Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Tue. Feb. 19 - 3:57 pm
Tue. 02/19/19
Hermiston Woman Sentenced to Six Months In Federal Prison For Dealing Fentanyl
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/19/19 2:23 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Veronica Rivera, 46, of Hermiston, Oregon, was sentenced today to 6 months in federal prison and 3 years of supervised release for selling fentanyl.

            According to court documents, in October 2017, the Tactical Diversion Squad of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Blue Mountain Enforcement Narcotics Team began investigating a drug trafficking organization selling small blue pills pressed to look like 30 milligram oxycodone tablets but that actually contained fentanyl.

On two separate occasions in March 2018, Rivera sold a total of 167 of the fentanyl pills in Hermiston. In April 2018, investigators seized approximately 100 pills from a location where Rivera had hidden them and an additional 129 pills from her Hermiston residence.

            On April 25, 2018, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Rivera with distribution of fentanyl and possession with intent to distribute fentanyl. She pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl on August 14, 2018.

This case was investigated by DEA and the Blue Mountain Enforcement Narcotics Team.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/122157/SENTENCING-Rivera-final.pdf

***Update 2*** Oregon State Police Seeks Public Assistance on Deceased Female Found North of Road's End in Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 02/19/19 1:59 PM

Star had last been seen February 11,2019 not 2018.

###

Update

Based on tips received through the hotline, Oregon State Police has identified the deceased female as Satin Fever Star (aka Kahrin Jean McDonald), age 63, from Lincoln City, Oregon.

Star was seen on February 11, 2019. The investigation remains active but at this time there is no known threat to the community and her death does not appear suspicious.

The Oregon State Police would like to thank everyone who called the tip-line.

###

On February 17, 2019 at approximately 5:00 PM, Oregon State Police, with the assistance of US Coast Guard and Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, recovered the body of a deceased female in the ocean, in a cove, just north of “God’s Thumb”.

The female is described as a white adult female with long dark brown hair. She was approximately 5’7” and 190-200 pounds.

The Oregon State Police is continuing its investigation as to the specifics of her death but we are asking for the public’s assistance for information on her identity.

If anyone has any information on a recent missing female, matching this description, please call (800) 452-7888 and reference case number SP 19-058230. Detective Carla Urbigkeit is the lead investigator.

No photos are available or additional information is available at this time.

###


Eight Grants Announced to Support the Acquisition of Artworks by Oregon Artists in the 10th year of The Ford Family Foundation Acquisition Support (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 02/19/19 1:02 PM
Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1418/122150/thumb_Schneider01.jpg

Salem, Oregon – The Oregon Arts Commission is excited to announce eight grants made through The Ford Family Foundation’s Art Acquisition Fund, which supports our state’s collecting visual arts institutions, the artists whose work they are able to acquire, and the public who will be guaranteed access to these important works in perpetuity. Funds were awarded by a panel of art professionals to: the City of Halsey, Coos Art Museum, High Desert Museum, Portland Art Museum, Portland State University, Reed College, The Schneider Museum of Art, and Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at University of Oregon. More details about each artist and work are listed below.

This year marks the 10th that the Arts Commission has administered these funds for The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program. Since 2010, funds have been granted to 20 organizations throughout the state and advanced the careers of more than 50 artists: Robert Adams, Corey Arnold, Rick Bartow (1946–2016), Carol Benson, Christine Bourdette, Harrison Branch, Michael Brophy, Pat Courtney Gold, John Van Dreal, Gale Everett, Judith Poxson Fawkes. Betty Feves (1918–1985)

Sally Finch, Stephen Hayes, Robert Hess (1935–2014), Yuji Hiratsuka, Deborah Horrell (1953–2018), Jeffrey Hull, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Malia Jensen, Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, Mel Katz, Lee Kelly, Arnold J. Kemp, Kristan Kennedy, Michael Knutson, Cynthia Lahti, James Lavadour, Ellen Lesperance, Evan La Londe, Elizabeth Malaska, Victor Maldonado, Akihiko Miyoshi, Christiaan H. Mostert, Multiple quilt artists and Sisters Quilt Festival, Jay Stratton Noller, Whitney Nye, Geraldine Ondrizek, Andy Paiko and Ethan Rose, Henk Pander, Lucinda Parker, Don Prechtel, Wendy Red Star, Vanessa Renwick, Susan Seubert, Randall David Tipton, Samantha Wall, Heather Watkins, Marie Watt, and Phyllis Yes.

 

2019 grants are awarded to:

 

 

 

City of Halsey ($1,500) to acquire Gale Everett, “From the Land,” 2016, aluminum, PVC, galvanized steel bolts, plywood (13 panels)

Gale Everett (b.1969. Lives and works in Albany, Oregon) is a visual artist who works and lives in the heart of the Willamette Valley. Her work connects to the forest and rivers, to native plants, farmlands and a love of animals. She moves between hand-cut paper, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture. "From the Land" will be a permanently installed at Halsey City Hall.

Coos Art Museum ($2,800) to acquire Christiaan H. Mostert, “High Truckin',” 2017, acrylic on canvas

Christiaan H. Mostert (Dutch) (b. 1950. Lives and works in North Bend, Oregon) is a prominent artist on Oregon's South Coast. He was born into an artist family in the Netherlands in 1950. The family immigrated to Southern California in 1961 where he attended art classes at the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena. He started his own design and illustration studio in 1979, doing mostly commercial art and architectural renderings. In 1990 he moved to Oregon to open his own fine art studio and gallery. Since then, Dutch has concentrated mostly on painting the maritime environment, in the studio and on location, gathering numerous awards for his work on both coasts. Dutch is the West Coast representative for the American Society of Marine Artists. He helped found the Annual Maritime Art Exhibition at Coos Art Museum 25 years ago.

High Desert Museum ($15,000) to acquire James Lavadour, “Golden,” 2018, oil on panel

James Lavadour (b.1951. Lives and works on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon) is one of Oregon’s premier artists. His work has been exhibited internationally, including recent group exhibitions at Converge 45, “You in Mind,” 2017, Portland, Oregon; “State of the Art” 2014-15, Crystal Bridges, Bentonville AR; and the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition “Personal Structures,” along with numerous regional one-person exhibitions. Growing up on the Umatilla Reservation, his work reflects his deep connection to the landscape of Eastern Oregon and incorporates Indigenous views of the land and sense of place. The High Desert Museum’s collection currently includes two of Lavadour’s early works. By acquiring one of his more mature works, they expand their capacity to trace his development as an artist and make his artwork accessible to broad audiences in their rural region. Lavadour is represented by PDX CONTEMPORARY ART

Portland Art Museum ($20,000) to acquire Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, “Furniture Sculptures,” 2018, wood, cotton

Chris Johanson's (b. 1968. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) multidisciplinary art encompasses painting, sculpture, installation and music; his works touch on universal themes of spirituality, sociology and environmentalism. Johanna Jackson (b. 1972. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) transforms common objects and materials to  explore the confluence of life and work, art and craft, magic and the ordinary in her handmade, functional objects and domestically-scaled installations. Both artists have exhibited internationally and are significant members of Portland’s artistic community. Working together, they created the exhibition design that transformed a gallery for the museum’s exhibition series WE.CONSTRUCT.MARVELS.BETWEEN.MONUMENTS. The artist team’s murals, furniture and spatial interventions shifted the white cube into a warm, lively environment. Acquiring these furniture pieces is an important testimony to the transformative, community-centered ambitions of the WCMBM series. Johanson is represented by Mitchell-Inness & Nash, New York.

Portland State University ($27,000) to acquire Jessica Jackson Hutchins, “Woman Be Free,” 2018, fused glass

Jessica Jackson Hutchins (b. 1971. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) is a Hallie Ford Fellow and an important American artist. Her expressive and intuitive studio practice produces dynamic sculptures, collages, paintings and large-scale ceramics, all hybrid juxtapositions of the handmade. She has received recent solo exhibitions at the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, OH (2016); the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (2014); the Hepworth Wakefield Museum (2013); and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, MA (2011). Significant group exhibitions include the 55th Venice Biennale, and The Whitney Biennial (2010). Her work has been incorporated into public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

Hutchin’s fused glass panel “Woman Be Free” will complete a series of three, with “Totem” and “19 Years Old” –each made in residence at Bullseye Glass, Portland, that will be permanently displayed at PSU’s 724 Harrison building (formerly Neuberger Hall), as part of a collection of works that explore issues of material expression of identity. Other artists represented in the grouping are Ursula von Rydingsvard, Hank Willis Thomas, Lorna Simpson, Wendy Red Star, and Saya Woolfalk. Hutchins is represented by Marianne Boesky, New York.

Reed College ($12,500) Heather Watkins, “Recordings, 2018, twelve individually framed works, thread on linen

Heather Watkins (b. 1969. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) has exhibited her work regionally and beyond since earning her MFA in Typography and Design at RISD in 2000. Trained in type and graphic design, textiles, bookmaking and printmaking, Watkins’ mature work exhibits the sensitive interweaving of these mediums. As an undergrad Watkins studied Classics at Pitzer College, studying in Athens, Greece, and her art evinces this study of classical art and poetics. Watkins has held solo exhibitions at: the Portland Art Museum; The Art Gym; and PDX CONTEMPORARY; and group exhibitions at CANADA NY; the lumber room, and other spaces. Her work is in the collection of: MoMA, NY; the Miller-Meigs Collection; among others. She has installed major public artworks at PSU and PCC. Her accomplished work is critical to the region’s history of design, craft and spiritual abstraction. Watkins created the “Recordings” while “waiting” in various spaces, mainly medical environments. Each intricate embroidery expresses the mind and body negotiating time and space. Watkins is represented by PDX CONTEMPOARY ART.

Schneider Museum of Art, $4,562, Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas

Elizabeth Malaska (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) received her MFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art and BFA from California College of the Arts. With a recent critically acclaimed solo exhibition at Russo Lee Gallery in Portland and a 2018 Hallie Ford Fellowship, Malaska is emerging as an important Oregon artist. In a recent Art Form Critic's pick, Stephanie Snyder writes, "Elizabeth Malaska’s recent paintings celebrate the pathos and resilience of the anima, asserting its reproductive and spiritual power over millennia of oppression... Malaska’s pieces exorcise and overcome the clichéd representations of the feminine form seen throughout art history."  Malaska is represented by Russo Less Gallery.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, $4,500, University of Oregon, Victor Maldonado, “The Fallen,” 2018, Acrylic on canvas

Victor Maldonado (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) was born in Michoacán, Mexico, and raised in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley. Maldonado draws from their experiences in a family of migrant field laborers to create multidisciplinary art that explores identity, cultural symbols and perceptions… yet they call it “art about nothing,” “Lucha libre” is a recurring theme in the work. The iconic Luchador mask, a symbol of Mexican freestyle wrestlers, stands for the struggle between two forces. In addition to their work as a conceptual, visual, performance, and installation artist, Maldonado is also a freelance curator and writer and assistant dean of diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at Pacific Northwest College of Art. This is the first work of Maldonado to enter the JSMA collection. Maldonado is represented by Froelick Gallery.

PLEASE NOTE. More images available on request.

                   

About The Ford Family Foundation Visual Arts Program

Established in the memory of one of its co-founders, Mrs. Hallie Ford, the goal of the Foundation’s Visual Arts Program is to accelerate an enhanced quality of artistic endeavor and bodies of work by mid-career Oregon visual artists through support of their exploration, conceptualization, production, exhibition and documentation of new work, and to improve Oregon's visual arts ecology. 

In addition to the Art Acquisition Funding, other resources are being dedicated to the following:

Fellowships:  five annual Hallie Ford Fellows are provided unrestricted grants to support the conceptualization and the development of new work.

Artists-in-Residences:  bi-annual awards "Golden Spot" residency programs in Oregon that provide opportunities for artists to explore and conceptualize new work.

Exhibition & Documentation:  funding for the curation, preparation, materials and traveling of exhibitions

Capital Projects:  resources to improve and/or expand studio and exhibition space at key Oregon visual arts institutions

Curator/Critic Tour:  visitations by national curators to consult with Oregon's visual artists and interact with the arts community

Opportunity Grants:  resources to Oregon visual artists who face unanticipated circumstances that could aid in significantly advancing the creation, production or exhibition of their work. These grants are managed by the Oregon Arts Commission on the foundation's behalf.

About The Ford Family Foundation

The Ford Family Foundation is the sole funder of this Visual Arts Program.  It partners with Oregon's leading visual arts educators, gallerists, museum and arts professionals to help implement program elements and leverages funding with other state and national resources.

The Foundation was established in 1957 by Kenneth W. and Hallie E. Ford. Its Mission is “successful citizens and vital rural communities” in Oregon and Siskiyou County, California.  The Foundation is located in Roseburg, Oregon, with a Scholarship office in Eugene.  For more information about the Foundation, please visit the website at www.tfff.org.  

About the Oregon Arts Commission

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas , Jessica Jackson Hutchins, “Woman Be Free,” 2018, fused glass , James Lavadour, “Golden,” 2018, oil on panel

OHA receives updates to letters of intent for coordinated care contracts
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/19 12:25 PM

Resent with link to CCO 2.0 Website

February 19, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA receives updates to letters of intent for coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority has received 10 updates to the letters of intent (LOIs) from organizations seeking to apply for 2020-2024 coordinated care organization (CCO) contracts. Organizations had until February 15, 2019 to submit updates to their LOIs to OHA.

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid). They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.

Updates to the LOIs include:

  • In the Portland metro area, four organizations have withdrawn their letters of intent (CareOregon, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, Moda Health Plan, and PacificSource Community Solutions - Portland)
  • Providence Health Assurance has changed its service area to Hood River, Clatsop, and Jackson counties, removing Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties.
  • PacificSource Community Solutions – Columbia Gorge removed Sherman, Gilliam, and Wheeler counties from its service area.
  • Four organizations have made technical changes to their names and business registration numbers.

Based on the updated LOIs, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon will continue to have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care. In some parts of the state, multiple organizations filed letters of intent to operate in the same counties, giving Oregon Health Plan members more than one CCO choice.

Complete applications will be due to OHA April 22. Only organizations that submitted letters of intent may submit applications in April. An organization submitting a letter of intent is not obliged to follow with a complete application. Awards for the CCO contracts are expected to be announced in July.

In October 2018, the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state.

These policy priorities will be written into the 2020-2024 CCO contracts, which represent the next phase of health care transformation, known as "CCO 2.0." The new contracts with CCOs represent the largest procurement in state history, totaling more than $20 billion over five years.

###


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Job Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/19/19 10:51 AM
TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019
TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3585/122142/thumb_TT_-_Job_Scams_-_February_19_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against new job frauds.

Maybe you are a federal employee who was desperate to pay the bills during the recent shutdown – or you just really need to pay off those Christmas debts. Either way, we are getting more and more reports this month of people looking for jobs who are getting scammed.

In particular, we are hearing accounts of people who find jobs listed on social media platforms and end up losing money. Here’s how it can start:

You are browsing through your favorite social media platform and land in a group post for your area. Maybe the group uses your city’s name with the words “now hiring” or the like. You find a job that fits your skills and pays decently. You shoot off a message through the platform or an email to the employer. After a bit of back and forth, you agree on a salary and schedule.

In another twist on this scam, you sign up for one of the big, very recognizable online employment sites. You start to get job offers that appear to come from that site – but in reality the bad guy is spoofing the look of the offer to make himself appear legitimate.

In both cases, the person interviewing or offering you a job may start to ask for information such as your date of birth, address and Social Security number – personally identifiable information that can be used to open fraudulent bank accounts, take out loans and obtain credit cards.

The scam artist might also send you a signing bonus, first paycheck or funds to buy equipment for your work-at-home office. The bad guy tells you to cash the check, take a bit out for yourself and send the rest to a specified vendor for supplies or needed software. The check, of course, is bogus, and the fraudster actually controls the bank account of what you thought was a legitimate business vendor.

In the end, your bank may close your account due to the fraudulent activity, and you are now responsible for reimbursing that bank for the counterfeit check. Your credit history may take a hit, too.

So how to protect yourself?

  • Never open a bank account for use by strangers.

  • Don’t accept a job that requires accepting money then wiring portions of checks to other individuals or accounts.

  • Look for poor use of the English language in messages, including the incorrect use of grammar, capitalization, and verb tenses. 

  • Confirm that the company that you are dealing with really is hiring. Call the company using a publicly-available number -- such as one off its website - - to confirm that the offer is legitimate, and

  • Be wary of an exceptionally-fast hiring process

How do businesses protect themselves?

  • Make sure your website and social media accounts specify how your hiring process works, and

  • Be very clear about the fact that you would not hire people in the ways described above.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Job Scams AUDIO - February 19, 2019 , TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019

Mon. 02/18/19
Pilot Butte Master Plan Advisory Committee meets Feb. 28 in Bend
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/18/19 7:00 AM

BEND, Ore. – The Pilot Butte Master Plan Advisory Committee will be working to guide and develop recommendations to the update of the master plan for Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Bend Park and Recreation District Office, 799 SW Columbia St., Bend. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: review information gathered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) to inform advisory group process; hold workshop exercises to develop design or management recommendations for access, trails and various park zones; determine areas of agreement and questions for public input.

A detailed meeting agenda will be available online: pilotbuttemasterplan.com

No public comments will be accepted during the meeting. The next opportunity for in-person comment will be at a public meeting about the plan April 8 in Bend.

The 16 member advisory committee consists of volunteers from various local and statewide groups with an interest in outdoor recreation. A full list of committee member affiliations is available on the master plan website: pilotbuttemasterplan.com/q-and-a/

A park master plan guides the development and use of park facilities. It also provides guidelines for the protection and management of important natural, cultural and scenic resources within the park. Master plans are on a 20-year update cycle and are subject to final approval by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

An initial draft master plan for Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint, last updated in 1995, is expected to be completed by July 2019.

Learn more about the master plan at pilotbuttemasterplan.com.

Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Rachel Hill, OPRD Park and Recreation Planner, at least three days in advance: 503-947-8618 or achel.Hill@oregon.gov">Rachel.Hill@oregon.gov.


Sat. 02/16/19
More than 300 Firefighters Attend Weekend Training in Salem (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/16/19 3:37 PM
Winter Fire School
Winter Fire School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1187/122103/thumb_2019_WFS_J.jpg

More than 300 career and volunteer firefighters from more than 100 fire agencies (city and tribal fire departments, fire districts, and wildland) throughout the state are at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem this weekend for the State's annual Winter Fire School.

This is the 16th annual Winter Fire School hosted by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) at the Oregon Public Safety Academy 4190 Aumsville Highway in Salem.

Eleven classes are being offered by the National Fire Academy, DPSST, and the City of Dallas Fire & EMS Department.
Classes range from leadership topics such as Health and Safety Officer, Strategy and Tactics for Initial Company Operations, Decision Making for Initial Company Operations, Leadership in Supervision: Creating Environments for Professional Growth, Perspectives in Thinking, Leadership in Supervision: Frameworks to Success, Wildland Urban Interface Firefighting for Structural Company Officer, and hands-on classes such as Vehicle Extrication and Back to the Basics: Hose and Ladders Instructor Course.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "DPSST is proud to offer this weekend training event each year.  This event is held in a weekend setting because over 80% of the firefighters in Oregon are volunteers. This two-day event is the largest two-day fire training experience in the Pacific Northwest that is offered free of charge.  The hands-on classes being offered are using training props which DPSST recently received thanks to a FEMA Assistance to Firefighters Grant."

While many people are aware of DPSST's law enforcement training programs, they may not realize that DPSST is also the state fire training organization for Oregon and provides hundreds of training opportunities to firefighters each year at the Academy and at regional locations statewide.

DPSST appreciates the red carpet hospitality local businesses, and the Salem community as a whole, roll-out for the career and volunteer firefighters attending this weekend training opportunity.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School

I-84 EASTBOUND is now open at Exit 216, 6 miles east of Pendleton (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/16/19 2:58 PM
Slow down around MP 257 crash site
Slow down around MP 257 crash site
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1204/122101/thumb_61B8E6F8-E3FF-428C-A433-CABDF8C063CF.jpeg

I-84 EASTBOUND is now open to traffic at Exit 216, 6 miles east of Pendleton. The route was closed earlier today due to a truck on fire near MP 257, 4 miles west of La Grande. The westbound lanes were not impacted and remain open. Expect winter conditions throughout eastern Oregon and drive with extra caution, especially around the crash site work zone (see photo). For update highway and weather conditions check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941

 




Attached Media Files: Slow down around MP 257 crash site

Fri. 02/15/19
Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 02/15/19 6:12 PM
Clinton Adams
Clinton Adams
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1070/122094/thumb_Clinton_Adams.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Clinton Adams, died the evening of February 14, 2019. Adams was incarcerated at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. 

Adams entered DOC custody on September 5, 2012, out of Washington County, with an earliest release date of January 5, 2022. Adams was 62 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. 

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 individuals. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first adults in custody in June 1985.

####

 

 




Attached Media Files: Clinton Adams

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20
Oregon Health Authority - 02/15/19 3:00 PM

February 15, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Review themes from the January meeting; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6, 2018, kickoff meeting; discuss options for focus of workgroup.

When: February 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Suspected Serial Bank Robber Arrested in Beaverton
FBI - Oregon - 02/15/19 2:47 PM

Washington County Sheriff's Office deputies, with the assistance of Portland Police Bureau, Beaverton Police Department and the FBI, arrested Robert Norman Benham on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at his Beaverton home without incident. According to the federal criminal complaint filed in this case, Benham, age 53, faces charges related to a series of bank robberies that occurred starting in mid-December. Those charged robberies include:

  • December 11, 2018 - Wells Fargo Bank (located inside a Thriftway), 7410 SW Oleson Road, Portland
  • December 24, 2018 - Columbia Bank, 4805 SW 77th Avenue, Washington County
  • January 30, 2019 - Columbia Bank, 4805 SW 77th Avenue, Washington County

Benham appeared before a federal magistrate judge on Wednesday, and the judge ordered himheld pending further court proceedings.

Investigators are gathering information related to as many as six other unsolved bank robberies in this area between November 2018 and now. Anyone with information on these other robberies is asked to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181, Washington County Sheriff's Office at (503) 846-2700, the Beaverton Police Department at (503) 526-2282 or Portland Police Bureau at (503) 823-3333. Information may also be submitted via the online portal at https://tips.fbi.gov/

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

###


Boys and girls varsity basketball playoff games rescheduled for tonight
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 02/15/19 11:46 AM

WALLA WALLA – The Walla Walla High School boys and girls varsity basketball games originally scheduled for Feb. 8 have been rescheduled for tonight due to weather cancellations.

Friday, Feb. 15:

  • Wa-Hi Girls vs. Pasco HS at 3:30 p.m. @ Pasco High School
  • Wa-Hi Boys vs. Chiawana HS at 5 p.m. @ Chiawana High School

Cost: $7 for adults and $5 for students w/ASB (admission fee required for both games – bring cash)

For playoff brackets and schedules, click on the links below:

Boys Basketball: http://www.mid-columbiaconference.com/tournament.php?tournament_id=2797&sport=3

Girls Basketball: http://www.mid-columbiaconference.com/tournament.php?tournament_id=2798&sport=12


Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance
Oregon Farm Bureau - 02/15/19 10:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance

SALEM, OREGON, February 15, 2019 – “On Feb. 14, 2014, the Bureau of Land Management revoked the grazing permit of Hammond Ranches. Almost five years to the day later, on Feb. 13, 2019, BLM signed documents that reissued the permit, allowing the Hammond family to get back to the business of raising cattle in eastern Oregon.

“This reissued grazing permit signals that justice has finally been achieved for this rural family. While nobody can restore what the Hammonds have lost to years of prosecutorial overreach and bureaucratic vendetta, we are grateful that this awful chapter is closed.

“Oregon Farm Bureau was proud to play a role in advocating on the Hammonds’ behalf, including gathering over 25,000 online signatures and working directly with officials, so the family can return to doing what they love and keep a proud heritage of ranching alive.”

###
 

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.


Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation Awarded $257,900 Grant to Expand Micro Lending Program (Photo)
Wells Fargo - 02/15/19 9:46 AM
Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez
Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1188/122069/thumb_ATNI_check_small_group_1-19.jpg

Portland, OR – February 15, 2019 – Wells Fargo has awarded the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation (ATNI-EDC) with a two-year $257,900 grant to support the expansion of a small business micro-lending program for tribal members. The nonprofit organization will use the funding to build infrastructure including hiring a loan program manager, renting office space and developing marketing materials for the loan program.

The ATNI-EDC Revolving Loan Fund provides access to capital to help Native entrepreneurs start or grow their businesses in the Pacific Northwest. The Wells Fargo grant will enable ATNI-EDC to double its lending capacity to $500,000 with a goal of 10 loans per year.

“This grant is a game-changer for our organization,” said Amber Schulz-Oliver, executive director for ATNI-EDC. “With increased capacity, we will be in a strong position to better serve the economic development needs of tribes. When we leverage the vast economic power generated by Pacific Northwest tribes, we succeed in elevating our communities out of poverty and into prosperity.”

In April 2019, ATNI-EDC will host an economic summit in Portland to help tribal leaders implement economic development initiatives, share best practices, strengthen inter-tribal relationships and advance solutions to common barriers. 

The Wells Fargo Foundation grant is part of the company’s five-year, $50 million commitment to expand its focus on tribal philanthropy to provide greater economic empowerment in Native American and Alaska Native communities. The philanthropic investment aims to increase homeownership, energy sovereignty, and workforce development on tribal lands, promote development of Native-owned small businesses, and help build capacity for nonprofits to better serve their clients in Indian Country.

“Wells Fargo has been serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities for more than 50 years,” said Jon Campbell, president of the Wells Fargo Foundation. “We believe it is important to support nonprofit and community organizations that empower tribal communities to determine their own way of life on their own lands — according to their time-honored cultures, traditions and beliefs — while also providing access to the tools and opportunities that can lead to financial success and well-being.”

National nonprofit organizations serving individuals, families and businesses in Indian Country who wish to be considered for a grant under the foundation’s commitment should contact AIANPhilanthropy@wellsfargo.com to determine eligibility. Community-based, local 501(c)(3) organizations serving the American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian communities can continue to apply for grants through Wells Fargo’s online tool.

 

About Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation  

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation provides community and

economic services to nearly 60 Tribes in the Pacific Northwest, including all nine tribes of Oregon, all 29 tribes of Washington, and all five tribes of Idaho, as well as four tribes in California, two tribes in

Nevada, four tribes in Montana and three tribal communities in Alaska.

About Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.9 trillion in assets. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, investment and mortgage products and services, as well as consumer and commercial finance, through 7,800 locations, more than 13,000 ATMs, the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 37 countries and territories to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 259,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 26 on Fortune’s 2018 rankings of America’s largest corporations. In 2017, Wells Fargo donated $286.5 million to 14,500 nonprofits and Wells Fargo team members volunteered a record 2 million hours. Wells Fargo’s corporate social responsibility efforts are focused on three strategic priorities: diversity and social inclusion, economic empowerment, and environmental sustainability. News, insights and perspectives from Wells Fargo are also available at Wells Fargo Stories




Attached Media Files: Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez

Prescott JR./SR. High School 2 hr. Delay no ECEAP
Prescott Sch. Dist. - 02/15/19 9:19 AM

Prescott school district  2 hr. Delay , No ECEAP


Celebrate 32 years of Waterfront Blues during the July 4th holiday weekend Preliminary line-up announced, passes on sale February 15 for the award-winning event July 4 - 7 at Waterfront Park in Portland, Ore. (Photo)
Waterfront Blues Festival - 02/15/19 8:46 AM
Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot
Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6319/122063/thumb_20180707-4C7A9212-2.jpg

Celebrate 32 years of Waterfront Blues during the 

July 4thholiday weekend

Preliminary line-up announced, passes on sale February 15 for the award-winning event
 July 4 - 7 at Waterfront Park in Portland, Ore.

 

Portland, Ore. (February 15, 2019)– Join blues legends, up-and-comers and regional favorites to mark the 32nd  Annual Waterfront Blues Festival July 4-7, 2019 at Tom McCall Waterfront Park. 4-Day passes go on-sale Friday, February 15

This year’s festival will feature more than 100 acts on four stages. Highlights include:

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue • St. Paul & the Broken Bones • Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe • Vintage Trouble • California Honeydrops • Shemekia Copeland  • Cyril Neville • Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings with special guest & Carlos Reyes 
Christone “Kingfish” Ingram  • Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band • Sugaray Rayford • Songhoy Blues • Southern Avenue • Brother Yusef • Lucious Spiller • Kevin Burt • Feu Follet • Curley Taylor • Vanessa Collier • Sarah Grace of The Voice

 

…and many more to be announced, including additional headliners!

This year’s lineup includes new, as well as some festival favorites from years past. Closing headliner TroyTrombone Shorty” Andrewsmade his first public Northwest appearance at Waterfront Blues Festival more than a decade ago, playing on the festival’s Front Porch Stage and on a late-night cruise. “We’ve been trying to get Shorty back to our main stage ever since,” said festival Artistic Director Peter Dammann, who first encountered a scrawny Shorty, then in his mid-teens, busking on a street corner more than 15 years ago in New Orleans’ French Quarter. “Even in those days, playing for tips on the sidewalk, Shorty was already considered by those-in-the-know to be one of the major up-and-coming horn players on the planet.” In the interim Shorty has headlined major stages all over the world, including five appearances at the White House. The festival is thrilled to welcome him back this year.  

Joining Shorty on the Festival’s Sunday salute to the Crescent City will be legendary vocalist/percussionist Cyril Neville and his Uptown Rulers; and ‘zydeco junkie’ Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band who headline two-days of Cajun/zydeco dancing on the festival’s Front Porch Stage. 

Newcomers this year include the high voltage, horn-driven soul-rock of Alabama-based St. Paul & the Broken Bones; the swaggering rock-soul of Vintage Trouble; North Africa desert grooves of Songhoy Blues; the powerful Oakland bluesman Kevin Burt,winner of the 2018 International Blues Challenge in threecategories; Arkansas/Mississippi Delta bluesman Lucious Spiller; the masterful, up-and-coming vocalist/saxophonist Vanessa Collier (“Amazing!” – Buddy Guy); Louisiana’s ‘future of Cajun music’, Feufollet; and Houston’s 16-year-old “pint-sized powerhouse,” Sarah Grace, whose soulful vocals carried her into the final 10 on this season’s The Voice.

Returning are some of the festival’s favorites from years past, including: the bluesy soul/funk of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe; the California Honeydrops (“the most refreshing act to roll down the blues highway in some time.” – Living Blues); the searing vocalist Shemekia Copeland (“A powerhouse, a superstar, she can do no wrong,” Rolling Stone); slide guitar virtuoso Roy Rogers(“One of the rare guitar heroes who values feeling over flash” - Rolling Stone) in a collaboration with Parguayan violinist/harpist Carlos Reyes; young Mississippi guitar phenom Christone “Kingfish” Ingram, about to release a debut album produced by Buddy Guy (festival fans may remember Guy brought Kingfish on stage for his headlining WBF set four years ago); ‘Fatback Blues’ master, Brother Yusef,a favorite of swing/blues dancers.

“Stay tuned, we have some more announcements to come,” said Dammann, “including of course our world-class soul and blues acts from the Northwest.”

“This is the concert deal of the summer,” continues Dammann. “Four days, four stages, more than 100 eclectic performances, starting at just $50 for a 4-day pass—that’s only $12.50 a day!”

The following four-day passes offered this year: 

4-Day Fan Pass($50—just $12.50 a day!) — Four-day pass, priority re-entry.

Blues Buddy Pass($75 early bird discount) — Four-day pass, EARLY entry, priority re-entry, and discounted admission to Waterfront After-Hours Concerts in the Marriott Ballroom (just $5 each, these after hours shows are otherwise $20 advance; first-come, first-served).

Gold Pass($350) — Four-day EARLY entry and priority re-entry, access to Main Stage shaded seating, access to central stage shaded seating, admission to After-Hours concerts, four meal and drink vendor coupons, festival T-shirt and poster, parking pass & more! SOLD OUT LAST FEW YEARS!

Platinum Pass($1,250) — Four-day EARLY entry & priority re-entry, priority access to on-stage seating at Main Stage and Blues Stage, access to central stage shaded seating, access to VIP Hospitality Pavilion with catered buffets and VIP restrooms, admission to After-Hours concerts, parking passand many other VIP perks. SOLD OUT LAST FEW YEARS!

Also on sale now are tickets to the Festival’s exciting After-Hours Shows in the Marriott Ballroomacross Naito Parkway from the festival site. Featured this year:

Friday, July 5: California Honeydrops • Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe presents “Eat Lots of Peaches” Allman Brothers tribute

Saturday, July 6: Southern Avenue with special guest Christone “Kingfish” Ingram • Vintage Trouble.

Tickets and lineup information for the popular Blues Cruisesaboard the Portland Spirit, will be available in early April

For artist bios, preliminary schedule, videos and music samples, visit the newly updated: waterfrontbluesfest.com.    

 

About Waterfront Blues Festival:

Since 1988, the Waterfront Blues Fest has raised funds and awareness to fight hunger in our region. Since its inception, the festival has raised nearly $11 million and more than 1,000 tons of food to fight hunger in Oregon. Last year Oregon Food Bank, producer of the event since its inception, turned over ownership and production responsibilities to its long time production company, Waterfront Blues Production LLC, so the agency could refocus on its core hunger mission. The 2018 festival featuring George Thorogood, The Revivalists and Beth Hart was the first under the management/ownership of WBP. The Festival again this year welcomes as its Community Partner, the Portland Sunshine Division, which will run the event’s food drive to help stock its two emergency food pantries.

This Portland flagship festival has become a treasured tradition for locals and visitors alike, and has served as downtown Portland’s signature Fourth of July Celebration. It is the largest blues festival west of the Mississippi, the second-largest blues festival in the nation, and one of the most revered festivals of its kind in the world. It is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Memphis-based Blues Foundation’s coveted Keeping the Blues Alive Award for ‘Best Festival.’ Since its inception, the festival has been committed to elevating the presence of local non-profits through fundraising and exposure. 

Major sponsors: Buick GMC of Beaverton, KGON radio, KOIN-TV, The Oregonian.

More information: waterfrontbluesfest.com 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Peter Dammann, Festival Artistic Director
503-283-3225, 503-341-2068 c
damray@europa.com




Attached Media Files: Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot , Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 - Revivalists , Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 - Mavericks , 2019-02/6319/122063/TromboneShorty_2019_(hi-res-0).jpg

Thu. 02/14/19
Washington Man Faces Federal Charge for Disturbance on Flight
FBI - Oregon - 02/14/19 3:53 PM

The FBI charged Douglas B. Smyser, age 21, with interfering with a flight crew for alleged disturbing behavior aboard Compass Air flight 6054 on Wednesday, February 13, 2019. Smyser, a Bonney Lake, Washington, man, boarded the flight at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The flight, bound for Los Angeles, diverted to Portland International Airport when the crew became concerned about Smyser's actions. The plane landed at 7:51 pm in Portland, and both Port of Portland Police officers and the FBI responded.
 
According to the federal criminal complaint filed in this case late Thursday, witnesses and crew report there were multiple incidents that occurred between the time the plane left the gate in Seattle and when it landed in Portland. About 20 – 30 minutes into the flight, the captain said the crew became concerned that Smyser would rush the cockpit, and he made the determination at that time to divert to Portland.
 
Specifically, witnesses and crew reported incidents involved Smyser throwing his backpack in the aisle and claiming it wasn’t his; his refusal to stay in his seat; and his pacing the aisle with several attempts to move towards the front of the plane. A crew member also said that Smyser told her at one point that “someone has a gun in the back row of this plane.” As the plane was approaching Portland for landing, a passenger helped return Smyser to his seat and used his body weight to physically block Smyser from leaving his seat until Port officers took him into custody.
 
On Wednesday night, Port officers charged Smyser with two state crimes: menacing and disorderly conduct 2. On Thursday, February 14, 2019, the FBI filed the federal criminal complaint charging him with interference with a flight crew. Smyser is expected to make his initial appearance before a federal magistrate at 1:30 pm on Friday, February 15, 2019, at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland.
 
A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.
 
###


DPSST Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/14/19 3:22 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

February 14, 2019

Contact:                Jessie Charlton
                                503-378-2256

Notice of Regular Meeting

 

The Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel will hold a regular meeting on March 1, 2019 from 9:00a-3:00p.  The meeting will be held in conference room A235 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

1.  Welcome

2.  PCOD Curriculum Review

3.  PCOD Hour Breakdown Review

4.  Revision Discussion

5.  Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Superintendent Search for Naches Valley School District
Naches Valley Sch. Dist. - 02/14/19 11:28 AM

The Naches Valley School Board has selected 7 superintendent candidates for preliminary interviews.  The interviews will be held in the Elementary School Cafeteria on Tuesday, February 19th at 4:00, 5:00, 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. and again Thursday, February 21st at 4:00, 5:00 and 6:00.  This is an open meeting and you are invited to attend, observe and provide the Board written feedback on each candidate.  This will not be a forum to ask questions of the candidates.  Three finalist will be chosen from this field for an all day interviews on Monday, March 4th, Tuesday, March 5th and Thursday, March 7th.  During these interviews there will be an opportunity to meet each candidate, ask questions and again provide written feedback to the School Board.

 


Six Candidates to be Interviewed for Yakima Public Schools Superintendent
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 02/14/19 10:47 AM

Tuesday evening February 12th, the Yakima School District Board of Directors selected candidates to be interviewed to fill the upcoming vacancy for Superintendent of the Yakima School District.  Dr. Jack Irion has announced his retirement after the 2018-2019 school year.  The next Superintendent will begin on July 1, 2019.

            Fifteen people submitted their application for consideration.  The candidates selected by the school board for preliminary interviews include:

  • Carlos Ramirez, Eagle, Colorado 
  • Christopher Ortiz, San Jose, California
  • Pam Ansingh, Yakima, Washington
  • John Boyd, Quincy, Washington
  • Ben Ramirez, Fife, Washington
  • Trevor Greene, Federal Way, Washington

Preliminary interviews are Tuesday, February 19 and Thursday, February 21 at the Yakima School District Central Services building located at 104 N 4th Ave.  Interviews will begin at 4 PM for approximately one hour, 15 minutes per candidate.  Interviews are open to the public.


A comforting Win for Life win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/14/19 9:37 AM
2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/4939/122032/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

February 13, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – A recently-retired Fairview man won the top prize of the Win for Life game and will take home $1,000 per week for life.
Robert East of Fairview will now receive $1,000 per week for life, thanks to his Oregon Lottery win. He matched all four numbers for the Monday, Feb. 11 drawing. He purchased the ticket at CJ’s Pub on Sandy Boulevard in Portland. East said he is a regular player of Lottery jackpot games and was very surprised when he realized he won.
“I was at home and Googled the results from my phone,” he said. “I looked at the ticket again, checked the date and double checked it. Then I immediately called my best friend.”
East said he stopped by the store and scanned the ticket to be sure, and confirmed it was the winning ticket.
“I recently retired so this is going to help me relax in retirement,” he said. “I have limited income so this will make me more comfortable.”
CJ’s Pub will receive a retailer sales bonus of $13,000 for selling the winning ticket.
Chris Taylor, owner of CJ’s Pub said that the bonus money would be going back into the business.
“We need some (heating and air conditioning) work and will get new chairs,” Taylor said. “It’s all going back into the business.”
Taylor said he has a number of regular customers who will love the fact he sold the winning ticket.
“I think my wife might have sold the ticket,” he said. “It’s just tremendous. It boosts you and makes you want to work harder and continue to grow our business.”
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $109 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where East lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , Robert East winning ticket

U.S. Attorney Statement on the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/14/19 9:26 AM

The decision to withdraw the Portland Police Bureau from the Joint Terrorism Task Force is a mistake that defies logic. It’s disappointing that in spite of the overwhelming evidence presented of JTTF successes in Oregon and across the nation, a majority of the city council chose a politically-expedient broadside against the federal government over the safety and well-being of their constituents. The law enforcement community’s duty and commitment to ensuring public safety and protecting civil rights will not be deterred by the politics of the moment.

-- Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon


3 heartfelt ways to make a co-worker's day
SAIF - 02/14/19 8:46 AM

Summary: Reach out to your co-workers in need.

-----

Instead of focusing on romance this Valentine’s Day, consider reaching out with kindness.

According to research by Mental Health America, Oregon has one of the worst rates of mental health issues in the country.

“Mental health is a taboo subject in general, but especially at work,” said Liz Hill, Total Worker Health® advisor at SAIF. “Reduce that stigma by reaching out to your co-workers.”

Hill points out several factors that impact mental health this time of year. Cold, dark days can be tough for Oregonians, especially those dealing with seasonal affective disorder. Bills from the holiday season are due. And Valentine’s Day can underscore loneliness or loss for some.

Small gestures can make a big difference, according to Hill. Here are some ways you can reach out to a co-worker in need:

  • Grab a cup of coffee or tea
  • Go for a walk
  • Ask how they’re doing, and just listen

You can also direct co-workers to your employee assistance program or the many community-based resources that are available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline offers free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress through local crisis centers 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  

More information and 60-second stress break videos can be found at saif.com/relax.  

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.

 


Wed. 02/13/19
I-84 Westbound closed in La Grande due to truck crash/fire (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/13/19 9:58 PM
I-84 truck crash, MP 234
I-84 truck crash, MP 234
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1204/122022/thumb_I-84_MP234_WB_truck_crash_02_021319.jpeg

I-84 WESTBOUND is closed in La Grande at Exit 265 due to three semi trucks that crashed (two on fire) near MP 234, 27 miles west of La Grande. The eastbound lanes are open. This is expected to be an extended WESTBOUND closure lasting several hours. If you plan to use alternate routes, expect winter conditions throughout the region. For update conditions check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941.




Attached Media Files: I-84 truck crash, MP 234 , I-84 truck crash, MP 234

FBI Special Agent in Charge Renn Cannon Statement on Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF)
FBI - Oregon - 02/13/19 6:10 PM

The FBI's mission is to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution. With the withdrawal of the city of Portland from the Joint Terrorism Task Force, that mission doesn't change.

The agents, analysts, language specialists, legal experts and other professional staff of the FBI who work every day to keep our community safe will continue to do so, addressing threats of violence and criminal activity that impact our neighborhoods. To this end, the FBI will continue to partner formally with other members of the JTTF as well as informally with cities and counties across the state to share information and address threats as appropriate.

Robust discussions about law enforcement's role in our society are valuable. Recognizing the fears that exist in the community, we will continue to visit with community leaders and work together to keep Oregon safe while addressing those factors that can drive a wedge between us.

I want the people of Oregon to know that the men and women of the FBI do their work with the utmost respect for and adherence to our shared Constitutional protections that allow us to speak, gather and worship freely no matter who we are or where we come from. I thank them for the work they do every day, and I thank the Portland Police officers who have joined us the past few years for their work in keeping our shared community safe.

-- Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon


Jury Convicts San Diego Man of Traveling to Portland for Sex with Minor
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/13/19 4:54 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A federal jury found David George Hopkins, 60, of San Diego, California, guilty today for traveling with the intent to engage in sex with a minor and other related charges.

“This case is another example of the extraordinary lengths some will go in an attempt to victimize children,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “It is also an example of the dogged determination of federal law enforcement to intercept individuals who seek to victimize children. I hope this conviction will serve as a warning to would-be child predators who believe they can pursue minors online without consequences.”

“Today’s conviction started with one person who was so concerned that she reported her disturbing interactions with Mr. Hopkins to law enforcement. Her willingness to step forward was critical to our ability to protect children from this predator. I would ask anyone with such information in the future to contact the nearest FBI office or submit tips online at https://tips.fbi.gov,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

According to court documents and information shared at trial, on June 9, 2017, Hopkins traveled from San Diego to Portland, Oregon believing he would be able to have sex with a 13-year-old girl named Paula along with her mother, Norma, and her mother’s friend, Ana, with whom he had been chatting online. Unbeknownst to Hopkins, he had been chatting with an FBI Special Agent acting as both Norma and Paula, and with a person using the alias Ana.

Hopkins and Ana began chatting online in 2012, and during one of the conversations, Hopkins raised the topic of having sex with a minor female in Peru and sent Ana a photo of what was purportedly him receiving oral sex from a minor.

In February 2017, Hopkins again contacted Ana and they began communicating using Skype and Facebook. In their first few conversations after reconnecting, Hopkins disclosed more details about his sexual relations with a minor in Peru. He also claimed to have had similar illicit contact with a minor in Panama. Hopkins later wrote, “did it bother u i [sic] had sex with young girls?” Hopkins did not present his conduct as a fantasy and Ana did not believe it was.

Concerned by the information shared with her, Ana reported Hopkins to the Eugene Police Department who referred the matter to the FBI. In March 2017, Ana met with an FBI Special Agent and agreed to cooperate with an investigation of Hopkins.

Ana continued chatting with Hopkins and their conversations grew increasingly more detailed and graphic as Hopkins shared information about his claimed past sexual experiences with minors and his desire to continue such behavior. In one conversation, Ana mentioned her fictitious Peruvian friend Norma. Hopkins asked if they could all have sex together. Ana also mentioned that Norma had a daughter named Paula. Hopkins also expressed an interest in having sex with Paula.

Ana told Hopkins that Norma had agreed to let him have sex with Paula. Shortly thereafter, Hopkins began communicating directly with Norma, the FBI Special Agent. The conversation quickly turned sexual and they discussed Hopkins flying to Oregon. In subsequent conversations, Hopkins began asking Norma about having sex with Paula, and, later, began communicating online directly with Paula. Hopkins chatted with Paula about having sex with her, describing in detail what he wanted to do.

In June 2017, Hopkins flew from San Diego to Portland with intent to engage in sexual conduct with Paula. He was met and arrested by the FBI at Portland International Airport upon his arrival. Hopkins claims of abusing children have not been corroborated.

In an indictment returned on June 20, 2018, a federal grand jury in Eugene charged Hopkins with one count each of attempting to use a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct, attempting to coerce or entice a minor, traveling with the intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct and transferring of obscene material to a minor.

Hopkins will be sentenced on May 23, 2019, by U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by Amy Potter and Jeff Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/122017/VERDICT-Hopkins-Final.pdf

Serious Injury Crash on US Hwy 97 Turns Fatal (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/13/19 3:53 PM
2019-02/1002/122013/hwy_97.2019.jpg
2019-02/1002/122013/hwy_97.2019.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1002/122013/thumb_hwy_97.2019.jpg

On February 7, 2019 at approximately 11:45 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers responded to a serious injury crash on US Hwy 97 near milepost (MP) 133. OSP has learned the seriously injured driver succumbed to her injuries on February 09, 2019.

The preliminary investigation revealed a southbound Ford Edge, driven by Anita Johnson (age 75 from Redmond) was slowing for another vehicle when a 1994 Kenworth tractor- trailer with a semi-trailer, driven by Chelsea Rice (age 28 from Aumsville) loaded with gravel rear ended the Ford Edge. The Ford Edge went off the highway to the right and struck a tree.  The Kenwood came to rest partially blocking the slow lane and right shoulder.

Johnson sustained life threatening injuries and was transported, by ground ambulance, to St. Charles Hospital in Bend where she died from her injuries on February 9, 2019. Chelsea Rice sustained minor injuries.

The highway was diverted to a single lane of travel for both SB and NB traffic for approximately 4 hours.  The investigation of the crash is still on-going. OSP was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Deschutes County Fire and Rescue.

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1002/122013/hwy_97.2019.jpg

Oregon Department of Human Services Hosts Stakeholder Meeting on February 22, 2019
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 3:28 PM

SALEM, Oregon –  Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) will host its regular stakeholder meeting on February 22, 2019 in Salem. Join us in person, by phone or online.

 

DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht, along with the agency’s Executive Leadership Team, will present brief updates followed by a question-and-answer period. Updates will be provided on each of the agency’s divisions: Aging and People with Disabilities, Child Welfare, the Office of Developmental Disabilities, Self-Sufficiency Programs, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Central and Shared Services.

 

Date:          Friday, February 22, 2019

Time:         1:30 to 3 p.m.

Participate:

  • In-Person: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137, 500 Summer Street NE, Salem
  • By phone: Take part by conference call. Dial-in number: (800) 260-0719. Participant Code: 464300
  • Online: Join from any PC or mobile device browser: Join the meeting.

 

Participate in the conversation on Twitter by using #ORDHSforum.

 

Learn more about the services DHS offers: www.oregon.gov/dhs


Oregon to Deliver First Crisis Intervention Training for 9-1-1 Operators
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/13/19 1:58 PM

Across the nation first responders (law enforcement, fire and EMS) are helping residents in crisis on a daily basis. To assist our state's first responders with training for these types of incidents, Oregon identified the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model as an effective and collaborative approach for law enforcement response to persons with a mental health crisis. One component of CIT is a 40-hour training class that includes information on mental health, de-escalation, consumer voices, resources, and other issues that are specific to a jurisdiction.

With staffing and funds provided by the Oregon Legislative Assembly and Oregon Health Authority, the Department of Public Safety and Standards Training (DPSST) in collaboration with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) created Oregon's CIT Center of Excellence (CITCOE). CITCOE serves as a training resource clearinghouse which works with law enforcement and behavioral health agencies across the state to develop, implement and support CIT’s. Currently there are 26 CIT’s in Oregon and several more are being developed.

The more than 900 women and men who work around our state as 9-1-1 communications professionals are an important part of the public safety family and in many ways are the first, first responder.  Their interaction with a person in crisis is different than with other first responders as they can only rely on the information they can gather by talking with a caller over the phone, or via Text to 9-1-1, as opposed to interacting with an individual in person.  This specialized contact does not make the 40-hour CIT training ideal for the public safety telecommunicator.

To help address this need, approximately 18 months ago an ad-hoc work group was formed that brought together interested parties from across Oregon.  This dedicated team spent countless hours to develop a Public Safety Telecommunicator CIT that will be relevant to 9-1-1 professionals in all areas of the state. The CIT training class will be a model that can be used by an individual agency or as a regional 9-1-1 CIT training opportunity in different parts of the state. The pilot Oregon Public Safety Telecommunicator CIT class will be held on February 20-21, 2019.  This class will be offered at DPSST's Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first statewide class of its type in the nation.

The 9-1-1 CIT work group was co-chaired by Melanie Payne with Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC) and Erica Stolhand of Hood River County 9-1-1. Work group members included Sgt. Bill Wright of the Umatilla Police Department, Sgt. Jason Ritter of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Captain Jason Wade of the University of Oregon Police Department, 9-1-1 Supervisor Jennifer Reynolds of Central Lane 9-1-1 (Eugene), Telecommunicator Jeremy Hipes of Clackamas County 9-1-1, Communications Supervisor Karen Primmer of the Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office, 9-1-1 Training Coordinator Karma Fletchall of the Washington County Consolidated Communications Agency (WCCCA), 9-1-1 Training Supervisor Megan Craig  Deschutes County 9-1-1, Emergency Communications Supervisor Mickie Reed Portland BOEC, Officer Tom Hietala of the Bend Police Department, 9-1-1 Training Program Coordinator Tamara Atkinson of DPSST, Training Coordinator Eilene Florey of GOBHI/CITCOE, and Crisis Intervention Training Program Coordinator Linda Maddy of DPSST.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "public safety agencies around Oregon work in partnership with both public and non-profit organizations in communities around our state to help our residents in crisis.  The program this work group created to train our 9-1-1 professionals to assist people in crisis is greatly appreciated and will help make a difference in our emergency response system." 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


On Valentine's Day, Remember the Sweet Deals at Washington Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 02/13/19 1:10 PM
Graphic
Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/4992/122003/thumb_Valentines-Day_(1).jpg

Chocolate offers instant gratification, but lower fees, great rates, and member perks last longer.

 

SEATTLE (Feb. 12, 2019) – With Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s a great time to remember all the sweet deals from your credit union. Members enjoy a variety of money-saving perks that are better than a box of chocolates, whether you’re treating yourself or someone special on the big day.

If your idea of a romantic dinner out is more steak-and-lobster than burger-and-fries, try a free financial education course, such as budgeting, to align your finances. Hoping to take a romantic sunset drive in a new car sometime soon? Credit union members save big on auto loan financing, an average of $91 per year. Want to start a long-term financial relationship with a low-interest credit card? You could be enjoying a credit card rate as much as 3.09 percent lower than those offered at other financial institutions. All of these benefits are available for the 4.3 million Washington credit union members and joining a credit union is easier than you think.

These perks and savings aren’t just candy-coated promises. They exist because of credit unions’ not-for-profit structure. Credit unions are owned by their members, so they do not pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they return profits to their members in the form of favorable loan rates, better returns on savings accounts, and lower fees.

Washington credit unions love their members and Valentine’s Day is a great time to remember all the sweet deals waiting for you at your credit union. Want to join a credit union? Find one that best suits your needs at www.asmarterchoice.org.


Washington Benefits of Membership Report, a, Credit Union National Association study based on Datatrac, NCUA, and CUNA comparison of bank and credit union rates, for 12 months ending in Sept 2018.

 

                                                                          <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4992/122003/Washington_Loves_Credit_Unions.docx , Graphic

On Valentine's Day, Remember the Sweet Deals at Oregon Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 02/13/19 1:07 PM
2019-02/4992/122002/Valentines-Day_(1).jpg
2019-02/4992/122002/Valentines-Day_(1).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/4992/122002/thumb_Valentines-Day_(1).jpg

Chocolate offers instant gratification, but lower fees, great rates, and member perks last longer.

 

PORTLAND (Feb. 12, 2019) – With Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s a great time to remember all the sweet deals from your credit union. Members enjoy a variety of money-saving perks that are better than a box of chocolates, whether you’re treating yourself or someone special on the big day.

If your idea of a romantic dinner out is more steak-and-lobster than burger-and-fries, try a free financial education course, such as budgeting, to align your finances. Hoping to take a romantic sunset drive in a new car sometime soon? Credit union members save big on auto loan financing with an average of $116 per year. Want to start a long-term financial relationship with a low-interest credit card? You could be enjoying a credit card rate 2.93 percent lower than those offered at other financial institutions. All of these benefits are available for more than two million Oregon credit union members and joining a credit union is easier than you think.

These perks and savings aren’t just candy-coated promises. They exist because of credit unions’ not-for-profit structure. Credit unions are owned by their members so they do not pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they return profits to their members in the form of favorable loan rates, better returns on savings accounts, and lower fees.

Oregon credit unions love their members and Valentine’s Day is a great time to remember all the sweet deals waiting for you at your credit union. Want to join a credit union? Find one that best suits your needs at www.asmarterchoice.org.

Oregon Benefits of Membership Report, a Credit Union National Association study based on Datatrac, NCUA, and CUNA comparison of bank and credit union rates, for 12 months ending in Sept 2018.

 

                                                                          <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4992/122002/Oregon_Loves_Credit_Unions.docx , 2019-02/4992/122002/Valentines-Day_(1).jpg

March Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits to be issued March 1.
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 11:38 AM

The U.S Department of Agriculture has asked states to provide early issuance of March benefits for those who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for food security. This request is due to the partial federal government shutdown that occurred in January.

Oregonians who normally receives their SNAP benefits between the 1st or 9th of each month will get their March allocation on March 1, 2019.

This is the second month that SNAP benefits will be issued differently than the regular issuance schedule. The early March issuance date will help to ease the burden on affected households who have had a longer than usual gap between their usual SNAP issuances.

“We understand that this disruption in the schedule of how benefits are distributed can be difficult for SNAP participants,” stated Self-Sufficiency Programs Director Kim Fredlund. “Our goal, during this unprecedented time, is to ensure we provide vulnerable Oregonians with access to food benefits and help them find additional resources if needed.”

If people are concerned about running out of SNAP benefits, they can contact to 211Info, the Oregon Food Bank or the Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) to find resources in their local communities.

To find a local DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs and click on Office Locations.


Oregon's Office of Emergency Management says it's a good time to prepare for flooding and adhere to basic flood safety (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/13/19 9:54 AM
2019-02/3986/121990/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg
2019-02/3986/121990/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3986/121990/thumb_5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg

With recent wet weather and more rain on its way, now is a good time to prepare for floods, check your emergency supplies, and adhere to basic flood safety. Some simple tips include clearing out leaves or remaining ice/snow from storm drains and culverts to prevent localized flooding, and having an emergency kit with necessary supplies. Oregon Office of Emergency Management recommends being 2 Weeks Ready http://bit.ly/2dxylmA. 

Many flood-related fatalities are caused by vehicles driven into hazardous waters.  Six inches of moving water can knock over an adult and 12 inches can carry away a small vehicle. Remember “Turn Around, Don't Drown.”

  • Heavy rains reduce drivers' visibility. When driving, turn on your lights, increase following distance, slow down, and watch for bicyclists and pedestrians. Follow the Oregon Department of Transportation tips for driving in the rain: https://www.oregon.gov/odot/pages/winter-driving.aspx
  • Give yourself more time for heavy traffic. Keep a safe distance between you and the driver in front of you. Make sure your windshield wipers in are good working condition.  Obey the speed limit and drive slower in the rain. Turn on headlights. 
  • If you are in your vehicle and floodwater is blocking your evacuation route, go to a building on high ground. If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, stay in the vehicle. If water is rising inside the vehicle, seek refuge on the roof. 

A flood does not have to be a catastrophic event, and you do not have to live in a high-risk flood area to suffer flood damage. Around twenty percent of flood insurance claims occur in moderate-to-low risk areas. Property owners should remember to: 

  • Buy Flood Insurance. Most standard homeowner’s policies do not cover flood damage. Flood insurance is affordable, and important to protecting your investment. An average flood policy costs around $890 a year, and rates start at less than $516 a year for homes in moderate- to low-risk areas. 
  • Prepare Now. Review your insurance coverages. No flood insurance? Remember: It typically takes 30 days for a new flood insurance policy to go into effect, so get your policy now.
  • Plan Ahead. Plan evacuation routes. Keep important papers in a safe, waterproof place. Conduct a home inventory; itemize and take pictures of possessions and the inside and outside of your home. For more information about flood insurance, please call your insurance agent or contact the National Flood Insurance Program Call Center (NFIP) at 1-800-621-3362 for information about the NFIP or questions about an existing policy.  Visit the National Flood Insurance Program at www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program to learn more about flood risk and flood insurance.



Attached Media Files: 2019-02/3986/121990/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg

BLM seeks nominations for National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/13/19 9:35 AM

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking nominations to fill three positions on its National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.  Selected Board members advise the BLM and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) from the perspective of a particular interest in wild horse and burro management. The call for nominations released today is for the positions that represent humane advocacy, livestock management, and wildlife management interests.

The board plays an important role in the Department of the Interior’s efforts to be a good neighbor in states where the BLM and USFS oversee wild free-roaming horses and burros. The advisory board advises the BLM and USFS on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The board typically meets twice annually, but the BLM may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve a three-year term without salary. Members are reimbursed for approved travel and per diem expenses related to their activities on the board.

The advisory board is comprised of nine members who represent a range of interests. Individuals qualify to serve on the board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. Successful nominees will demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Board; individuals may also nominate themselves. Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board. 

Interested parties should submit an application packet that includes at a minimum a resume and nomination letter. Provide the following information as part of the application packet:

  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name.
  • Position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered.
  • Business and home addresses and phone numbers.
  • E-mail address.
  • Present occupation/title and employer.
  • Education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study).
  • Career highlights (significant related experience, civic and professional activities, elected offices, including prior advisory committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to be represented).
  • Relevant education, training, and experience.
  • Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management.
  • Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management).
  • Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions.
  • Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by nominee or employer.
  • Indication of whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist.
  • Explanation of interest in serving on the Board.
  • Reference letter(s) from special interests or organizations the nominee desires to represent.

References may include, but are not limited to, business associates, friends, co-workers, and local, state and/or federal government representatives or elected officials. All nominations must include at least one letter of reference.

Submit nominations by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, acting Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at dboothe@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260, Washington, DC 20240.  To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, Washington, DC 20003.

Nominations must be received no later than 45 days after the notice has been published in the Federal Register, or postmarked by the same date. The BLM request for nominations appears in the February 13 edition of the Federal Register.  For more information on the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, visit the BLM website.
 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


Heppner Physician Pleads Guilty to Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/13/19 8:49 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On February 12, 2019, Kenneth Wenberg, 72, a medical doctor from Heppner, Oregon, pleaded guilty to a single count of tax evasion. The government demonstrated it could prove Dr. Wenberg failed to report income resulting in a tax loss of approximately $187,000.

According to court documents, Dr. Wenberg created nominee entities to hide assets and income he personally earned while serving as a physician at the Morrow County Health District (MCHD) and Urgent Health Care Center (UHCC) in Heppner. Dr. Wenberg instructed MDHD and UHCC to make payments for services he performed directly to sham entities to avoid income tax liabilities. Dr. Wenberg opened numerous bank accounts and purchased real property in the names of his nominee entities. He also paid for his and his family’s personal living expenses out of the nominee accounts. Dr. Wenberg failed to report his income to the IRS, despite knowing he owed taxes.

Wenberg faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on June 6, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Marco A. Hernandez.

As part of the plea agreement, Wenberg has agreed to pay restitution to the IRS in the full amount of the tax loss as determined by the court after sentencing.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) and is being prosecuted by Clemon D. Ashley and Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office and IRS-CI remind Oregonians that tax day is Monday, April 15, 2019. For tips to assist taxpayers in choosing a reputable tax professional or preparing their own taxes, visit the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/help-resources.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/121987/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Wenberg-Final.pdf

Prescott school canceled today
Prescott Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 8:36 AM

Prescott school canceled today 2/13/19


CORRECTION: Finley Food Pantry Opening to be Rescheduled
Finley Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 8:21 AM

KENNEWICK, WA – Please note a correction to an incorrect message sent earlier regarding Finley's Food Pantry.  Due to inclement weather and dangerous road conditions, Finley School District will RESCHEDULE the opening of its new Food Pantry.  The pantry was originally scheduled to open on Thursday, February 14th.

For more information, contact Finley PIO Molly Curtiss at 509.544.5787 or tiss@esd123.org">mcurtiss@esd123.org.

###


Quality Measurement Council meets Feb. 21
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 8:00 AM

(Wilsonville, Ore.) – The Quality Measurement Council will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Training Rooms 1 and 2 at the Oregon Child Development Coalition, 9140 S.W. Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070.

The Quality Measurement Council was formed with the passage of House Bill 3359 in 2017. The council meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include a discussion on collecting and reporting metrics.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, 1-888-363-4735, and using Conference ID #3439085. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us

About the Quality Measurement Council

The council was established to create and maintain a system through which community-based, long-term care facilities report reliable and meaningful data that will make possible a system for measuring a facility’s performance compared with other long-term care providers in the state.

# # #


Prescott Elementary and High School 2 hr. Delay today,buses on snow routs
Prescott Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 5:54 AM

Prescott Elementary and High School 2 hr. Delay tomorrow 2-13-19, buses on snow routs


Tue. 02/12/19
Medicaid long term quality council meets Feb. 13 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/19 8:37 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council meets from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 13, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 285, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: public comment, Governor’s Recommended Budget document, bills of possible interest and council business.

For those who can’t attend in person, there is a toll-free phone number that can also be accessed through Skype for Business: (503) 934-1400, participant code 50479028.  

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Alex Pelusi at alex.j.pelusi@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown, 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us.

About the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality & Reimbursement Advisory Council

The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council (MLTCQRAC) was established by the 1995 Legislative Assembly to advise the Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities program on changes or modifications to the Medicaid reimbursement system for long-term care and community based care services.

                                                                                      # # #

 


Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services committees meet Feb. 15 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/19 8:16 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee will hold its full advisory and executive committee meetings on Feb. 15 in Salem.

The full advisory committee will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room 160 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301. Agenda items for the meeting, which is open to the public, will include public comment, announcements, new staff introduction, new membership discussion, retreat priorities, other budget items, legislative updates, and bylaws committee scheduling.

The executive committee, which is also open to the public, will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. in Room 160 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301. Agenda items include will include public comment, announcements, 2019 meeting planning, brochure and website ideas, and new business.

Sign language interpreters, close vision interpreters, FM assistive listening devices and live captioning will be provided for each meeting. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join each meeting by calling toll-free phone number, (503) 934-1400, and using Conference ID 8113673#.   

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Request.ODHHSP@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.  For questions about these meetings, please contact: Max Brown at 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Service Program (ODHHSP) by providing information and expertise on issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disability.

# # #