu/empirical-theater
Named for knowledge gained through observation, the Empirical Theater emphasizes programming that engages and entertains visitors on educational, scientific and cultural topics. With a new giant screen, Dolby Atmos sound system and 3D capability, the theater is expanding the tradition of offering the latest in high-quality informative and entertaining films for all ages.

NEW INFO
Godzilla
Coming Soon
An epic rebirth to Toho's iconic Godzilla, this spectacular adventure pits the world's most famous monster against malevolent creatures who, bolstered by humanity's scientific arrogance, threaten our very existence.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier
Playing June 2
After the cataclysmic events in New York with The Avengers, Steve Rogers--aka Captain America--retires to a quiet life in Washington, D.C.. But when a S.H.I.E.L.D. colleague comes under attack, Steve becomes embroiled in a web of intrigue that threatens to put the world at risk. As the full scope of the villainous plot is revealed, Captain America and the Black Widow enlist the help of a new ally, the Falcon. However, they soon find themselves up against an unexpected and formidable enemy--the Winter Soldier.

Bears
An epic story of breathtaking scale, Disneynature's new True Life Adventure showcases a year in the life of a bear family as two impressionable young cubs are taught life's most important lessons. Set against a majestic Alaskan backdrop, Bears captures the fast-moving action and suspense of life in one of the planet's last great wildernesses.

Dinosaurs Alive 3D
A global adventure of science and discovery featuring the earliest dinosaurs of the Triassic Period to the monsters of the Cretaceous Period "reincarnated" life-sized for the giant screen. Narrated by Michael Douglas, the film uses state-of-the-art CGI to bring dinosaurs, their behaviors, and their ancient environments to life. Witness dinosaurs locked in mortal combat, nesting in colonies, protecting their young and facing catastrophic forces of nature. Interwoven is a real-life scientific adventure that looks at the field of paleontology and the discoveries that have revolutionized our understanding of these creatures that once dominated the Earth.

Flying Monsters 3D
220 million years ago, dinosaurs were beginning their domination of Earth, but another group of reptiles was about to make an extraordinary leap: pterosaurs were taking control of the skies. The story of how and why these mysterious creatures took to the air is more fantastical than any fiction. Sir David Attenborough, the world's leading naturalist, sets out to uncover the truth about the enigmatic pterosaurs, whose wingspans of up to 40 feet were equal to that of a modern day jet plane. Audiences of all ages will be in awe as never before.

Sea Monsters 3D
Sea Monsters 3D brings to life the most bizarre, ferocious and fascinating creatures to ever inhabit Earth's oceans, from saber-toothed fish to ancient sharks and giant squid. Combining state-of-the-art animation with exciting paleontological discoveries, this National Geographic production will take you on an unforgettable journey to an era when reptiles ruled the oceans as well as the land.

Great White Shark
Unraveling the mystery of a creature that haunts our imaginations, Great White Shark explores this iconic predator's much maligned reputation as it takes viewers around the world to tell the true story of the great white's threatened role atop the oceanic food chain.

Mysteries of the Unseen World
In the National Geographic tradition of powerful natural-history images and storytelling, Mysteries of the Unseen World reveals once-invisible dimensions of nature that are filled with beauty and wonder--and hold secrets crucial to our survival.

Flight of the Butterflies 3D
A scientific adventure story about the remarkable Monarch butterfly which makes one of the longest migrations on Earth with pinpoint navigational accuracy to a secluded place it has never been. Follow the monarchs' perilous and extraordinary journey through the story of an intrepid scientist's 40-year search to find their remote hideaway in the mountains of Mexico.

PLANETARIUM SHOWS
For more information, visit: omsi.edu/planetarium

To Space and Back
Now Showing Daily at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.; Sat-Sun at 11:30 a.m.
Space exploration--our greatest adventure--is having a big impact on our lives. Discoveries made through space exploration are helping us discover a universe of unimaginable scale and beauty, and it is reaching down into our world and influencing the way we live. To Space and Back, narrated by James May, takes audiences on an incredible journey from the far reaches of our known universe to our own planet. It is an extraordinary story of human ingenuity and incredible engineering, describing how the technology that transports us through space is paving the way for the devices and apps we use every day. Discover how we've been changed by space exploration, and what we owe to curiosity and the spirit of discovery.

Perfect Little Planet
Now Showing Daily at 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.; Sat-Sun at 4:30 p.m.
Imagine the ultimate space vacation! Discover our solar system through a new set of eyes--a family from another star system seeking the perfect vacation spot. Fly over the surface of Pluto, our best known dwarf planet. Dive over the ice cliffs of Miranda. Sail through the rings of Saturn. Feel the lightning storms of Jupiter. Walk on the surface of Mars. Which destination would you choose? A solar system journey for space travelers of all ages.

Starry Nights LIVE!
Now Showing Daily at 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.; Sat-Sun at 4:00 p.m.
Showing Daily at 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.; and 4:00 p.m. starting June 14
Learn about the interesting stories of the constellations and others in this live presentation in OMSI's Kendall Planetarium. It is not just stars in the night sky--planets, constellations, zodiac, shooting stars, and satellites are all there if you know when and where to look. Navigate by the stars and discover how you can become a backyard astronomer. Topics will change monthly and graphics will be programmed accordingly. All shows are hosted and narrated live by OMSI planetarium staff.

MATINEE LASER SHOWS

Laser Movie Madness
Showing Daily at 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.; Sat-Sun at 11:00 a.m.
Music from the movies is brought to life in Laser Movie Madness, featuring a compilation of soundtrack favorites set to spectacular lasers. Song selections include the Theme from Jurassic Park, Circle of Life from the Lion King, music from Tron: Legacy and more.
"Circle of Life" from The Lion King (Carmen Twillie), Theme from Jurassic Park (John Williams), "Derezzed" from Tron: Legacy (Daft Punk), "The Galaxy Song" from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (Eric Idle), "Imperial March" from Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back (John Williams),"Conversation" from Close Encounters of the Third Kind (John Williams), "Danger Zone" from Top Gun (Kenny Loggins), Theme from Lone Ranger (William Tell Overture) Gioachino Rossini)

EVENING LASER SHOWS (Fridays and Saturdays only)
July
8:15 p.m.
Laser Rush - Fly By Night, 2112: Overture, 2112: Temples of Syrinx, The Trees, Closer to the Heart, Tom Sawyer, Subdivisions, Distant Early Warning, Big Money, Dreamline, Presto

9:30 p.m.
Pink Floyd Vision Bell - Keep Talking, One Slip, Astronomy Domine, Any Colour You Like, Brain Damage, Eclipse, Have A Cigar, Wish you Were Here, Another Brick in the Wall (Pt. 1), The Happiest Day of Our Lives, Another Brick in the Wall (Pt. 2), Hey You, Is There Anybody Out There?, Pigs on the Wing (Pt. 2)

August
8:15 p.m.
Beatles - Rock and Roll Music, Twist and Shout, Drive My Car, All Together Now, Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, With a Little Help from My Friends, Octopus's Garden, Get Back, The End

9:30 p.m.
Pink Floyd Vision Bell - Keep Talking, One Slip, Astronomy Domine, Any Colour You Like, Brain Damage, Eclipse, Have A Cigar, Wish you Were Here, Another Brick in the Wall (Pt. 1), The Happiest Day of Our Lives, Another Brick in the Wall (Pt. 2), Hey You, Is There Anybody Out There?, Pigs on the Wing (Pt. 2)

OMSI CONTACT INFO
503.797.4000 or 800.955.6674
www.omsi.edu

PRICING

Museum Admission: $13.00 Adults, $9.50 Youth 3-13 and Seniors 63+, FREE for members
Submarine: $6.75 (Tours are for ages 3 and above)
Empirical Theater Before 6pm: $8.50 Adults, $6.50 Youth 3-13 and Seniors 63+, $1 off for members
Empirical Theater 6pm and After: $7 Adults, $6 Youth 3-13 and Seniors 63+, $1 off for members
Planetarium: $5.75 Non-Members/$4.75 Members
Matinee Laser Light Shows: $5.75 Non-Members/$4.75 Members
Evening Laser Light Shows: $7.50

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Outdoor workers at risk as temperatures climb
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/30/14
(Salem) - Landscaping, construction, and agriculture are some of the outdoor jobs that can expose workers to dangerous high heat. Labor-intensive activities in hot weather can raise body temperatures beyond the level that normally can be cooled by sweating and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages employers and workers to learn the signs of heat illness and take precautions. A person overcome with heat exhaustion will still sweat but may experience extreme fatigue, nausea, lightheadedness, or a headache. The person could have clammy and moist skin, a pale complexion, and a normal or only slightly elevated body temperature. If heat exhaustion is not treated promptly, the illness could progress to heat stroke, and possibly even death.

"Water, rest, and shade are the three things to remember," said Penny Wolf-McCormick, health enforcement manager for Oregon OSHA. "Employers should ensure workers are taking water breaks throughout the day and provide shade to give their body time to recover."

From 2009 through 2013, 33 people received benefits through Oregon's workers' compensation system for heat-related illnesses. The majority of claims each year occur in July.

"Many Oregon workers aren't used to this type of heat and may need time to acclimate," Wolf-McCormick said.

To help those suffering from heat exhaustion:
* Move them to a cool, shaded area. Do not leave them alone.
* Loosen and remove heavy clothing.
* Provide cool water to drink (a small cup every 15 minutes) if they are not feeling sick to their stomach.
* Try to cool them by fanning them. Cool the skin with a spray mist of cold water or a wet cloth.
* If they do not feel better in a few minutes, call 911 for emergency help.

Certain medications, wearing personal protective equipment while on the job, and a past case of heat stress create a higher risk for heat illness.

Heat stroke is a different condition than heat exhaustion. There are several reactions that occur in the human body with heat stroke: hot, red skin (looks like a sunburn); mood changes; irritability and confusion; and collapsing (person will not respond to verbal commands). Immediately call for emergency help if you think the person is suffering from heat stroke. If not treated quickly, the condition can result in death.

Here are some tips for preventing a heat-related illness:
* Perform the heaviest, most labor-intensive work during the coolest part of the day.
* Use the buddy system (work in pairs) to monitor the heat.
* Drink plenty of cool water (one small cup every 15 to 20 minutes).
* Wear light, loose-fitting, breathable clothing (such as cotton).
* Take frequent short breaks in cool, shaded areas - allow your body to cool down.
* Avoid eating large meals before working in hot environments.
* Avoid caffeine and alcoholic beverages (these make the body lose water and increase the risk of heat illnesses).

Employers can calculate the heat index for their worksite with the federal OSHA heat stress app for mobile phones. The tool is available at
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html. A number of other tools are also available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html.

Oregon OSHA also has a pocket-sized booklet available, in both English and Spanish, with tips for working in the heat: http://www.orosha.org/pdf/pubs/4926.pdf (English version).

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About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter at www.twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.