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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Dec. 11 - 12:12 pm
Wed. 12/11/19
When the predator becomes the prey
Bonneville Power Administration - 12/11/19 11:45 AM

Sport fishing reward program helps save millions of migrating juvenile salmon

Portland, Ore. – Anglers earned nearly $1,162,000 in 2019 through participation in the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program. In all, they removed more than 146,000 northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers, which means fewer big fish preying on juvenile endangered salmon.

 

Each year millions of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers make their way downstream toward the Pacific Ocean. These young fish face numerous predators along the way, including the ravenous northern pikeminnow.  The native fish is responsible for depleting the numbers of out-migrating juveniles.

 

For nearly 30 years the Bonneville Power Administration has funded the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program, paying fishing enthusiasts to remove pikeminnow from the river, reducing the number of predators that prey on juvenile endangered salmon. Registered anglers who removed pikeminnow more than 9 inches long earned $5 to $8 per fish. Specially tagged northern pikeminnow were each worth $500.

 

The 2019 northern pikeminnow sport reward season wrapped up Sept. 30, and based on some of the numbers below BPA continues to meet its annual goal to remove 10-20% of the predators:

 

  • Fish removed                                   146,225
  • Registered anglers                          2,700
  • Average angler catch                     7.2 fish/day
  • Total paid to anglers                      $1,161,421
  • Top angler
    • Total earnings                  $53,107
    • Fish removed                   6,482

 

The program’s goal is not to eliminate northern pikeminnow, but rather to reduce the average size and number of larger, predatory fish.

 

“Large northern pikeminnow are responsible for eating the most salmon and steelhead smolts,” said Eric McOmie, BPA program manager. “Reducing the number of large pikeminnow can help more young salmon make their way to the ocean, which means more of them will return to their home streams as adults.”


The program’s effectiveness may even go beyond saving juvenile salmon and steelhead.

 

“Lamprey are often found in the diets of the northern pikeminnow,” said Mac Barr, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Predation Studies project leader. “In 2019, we began exploring ways to better estimate how many juvenile lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers are eaten by the northern pikeminnow. Understanding the predation rates on lamprey is important because they are a state sensitive species as well as a federal species of concern and are culturally important to many Columbia Basin tribes.”

 

The Sport Reward Program has removed more than 5 million northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers since 1990, reducing predation on young salmon and steelhead by up to 40%. BPA funds the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program as part of its mitigation for the construction and operation of the dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The program operates each year from May 1 to Sept. 30 and is managed by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

 

The PSMFC works with the Oregon and Washington fish and wildlife departments to offer information and seminars at events throughout the year. Learn more about the program at http://www.pikeminnow.org.

 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 262 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 500 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov


Visit the Oregon coast for Whale Watch Week Dec. 27 - 31
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/11/19 10:55 AM

Thousands of Gray whales are migrating south through Oregon’s waters later this month and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites visitors to the coast for the annual Winter Whale Watch Week Dec. 27 - 31.

Trained volunteers from the Whale Watching Spoken Here program will be stationed 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. each day at more than 20 of best whale watching sites on the coast, ready to help visitors spot whales and answer questions about the animals.

A map of volunteer-staffed sites is available on the official event webpage

An estimated 25,000 Gray whales are expected to swim past Oregon’s shores over the next several weeks, part of their annual migration south to the warm calving lagoons near Baja, Mexico. The end of December is the peak time for their migration; roughly 30 whales pass by per hour.

The Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay will be open 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily. Visitors to the center can enjoy interactive whale exhibits and take in the panoramic ocean views. Binoculars are provided. Park rangers will also be on hand to answer questions about the whales.

A live stream of whale activity in Depoe Bay returns this winter too; watch it on the Oregon State Parks YouTube channel during the event.

For more information about coast state parks and campgrounds, visit oregonstateparks.org.

Editors: view and download an online gallery of whale and whale watching photos here. Credit Oregon State Parks. 


E911 rate increases January 1
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/11/19 10:32 AM

The Oregon Emergency Communications (E911) tax rate will increase from $.75 cents to $1, beginning January 1, 2020. This is the first increase to the E911 tax since 1995.

Phone companies and retailers are required to collect the tax and pay it to the Oregon Department of Revenue. The E911 tax provides about 24 percent of the total operating costs for 9-1-1 centers in Oregon.

Examples of products or services subject to the E911 tax include:

  • Landline telephone service.
  • Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service.
  • Wireless telephone prepaid or postpaid service.
  • Additional prepaid minutes, regardless if the purchase is made at a retailer’s physical location, online, or over the phone.

Examples of products or services not subject to the E911 tax include:

  • Phone accessories such as batteries, chargers, phone covers, etc.
  • Ringtones.
  • Long-distance phone cards.

For more information on the state 9-1-1 program and how Oregon E911 tax revenue is used, see “Emergency Communications Tax” on the Oregon Office of Emergency Management website:

https://www.oregon.gov/oem/911/Pages/911-Tax-Distribution.aspx


On time - Alternate Snow Routes
West Valley Sch. Dist. - 12/11/19 5:23 AM

West Valley SD - will operate on time with alternate snow routes.


Tue. 12/10/19
Fatal Crash on Hwy 62 - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/10/19 7:15 PM
2019-12/1002/129948/20191210_150236_resized.jpg
2019-12/1002/129948/20191210_150236_resized.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1002/129948/thumb_20191210_150236_resized.jpg

On Tuesday, December 10, 2019  at approximately 2:35 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 62 near milepost 10.

Preliminary investigation reveals a PT Cruiser, operated by Jason Renfro (35) of Medford, was traveling westbound on Hwy 62 when for unknown reasons crossed the center line and struck a eastbound VW Beetle operated by Rickie Beer (70) of Eagle Point.

Beer sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  His passenger, Susan Beer (67) of Eagle Point, was transported to the hospital with injuries.

Renfro and his passenger, Lawrence Hunsley (59) of Prospect, were transported to the hospital with injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Jackson County Fire District 3, Eagle Point Police Department, Jackson County Sheriff's Office and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129948/20191210_150236_resized.jpg

Exploration of potential Elliott State Research Forest to continue
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/10/19 5:05 PM

The Oregon Department of State Lands and Oregon State University will continue to explore transforming the Elliott State Forest into a publicly owned state research forest

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) and Oregon State University (OSU) today updated the State Land Board on exploration of the Elliott State Research Forest concept and significant progress made over the past year.

This progress includes the development of a draft research charter and development of guiding principles related to forest benefits of recreation, education, local economy, conservation and governance. The potential research forest concept has also been incorporated into ongoing habitat conservation planning.

The Elliott State Forest Advisory Committee delivered a unanimous joint statement to the Land Board and recommended that work continue to transform the Elliott into a publicly owned state research forest.

“Our individual perspectives on the Elliott State Forest and our priorities for its future may differ. However, we agree that OSU should be provided the opportunity to address outstanding issues, and determine if terms required to address those issues are consistent with the Land Board vision for the Elliott,” the committee’s joint statement read.

In addition to the work of the advisory committee this past year, DSL and OSU have engaged tribes, local governments, state agencies, stakeholders, and the public in initial conversations regarding a potential Elliott State Research Forest.

Last December, the State Land Board directed DSL to work collaboratively with OSU to develop a plan for transforming the Elliott into a research forest.

The Land Board vision for the forest includes keeping the forest publicly owned with public access; decoupling the forest from the Common School Fund and compensating the fund for the forest; continuing habitat conservation planning to protect species and allow for harvest; and providing for multiple forest benefits, including recreation, education and working forest research. A successful research forest proposal is expected to be consistent with the Board vision.

The Advisory Committee noted that continued work was needed to resolve complex outstanding questions, such as how the forest will be decoupled from the Common School Fund and what a governance structure for the forest should look like.  

“While outstanding questions remain, there is enthusiasm around continued pursuit of an Elliott State Research forest,” says DSL Director Vicki L. Walker. “Diverse interests have expressed commitment to seeking a future for the Elliott in a research forest.”

As exploration continues, Oregonians can stay up-to-date via the Elliott State Forest website or by joining the Elliott State Forest updates email list. Increased opportunities for the public to provide input, both as part of the continuing exploratory process and during the formal habitat conservation planning process, are anticipated.


Rules Advisory Committee meets in Portland Dec. 17
Oregon Health Authority - 12/10/19 4:34 PM

December 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rules Advisory Committee meets in Portland Dec. 17

What: A rules advisory committee will meet to consider proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) 333-014-0590. The proposed changes are the result of the passage of Senate Bill (SB) 253 during the 2019 legislative session. SB 253 revised ORS 431.382 to include provisions for a local public health authority that has previously transferred its responsibilities to the Oregon Health Authority to request the responsibilities be transferred back to the local public health authority.

Agenda: Review of proposed draft rules. The agenda will include time for public comment. Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials at http://www.healthoregon.org/lhd.

When: 1-2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland OR 97232.

A conference call option is available for rules advisory committee members and members of the public at 1-877-873-8017, access code 767068#. Members of the public are asked to mute their phone lines unless they are providing public comment during the designated agenda time.

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets Dec. 16
Oregon Health Authority - 12/10/19 4:12 PM

December 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets Dec. 16

What: The quarterly meeting of the Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee. The meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Review of modification request; presentation by Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board; presentation by Rose McPharlin, DDS, on classification of adverse events in dentistry; review of site visit report

When: 9–11:30 a.m. Dec. 16. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 900, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-636-3807, access code: 79-38-00

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon State Police arrest subject for Wildlife Harassment and Animal Abuse II (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/10/19 4:09 PM
2019-12/1002/129943/buckdeerincident_Moment4.jpg
2019-12/1002/129943/buckdeerincident_Moment4.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1002/129943/thumb_buckdeerincident_Moment4.jpg

On December 6, 2019 Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Troopers received information from the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife regarding a disturbing video shared via social media.  The video displayed what appeared to be a young adult male climbing onto, and eventually riding on the back of a live and exhausted mule deer buck while it was contained within a fenced enclosure.  Throughout the video, the mule deer buck can be heard grunting and/or bleating and after escaping the rider, the buck jumped into a linked fence, multiple times, attempting to escape the enclosure. 

After reviewing the video, OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers conducted further investigation and identified two suspects from Riley, OR.  The primary suspect, identified as Jacob Belcher (18) from Riley, OR., was located on a rural ranch in Harney County where he was interviewed by Troopers.  The investigation and interviews revealed that the buck mule deer had entrapped itself within a fenced feeding enclosure, before being ridden by Belcher.  The buck was eventually freed and its status at this time is unknown.

Following interviews, Belcher was arrested and lodged at the Harney County Jail on charges of Wildlife Harassment and Animal Abuse II.  Another suspect, who was responsible for filming the incident, was identified and interviewed as well.  Charges of Aiding in a Wildlife Offense will be referred to the Harney County District Attorney’s Office.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

 Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129943/buckdeerincident_Moment4.jpg , 2019-12/1002/129943/buckdeerincident_Moment1.jpg

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meets December 12
Oregon Health Authority - 12/10/19 4:00 PM

December 10, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Zachary Goldman, 503-881-8698, zachary.k.goldman@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meets December 12

What: A public meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee.

When: December 12, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street Portland. The public can join remotely through a conference line at 888-808-6929, access code 915042. This meeting can also be viewed via live-stream at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eraJMDgmaig.

Agenda: Welcome; follow-up from previous meeting; adoption of charter and operating procedures; defining total health care expenditures; defining the inclusion criteria for payers; stakeholder engagement process; meeting schedule and proposed topics; public comment; next steps.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/Sustainable-Health-Care-Cost-Growth-Target.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Zachary Goldman at 503-881-8698, 711 TTY, y.k.goldman@dhsoha.state.or.us">zachary.k.goldman@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees meetings
Oregon Health Authority - 12/10/19 3:47 PM

Spanish / Español

December 10, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees meetings

What: Subcommittees of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) are tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP. Each of the five subcommittees is focused on one of the following priority areas:

  • Access to equitable preventive health care.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress.
  • Behavioral health.
  • Economic drivers of health.
  • Institutional bias.

Agenda: Develop and review strategies to support priority area goals.

Where: All meetings are held at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings are also available remotely. For remote meeting attendance, visit the subcommittee page through the following links:

When:

  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee: Dec. 18, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 915.
  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee: Dec. 18, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee: Dec. 20, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee: Dec. 16, 1-3 p.m., Room 900.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee: Jan. 7, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.

All meetings are open to the public. A five-minute public comment period will be held near the end of each meeting; comments are limited to one minute.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based off findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Elizabeth Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Bend Man Sentenced to Federal Prison After Hash Oil Explosion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/10/19 3:02 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—David Carl Paulsen, 33, of Bend, Oregon, was sentenced today to 12 months and one day in federal prison and two years’ supervised release for illegally manufacturing and possessing marijuana during a March 2018 butane honey oil (BHO) explosion in Bend.

According to court documents, on March 18, 2018, Bend police officers responded to an explosion at a residence where David Paulsen lived with his wife, Jennifer Paulsen, 34, and their three-year-old daughter. Witnesses reported that, following the explosion, the Paulsens were running around their house, putting items in their truck and car, and telling neighbors not to call the police. Witnesses also reported that David Paulsen gave his daughter to a neighbor and told the neighbor to tell police that she had been with the neighbor during the explosion. Both Paulsens suffered severe burns.

During a search of the residence, investigators discovered more than 34 pounds of marijuana, multiple butane cans, and a BHO extraction device. BHO is a concentrated form of marijuana extracted using highly flammable or combustible solvents. Investigators believe David Paulsen was operating an illegal and unlicensed open flame BHO lab in his house, which caused the explosion.

On July 18, 2018, the Paulsens were charged by a federal grand jury with manufacturing or possessing with intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense marijuana and endangering a human life while illegally manufacturing a controlled substance.

On September 18, 2019, David Paulsen pleaded guilty to one count of manufacturing or possessing with the intent to manufacture, distribute, or dispense marijuana. Prior to David Paulsen’s sentencing in federal court, Jennifer Paulsen pleaded guilty and was sentenced for unlawful delivery of marijuana in Deschutes County Circuit Court. The government moved to dismiss Jennifer Paulsen’s federal charges during her husband’s sentencing.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Bend Police Department. It was prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Walla Walla Public Schools graduation rates hit all-time high (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/10/19 11:03 AM
2019-12/1288/129929/Graduation_2019.jpg
2019-12/1288/129929/Graduation_2019.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1288/129929/thumb_Graduation_2019.jpg

WALLA WALLA –   More Walla Walla Public Schools students are graduating on time than ever before in modern history according to data released from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the Class of 2019. Last year's on-time graduation rate jumped to 90.3%, which is 9.4% above the state average.

The district is also closing the gap between student ethnic populations as the Hispanic/Latino graduate rate has grown 16% in recent years, to 89.3%.

"This now mirrors the rate of our non-Hispanic/Latino students," said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. "This rate is 13.6% above the state Latino graduation rate and our Hispanic/Latino dropout rate is now lower than our district's average at 6%, 9% below the Hispanic/Latino rate statewide."        

The state's annual data release also had more good news for the district as dropout rates continue to decline, now more than 4% below the state average for an all-time low of 7%.

Students receiving Special Education services are also performing well above the state average.

"A huge shoutout to our special education staff, where 88.1% of our special education students graduated on time marking a 28% increase over the last six years and more than 25% above the state average," said Smith.

Smith credits the district's strategic plan, dedicated staff, and deliberate efforts in keeping students connected and engaged to their school in this historic data release.

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1288/129929/Graduation_2019.jpg

Tech Tuesday - Online Shopping (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 12/10/19 9:00 AM
Online Shopping Info Slide
Online Shopping Info Slide
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3585/129452/thumb_TT_-_Online_Shopping_-_December_10_2019_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense as you race to finish your holiday shopping.

Today, we have a red alert straight from the big guy at the North Pole – we are just two weeks away from Christmas! Are you ready?

Online shopping makes it easier and easier for procrastinators to push those deadlines into the danger zone – but we have 12 days of tips to keep you shopping safely, and get you done early!

Day 1 – Don’t go online until you make sure that your computer and your phone are fully up to date. Santa says you should make sure you aren’t susceptible to viruses and malware.

Day 2 – Put the cold freeze on using public WiFi. If you do logon to unsecured wireless networks, you can put your private info out there for any grinch to steal.

Day 3 – Find the perfect whatnot, but the seller requires that you pay using a gift card or wire transfer? Watch out – those are telltale signs of a possible fraud.

Day 4 – Mrs. Claus is a big believer in giving “experiences” over “things”… but if you are thinking of buying tickets to a concert or sporting event for that special someone, make sure you stick with a reputable seller. You might find websites or online marketplaces where people are offering good tickets cheaply, but know that plenty of counterfeiters are ready to cash in on Christmas at your expense.


Day 5 – Hot toy or blingy bauble sold out everywhere you look? You think you hit the jackpot when you find it on a never-heard-of-before website, and, bonus, it’s cheaper than expected! Sounds great, but be warned – if you stumbled upon a scammer trying to take advantage of your desperation, the only thing that is likely to show up in the mail is a bill.

Day 6 – Pay with a credit card when possible. You will likely have more protections than paying with your debit card or cash.

Day 7 – Time to put your jingle jangle on and buy some gift cards. They are popular options, but watch out for sellers who say they can get you cards below-market value. Also be wary of buying any card in a store if it looks like the security PIN on the back has been uncovered and recovered. Your best bet is to buy digital gift cards directly from the merchant online.

Day 8 – Stay off you-know-who’s naughty list by changing your passwords. Yes, they can be difficult to remember, but, no, they shouldn’t all be the same. Make sure you use long and unique passwords for the most important sites – like your email and bank account – and update the others to stronger options frequently.

Day 9 – Tis the season for giving, and it is prime time for charities to ask for money as we get close to the end of the year. Make sure that your donations are going to legitimate non-profits by doing some basic research. Also keep an eye on how much of your donation goes directly to services – and how much it is gobbled up by admin and overhead costs.

Day 10 – It’s candy cane crunch time, with only a few days left. Don’t let stress drive you to making poor choices. Fraudsters love using social engineering techniques to trick you into making quick decisions you wouldn’t otherwise make. As the saying goes, if the deal sounds too good to be real, it likely is.

Day 11 – Almost there, and scammers are going down to the wire to make their pitch sound perfect. Beware of unsolicited emails, texts, or social media posts that promise you the chance to purchase that final needed gift. Don’t click on links or attachments no matter how much you want to be done with shopping madness.

Day 12 – You made it with just a few days to spare. We have just one final tip for you before you try to wrap that pile of presents. Spend a few minutes checking your bank and credit card statements for unauthorized transactions. If there’s anything suspicious – make sure you report it right away.

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office.

Have a great holiday everyone and remember to shop safely.




Attached Media Files: Online Shopping Audio File , Online Shopping Info Slide

Mon. 12/09/19
Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/09/19 4:40 PM
Charles Gilbert
Charles Gilbert
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1070/129919/thumb_Gilbert_C.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Charles E. Gilbert, died December 8, 2019. Gilbert was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in a local hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Gilbert entered DOC custody on March 29, 1989, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of August 21, 2039. Gilbert was 76 years old. Next of kin has been notified.                                                                             

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 individuals. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Charles Gilbert

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet December 12
Oregon Health Authority - 12/09/19 4:37 PM

December 9, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet December 12

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: December 12, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5441985918617611266 and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome and roll call/introductions; review agenda and approve minutes; public comment 12:40-12:50; debrief November presentation on Oregon’s Health System Transformation; development of New and Innovative Measure Criteria; Discussion: OHA Health Equity definition; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Drafts of eight CAT rules now available on Department of Revenue website
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/09/19 4:20 PM

Salem, OR — Drafts of eight administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) are now available to the public on the CAT page of the Department of Revenue’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor, agency officials said today.

“The taxpaying community has expressed significant interest in the CAT administrative rulemaking process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue.  “By prioritizing the creation of rules that the agency believes are most urgently needed, and sharing them as early as possible, we hope to minimize the risk of confusion and non-compliance.”

The Oregon Legislature created the Corporate Activity Tax in House Bills 3427 and 2164 during the 2019 session and gave the Department of Revenue the responsibility of writing administrative rules to implement the new law.

The agency has identified nearly three dozen issues which may need to be addressed with administrative rules. Those issues have been prioritized into three groups.

The first group of rules—those most business taxpayers and tax preparers have said they need to understand first—will be officially filed with the Secretary of State on Jan. 1, 2020. The other two groups will follow on Feb.1, 2020 and March 1, 2020.

The eight drafts posted on the agency’s website this week address:

  • Estimated payments.
  • Estimated payments for unitary groups.
  • Underpayment of or delinquent estimated payments.
  • What establishes nexus between a business and Oregon.
  • What constitutes a unitary group for the CAT.
  • Property brought into Oregon.
  • The definition of agent.
  • Filing extensions.

Sharing draft rules ahead of officially filing them allows business taxpayers and tax professionals time to review the rules and use them as guidance on how to proceed starting Jan. 1. It also offers them an additional opportunity to have input into the rules.

The agency previously engaged more than 800 stakeholders in the rulemaking process through a series of public meetings, video conferences and conference calls. Department officials said they will welcome additional feedback on the draft rules.  Those with comments can send feedback via email to ules.dOR@oregon.gov">catrules.dor@oregon.gov. (Please include “comments on draft rules” in the subject line.)

When officially filed with the Secretary of State all of the rules for the CAT will initially be adopted as temporary rules. Temporary rules are only good for 180 days. Starting April 1, 2020 the department will begin the process of adopting permanent rules for the CAT. That process involves public comment, giving stakeholders another chance to provide input.

The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon. It applies to all business entities including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It is measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from commercial activity in Oregon.

Businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax is available on the Department of Revenue’s website. It includes a list of frequently asked questions and a form to sign-up for email updates on the CAT. Stakeholders can direct questions or comments about the CAT via email to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Final week to buy health insurance and qualify for help paying for it; open enrollment ends Sunday, Dec. 15 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/09/19 1:52 PM
2019-12/1073/129912/Marketplace_Logo.jpg
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(Salem) – Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their employers and who do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan have only until Sunday, Dec. 15, at 11:59 p.m. (Pacific) to sign up for coverage and get help paying for the coverage. Get started now by estimating your subsidy and reviewing the plans and prices at OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop

“It’s a busy time of year, but don’t wait until the final hours. There are many health plans to choose from and you’re going to want time to shop for the right one,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. The Marketplace is a part of state government that helps connect Oregonians to coverage. It partners with HealthCare.gov, the website where people apply for federal subsidies.

Throughout Oregon, between seven and 41 plans are available, depending on your county. People who qualify for subsidies can use that financial help on any plan. Last year, 74 percent of Oregonians who enrolled through the Marketplace got subsidies. The average bottom-line premium for them was $140 per month.

Oregonians will see increased advertising in this final week of enrollment. Video and audio ads on Hulu, Spotify, broadcast TV, and other outlets highlight consumer testimonials and lay out how and why to enroll. Samples are online at http://bit.ly/subsidy-testimonials and http://bit.ly/coverage-and-subsidies.  

To get help filling out the subsidy application and reviewing health plan options, use the directory at OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp, or call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free).

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1073/129912/Marketplace_Logo.jpg

Isaiah Garza, Pop Artist/Fashion Designer to the Stars (From Yakima) - Motivational Speaker for Yakima School District students (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 12/09/19 12:41 PM
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Through a grant, the Yakima School District will bring Isaiah Garza to schools and the community as a motivational speaker and solicit ideas on how to “reimagine Yakima and Yakima Schools.”  The Yakima School District is currently engaged in a "Reimagine" campaign to solicit ideas for the future of the Yakima School District.  As part of the campaign, the district is engaged with the students, staff, and the community in strategic planning.  Mr. Garza will connect directly with students to hear their thoughts and ideas and to motivate them toward a planned and successful future. Anyone can submit a "reimagine idea" online at https://www.yakimaschools.org/reimagine  

After students reported very positive engagement and “life-changing” motivation as a result of Isaiah’s talk to 700 Eisenhower students in October, Superintendent Greene felt Mr. Garza was a great fit to expand the impact to all students in 4th-12th grade over eight days in December.

Isaiah is available for media interviews on Tuesday, December 10 to talk about his presentation to students.  Please email Isaiah directly to schedule, isaiahgarzacc@aol.com.

Recent radio interview with Isaiah: https://www.instagram.com/p/B3aFXo-J9xM/

Recent television interview with Isaiah: https://www.instagram.com/p/B3DFNJjp0K9/

About Isaiah Garza:

Isaiah Garza is a once in a generational artist in fashion, music, activist, marketing and
business. Isaiah's mission statement is to make a change across this universe and leave a true
legacy behind. Isaiah grew up in the small town of Yakima, WA. Isaiah always knew his
ambition to a positive impact on this world would drive his success one day. Isaiah Garza
moved to Los Angeles with one mission in mind, to change the world. Starting off designing
clothes and jewelry on a small scale Isaiah has since designed for retailers such as Barneys
NY, Nordstroms, QVC and worked with everyone from Cardi B, Rihanna, Khloe Kardashian,
Chance The Rapper, Janet Jackson and many more. Isaiah’s work has been featured in
magazines such as Wonderland, Vogue and interviews with NBC, The View and E! News.
Isaiah's music will be used to promote activism across the world. His goal is to save as many
kids’ lives who deal with human trafficking, mental health & depression. On his current
Instagram, you can already see him visiting schools doing inspirational speeches, mentoring
child human trafficking victims and helping the homeless. With every song he puts out he will
include merch he designed that will donate to a charity ranging from human trafficking, providing
clean water around the world for children, mental health and the homelessness. Garza plans on
being one of the first music artists to use the music platform to travel the world in search of
giving back everywhere he goes.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/3536/129903/ReimagineYakimaSchools-Salmon.png , 2019-12/3536/129903/66067116_711459909300672_2183794068739148910_n(1).jpg , 2019-12/3536/129903/51655265_257359341880280_8324344911934822983_n.jpg , 2019-12/3536/129903/51098332_397732934106172_3078836959907397294_n.jpg , 2019-12/3536/129903/75324270_2382660575380708_4377804757590695452_n.jpg

Sat. 12/07/19
Fatal Crash on Hwy 395 - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/07/19 6:28 PM
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On Friday, December 6, 2019 at approximately 10:03 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle crash on Hwy 395 at the intersection of E Punkin Center Rd.  

The preliminary investigation revealed that a gold, 2009 Toyota Camry, operated by Michelle Dawn Fry (45) of Umatilla,  was traveling northbound on Hwy 395 and failed to stop at a red light and collided with a black 2006 KIA Spectra, operated by Elidio Salas De La Paz (77) of Hermiston, which was traveling southbound on Hwy 395 making a left hand turn onto E Punkin Center Rd. 

Salas De La Paz and his wife/passenger Alicia Salas (75) were both transported by ambulance to Good Shepherd Medical Center, Hermiston.  Alicia Salas was pronounced deceased at the hospital.

Fry was lodged at the Umatilla County Jail on the charges of Manslaughter, DUII, Assault, and reckless driving.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Umatilla County Fire District #1, Umatilla County Sheriff's Office and Hermiston Police Department.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129881/20191206_223932.jpg

Fri. 12/06/19
Federal changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program could affect 19,000 Oregonians
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/06/19 3:32 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – At least 19,000 Oregonians could lose government food assistance under a new federal rule finalized Thursday, December 5.

The rule will restrict states' ability to allow certain adults to receive benefits for more than three months in a three-year period if they aren't working or training at least 20 hours a week.

The change in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was approved despite more than 140,000 negative public comments. It is expected to affect 700,000 SNAP recipients nationally once it takes effect in April.

Oregon, like most states, has used waivers to extend benefits for longer than three months to a group of SNAP recipients known as "able-bodied adults without dependents" (ABAWD) if they live in areas with high unemployment and limited job opportunities. This group includes individuals ages 18 through 49 who don't have disabilities, don't have children or other dependents and are considered able to work.

In January 2020, Oregon has approved waivers for 31 counties for ABAWD work requirements, which will now expire on March 31, 2020. Federal changes to eligibility requirements for waivers will limit the areas in Oregon that meet the requirements starting April 1, 2020. As a result, this means only six counties may be eligible to receive the waiver.

“SNAP plays a critical role in addressing hunger and food insecurity,” said Fariborz Pakseresht, Department of Human Services director. “SNAP benefits assist Oregonians during difficult times to help make ends meet, in particular those working low-wage or who are between jobs. For those already facing difficult circumstances, this rule exacerbates those circumstances. It also will result in an increased burden on food banks and other community resources to fill the void.”

Areas requesting federal waivers must have unemployment rates at least 20 percent higher than the national rate but not less than 6 percent. The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates unemployment rates for people without a high school diploma or GED are often more than double average unemployment rates. Other groups that face additional obstacles when seeking steady employment include agricultural workers, veterans, former foster youth, formerly incarcerated people and rural residents with limited transportation.

In addition to administrating SNAP benefits, the Department of Human Services provides workforce development and training opportunities so Oregonians can secure a living-wage job. More information on those programs can be found here https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/pages/index.aspx.




Attached Media Files: Federal changes to SNAP in Oregon

OHA Approves AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance for Full Five-Year Coordinated Care Contracts
Oregon Health Authority - 12/06/19 12:54 PM

Dec. 6, 2019

OHA Approves AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance for Full Five-Year Coordinated Care Contracts

The Oregon Health Authority is announcing that three CCOs which had received one-year contracts have met the necessary requirements to earn full five-year contracts to serve Oregon Health Plan members for 2020-2024: AllCare CCO, Cascade Health Alliance, and Umpqua Health Alliance. Services for the new CCO contracts begin January 1, 2020. These contracts have been referred to as "CCO 2.0."

In July OHA announced its intent to award 15 organizations with contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations for OHP, four of which were for one year. These four applicants did not show enough evidence in their applications to be awarded full five-year contracts. Instead they initially received a one-year contract. OHA required the four CCOs to show evidence they had policies, procedures and plans in place to meet the goals of CCO 2.0 OHA provided technical support to help the plans.

Yamhill Community Care (YCC), the remaining CCO with a one-year contract, continues to make good progress toward resolving its remediation plan. OHA and YCC are working together to resolve the few remaining items in their remediation plan this month.

Contract awardees had to demonstrate they can meet the goals of CCO 2.0 to improve care coordination, transform service delivery, engage local communities, improve clinical care, have effective and efficient business processes, and demonstrate financial stability.

"I appreciate the steps AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance have taken to show they are ready to meet the higher bar we’ve set in CCO 2.0," OHA Director Patrick Allen said. "We recognize that CCOs play a vital in their communities. We look forward to partnering with these three CCOs over the next five years to improve the lives of OHP members and make health care more affordable in the communities these CCOs serve."

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.


Richland Police Department Launches Voluntary Camera Partnership (Photo)
City of Richland - 12/06/19 9:06 AM
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The Richland Police Department is seeking your help in fighting crime by taking part in the Voluntary Camera Partnership (VCP). The VCP allows residents and business owners to register the locations of their video surveillance systems with the Richland Police Department.  When a crime occurs, police will be able to identify the locations of nearby cameras and enlist the assistance of the community to help officers collect video evidence and follow up on leads. With this program, the Richland Police Department will be able to directly contact VCP members that are using video surveillance in an area in which a crime occurred. Police would ask VCP members to check their video footage for a specific date and time that may show activity involved with a crime, such as a getaway car or the direction that a person of interest traveled.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/5957/129849/VCP_FB_Post.jpg

Walla Walla native Hernandez named Green Park assistant principal (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/06/19 8:59 AM
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WALLA WALLA – Edison Elementary 4th grade dual language teacher Cesar Hernandez has been promoted to assistant principal at Green Park Elementary School  beginning next school year.

Hernandez was born and raised in Walla Walla where he attended Sharpstein and Green Park Elementary schools, Garrison Middle School and Walla Walla High School. He received an Associates of Art’s degree from Walla Walla Community College a Bachelor’s Degree from Washington State University and a Master’s in Education from Eastern Washington University. Hernandez has been employed with Walla Walla Public Schools for eight years, including five years as a dual language teacher at Edison Elementary.

“Mr. Hernandez has a solid reputation for being an advocate for students and student learning,” said Green Park Principal Rick Kline. “Not only does he possess the bilingual language skills which are integral as Green Park Elementary transitions to a dual language school, he will provide a cornerstone for outreach to parents and the community as we continue to build relationships with our students and families.”

Hernandez is a volunteer wrestling coach for Edison Elementary and soccer coach at Pioneer Middle School. He enjoys restoring classic cars. He and his wife Lizbeydi have a daughter Kendra and son Cesar Jr.

“I am honored to have this wonderful opportunity and to be part of the amazing team at Green Park,” said Hernandez. “I am excited to work with the Green Park staff and continue to strengthen the dual program. As the assistant principal, I want to continue to work on building relationships with students and staff, raising cultural awareness, continue implementing social emotional strategies, and advocate equity for all.”

Hernandez will assume his new role July 1, 2020.

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1288/129848/Cesar_Hernandez.jpg

DPSST Executive Committee Meeting Scheduled *Amended ORS*
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/06/19 7:55 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

December 5, 2019

Contact:       Mona Riesterer
                    (503) 378-2431

Notice of Teleconference Meeting

The Executive Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a teleconference meeting at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 10, 2019

A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The teleconference information is: 

Dial in: (877) 873-8017 Access Code: 8191185

For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 373-2431 or at iesterer@state.or.us">MonaRiesterer@state.or.us 

Chair’s Report and Administrative Announcement

“This is a public meeting subject to the public meeting law which will be tape recorded.”

1.  Minutes of February 28, 2018

2.  Executive Session

The Executive Committee will hold an executive session to consider exempt public records. The executive session is  being held pursuant to ORS 162.660(2)(f).

3.  Beers, Tyler DPSST #58455; Department of Corrections

4.  Saulo, Caleb DPSST #59701 – Appeal of Academy Dismissal; Warm Springs Police Department.

5.  Next Meeting – TBD – as needed.

Requires a vote by the Committee


Public comment period opens for updates to administrative rules describing Special Access Pass benefits
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/06/19 7:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on a proposed change to Oregon Administrative Rule language describing how the agency bundles free camping days under their Special Access Pass program. The program is offered to foster and adoptive foster families, and veterans with a service-connected disability. It provides up to 14 days of free overnight camping to passholders at any Oregon State Park.

Under the proposed rule change, the free camping days would move from up to 14 days within a rolling 30-day period to up to 14 days within a calendar month. The change is intended to make it easier for passholders to track their available days and plan their camping trips.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Jan. 6, 2020. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff will present a final recommended rule for consideration to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2020 business meeting.

The full text of the proposed change is available online: oregon.gov/oprd/RULES/Pages/Rulemaking%20Notices.aspx

Learn more about the pass program for veterans with a service-connected disability online

Learn more about the pass program for foster and adoptive foster families online.


Thu. 12/05/19
Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Workgroup meets December 12
Oregon Health Authority - 12/05/19 4:13 PM

December 5, 2019

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Workgroup meets December 12

What: A public meeting of the Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Advisory Board Workgroup.

Agenda: Welcome, chair and vice-chair roles and responsibilities, feedback mechanism for board members, wrap-up and next steps.

When: Thursday, Dec. 12, 3-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Public Health Laboratory, Suite 100, 7202 NE Evergreen Parkway, Hillsboro. Please check in at the front desk and bring a photo ID. Also available remotely by telephone at 888-337-0215, access code 2001129#.

Background: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Program screens newborns for endocrine, hemoglobin, cystic fibrosis, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders that may not be clinically evident in the first few days or weeks of life. Detecting these conditions early allows the infant to be referred for diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death or disability. For more information, visit the program's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/nbs.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christianne Biggs at 503-693-4172, 711 TTY or istianne.BIGGS@dhsoha.state.or.us">christianne.biggs@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@state.or.us


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers Requesting Public's Assistance with Killing and Waste of Bull and Cow Elk in Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/05/19 3:17 PM
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The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help in locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing and waste of a 4X5 bull elk and a cow elk in Tillamook County.

On Wednesday, December 4, 2019, Tillamook OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers were dispatched to a report of a deceased bull elk. The deceased bull elk was located approximately 3 miles up Kansas Creek Road in an area known as Hembre Ridge.  

The bull elk was killed using a rifle and left to waste with no meat removed.  Further investigation led to the discovery of a deceased cow elk nearby.  Neither elk was salvageable and it appeared both elk had been shot within the past few days.

OSP is asking anyone who was in the area or anyone who may have information on the person(s) responsible to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888, or OSP (677) and refer information to Trooper Charles Reeder.  Information can also be sent by email to TIP@state.or.us.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129834/7443.jpeg , 2019-12/1002/129834/7440.jpeg

United States Wildland Fire Personnel Called to Assist with Australia Wildfires 
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 12/05/19 12:30 PM

Boise, Idaho – The United States is sending 21 wildland fire personnel from the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service to assist with ongoing wildfire suppression efforts in Australia. Australia is experiencing early and significant fire activity, particularly in the states of New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria. Extended drought combined with hot and dry weather conditions have elevated wildfire risk, and fire activity is expected to continue for the next several months.

“This exchange demonstrates the value of our arrangement for mutual wildland fire support with Australia.  It’s a valuable tool for both countries as we face increasingly complex and challenging fires,” said Department of the Interior’s Office of Wildland Fire Director Jeff Rupert. “The interagency team of professionals will share expertise from managing wildland fire under a variety of locations and conditions in the U.S., many of which are similar to what they’ll encounter in Australia.”

Based on the current situation in Australia, the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council is requesting 21 qualified U.S. fire personnel to assist with wildfire and aviation management. The BLM is sending six personnel, including two interagency resource representatives on behalf of the National Interagency Fire Center located in Boise, Idaho. The NPS is sending two people, the BIA is sending one person, the FWS is sending one person, and the USFS is sending 11 personnel. The employees, coming from Alaska, Nevada, Montana, Colorado, Arizona, Idaho, Utah, California, Oregon, Hawaii, and Virginia, will be departing for Australia from the San Francisco International Airport on Thursday, December 5. 

Fires that started to burn in August have continued uninterrupted with large areas of both New South Wales and Queensland burned, multiple property losses, and, sadly, fatalities. Fire conditions continue to challenge in New South Wales and Queensland, while new fires are causing concern further south in Victoria. Fire conditions in Australia are extreme due to an extended drought, hot temperatures, and relative humidity in the single digits. 

“We’re sending a contingent from several federal agencies that reflects decades of fire management experience,” said U.S. Forest Service Fire Director Shawna Legarza. “We face many of the same firefighting challenges in each country. We’ve utilized their expertise in the past and welcome the opportunity to reciprocate.”

The last fire assistance between the two countries was in August of 2018 when 138 Australian and New Zealand wildfire management personnel were sent to the U.S. for almost 30 days to assist with wildfire suppression efforts in Northern California and the Northwest. The Australian and New Zealand personnel filled critical needs during the peak of the western fire season for mid-level fireline management, heavy equipment, helicopter operations, and structure protection. 

 The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group is working with the National Interagency Coordination Center to mobilize resources and distribute the request across interagency partners. The last time the U.S sent firefighters to Australia was in 2010.  

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The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC), located in Boise, Idaho, is the nation's support center for wildland firefighting. Eight different agencies and organizations are part of NIFC including, the Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, National Weather Service, U.S. Fire Administration, and the National Association of State Foresters.


Walla Walla Public Schools Bond Oversight Committee Meeting: December 10, 2019
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/05/19 11:49 AM

In accordance with their duties to review the 2018 Bond program, a meeting of the WWPS Bond Oversight Committee will be held on Tuesday, December 10, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. in the WWPS Administration Building, Anne Golden Boardroom, 364 S. Park Street, Walla Walla.

Details are available via the following link:  http://www.wwps.org/bond/bond-oversight-committee


Five tips for the final 10 days to sign up for health insurance (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/05/19 11:26 AM
The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov
The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1073/129820/thumb_Marketplace_Logo.jpg

(Salem) – Time is running out for people who want health insurance in 2020 but do not get coverage through their job or the Oregon Health Plan. Sunday, Dec. 15, is the last day to enroll in a health plan through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, our state’s pathway to subsidized coverage.

About 100,000 uninsured Oregonians may be eligible for help paying for their health insurance, but signups in Oregon are lagging so far this year. To get coverage or re-enroll in a plan, follow these five tips:

Tip No. 1: Get a quick estimate of your subsidy and bottom-line cost of coverage. Go to OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop to see the size of the subsidy you may qualify for, and what your plan may cost once that financial assistance is factored in. People whose incomes are just above the limit for the Oregon Health Plan can find plans costing them as little as $1 per month, when they meet all eligibility requirements.

Tip No. 2: Get free, local help enrolling. Licensed insurance agents and certified community partners are ready to help you complete the application for subsidies, and sort through plan options. Choose an agent or partner in the directory at OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp, or call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free).

Tip No. 3: Get to know the new benefits in some plans. Consumers have reported that large deductibles on the lowest-priced plans sometimes keep them from getting care. In response, the state redesigned some plans to allow more services before the plan’s deductible is met. For the first time, plans with the words "standard bronze" in their name all cover primary care office visits for a flat $45 co-pay, even when the plan's $7,900 deductible has not been met. This plan type is among the options with a net cost of $1 per month for single people making about $19,000 a year and meeting a few other qualifications.

Tip No. 4: Hear from people who have gotten subsidies through the Marketplace. Health plan specifics matter, but so does the human impact of having coverage you can afford. If you need a two-minute break from insurance details, listen online to other Oregonians describe their experience with subsidized coverage at http://bit.ly/subsidy-testimonials.
 
Tip No. 5: Don’t miss the deadline. The deadline to enroll is Sunday, Dec. 15. If you miss it, you may go a year without health insurance. Avoid the risk and get started at OregonHealthCare.gov.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov , Insurance agents and community partners provide enrollment help at no charge to the consumer. , Insurance agents and community partners provide enrollment help at no charge to the consumer.

Revenue encourages taxpayers to protect their data and money
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/05/19 9:35 AM

It’s National Tax Security Awareness Week and the Oregon Department of Revenue and the IRS are reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for money scams and identity theft.

Phishing scams

As the holiday season approaches, taxpayers need to watch out for phishing scams in the deluge of holiday email messages coming from retailers and others. According to the IRS, more than 90 percent of all data thefts begin with an email phishing scam.

Here’s what you need to know to protect yourself from phishing scams:

  • First, the most common way thieves steal identities is simply by asking for it. Their favorite tactic is a phishing email. Phishing emails “bait” users into opening them. They pose as a trusted company such as a bank, a favorite retailer, or even a tax professional.
  • Second, learn to recognize and avoid these phishing emails. The scams tell an urgent story—like there’s a problem with your account or your order. The message then instructs the receiver to open an embedded link or download an attachment.
  • Third, don’t take the bait. The email link may send users to a familiar website to log in, but the username and password goes to the thieves. Or, the scam suggests users open an attachment, which secretly downloads malicious software. Either method works for identity thieves.

These scam emails can show up in personal inboxes or even a work inbox, endangering the entire organization. Mobile phone users are especially prone to responding more than those working on a laptop or desktop computer. If at home, just delete the email. If at work, follow your organization’s guidance on handling the email.

Identity theft

With millions of people logging in to websites and online accounts this holiday season, Revenue and the IRS remind taxpayers that common mistakes can increase their risk of having sensitive financial and tax data stolen by identity thieves.

Using strong passwords and keeping them secure are critical steps to preventing thieves from stealing identities, money, or other information to file a fraudulent tax return.

In recent years, cybersecurity experts’ recommendations on what constitutes a strong password have changed. They now suggest people use word phrases that are easy to remember rather than random letters, characters, and numbers that can’t be easily recalled.

For example, experts previously suggested something like “PXro#)30” but now suggest a longer phrase, such as “SomethingYouCanRemember@30.” By using a phrase, users don’t have to write down their password and expose it to additional risk. Also, people may be more willing to use strong, longer passwords if it’s a phrase, rather than random characters that are harder to remember.

Protecting access to digital devices is so critical that some now feature fingerprint or facial recognition technology, but passwords remain common for many people.

Given the sensitivity of many of these online accounts, people should consider these password tips to protect devices or online accounts:

  • Use a minimum of eight characters; longer is better.
  • Use a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols in password phrases, i.e., UsePasswordPhrase@30.
  • Avoid personal information or common passwords; use phrases instead.
  • Change default or temporary passwords that come with accounts or devices.
  • Don’t reuse or update passwords. For example, changing Bgood!17 to Bgood!18 is not good enough; use unique usernames and passwords for accounts and devices.
  • Don’t use email addresses as usernames if that is an option.
  • Store any password list in a secure location, such as a safe or locked file cabinet.
  • Don’t disclose passwords to anyone for any reason.
  • When available, a password manager program can help track passwords for numerous accounts.

Whenever it’s an option for a password-protected account, users also should opt for a multi-factor authentication process. Many email providers, financial institutions, and social media sites now offer customers two-factor authentication protections.

Two-factor authentication helps by adding an extra layer of protection. Often this means the user must enter their credentials (username and password) plus another step, such as entering a security code sent via text to a mobile phone. Another example is confirming “yes” to a text to the phone that users are accessing the account on.

The idea behind multi-factor authentication is that a thief may be able to steal usernames and passwords, but it’s highly unlikely they also would have access to the mobile phone to receive a security code or confirmation to complete the log-in process.

For more information on protecting yourself or what to do if you’re a victim of identity theft, visit:

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments. For other information or questions, call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish), 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon, or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 730 - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/05/19 9:09 AM
2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg
2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1002/129813/thumb_Hwy730.jpg

On Wednesday, December 4, 2019 at approximately 8:40 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 730 near milepost 202.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 1999 Ford F-150 PU was westbound on Hwy 730 when for unknown reasons crossed into the eastbound lane and collided with a 2011 Volvo Semi Truck with flatbed trailer loaded with metal products, operated by Steven Unruh (64) from Nampa. ID.

The operator of the Ford F-150 sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Name will be released after next of kin has been notified.

Unruh was transported to Good Shepherd Medical Center in Hermiston.

Hwy 730 was closed for approximately 4 hours.

OSP was assisted by Umatilla Fire District #1 and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg

First Day Hikes event returns to state parks Jan. 1, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/05/19 7:00 AM
Tryon Creek State Natural Area
Tryon Creek State Natural Area
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1303/129789/thumb_First_Day_Hike_3.JPG

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors on New Year’s Day for the annual First Day Hikes event. Visitors can choose from 37 hikes in 31 parks across the state. All hikes will be guided by a park ranger or volunteer who will share stories about the park’s history, geology, wildlife and plants. 

All hikes are free and day-use parking fees will be waived at all participating parks Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for specific hikes online at the Oregon State Parks Store: bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. While online registration isn’t required for participation, visitors are encouraged to register. It helps park staff plan the hike and provides them with participant contact information should hike details change.

OPRD advises visitors to plan for inclement weather, dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, bring water and remember to carry binoculars for viewing wildlife.

OPRD has sponsored First Day Hikes annually since 2012, part of a larger national event organized by America’s State Parks.

Participating parks and meeting areas are below. Full details for each hike are also on bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents.

PORTLAND

  • L.L. Stub Stewart State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Clayhill horse staging area.
  • Milo McIver State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Maple Ridge Trailhead in the Lower Boat Launch parking lot.
  • Tryon Creek State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the nature center.

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

  • Deschutes River State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at Oregon Trail kiosk.
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail: 1 p.m., meet at the Mark O. Hatfield East trailhead in the Mossier Twin Tunnels parking lot.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY/CASCADES

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area: 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., meet at the visitor center.
  • Dexter State Recreation Site: 9 a.m., meet at the Dexter Disc Golf course.
  • Elijah Bristow State Park: noon, meet at the equestrian parking area for horse riding (bring your own horse.)
  • Silver Falls State Park: 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m., meet at South Falls Lodge porch.
  • Willamette Mission State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Wheatland Ferry.

COAST

  • Bullards Beach State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the meeting hall.
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint: noon, meet in the Cape Meares parking lot.
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site: 11 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Fort Stevens State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the Battery Russell parking lot.
  • Humbug Mountain State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Humbug Mountain trailhead.
  • Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the group camp parking lot.
  • Oswald West State Park: 8 a.m., meet at the Cape Falcon trailhead.
  • Seal Rock State Recreation Site: 9:30 a.m., meet in the Seal Rock parking lot.
  • Umpqua Lighthouse State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Lake Marie Day-use area.
  • William M. Tugman State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Eel Lake boat ramp.

SOUTHERN OREGON

  • Collier Memorial State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the Logging Museum.
  • Golden State Heritage Site: 1 p.m., meet in the Historic Church.
  • Illinois River Forks State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the West Fork trailhead.
  • Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at the group camp.
  • TouVelle State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the day-use area.
  • Valley of the Rogue State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the amphitheater. 1 p.m., meet at Del Rio Vineyards (bring your own bike.) 1 p.m., meet at Rogue River Bridge in the city of Rogue River (bring your own bike.)

EASTERN/CENTRAL OREGON

  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the experience center.
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the interpretive kiosk (bring your own snowshoes).
  • LaPine State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the meeting hall in the south loop.
  • Smith Rock State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the Group Camp A parking lot.

More information about participating parks, including maps and directions, is on oregonstateparks.org.




Attached Media Files: Tryon Creek State Natural Area