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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Tue. Aug. 9 - 1:38 am
Mon. 08/08/22
OHA launches website to share updates on opioid settlement funds
Oregon Health Authority - 08/08/22 5:02 PM

August 8, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA launches website to share updates on opioid settlement funds

Users can get info on national settlement agreement sites, distribution of money for prevention, treatment, recovery effort

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has launched a new website to share updates and information on opioid settlement funds, which will be used to support opioid prevention, treatment and recovery efforts around the state.

The Oregon Opioid Settlement Funds site, at www.oregon.gov/opioidsettlement, has background on the multi-state litigation against the pharmaceutical industry of which Oregon was a party and links to national settlement agreement sites. It also describes how the settlement funds will be distributed in Oregon, how much money is available and what it can be used for.

In addition, the site offerspeople the opportunity, if interested, toapply to serve on the Oregon Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Board, which will determine how the state uses its share of funds from the settlements with the opioid industry.

“These settlement funds will provide much-needed opportunities for cities and counties in Oregon to help their communities begin healing from the ravages caused by the pervasiveness of these drugs over the last decade,” said John McIlveen, Ph.D., state opioid treatment authority, OHA Health Systems Division. “We’re looking forward to working with our local partners to get these funds distributed as soon as they become available.”

The lawsuits hold opioid manufacturers, distributors and retailers accountable for their role in creating and fueling the opioid epidemic and for aggressively marketing prescription opioids while simultaneously downplaying their risks to health care providers and the public. The State of Oregon reached resolution with four of these companies in July 2021.

The resolution consists of two agreements and is referred to as the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements.

The 18-member, governor-appointed Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment and Recovery (OSPTR) Board will be responsible for making funding decisions that align with approved opioid prevention, treatment and recovery strategies listed in Exhibit E of the settlement and Oregon's Strategic Plan for Substance Use Services developed by the state Alcohol & Drug Policy Commission (ADPC). A portion of the state’s funds must go toward a unified and evidence-based state system for collecting, analyzing and publishing data about the availability and efficacy of substance use prevention, treatment and recovery services statewide.

The governor will appoint the board based on the OSPTR Board membership requirements defined in House Bill 4098. The OSPTR Board is expected to begin meeting in late fall 2022.

About $333 million will be awarded to Oregon from the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements over the course of 18 years, beginning this year. Forty-five percent of the opioid settlement funds will be allocated to a new Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment & Recovery fund managed by OHA; 55% will be paid directly to cities and counties with populations of more than 10,000.

About $503 million is going directly to tribes from the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements. All federally recognized tribes are eligible to participate in the Tribal Opioid Settlements, regardless of whether that tribe filed an opioid lawsuit. Oregon’s tribes are eligible to receive a portion of the $503 million settlement.

Oregon followed the model developed through the national opioid settlement to determine how much funding each eligible city and county would receive. This allocation formula is based on population and public health metrics.

Oregon anticipates receiving additional opioid settlement funds from other lawsuits. However, the timing, amount and allowable uses of these funds have yet to be determined. Generally speaking, the funds must be used for opioid prevention, treatment and recovery strategies that are listed in the settlement. They may not be used for other purposes.

Cities and counties will decide how their funds are used.

Oregon drug overdose deaths more than doubled between 2019 and 2021, an alarming trend driven largely by misuse of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl, an OHA analysis found. Preliminary data indicate this trend continued in 2022.

A review of State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS) and Oregon death certificate data by analysts from OHA’s Injury and Violence Prevention Section found that unintentional/undetermined drug overdose deaths increased from 496 in 2019 to 1,072 in 2021. The 2021 figure doesn’t include all fourth-quarter overdose deaths, which are still being tallied and analyzed.

The number of unintentional/undetermined fentanyl overdose deaths jumped more than 600% between 2019 and 2021, from 71 to 509, respectively.

Of all unintentional/undetermined drug overdose deaths in 2021, 47.5% were due to fentanyl; in 2020, fentanyl caused 32.1% of overdose deaths; in 2019, the drug was responsible for 14.3% of overdoses.

Overall, unintentional/undetermined overdoses from opioids, including fentanyl and heroin, also rose sharply during that time, from 280 to 739 deaths – a 164% increase. Unintentional/undetermined stimulant – methamphetamine – overdoses doubled, from 325 to 658 deaths between 2019 to 2021.

The Oregon Department of Justice provides additional information on the settlement here.


Missing child alert -- Davin Moore is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/08/22 4:28 PM
Davin Moore
Davin Moore
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156602/thumb_Davin_Moore.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Davin Moore, age 14, a child in foster care who went missing from Hermiston, Oregon on Aug. 5. He is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Davin and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see him.

Davin is suspected to be in the Oregon cities of Pendleton, La Grande or Richland. 

Name: Davin Moore
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 22, 2008
Height: 5-foot-6
Weight: 229 pound
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Brown 
Hermiston Police Department Case #22-1712
Pendleton Police Department Case #22-2082
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children # 1457596

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

###




Attached Media Files: Davin Moore

OSP Fish & Wildlife seeking public assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for killing an antelope- Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/08/22 3:22 PM
2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg
2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156600/thumb_SP22203156-Antelope.jpg

On August 5, 2022, OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers received information from a citizen who found an antelope carcass on BLM property between Mother Lode Road and Skinner Lane in Keating, OR.

OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers responded to the scene and found the butchered carcass of an antelope with the head removed. Troopers determined the antelope was likely killed sometime during the first week of August.  In addition to the unlawful take, Troopers also determined meat was left to waste. 

The first controlled antelope season in this area, the 462 Pine Cr-Keating hunt is August 13-21, 2022. 

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for public assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for killing the antelope in the Keating Wildlife Management Unit. Anyone with information about this case is urged to call the Oregon State Police via the Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email TIP@osp.oregon.gov  Please, reference case number SP22203156. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Turn in Poachers (TIP) program offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation, to a suspect, for the unlawful killing of wildlife, and or waste of big game. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags. Learn more: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 - Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 - Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Game Birds or Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

Birds

$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey

All other protected avian species: see category below for listed species 

Mammals

$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$1,000 (e.g. wolf, wolverine, kit fox, red tree vole, Canada lynx, sea otter, Columbian white-tailed deer, California brown pelican, western snowy plover, California least tern, northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, short-tailed albatross, streaked horned lark, yellow-billed cuckoo, leatherback sea turtle, olive ridley sea turtle, Oregon spotted frog, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle)

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg

2023 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Application Period Begins (Photo)
City of Richland - 08/08/22 3:11 PM
2022-08/5957/156599/CDBG_Applications_mainweb.png
2022-08/5957/156599/CDBG_Applications_mainweb.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5957/156599/thumb_CDBG_Applications_mainweb.png

The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program will begin accepting applications August 8 through 31, 2022, for proposed neighborhood revitalization projects, affordable housing programs, expanded economic opportunities and improvements to community facilities and/or services for low-and moderate-income persons. Proposals must address a priority need identified in the 2020-2024 Consolidated Annual Action Plan (See  www.ci.richland.wa.us/CDBG)

The public is invited to participate in a Richland Planning Commission meeting on August 24, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall.  Richland citizens will have the opportunity to express their views and provide comments on community development and housing needs for low-and moderate-income persons.

The city also encourages projects and programs assisted by other funding sources to help leverage the CDBG allocation. Details and previously funded projects can be found at www.ci.richland.wa.us/CDBG. You can also email Tlehman@ci.richland.wa.us or call 509-942-7580 for more information. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5957/156599/CDBG_Applications_mainweb.png

Oregón supera la meta de ayudar a financiar 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo para personas sin hogar
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/08/22 2:44 PM

8 de agosto de 2022

 

Contacto para medios de comunicación: 

Delia Hernández                                                   

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

Oregón supera la meta de ayudar a financiar 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo para personas sin hogar

SALEM, Ore. – El Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios (OHCS, por sus siglas en inglés) anuncio que superó la meta del Plan Estatal de Vivienda de 20192023 de ayudar a pagar por la construcción de 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo (PSH, por sus siglas en inglés). El Concilio para la Estabilización de Vivienda de Oregón aprobó la semana pasada financiación para la construcción de unas 250 viviendas con servicios de apoyo lo que ayudo a la agencia a superar su meta un año antes de la fecha fijada. Hasta el momento, OHCS se ha comprometido a ayudar a pagar la creación de un total de 1,255 viviendas PSH. 

“Lograr este objetivo es la manifestación de un esfuerzo colectivo entre la gobernadora, la Legislatura de Oregón, socios comunitarios, Naciones Tribales, agencias federales, estatales y locales, desarrolladores de vivienda, negocios y comunidades locales”, dijo la directora de OHCS Andrea Bell. “No aceptamos la falta de hogar como un hecho de la vida. Invertir en soluciones humanas y dignas que sabemos funcionan es lo que las personas de Oregón se merecen y a la vez ahorramos dinero de los fondos públicos. Estoy orgullosa de lo que hemos logrado. Al avanzar hacia adelante, estamos dispuestos a construir y avanzar soluciones juntos”. 

La vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo es un modelo que se ha comprobado funciona para apoyar a individuos y familias carentes de hogar. Este tipo de vivienda es una estrategia reconocida nacionalmente para afrontar la falta de vivienda crónica, la cual provee vivienda profundamente asequible y permanente con servicios extensivos para albergar a personas independientemente de las barreras que enfrenten.  

Alder House, localizada en el centro de Portland, es un ejemplo de vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo en Oregón. Alder House provee 130 departamentos a individuos con ingresos bajos, con 30 departamentos designados como vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo. Todos los hogares reciben servicios para ayudar a construir el sentido de comunidad y mejorar la estabilidad de los residentes, además de que los 30 hogares PSH reciben administración intensiva de casos. Alder House tiene una sala comunitaria donde residentes pueden organizar eventos y convivir con sus vecinos.  

Alder House está cerca de varias opciones de transporte y supermercados, para que las personas tengan acceso a las necesidades básicas. Con un enfoque principal en facilitar el acceso a la vivienda, Alder House ayuda a las personas a conectarse con los recursos que necesitan para permanecer en sus hogares y prosperar en sus comunidades.  

Los esfuerzos para construir más viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo en Oregón continúan dada la magnitud de la necesidad de vivienda en el estado. Actualmente, hay nueve proyectos PSH en Oregón participando en el Instituto de OHCS para Vivienda con Servicios de Apoyo de 2022. La agencia continuará trabajando junto a la comunidad para encontrar soluciones innovadoras y orientadas en la equidad con la meta de ayudar a familias que carecen de vivienda. Para más información sobre este trabajo, visite el sitio de internet de OHCS.  




Attached Media Files: PSH PR

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet August 17
Oregon Health Authority - 08/08/22 1:59 PM

August 8, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet August 17

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: August 17, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605687795?pwd=M2xPWmlicTlZZHNaVTQ1aERTZEFWQT09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 160 568 7795, Password: 183443.

Agenda: Attendance for those attending by phone only; Meeting opening; Public comment; General updates; Status of 2022-23 rule changes and timeline; System updates; Follow up on race/ethnicity data in APAC; Future topics; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.

Some examples are:

  • spoken language interpreters,
  • sign language interpreters,
  • CART captioning,
  • braille,
  • large print,
  • transcripts,
  • virtual platform change.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Brian Toups, 503-385-6542 (voice/text), rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 business hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.


The Great Resignation
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/08/22 12:42 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey to determine whether and how the COVID-19 pandemic changed Oregonian’s work lives and ask about the great resignation. The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q14–24). 

First Off, How Many People Have Worked Over the Last Two Years?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

About two out of every three Oregonians over the age of 18 worked for pay over the last two years (65%) (Q14). 

Men are more likely than women to have worked at some point during the past two years by a small, but statistically significant, margin (68% to 61%). 

Most People Experienced a Job-Related Change in Their Life

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2-300x225.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2-768x576.png 768w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2.png 1200w" sizes="100vw" width="1024">The pandemic brought seismic changes for many Oregon workers—but for others, there were no changes at all. A plurality of workers say nothing has changed in the past two years (38%) (Q15). 

Men are more likely than women to say nothing has changed in their workplace as a result of the pandemic (44% compared to 31%). Workers with higher annual incomes have experienced fewer pandemic-related changes than those making less than $50,000 per year (39%-42% compared to 33% of those who make less than $50,000).

Has Covid-19 Created More Remote Work Environments?

Since the beginning of the pandemic, one in five Oregon workers has stopped going to an office every day and has instead become a remote or hybrid worker (20%), but the benefits of working from home were not shared across all groups (Q15).

34% of six-figure workers switched to a home office situation, compared with 13–18% of workers at lower income levels (less than $100K per year).  Those with college degrees were much more likely to have moved work to their homes than those with less formal education (34% compared to 16% of those with just some college and 8% of those with a high school education or less).

Unemployment Benefits

One in four workers with household incomes of $50,000 or less had to go on unemployment at some point between 2020 and today (26%) (Q15). 

The lowest income workers were most likely to have reported filing for unemployment, but between 9–15% of Oregon workers in all other income groups say they filed, too. One in five women (21%) accessed unemployment benefits sometime during the past two years, a bit more than men (15%). 

Do Oregonians Prefer a Remote Work Environment?

Today, workers are a bit more likely to have the option of working remotely, at least sometimes, than they are to report to an office or facility every day (40%, 37%) (Q20). 

Workers who work remotely at least sometimes are split fairly evenly: 22% work exclusively from home and 18% work in a hybrid model. High school graduates and those with some college education are most likely to report to work each day in person (43–44%), while just 24% of college grads do the same. 

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

Twice as many Oregonians would like the option of working from home or an office than currently have the option of a hybrid work environment (41%, 18%) (Q21, Q20). 

While residents would prefer to work exclusively from home more than coming into work each day (26% to 19%), they are even more likely to prefer a hybrid environment (41%). Half of college graduates want the option of choosing whether to go to an office or stay home (54% compared to 33–37% for other educational levels). 

One in Four Oregonians Joined “The Great Resignation”

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

One in four Oregon workers joined The Great Resignation by quitting a job (28%) (Q16). 

Some of these Oregon workers decided to become self-employed (12%), became a stay-at-home parent (5%), or chose to retire early (4%) (Q15). 

Self-employment—perhaps via the gig economy—was an especially notable choice for lower-income Oregonians (18% compared to 5-9% for those who make more than $50,000 a year). 

 

The most common reasons for resignation include that Oregonians felt disrespected and underpaid (43%, 41%) (Q17). Workers say disrespect is worse than low pay, and Oregonians are more likely to have quit over it than Americans broadly, per a Pew survey from February 2022data://8BDF1DB8-3878-4914-89CA-F225E007CA7C#_ftn1">[1] (43% to 35%). 

Oregonians are also more likely than other Americans to quit over low pay1 (41%, 37%). 

Oregonians are less likely than the national average to have quit their job due to dissatisfaction with benefits, with 15% saying they quit because benefits like health insurance and paid time off weren’t good, compared to 23% of Americans1.

“Our town hasn’t been able to fill positions for a pharmacist, anesthesiologist, teachers, and domestic violence shelter executive director due to lack of housing (housing turned into tourist rentals).”

Woman, age 30–44, Curry County, white

“Prejudices against people with prior felony convictions prevents so many from finding work, not enough access to affordable childcare, irregular shifts that interfere with family life, lack of transportation.”

Woman, age 65–74, Wallowa County, white

Why Did Some Oregonians Lose Their Job?

Additionally, 21% of workers lost their job during the pandemic (Q18). 

Nearly one-third of workers with a high school education lost a job (30%), double the number of college grads who lost a job (15%). Four times as many low-income residents lost their jobs compared to those who make $100,000 or more a year (31%, 7%). 

Four in ten employees lost their jobs due to a lack of work, or the business folding entirely (43%). Notably, three in ten workers say their job loss stemmed from physical or mental health issues (30%) (Q19). 

Lower-wage workers with household incomes of $50,000 per year or less were among the most likely to say that their employer went out of business (25%, compared to 11–14% for other income groups). 

“It’s being falsely represented that employers are having a hard time finding willing workers. I have applied to a lot of jobs [since] I lost my job, and it was hard to get even one interview when I have plenty of work history. They’re turning away so many applicants without a second look at us.”

Woman, age 18-29, Washington County, Native American/American Indian/Alaska Native and white

Women Favor Working From Home

Nearly half of Oregon residents—working or not—say that the option to work from home would determine whether they accepted a job (44%) (Q22). This is especially true for women (49%), more so than men (38%). There is no difference between different income levels as to whether a work from home option would determine their acceptance. 

“The Great Resignation” is the Product of High Cost of Living

Oregonians say The Great Resignation and the low-wage worker shortage is the product of a high cost of living, not people living off government benefits (60% to 34%) (Q23). 

“If the pay matches the expense of living, more people would be looking for jobs.”

Woman, age 18-29, Multnomah County, Black or African American

“Partly due to high cost of living but also due to family obligations (caretaking), stressful working conditions of many low-wage jobs, and thoughts of entitlement.”

Man, age 65-74, Benton County, Asian

“Benefits and wages aren’t keeping up with inflation and supply chain issues.”

Man, age 30-44, Multnomah County, Asian

“If employers were willing to raise wages to a living level, people would jump at the chance to get those jobs. Since they have a bit of a cushion now, people looking for work can afford to be slightly pickier rather than desperate.”

Woman, age 30-44, Deschutes County, white

“I’m one of them. I wish I knew where these people are getting all this money to live off of. [Maybe] Mitch McConnell can tell me. Our only income is my husband’s $728.00 per month.”

Woman, age 55–64, Marion County, Asian and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

“I believe people have realized they deserve better as well.”

Woman, age 30–44, Coos County, white

“In addition to young people not wanting to work in low wage jobs, I believe quite a few believe that it is beneath their perceived status to work in a minimum wage job.”

Woman, age 65–74, Multnomah County, white

“People want a free ride off the backs of others. Those on fixed income should get stimulus but don’t.”

Woman, age 45–54, Deschutes County, white

Demographic Trends

Identifying what unites us. Understanding what divides us.

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

  • BIPOC Oregonians are more likely than white residents to have been employed in the past two years (72% to 63%) (Q14). 
    • BIPOC workers were equally likely to experience changes (or not) in their workplace over the last two years. For example, one in five workers in each demographic group shifted to remote or hybrid work (19% and 20%) (Q15).
  • Given the option, BIPOC Oregonians have a stronger preference for an all-at-home work model than white Oregonians (31%, 24%) (Q21). 

These findings mirror those from some companies’ internal workplace surveys[2]. Several publications have addressed the issue as well, investigating the link between discrimination and microaggressions in the workplace and the desire to return in-person. 

  • In rural Oregon, fewer people have worked within the past two years (55%), due in large part to a higher percentage of senior residents in rural areas (Q14). Of those who are still in the workforce, rural residents are less likely to have experienced changes over the past two years.
    • 43% of rural workers say nothing in their job has changed as a result of the pandemic, compared to 28% of urban workers (Q15).
    • Rural workers are about as likely to have quit a job since 2020 as urban and suburban workers (25–31%) (Q16).
  • Rural workers were less likely to shift to working remotely, whether in the same job or in a new one (Q15). 
    • The shift to remote work affected one in four residents in urban areas, but just one in ten in rural parts of Oregon (26% to 10%) (Q15).
    • Urban residents are also more likely than rural residents to have started a new job in order to work remotely, although not by a significant margin (12% urban, 7% rural) (Q15).
    • Nearly one in three urban residents works from home 100% of the time (30%), compared to just 18% of rural workers (Q20).
  • Rural workers are about as likely to have quit a job since 2020 as urban and suburban workers (25–31%) (Q16). 
    • Unlike their suburban and rural-changing-to-suburban counterparts, the most common reason urban and rural residents quit their jobs is low pay (urban: 42%; rural: 38%), followed by the top statewide reason: feeling disrespected as work (urban: 39%; rural: 37%) (Q17).
  • A majority of Oregonians from all types of communities believe that a skyrocketing cost of living is more to blame for a shortage of workers than a glut of government benefits keeping people at home. In rural areas, a scant majority of residents take that view (Q23). 
    • Exactly 50% of Oregonians in rural areas say people simply can’t afford low-wage work these days, a view shared by 72% of urban residents.
  • Workers are, of course, more likely to be people aged 18–64, and labor participation declines steadily with age. For those 18–29, about 83% were employed in the last two years; for those 65–74, 40% were employed. Fewer than one in five seniors over the age of 75 worked for pay in the past two years (19%). 
  • Half of workers under the age of 30 quit a job in the past two years, along with more than one-quarter of workers 30–44 (48%, 29%) (Q16). 
    • Between 0–21% of other age groups quit a job in the past two years, with numbers falling steadily as age groups rise. 
    • Low pay is an especially significant factor for young Oregonians just entering the workforce. For those under 30, more than half quit in favor of more financially sustaining opportunities (53%) (Q17). 
    • Additionally, more than one in four workers under 45 lost a job over the same period (27-28%) (Q18).
  • Oregonians under 30 have strong opinions on the labor shortage. Two-thirds say it is more accurate to blame the high cost of living, including rising rents (66%) (Q23). 
    • While some might believe these young residents are slacking off and simply not working hard enough, it is worth noting this same demographic group quit their jobs in search of higher income (53%) and demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit by becoming self-employed (16%) (Q17, Q15).  
  • About two out of every three Oregonians over the age of 18 worked for pay over the last two years (65%) (Q14). 
    • Workers are, of course, more likely to be people aged 18–64, and labor participation declines steadily with age. For those 18–29, about 83% were employed in the last two years; for those 65–74, 40% were employed. Fewer than one in five seniors over the age of 75 worked for pay in the past two years (19%). 

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.47%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs , OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire

Oregon surpasses goal to fund 1,000 permanent homes with supportive services for people experiencing homelessness
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/08/22 11:45 AM

August 8, 2022

 

Media Contact: 

Delia Hernández                                                   

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

Oregon surpasses goal to fund 1,000 permanent homes with supportive services for people experiencing homelessness

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announced it has exceeded the 20192023 Oregon Statewide Housing Plan goal to fund 1,000 units of permanent supportive housing (PSH). The Housing Stability Council approved last week funding for almost 250 PSH homes. OHCS has now committed to funding 1,255 PSH homes, which is a year ahead of the scheduled target date of 2023. 

“Achieving this goal is a manifestation of collective galvanizing of the governor, Oregon Legislature, community partners, Tribal Nations, federal, state and local agencies, developers, local businesses, and local communities,” said OHCS Director Andrea Bell. “We do not accept homelessness as a fact of life. Investing in humane, dignified solutions that we know are effective is what the people of Oregon deserve and optimizes public funds. I am proud of what we have accomplished together. As we continue pushing forward, we are eager to learn, build, and advance solutions together.” 

Permanent supportive housing is an evidence-based model for supporting people and households experiencing homelessness. PSH is a nationally recognized strategy to address chronic homelessness. It provides deeply affordable and permanent housing with wraparound services to house people regardless of barriers they may face. 

Alder House, located in the heart of downtown Portland, is one example of what permanent supportive housing looks like in Oregon. Alder House provides 130 apartments for individuals earning low incomes, with 30 apartments designated as permanent supportive housing (PSH). All households receive supportive resident services to help build community and improve housing stability, and the 30 PSH households also receive intensive case management services. Alder House features a community room in which residents can organize events and convene with neighbors. 

In addition, it is near various transportation and grocery options, so people have easy access to their basic everyday needs. With a housing first approach, Alder House helps people get connected with the resources they need to stay stable in their homes and thrive in their communities. 

The work to build more PSH developments in Oregon continues given the magnitude of Oregon’s housing needs. Currently, there are nine PSH projects throughout the state participating in the 2022 OHCS Supportive Housing Institute. Moving forward, OHCS will continue to work alongside community and partners to find innovative and equity-centered solutions to help families who are experiencing homelessness. For more information about this work, visit the OHCS website.  




Attached Media Files: PSH PR

Oregon State Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/08/22 11:22 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Dennis Eugene Dunn, died August 7, 2022. Dunn was incarcerated at Oregon State Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Dunn entered DOC custody on October 30, 2017, from Clackamas County with an earliest release date of October 30, 2026. Dunn was 83 years old. 

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSCI is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses approximately 870 adults in custody. It provides a range of correctional services and programs including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, work crews, and transition planning. OSCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a print shop and a contact center. OSCI was established by action of the 1955 Legislature and became fully operational on June 1, 1959.

 

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Attached Media Files: Dennis E. Dunn

UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Nevaeh Rohrbach has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/08/22 10:11 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Nevaeh Rohrbach. 

Nevaeh Rohrbach, age 13, is a child who went missing from Portland on Aug. 1. She was found Aug. 4. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold In-Person Meeting in Grand Ronde
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/08/22 10:00 AM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held in person Wednesday, September 14, 2022, at Spirit Mountain Casino, in the Kalapuya B conference room. Spirit Mountain is located at 27100 SW Salmon River Highway in Grand Ronde.

The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. It is the committee’s first in-person meeting since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon in March 2020.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

The committee meets quarterly in various locations across the state. The public is invited to attend.

ODVA’s Reports to the Advisory Committee are available to the public on the ODVA website: https://issuu.com/odva/stacks/38107bb40c054695831edf5634865ca4

More information is available online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.

Town Hall:

The business meeting will be followed by a town hall in which attendees will be invited to ask questions of the committee and director. This time is set aside for individuals to bring up broader veteran community issues. Members of the community are also invited to submit written public comments to the committee by email to vaac@odva.state.or.us.

Established in 1945, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is dedicated to serving Oregon’s diverse veteran community that spans five eras of service members. ODVA administers programs and provides special advocacy and assistance in accessing earned veteran benefits across the state. Learn about veteran benefits and services, or locate a local county or tribal veteran service office online at https://oregon.gov/odva.

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Committee for Family Forestlands meets Aug. 10
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/22 8:57 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Wednesday, Aug. 10 from noon to 4:30 p.m. The public meeting will be a hybrid meeting held in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St. in Salem. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment, please email estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Fire protection update
  • Forest Practices Act draft administrative rules based on the Private Forests Accord Report

The meeting is open to the public to attend in-person or online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.


Sun. 08/07/22
Ontario National Guard Tankers Mobilize for Kuwait Deployment (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/07/22 12:37 PM
220807-Z-ZJ128-1004
220807-Z-ZJ128-1004
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/962/156565/thumb_DSCF1331.jpg

ONTARIO, Ore.-A Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon Army National Guard, held a mobilization ceremony for 16 Soldiers deploying to the country of Kuwait Sunday, Aug. 7, at the Ontario National Guard Armory. The Soldiers will augment the 2nd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment from Idaho National Guard for a one-year deployment. The 16 are assigned to the same company and will leave soon for Fort Bliss, Texas, located near El Paso.

While in Kuwait, the deploying group will be part of Operation Spartan Shield (OSS), a joint mission under the U.S. Central Command, and part of Operation Enduring Freedom. OSS focuses on providing theater security, all while strengthening and building defense partner relationships in Southwest Asia.

The deploying Soldiers are all tank crew members led by 1st Lt. Matthew Booher and Staff Sgt. James Hawley have been in training to prepare for this deployment. Booher said, " We've been assigned to Bravo Company, 2-116 and participated with their battalion drilling and operating with them for the past three or four months."

"The training is not complete," Hawley said, "and there is still more to do. We'll be at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas, for two months and then to Kuwait, where we will fall in on our tanks."

The group of Soldiers are all traditional guard members who drill one weekend a month and train for two weeks annually, typically in the summer. Most are from surrounding communities and have full-time civilian employment, attend college, or are between jobs.


                                                                        -30-

 

Photos for release:

220807-Z-ZJ128-1001
Members of Adder Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon National Guard deploying to Kuwait in front of their armory in Ontario, Ore. Aug. 7, 2022. The group of armor crew members will be on a one-year deployment as part of Operation Spartan Shield in Southwest Asia.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220807-Z-ZJ128-1002

1st Lt. Matthew Booher stands in front of the deploying 16 guard members of Adder Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon National Guard, as 3-116 CAV Commander Lt. Col. Seth Musgrove addresses the crowd assembled for the unit's mobilization ceremony in Ontario, Ore. Aug. 7, 2022. The group of armor crew members will be on a one-year deployment as part of Operation Spartan Shield in Southwest Asia. 

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220807-Z-ZJ128-1003

Staff Sgt. James Hawley, part of the deploying group of Adder Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon National Guard, bows his head in prayer as Chaplain (Cpt.) Jeffrey Parker prays for the group's success during their yearlong deployment to Kuwait in Ontario, Ore. Aug. 7, 2022. The group of armor crew members will be on a one-year deployment as part of Operation Spartan Shield in Southwest Asia.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220807-Z-ZJ128-1004
Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel The Oregon National Guard Adjutant General shakes hands with deploying Adder Company members, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon National Guard after their mobilization ceremony in Ontario, Ore. Aug. 7, 2022. The group of armor crew members will be on a one-year deployment as part of Operation Spartan Shield in Southwest Asia.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220807-Z-ZJ128-1005

1st Lt. Matthew Booher stands in front of the deploying 16 guard members of Adder Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment (Combined Arms Battalion), Oregon National Guard, during the unit's mobilization ceremony in Ontario, Ore. Aug. 7, 2022. The group of armor crew members will be on a one-year deployment as part of Operation Spartan Shield in Southwest Asia.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 220807-Z-ZJ128-1004 , 220807-Z-ZJ128-1003 , 220807-Z-ZJ128-1002 , 220807-Z-ZJ128-1001 , 220807-Z-ZJ128-1005

Fri. 08/05/22
Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on August 10
Oregon Health Authority - 08/05/22 4:40 PM

August 5, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on August 10

What: An executive session of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has been scheduled for the first 45 minutes of the regular council meeting on Wednesday, August 10, 2022.

Agenda: Executive Session is to be held under ORS 192.660(2)(f) and (h) to discuss attorney-client privileged legal advice and discuss documents that are confidential with the Oregon Department of Justice.

The agenda for the public portion of the meeting will be posted on the OAC website prior to the meeting.

When/Where: Wednesday, August 10, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Public meeting will open with roll call then go into a short Executive Session. Public meeting will resume at 2:15 p.m.  https://youtu.be/GKSegDy7cOM

Executive Session: For media only:

Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610808672?pwd=VEVxcUxoRmc5NjdwangrU1pPQkZVZz09

Meeting ID: 161 080 8672 Passcode: 459711 +16692545252,1610808672# US (Pacific Time)

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Music Boosters donate grand piano to Walla Walla High School (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/05/22 8:18 AM
2022-08/1288/156538/WaHi_grand_piano.jpg
2022-08/1288/156538/WaHi_grand_piano.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1288/156538/thumb_WaHi_grand_piano.jpg

WALLA WALLA – Walla Walla Public Schools Music Coordinator Roger Garcia was all smiles this week as a Steinway B grand piano was delivered to the Walla Walla High School Performing Arts Auditorium thanks to a generous donation from the Music Boosters. The $24,000 used piano was purchased from a church in Salem, OR following nearly two decades of fruit sale fundraising by the Music Boosters.

“I am beyond thrilled as this has been one of my major goals since taking the position 16 years ago,” said Garcia. “The piano has a beautiful walnut finish and is in excellent condition.”

Garcia says the Steinway will be housed in a special cabinet on the stage of the auditorium for the Wa-Hi Choir and other performances. The school’s current Yamaha Baby Grand will be moved from the auditorium to the choir room of the new bond-funded Music Building for rehearsals and practice sessions.  

A local piano tuner is scheduled to come to Wa-Hi to service the piano later this month. The piano broker who secured the purchase will come back in two months to make sure it is working properly.

“This is a significant improvement for our program and I can’t wait for the students to see it on the first day of school,” said Garcia. “This piano will sound so much better and enhance the experience of our music students. We can’t thank the Music Boosters enough for this amazing gift.”


PHOTO - Piano broker Matt Hirschfelder delivers the Steinway B grand piano to the Walla Walla High School Performing Arts Auditorium.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1288/156538/WaHi_grand_piano.jpg

Cummings named to lead Walla Walla Center for Children & Families (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/05/22 7:52 AM
2022-08/1288/156537/Brent_Cummings.jpg
2022-08/1288/156537/Brent_Cummings.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1288/156537/thumb_Brent_Cummings.jpg

WALLA WALLA – Current Director of Accelerated Learning and Support Brent Cummings has been named the Director of Walla Walla Center for Children & Families following an extensive selection process. Cummings replaces Samantha Bowen who recently accepted the statewide Executive Director of Early Learning for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The Walla Walla Center for Children & Families provides early learning services for youth and parents as a coordinated and comprehensive community learning hub located in the former Blue Ridge Elementary School. Programs include four-year-old kindergarten (Transitional Kindergarten), Head Start, ECEAP and a host of community and agency partners. Established in 2019, the center represents a decades-long community quest to help ensure all children enter kindergarten socially, emotionally and academically prepared.    

"I am deeply honored and excited to continue to serve Walla Walla students and families in this leadership role,” said Cummings. “The opportunity to work with our youngest learners and their families is a special calling. Through the dedicated work of our tremendous teachers, educators, building staff and community partners, we will continue to expand upon the significant academic and social wellbeing foundations already established at the Walla Walla Center for Children & Families."

Due to his extensive grant management experience and program development skill set, Cummings was tapped two years ago to oversee the coordination and delivery of the district’s extensive federal Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) fund dollars to help address the impact of COVID on students. The district’s Summer SOL program, afterschool initiatives, and development of community partners such as Communities in Schools, are just a few of Cummings’ most recent accomplishments.  Prior to his current position, he served as the district’s Director of 21st Century Afterschool Programs for eight years.

Cummings holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Montana where he also earned All-Academic Honors while playing on the men’s basketball team. Cummings and his wife Audra, a Walla Walla High School graduate and former district teacher, have four young children.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1288/156537/Brent_Cummings.jpg

Thu. 08/04/22
OHA releases COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report
Oregon Health Authority - 08/04/22 5:02 PM

August 4, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, COVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov">orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA releases COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, reported 40,013 cases of infection during the month of July.  

Of those cases, 18,622, or 46.5%, were unvaccinated people, and 21,380, or 53.4%, were vaccine breakthrough cases. Among the breakthrough cases, 14,388, or 67.3%, were fully vaccinated and boosted.

To date, there have been 292,802 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. Of those cases, 103,563, or 35.4%, were fully vaccinated and boosted at the time of infection.  

To date, 2.6% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized, and 0.6% have died. The median age of vaccinated people who died is 80.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at protecting people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized and dying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends COVID-19 primary series vaccinations for everyone age 6 months and older and COVID-19 boosters for everyone age 5 years and older, if eligible.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

Note: The next breakthrough report will be published Thursday, Sept. 8. 


Missing child alert -- Oakley Miller is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/04/22 4:53 PM
Remington Miller
Remington Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156529/thumb_Remington_Miller.jpg

(Salem) – Oakley Miller, age 3-months, went missing with his mother McKinzie Simonis from La Grande, Oregon on Aug. 3. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that Oakley may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

They are believed to be in the La Grande area and may be staying in a hotel in the area. McKinzie Simonis and Oakley may also be with Oakley’s father, Remington Miller. 

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Oakely. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Oakley or McKinzie Simonis should call 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233)

Name: Oakley Miller
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 25, 2022
Hair: Blonde 
Eye color: Blue
Other identifying information: Oakley is a young infant who is likely with his mother, McKinzie Simonis.
Union County Sheriff’s Office Case #SO220612
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457364

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Remington Miller , Oakley Miller , Oakley Miller and McKinzie Simonis

Kirkland Man Charged with Drug Trafficking Offense Related to Recent Motel Robbery
U.S. Attorney's Office - Eastern Dist. of Wash. - 08/04/22 4:32 PM

Spokane – Vanessa R. Waldref, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Scott Banchero, age 58, of Kirkland, Washington, was charged by federal criminal complaint with Possession with Intent to Distribute 500 Grams or More of a Mixture or Substance Containing a Detectable Amount of Methamphetamine, in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(A)(viii).

As alleged in the criminal complaint, in the early morning hours of August 3, 2022, Banchero was identified as the victim of a robbery at a local motel in Spokane Valley, Washington.  Banchero had just arrived from the Seattle, Washington area when the robbery occurred. 

Agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and the Drug Enforcement Administration, as well as Detectives with the Spokane Police Department’s Special Investigations Unit, subsequently executed a federal search warrant on a storage unit rented to Banchero near Spokane, Washington.  In the storage unit, law enforcement located approximately 20,000 fentanyl-laced pills, 2 pounds of methamphetamine, 1 kilogram of heroin, and a half pound of cocaine. 

Assistant United States Attorneys Patrick Cashman and Caitlin Baunsgard of the Eastern District of Washington are handling this matter on behalf of the United States. 

The charges contained in the Complaint are merely accusations, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Case No.: 2:22-mj-276-JAG


Fatal Crash US 101 -- Curry County
Oregon State Police - 08/04/22 4:09 PM

On Thursday August 4, 2022, at about 5:30 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on US 101 near milepost 358.   

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Mazda CX9, operated by Benjamin Broderick, age 60, from Harbor, was northbound and crashed into an adult female pedestrian walking in the travel lane.  The pedestrian was wearing dark colored clothing at the time. 

The pedestrian was transported to a local hospital where she later died from her injuries.   The name of the pedestrian is being withheld pending next of kin notification to family. 

Broderick was uninjured and cooperated with investigators at the scene. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Harbor Fire Department and Cal Ore Life Flight.

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State Forester announces next steps for statewide wildfire risk map
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/04/22 3:56 PM

SALEM, Ore.— Cal Mukumoto, Oregon State Forester and Director of the Oregon Department of Forestry, issued the following statement today:

Oregon’s wildfire environment has changed significantly in the past decade. Climate change is bringing us hotter, drier summers and historic levels of drought, resulting in severe wildfire conditions and longer, more complex and more expensive fire seasons. We find ourselves at a critical juncture when it comes to wildfire and need to take bold action to mitigate further catastrophic impacts to Oregonians, communities and our state’s natural resources. 

Senate Bill 762 laid the foundation for that bold action. The bill passed in 2021 with bipartisan support and made investments in fire-adapted communities, wildfire response and resilient landscapes. Eleven state agencies are tasked with implementing the various components of SB 762. The Oregon Department of Forestry was directed to develop and maintain a statewide wildfire risk map. The map identifies the risk of a wildfire occurring in a given area to help determine where resources are needed most to protect lives and homes when a wildfire does occur. 

In addition to writing the rules for map development and maintenance with a rules advisory committee, we were also tasked with defining the wildland-urban interface and assigning a risk classification at the property ownership level (1.8 million tax lots across Oregon). This work had to be completed by June 30, 2022, less than a year after the bill was adopted. We knew the first iteration of an undertaking of this scale and complexity wouldn’t be perfect, but we have been and continue to be committed to improving the map and our processes related to it. At the same time, our partner agencies are working to collect input as they develop the new codes for defensible space (Office of the State Fire Marshal) and home hardening (Building Codes Division) and address concerns related to homeowner’s insurance (Division of Financial Regulation).

We’ve been soliciting and collecting questions, concerns, and other input since the statewide wildfire risk map was released just over a month ago. We’ve received specific feedback from nearly 2,000 Oregonians that has helped us understand the key areas of concern related to risk classification. We have a window of opportunity before the new codes go into effect to take some immediate steps toward addressing those concerns, and we will be taking full advantage of the opportunity. 

As required by SB 762, we posted a wildfire risk map on the Oregon Explorer on June 30, 2022 and sent notifications to property owners in the extreme and high risk classifications shortly after. In response to input received since posting, we have decided to remove the current iteration of the wildfire risk map from the Oregon Explorer and withdraw the notices sent. We will immediately begin working with Oregon State University on some refinements to improve the accuracy of risk classification assignments based on what we’ve heard from property owners thus far. 

Since we are withdrawing the initial map and notifications, the current appeals process will end and any appeals filed will become moot. For those who did submit an appeal, we will be reviewing the information submitted and using it to identify any additional areas where we may need to take a closer look at the data. Please note, this decision does not impact the code development and adoption processes currently underway through Office of the State Fire Marshal for defensible space or Building Codes Division for home hardening.

While we met the bill’s initial deadline for delivering on the map, there wasn’t enough time to allow for the type of local outreach and engagement that people wanted, needed and deserved. Once this round of refinements is complete, we are planning to bring a draft of the updated map to communities for discussion and input. After another round of revisions based on local input, the map will be finalized. We will then post an updated map on the Oregon Explorer and issue new notices to property owners in the extreme and high risk classifications, which will start a new appeal period. We are in the process of developing a plan and timeline to complete these activities, including public engagement and outreach opportunities. We will share that publicly as soon as it is complete. 

We know how important it is to get this right, and we’re fully committed to continuing to work with the Governor’s Office, legislators, our partner agencies, local governments, and Oregonians to do just that.


Bulletin aims to help homeowners with prolonged claims from 2020 wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/04/22 3:48 PM

Aug. 4, 2022

Salem – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has determined that certain property and casualty insurers should extend timelines for policyholders who suffered losses during the 2020 wildfire season and who have been unable to rebuild or replace property due to circumstances outside their control.

The bulletin applies to property and casualty insurers who write homeowners policies that specifically contain a time limit of less than three years for rebuilding a home, replacing contents, or both. The bulletin outlines the communications now required between these insurers and their policyholders who still have active claims almost two years after the wildfires. These insurers are directed to extend the rebuilding timeline and content replacement timeline if the delay has been due to circumstances beyond the insured’s control. They are also directed to notify policyholders of any extension by Aug. 30. 

For policyholders not being granted an extension until at least Sept. 30, 2023, insurers are required to report certain information to the division, including an explanation why the insurer refused to grant an extension after a thorough examination. The division will continue to monitor the situation to ensure that all policyholders are protected and allowed a reasonable time to rebuild and replace contents given the extreme difficulties they have faced. The division has the authority to take action against any insurer who unreasonably declines to extend timelines. 

The findings and background of the bulletin speak to the widespread destruction of property, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, global supply chain issues, and, consequently, the disruption of normal operations across the state for a prolonged period.

“The 2020 wildfires caused heartbreaking losses, and the recovery process has taken longer than it should due to circumstances completely out of homeowners’ control,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Our actions today are meant to provide wildfire survivors with the certainty they deserve. After nearly two years of struggling to rebuild in the face of unprecedented challenges, every homeowner should be given the time they need to finish recovering.”

The bulletin can be found at https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/Bulletins/bulletin2022-03.pdf and is effective immediately.

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.


Department of Revenue Gresham office emergency closure today due to broken water line
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 08/04/22 2:53 PM

The Oregon Department of Revenue’s Gresham regional office at 1550 NW Eastman Parkway, Suite 220 is closed Thursday, August 4, to in-person service, due to a broken water line. It’s possible the office could also be closed on Friday, August 5, 2022 if the waterline has not been repaired. Please call the office before visiting.

Although the Revenue office is closed, the building remains open. There is a secure drop box inside the building that is available for taxpayers to deliver any necessary payments or documents, which are removed daily from the drop box by office staff.

The Department of Revenue continues to expand features available through Revenue Online. Individuals can view letters sent to them by the department, initiate appeals, make payments, and submit questions. Visit Revenue Online on the Revenue website at www.oregon.gov/dor to learn more.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You can also call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), we accept all relay calls


 


UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Kanon Zee has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/04/22 12:56 PM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Kanon Zee. 

Kanon Zee, a newborn infant, is a child who went missing from Portland on Aug. 1. He was found Aug. 4. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Nova Millsap and Artimay Millsap have been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/04/22 12:52 PM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Nova Millsap and Artimay Millsap. 

Nova Millsap, age 13-months, and Artimay Millsap, age 2-months, went missing from Bend on July 7. They were found Aug. 4. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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$2.8 million in funding available to support newly arrived Afghans
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/04/22 10:25 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Refugee Program is inviting community partners to apply for a portion of $2.8 million in funding that is available to provide services and support to newly arrived Afghans who are eligible for refugee services.

The deadline to apply is Aug. 25 and the application can be found online.

The U.S. Resettlement Program is operated by the U.S. Department of State through contracts with national non-profit organizations called resettlement agencies. These organizations have local affiliate offices throughout the nation. 

The ODHS Refugee Program is responsible for some of the services that are outside of the initial resettlement provided by the resettlement agencies.  The Refugee Program provides cash, medical, employment, and acculturation services to refugees (and those eligible for refugee services) who are within 60 months of gaining their eligible immigration status.

Since August 2021, nearly 800 Afghan individuals have resettled in Oregon. 

The purpose of this request is to ask for applications from culturally and/or linguistically responsive organizations who provide services to immigrants or refugees (and those eligible for refugee services) to increase services and supports. 

Funding is available to support:

  • Employment services and housing assistance: $1,059,000
  • Health and mental health services: $435,000
  • Legal services: $641,000
  • Youth mentoring: $114,000
  • School assistance: $450,000
  • Senior services: $105,000

Organizations may express interest in supporting more than one service area. Community organizations are eligible to submit proposals for the funding if the organization can demonstrate they are:

  • A culturally and/or linguistically responsive organization
  • Community based organization 
  • Have an office located in the area where services will be coordinated and provided
  • Provide services in the languages of the populations that will be served 

More information the ODHS Refugee Program can be found online

About the Oregon Department of Human Services

The mission of the Oregon Department of Human Services is to help Oregonians in their own communities achieve wellbeing and independence through opportunities that protect, empower, respect choice and preserve dignity. 

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Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council meets Aug. 18, 2022
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/04/22 8:00 AM

The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m.–10:30 a.m., Aug. 18 via Zoom. The meeting includes updates about the Scenic and Regional Trail Program, a membership update, and a discussion of plans to issue the 2022 Doug Newman Memorial Award.

The meeting is open to the public. The agenda and link for the meeting is posted on the ORTAC website .

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon. 

The council is made up of seven members representing Oregon’s U.S. Congressional Districts, and at least two members representing counties bordering the coast. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. For more information about ORTAC, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Pages/BWT-ortac.aspx

For more information, contact Program Coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-856-6316 or ellefeuille@oprd.oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oprd.oregon.gov.


Fatal Crash US 730 -- Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - 08/04/22 7:24 AM

On Wednesday August 3, 2022, at about 12:00 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 730 near milepost 182.   

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Saturn SUV, operated by Scott McBride, age 59, from Hermiston, was westbound when for unknown reasons crossed into the on-coming lane crashing into an eastbound Peterbilt Semi-truck, operated by Luis Sandoval, age 42, from Grand View, Washington. 

McBride was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Sandoval was un-injured in the crash. 

US 730 was closed for about seven (7) hours. 

OSP was assisted by Umatilla Fire District 1, Umatilla Police Department and ODOT.   

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Congressional Gold Medal to be awarded to WWII-era Oregon Wing Civil Air Patrol member at August 9 event
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 08/04/22 5:35 AM

Family members of the late Lieutenant Colonel Ethyle E. O’Neal, CAP, will receive the medal from Civil Air Patrol National Commander Maj Gen Edward Phelka 

What: Ethyle E. (Kremers) O’Neal, a 14-year-old Portland native, joined the newly formed Civil Air Patrol in 1942 to help defend our unprepared nation at our entrance into World War II.   

She served until 1949, when she joined the US Air Force.   

During her early CAP service, she saved the life of a 15-month-old infant in the historic Vanport Flood of 1947. 

Upon retirement from the Air Force in 1976, O’Neal rejoined Civil Air Patrol in Oregon.  She commanded two Portland metropolitan area squadrons. 

She also served as the Oregon Wing Director of Cadet Programs until her passing in 2007. 

Who’s Attending: O’Neal family members and friends, invited Federal and State legislators, National, Pacific Region, and Oregon Wing CAP officials, and partner agency members,      

When: Tuesday, August 9, 2022, | 6:00 PM 

Where: Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum – 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, McMinnville, OR 97128 

 

CAP CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL BACKGROUND 

113th Congress Public Law 113-108   

(1) The unpaid volunteer members of the Civil Air Patrol (hereafter in this Act referred to as the ‘‘CAP’’) during World War II provided extraordinary humanitarian, combat, and  

national services during a critical time of need for the Nation.  

(2) During the war, CAP members used their own aircraft to perform a myriad of essential tasks for the military and the nation within the United States, including attacks on enemy submarines off the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States.  

(3) This extraordinary national service set the stage for the post-war CAP to become a valuable nonprofit, public service organization chartered by Congress and designated the Auxiliary of the United States Air Force that provides essential emergency, operational, and public services to communities, States, the Federal Government, and the military. ((3 of 42 Sections)) 

 

Since Civil Air Patrol’s formation during the earliest days of World War II, this vigilant organization of citizen Airmen has been committed to service to America. Founded on Dec. 1, 1941, to mobilize the nation's civilian aviation resources for national defense service, CAP has evolved into a premier public service organization that still carries out emergency service missions when needed — in the air and on the ground. 

Today as a Total Force partner and auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, Civil Air Patrol is there to search for and find the lost, provide comfort in times of disaster and work to keep the homeland safe. Its 56,000 members selflessly devote their time, energy, and expertise toward the well-being of their communities, while also promoting aviation and related fields through aerospace/STEM education and helping shape future leaders through CAP’s cadet program. 

Civil Air Patrol’s missions for America are many, and today’s adults and cadets perform their duties with the same vigilance as its founding members — preserving CAP’s 80-year legacy of service while maintaining its commitment to nearly 1,500 communities nationwide. 


Wed. 08/03/22
Missing child alert -- Nevaeh Rohrbach is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/03/22 6:02 PM
Nevaeh Rohrbach
Nevaeh Rohrbach
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156500/thumb_Nevaeh_Rohrbach.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Nevaeh Rohrbach, age 13, a child in foster care who went missing from Portland on Aug. 1. Nevaeh is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Nevaeh and to contact 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233) if they believe they see her.

Nevaeh frequents the unhoused encampments in SE Portland.    

Name: Nevaeh Rohrbach
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Sept. 6, 2008
Height: 5-foot-7
Weight: 135 pounds
Hair: Dyed black and blue
Eye color: Blue-green
Other identifying information: Nevaeh has a heart tattoo on her wrist and a tattoo on her finger.
Portland Police Bureau Case #22-205783
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457177

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Nevaeh Rohrbach

Recreational use advisory lifted for Cronemiller Lake Aug. 3; OHA advises dog owners to be alert to signs of cyanobacteria blooms
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/22 3:01 PM

August 3, 2022

 

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory lifted for Cronemiller Lake Aug. 3; OHA advises dog owners to be alert to signs of cyanobacteria blooms

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Cronemiller Lake in Benton County.

OHA issued the advisory on July 28.

OHA lifted the advisory based on sampling that confirmed levels of cyanotoxins in Cronemiller Lake to be below recreational guideline values for people. Although the levels detected are below the recreational use values for people, they continue to be above OHA’s educational guideline values for dogs. Owners should be aware of the potential exposure to their pets while at the lake, especially shallow, marshy areas where cyanobacteria blooms can form. Cyanobacteria can be present on green algae, growing from the sediment or on rocks.

OHA advises dog owners to continually be alert to signs of cyanobacteria blooms, or areas of the lake that look suspicious. Blooms can develop and disappear on any water body at any time, even in the fall and winter if conditions are favorable. Only a fraction of waterbodies in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria, blooms and toxins during the recreation season, and no monitoring or sampling is performed once recreation season has ended. It is very important for people to become familiar with signs of a bloom, exposures, and symptoms by visiting OHA’s Cyanobacteria Harmful Algae Bloom website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab.

Although many types of cyanobacteria can create scum that make the water look foamy, thick like pea green or blue green paint was spilled or develop thick brownish-red mats or bright green clumps, some are less visible or recognizable. These cyanobacteria anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment and on rocks, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water that can be harmful to your dog if exposed.

As dog owners you can take certain precautions to reduce your pet’s exposure to any toxins that may be present.

  • Do not let your dog drink from the reservoir, lick scum off rocks or eat aquatic plants
    • Bring water from home for your dog to drink
  • Do not let your dog lick their fur after being in the reservoir and wash them with clean water
  • Look for signs of distress or symptoms while at the reservoir. Symptoms can include:
    • Diarrhea
    • Vomiting
    • Loss of energy or appetite
    • Lack of muscle control, stumbling or falling
    • Drooling
    • Convulsions, tremors, or seizures.

If you observe any unusual behavior from your pet or notice any of the symptoms listed, transport them to a veterinarian clinic immediately, inform the veterinarian of any potential exposure to a cyanotoxin, and follow up with the OHA to report an illness at 971-673-0482


Zadeh Kicks Owner and Chief Financial Officer Charged in $85 Million Wire Fraud and Bank Fraud Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/03/22 2:27 PM

Fraud victims asked to submit loss information to the FBI

EUGENE, Ore.—The former owner and chief financial officer of Zadeh Kicks LLC, a now-defunct Oregon corporation that sold limited edition and collectible sneakers online, made their first appearances in federal court today after being charged with perpetrating a fraud scheme that allegedly cost customers more than $70 million in unfulfilled orders and defrauded financial institutions out of over $15 million.

Michael Malekzadeh, 39, a Eugene resident, has been charged by criminal information with wire fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud, and money laundering. Bethany Mockerman, 39, also of Eugene, has been charged with conspiring with Malekzadeh to commit bank fraud. 

According to court documents, Malekzadeh started his business in 2013 by purchasing limited edition and collectible sneakers to resell online. Beginning as early as January 2020, Zadeh Kicks began offering preorders of sneakers before their public release dates, allowing Malekzadeh to collect money upfront before fulfilling orders. Malekzadeh advertised, sold, and collected payments from customers for preorders knowing he could not satisfy all orders placed.

For example, in 2021, Malekzadeh began selling preorders of Nike Air Jordan 11 Cool Grey sneakers. Zadeh Kicks received and accepted preorder sales of over 600,000 pairs of sneakers, resulting in payments to Malekzadeh of more than $70 million. Malekzadeh had no way of acquiring the quantity of sneakers needed to fill the preorders received. In fact, he was only able to acquire just over 6,000 pairs. Customers were either left with unfulfilled orders or they received a combination refund of cash and Zadeh Kicks gift cards.

By April 2022, Malekzadeh owed customers more than $70 million in undelivered sneakers and unknown additional millions held by customers in worthless company gift cards.

In her role as Zadeh Kicks chief financial officer, Mockerman conspired with Malekzadeh to provide false and altered financial information to numerous financial institutions—including providing altered bank statements—on more than 15 bank loan applications. Together, Mockerman and Malekzadeh received more than $15 million in loans from these applications.

As part of the government’s ongoing criminal investigation, federal agents have seized millions of dollars in cash and luxury goods that Malekzadeh acquired with the proceeds of his fraud. The seized items include nearly 100 watches, some valued at over $400,000, jewelry, and hundreds of luxury handbags. The government also seized nearly $6.4 million in cash which was the result Malekzadeh’s sale of watches and luxury cars manufactured by Bentley, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, and others.

Malekzadeh and Mockerman are cooperating with the government’s investigation, including the seizure of assets described above. Both made their first appearances in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Mustafa T. Kasubhai and were released conditions pending further court proceedings.

If you or someone you know were a Zadeh Kicks customer with unfulfilled orders or otherwise believe you were defrauded by Malekzadeh or Mockerman, the FBI wants to hear from you. Please visit FBI.gov/ZadehKicks to complete a brief online questionnaire. Your voluntary responses will assist with the FBI’s ongoing criminal investigation and help to identify you as a potential crime victim. Based on your responses, you may be contacted by the FBI for more information.

This case is being investigated by IRS–Criminal Investigations, FBI, and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) with assistance from the Oregon Intellectual Property Task Force. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Gavin W. Bruce and Quinn P. Harrington are prosecuting the case. The related asset seizures and forfeitures are being handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Katie de Villiers and the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Asset Recovery and Money Laundering Division.

A criminal information is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Missing child alert -- Kanon Zee is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/03/22 2:07 PM
Darien's white Dodge Ram truck
Darien's white Dodge Ram truck
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156476/thumb_Johnathan_Dariens_Dodge_Ram_Truck.jpg

Note: This alert has been updated to include new information that Jonathan Darian and Kara Zee may also be traveling with Kanon Zee in a white Dodge Ram truck with Arizona license plate #0AA3NE. A picture of the truck is attached to this update.

(Salem) – Kanon Zee, a newborn infant, went missing with his mother Kara Zee and his father Jonathan Darian from Portland on Aug. 1. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that Kanon may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Kanon. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Kanon, Kara Zee or Jonathan Darian should call 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233). 

Kara Zee and Jonathan Darian frequent the homeless encampment around NE 122nd Street and NE Halsey Street in Portland. They are believed to be traveling in a 2014 Audi with Arizona license plate #FCA3DGA or in a white Dodge Ram truck with Arizona license plate #0AA3NE. They may be planning to leave the state or the country. 

Name: Kanon Zee
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: July 24, 2022
Height: 19-inches
Weight: 5-pounds and 15-ounces
Hair: Brown
Other identifying information: Kanon is a newborn infant. When he was last seen he had a feeding tube in place.
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457139

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Darien's white Dodge Ram truck

Successful outcome to an OSP Fish & Wildlife Snake River Guide Case- Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/03/22 10:38 AM
Dial *OSP Illegal Guiding
Dial *OSP Illegal Guiding
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156482/thumb_My_project-1.png

In August 2019, Oregon State Police Troopers and United States Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agents served search warrants in two Oregon counties and conducted simultaneous interviews in Oregon, Ohio, and Michigan. The warrants were served on David H Ravia, 69, from Dayton, Oregon, and Caleb L Richmond, 48, from McMinnville, Oregon. The warrants and interviews stemmed from a two-year investigation into ten years of alleged unlawful guiding activities taking place in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area within Wallowa County, Oregon.

On September 1, 2020, the Wallowa County Circuit Court issued search warrants for the arrest of the two individuals. On November 6, 2020, David H. Ravia was cited to appear, in lieu of custody, for eight counts of Outfitting/Guiding Without a License. On November 24, 2020, Caleb L. Richmond was cited to appear, in lieu of custody, for 12 counts of Outfitting/Guiding Without a License.  

On June 16, 2021, Caleb Richmond pled guilty to five counts of Fail to Register as an Outfitter/Guide. He was fined $350, ordered to pay $1000 restitution to the US Fish and Wildlife Service; serve twenty-four months bench probation, which includes a prohibition on hunting, guiding, and possession of firearms; serve eighty hours of community service; issue a letter of apology to all hunters and guides. 

On April 6, 2022, David Ravia pled guilty to three counts of Fail to Register as an Outfitter/Guide. He was ordered to pay $1000 to the US Fish and Wildlife Service; serve twenty-four months bench probation, which includes a prohibition on hunting and guiding; serve eighty hours of community service; issue a letter of apology to all hunters and guides; and forfeit all evidence seized to the State, which includes pack bags, chainsaw, saddle, elk calls, and six mules.  

To report any illegal guiding activity, contact the Oregon State Police Hotline: Dial 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677) from a mobile phone; email: TIP@osp.oregon.gov or file a complaint electronically  https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/Pages/Guide-Complaint.aspx  

The Oregon Outfitter Guide Association in a partnership with the Oregon State Marine Board, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Oregon State Police are now offering rewards for the issuance of a citation or arrest for:

· Unlawful Take/Possession related to an Outfitter Guide- $200.00

· Illegally Obtaining Oregon Hunting or Angling License or Tags- $200.00

· Illegally offering to act as Outfitter Guide- $200.00 

The Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB) oversees the program for all Guides and Charters in Oregon. The Oregon State Marine Board registers those individuals who provide outdoor recreational activities for compensation on land or water they do not own or control. These individuals, called Outfitter Guides, are required to provide the state with proof they are adequately insured and bonded, have basic First Aid and CPR skills, carry the required minimum safety equipment, and if using a motorized boat, carry either a US Coast Guard license or OSMB Motorized Passenger Boat Operator’s Certification, depending upon the waterbody. Outfitter Guides also agree to conduct themselves according to a set of Ethical and Professional Standards and are held responsible for them as well.​ To learn more about Guides & Charters in Oregon visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/Pages/Guides-Charters.aspx 

 




Attached Media Files: Dial *OSP Illegal Guiding

Public Health Advisory Board workgroup meets Aug. 18
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/22 9:51 AM

August 3, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board workgroup meets Aug. 18

What: A workgroup of the Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Make recommendations to update the PHAB charter and bylaws.

When: Thursday, Aug. 18, 3-4:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1603316411# or Zoom video: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603316411?pwd=ZTNnS2J4bzlRdExpZnlIYkVoK2VVQT09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or lichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon State Police SW Region Drug Enforcement Team Makes Illegal Marijuana Bust- Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/03/22 7:23 AM
2022-08/1002/156479/Marijuana-_JoCounty-2.jpg
2022-08/1002/156479/Marijuana-_JoCounty-2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156479/thumb_Marijuana-_JoCounty-2.jpg

On August 2, 2022, the Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement team served an illegal marijuana search warrant in the 1500 block of Lone Mountain Road, O’Brien, Josephine County.  

As a result, 1,773 illegal marijuana plants in seven large greenhouses and approximately 1,000 pounds of processed marijuana bud packaged for sale on the black market were located, seized, and destroyed.  A semi-automatic firearm was also seized while one adult male was detained, identified, and interviewed.

Additionally, the property is subject to multiple code violations through Josephine County Code Enforcement for solid waste, unpermitted structures (greenhouses), and unpermitted electrical installations (significant fire hazard).  Josephine County will move forward with enforcement action against the property owner which could result in the property's closure for one calendar year (illegal drug cultivation) and possible civil forfeiture.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information is available at this time. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156479/Marijuana-_JoCounty-2.jpg , 2022-08/1002/156479/Marijuana-_JoCounty.jpg , 2022-08/1002/156479/Marijuana-_JoCounty-3.jpg

Fatal Crash Interstate 5 -- Linn County
Oregon State Police - 08/03/22 5:52 AM

On Tuesday August 2, 2022, at about 1:15 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a rollover crash on Interstate 5 north of Albany. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white box truck operated by, Jay Ward, age 46, from Salem, was northbound near milepost 236 when for unknown reasons left the roadway onto the median shoulder.   After going on the median shoulder, the truck rolled multiple times before coming to rest. 

Jay Ward was pronounced deceased at the scene.  A passenger identified as Davis Ward, age 20, from Salem, was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.   

OSP was assisted by Albany Fire Department and ODOT.

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