Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Thu. Aug. 24 - 3:41 am
Wed. 08/23/17
Corps seeks comments on Boardman, Morrow County, Ore. permit application.
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 08/23/17 4:49 PM
US Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is seeking comments on a request by Columbia Improvement District to conduct work impacting the Columbia River at river mile 271.5 in Boardman, Morrow County, Ore.

Public Notice NWP-2017-280 can be viewed at http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Missions/Regulatory/Notices/Article/1287782/nwp-2017-280/
Red Cross Continues to Provide Shelter, Food, Other Resources for Wildfire Evacuees
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/23/17 1:08 PM
Sleeping areas, showers, food, water and other services available to wildfire evacuees at the Red Cross shelter, located in Gold Beach.

GOLD BEACH, Ore., August 23, 2017 -- The American Red Cross shelter set up for Chetco Bar Wildfire evacuees remains open in Gold Beach and continues to provide shelter and aid to people displaced from their homes.

The Red Cross shelter is located at Riley Elementary School, 94350 6th St, Gold Beach, OR 97444. Individuals and families in need of shelter assistance may simply show up at the shelter for help. People facing evacuations and in need of shelter assistance may call (888) 680-1455.

The following services are available at the shelter to people displaced by the Chetco Bar Wildfire:
Shelter (sleeping area, cots, blankets)
Food (hot meals and snacks)
Water and coffee
Shower facility
Informational updates from the Fire Management Team (typically daily resident briefings)
Other assistance (dependant on individual or community needs)
Information on pet shelter assistance
Information on livestock relocation


For information on the Chetco Bar wildfire:
Residents in Curry County who have a landline will receive emergency notifications via that number.

Residents in need of fire information may call the Chetco Bar Fire Information Line at: 541-247-3680 or 541-316-5816 or 541-414-4489.

Residents facing evacuations should make arrangements to move property and livestock. Caged animals and livestock can relocate to the Curry County Fairgrounds (event center at the beach). For more info on livestock relocation to the fairgrounds, call 541-425-1821.

HOW TO HELP:
If people are interested in helping Chetco Bar Wildfire evacuees the best way to assist Red Cross efforts is to make a financial donation at www.redcross.org or by calling 1-800-RED CROSS. A financial donation allows the Red Cross to mobilize quickly to aid people affected by disasters as well as to purchase supplies to address specific shelter resident needs.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: Wildfire Safety Checklist , News Release - Red Cross Continues to Provide Shelter, Food, Other Resources for Wildfire Evacuees
Birch Creek Road Bridge near Milton-Freewater will close Monday for bridge work, detour in place
ODOT: East. Ore. - 08/23/17 12:20 PM
The Birch Creek Road (Walla Walla River) Bridge in Umatilla County near Milton-Freewater will be closed to traffic starting Monday. The closure is needed to accommodate the replacement of the structure which will continue through the summer of next year. Travelers needing access to Birch Creek Road on the opposite side of the bridge will need to detour along OR11 and Eastside Road. Detour signs are in place.
Conference in Bend puts spotlight on workplace safety
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/23/17 11:29 AM
(Salem) -- A two-day event in Bend will offer employers and workers many opportunities to improve their skills at fostering and maintaining safe and healthy workplaces. Those opportunities include topics on everything from pinpointing workplace hazards and making safety committees more effective to implementing a solid hearing conservation program and exploring the fundamentals of fall protection.

Oregon's Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, is one of several partners presenting the Sept. 19-20 Central Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Conference at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes.

On Tuesday, Sept. 19, keynote speaker Gary Norland, an electrician who survived being electrocuted by a 12,500-volt, 200-amp overhead power line, will present "The Impact of an Injury: What are You Risking?"

Norland, a husband and father, will seek to inspire attendees to reflect on the fact that, while dedication to a job should be a focus, it should never become more important than working safely. His presentation also will underscore the need to understand that a life-changing accident triggers a ripple effect that touches families, co-workers, and communities.

"A conference like this helps you understand safety is a choice you need to make every day," Norland said. "When you attend my presentation, you will quickly understand how life can change in less than a second. And you will never be the same again."

Other conference topics include:
Tools for conscious leadership: Shifting out of drama
Compliance elements of a lockout/tagout program
Confined space: Elements of an effective program
Machine guarding
Electrical safety for non-electricians
How training impacts safety

Registration for the two-day event is $145, with an optional pre-conference workshop for $50. Attend any one day for $100. For more information or to register, go to https://safetyseries.cvent.com/central17.


###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
Parole & Probation Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/23/17 10:46 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 75th Basic Parole & Probation Officer Class on Friday, September 1, 2017 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon. The event will begin at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow after the ceremony. Assistant Director Jeremiah Stromberg of the Oregon Department of Corrections will be the guest speaker. All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and elected officials are welcome to attend.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Roster of Basic Parole and Probation Class 75

Parole & Probation Officer Elizabeth Armstead
Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Jay Childress
DOC/Douglas County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Kelly Crowley
Washington County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Jamie Cruz
Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

Parole & Probation Officer McKenzie Davis
Coos County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Averyl Growden
Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

Deputy Sheriff Jacob Howitt
Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

Parole & Probation Officer Alex Jones
Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

Parole & Probation Officer Vannak Kong
Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

Parole & Probation Officer Sheridan Lardner
Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Travis Lowe
Jackson County Community Justice

Parole & Probation Officer Leotis McCormack
Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

Director Todd McKinley
Grant County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Fernando Millan
Washington County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Amber Overman
Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Taylor Smith
Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Tessa Smith
Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Kaylee Trudel
Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Freddy Vidal
DOC/Douglas County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Gina Wilson
Morrow County Sheriff's Office

Parole & Probation Officer Jose Zepeda
Lane County Parole & Probation


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Milli Fire Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/23/17 10:06 AM
August 23, 2017 Morning Update

Crossroads subdivision, Edgington Road, Remuda Road, Peterson Burn Road, Wild Wing and Three Creeks Road residences returning to Level 2 (Be Set) Evacuation Notice, allowing residents to return to their homes.

With changes in evacuation status the American Red Cross shelter at the Sisters Middle School will provide lunch and dinner to clients today and then is scheduled to close this evening. The Red Cross will operate an Emergency Aid Station on Thursday at the Middle School location where the public is welcome to drop in between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. for breakfast, lunch, snacks, to escape fire smoke, and to access current fire information.

Burnout activity was initiated overnight on the north side of the fire from the containment line along Forest Road 1018 and up to OR242. This work is being conducted as an offensive strategy to reduce the fuel load and build a line of defense between the fire and structures to the east should the fire make a run from the northwest. Burnout activity will continue today as conditions allow in the areas near 1018, as well as north of OR242. Mechanical vegetative removal work will continue in order to further prep these areas for future burnouts.

The northwest, west and southwest sides of the fire remain active. The fire grew near Black Crater Lake, but was moving slowly. On the southwest side, the fire came across Forest Road 1026 burning into old Pole Creek Fire burned area. The western side is in the wilderness and is expected to slowly move towards the lava fields where it will naturally stop. Control lines on the northeastern and southeastern sides of the fire were further reinforced with wider lines and cooling off hot spots around the fire perimeter.

Structural task forces managed by the Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Green Team were out yesterday at the Black Butte Ranch and Tollgate communities to evaluate homes and assist homeowners with making their property better prepared. Those crews have been and will continue to patrol the area and support fire operations. No structures have been destroyed in this fire.

A public meeting is planned for Thursday, August 24, 6 p.m. at the Sisters High School, 1700 McKinney Butte Rd, Sisters, Oregon. Information regarding status of the fire, closures, and evacuations will be provided.
Evacuations:
Level 2 - The subdivisions of Crossroads, Edgington/Remuda, Wildwing, Peterson Burn Road Area, and along both sides of Three Creeks Lake Road (Forest Road 16) about one mile south of Sisters from the junction of the Brooks Scanlon logging road.
Level 1- The subdivision of Tollgate, all areas between OR 242 and HWY 20 and west of Cold Springs Cutoff (FS1018), which includes Black Butte Ranch.

Road Closures:
OR242 east of Cascade Crest to the junction of Forest Road 15. For further information see www.tripcheck.com

Links:
Forest Closures: There is an area closure in place in the Deschutes National Forest, due to fire activity. https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/deschutes/alerts-notices
Smoke monitoring information is available at: oregonsmoke.blogspot.com
Chetco Bar Fire Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/23/17 10:03 AM
August 23, 2017-- 9:30 p.m.

Chetco Bar Fire Information: (541) 247-3680
Additional Lines: (541) 414-4489, (541) 316-5816, & 541-469-1177

The Chetco Bar Fire is now operating with a unified command structure that includes Oregon State Fire Marshall, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry and Coos Forest Protection Association.

The Chetco Bar Fire is operating with a unified command structure that includes Oregon State Fire Marshal, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry and Coos Forest Protection Association. This team continues working with the Curry County Sheriff's Office and Emergency Operations Center. This unified team recognizes that every home and acre across the landscape has value to the community and are working to protect these values.

The fire growth was minimal yesterday. The same is expected today because of favorable weather. The fire is still about 5.2 miles northeast of Brookings. The public is asked to avoid the fire affected area and watch for fire crews and heavy equipment enroute to and from the fire line.

Actions: Firefighters made progress yesterday and overnight, building direct and contingency indirect line on the south and southwestern flank of the fire including establishing dozer line and working around structures to improve defensible space. Today, fire crews will continue to take advantage of the cooler air and higher relative humidity (RH) to improve and extend containment lines and continue to work around structures.

Weather: Yesterday's weather patterns of cooler air and higher relative humidity (RHs) is expected through Thursday, along with the light to moderate afternoon and evening sea breezes. Areas of fog and low clouds this morning will clear back to the coast this afternoon. One more night of excellent humidity recovery is expected tonight, with a deep marine layer ahead of an approaching weak cold front. Cool high pressure will build into the Pacific Northwest behind this front, presenting another round of gusty north to northeast winds Thursday night into Friday. Onshore flow is expected to return Sunday or Monday, returning to the region's typical weather.

Smoke and haze will continue to be visible along Gold Beach and Brookings-Harbor as there's little air movement. That is expected to change as soon as the coastal winds pick up in the afternoon. Rogue River valley and Gold Beach will see unhealthy levels throughout the day. Highway 101 will have limited visibility as smoke infiltrates along the coast. For more info about air quality, please visit the Oregon Smoke Blog: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

Evacuations:
For current information on areas under an evacuation please visit our interactive map at http://arcg.is/1zXWzD. Yesterday, portions of the evacuation area was reduced to a Level 2, allowing residents in the fire affected area from Cape Ferrello Road and Carpenterville Road north to Pistol River and east and west off Carpenterville Road to return to their homes. Residents returning to their homes in Level 2 evacuation areas can obtain re-entry forms at established check points with verifiable proof of residency. Re-entry forms are no longer available at Ray's Market. The Red Cross is continuing to staff an emergency evacuation shelter at Riley Creek Elementary in Gold Beach 94350 6th St. Gold Beach, OR. (541)-600-6068. There is no shelter in Brookings.

Community Meeting: A community meeting is being planned at Gold Beach this evening. The time and location will be announced later today.


Fire at a Glance:
Size: 99, 944 acres (approx.)
Cause: Lightning
Containment: 0%
Total personnel: 1078

Social Media Resources:
Interactive Map: http://arcg.is/1zXWzD
Reverse 911: http://tinyurl.com/CurryReverse911
Facebook: /https://www.facebook.com/R6RRSNF/
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5385/
Twitter: @RRSNF #ChetcoBarFire
E-mail: chetcobarfireinfo@gmail.com
Air Quality Report: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department accepting comments on overnight camping rate proposed change
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/23/17 9:00 AM
Salem OR -- The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is proposing amendments to agency rules related to overnight camping rates for state parks. A $2 per site increase in the base rate for overnight rental fees on select types of campsites was approved by the Oregon Legislature as part of the 2017-19 OPRD budget. The deadline for public comment on the amendments is extended to Sept. 15, 2017.

The proposed rule will increase the base rate for yurts, cabins, full hook up, partial hook up, hiker-biker, equestrian and group sites. Tent site rates will not increase, which maintains a lower cost option for park visitors. The proposed rule is aligned with the views expressed in park surveys that show visitors prefer smaller rate increases on a more frequent basis than a large fee increase in the future. Day-use parking pass prices will not increase.

The full text of the amendment to Oregon Administrative Rule 736-015-0020 and 736-015-0040 is available online at http://bit.ly/OregonStateParkRulemaking. Comments will be accepted until 5:00 PM on September 15, 2017, and can be made: online at http://bit.ly/OregonStateParkRulemaking ; in writing to: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, attn.: Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301; or through e-mail to OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov. After reviewing public comments, agency staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its September 20 business meeting. If approved by the Commission, new rates would be effective on new reservations made after Oct. 1, 2018.
Tue. 08/22/17
Eclipse passes over Oregon with minimal impact on wildfire efforts
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/17 4:05 PM
SALEM, Ore. - Months of planning for the great solar eclipse on Aug. 21 appear to have paid off. Minimal impacts on wildfire efforts were reported yesterday. Considering the influx of visitors during peak fire season, the day of the eclipse saw fewer than 10 new fires statewide across all jurisdictions. Those fires burned only about four acres. For the entire four-day eclipse period (Friday-Monday), new human-caused wildfire starts were down by nearly half. At Oregon State Parks, there were zero human-caused fires despite a heavy influx of campers.

Close cooperation between state agencies leading up to the eclipse helped spread widely messages about the importance of preventing wildfire. The Oregon Department of Transportation highway message boards alerted arriving visitors and residents alike to the extreme wildfire danger. Keep Oregon Green also peppered the state with similar messages on everything from billboards to restaurant placemats.

ODF brought in additional ground and aerial resources from out of state under the Northwest Compact. After briefings they were deployed in the path of totality where fire danger was high to extreme and travel times uncertain. Some engaged with local ODF districts in helping on existing large fires that threatened ODF-protected lands.

Today, resources are being repositioned in light of the state's current fire picture. There are nine large uncontained fires currently burning in Oregon. The greatest in area is the Chetco Bar Fire in Curry County. The fire has continued to grow from its explosive expansion over the weekend, reaching an estimated 98,000 acres as of this morning.

Strong winds had been pushing the fire south, driving it onto land protected by the Coos Forest Protective Association (CFPA). Several thousand acres of protected timber have been affected.

Level 3 evacuations have uprooted more than 3,000 people. The Red Cross has set up a shelter for evacuees at Riley Creek Elementary School in Gold Beach. While Highway 101 remains open, motorists are requested to avoid traveling the section north of the Brookings area if possible. The fire has reached as close as six miles from Brookings, where smoke is affecting air quality.

Dry air mass, lower relative humidity and north/northeast winds continue to present heightened potential for rapid fire growth. Forecast weather points to continued fire growth to the southwest and south, which will threaten several high-value resources.

A Type One Incident Management Team will take over command of the fire tomorrow. Deputy State Forester Nancy Hirsch is already at the incident command post along with other ODF personnel. ODF yesterday sent to the fire two strike teams of engines that had come from Washington State to provide extra help during the eclipse. Two Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopters are also being redeployed from the Whitewater Fire in the Cascades to the Chetco Bar Fire. Total personnel on the scene from all agencies now stands at over 360.

The fire was started by lightning July 12 on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

New wildfires on ODF-protected land
Prompt initial attack stopped a flurry of new fires in Douglas County on Monday. Firefighters from Douglas Forest Protective Association responded to four fires over the course of the day. They kept the largest - a vehicle fire along I-5 that spread up a steep hillside - from advancing beyond 1.5 acres. The others were kept to a tenth of an acre or less.

Fire conditions forecast
Thunderstorms with accompanying lightning is the concern today for south-central Oregon, increasing the risk of new fire starts. Wednesday, lightning is expected to spread more widely to central and eastern Oregon. Fire restrictions and closures remain in effect. To find those for ODF-protected lands, go to http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx

For more information on wildfires and wildfire readiness, please go to the department's wildfire blog.
Oregon State Penitentiary reports inmate death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/22/17 3:53 PM
Leroy Wayne Earp
Leroy Wayne Earp
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1070/107247/thumb_Earp.jpg
An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate died unexpectedly Monday afternoon of apparent natural causes at a local area hospital. He had been housed at Oregon State Penitentiary. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Division is conducting an investigation.

Leroy Earp, 77, was transported off-site for medical care on August 15, 2017. He was non-responsive to medical interventions and was pronounced deceased at 2:19 p.m. on Monday, August 21, 2017.

Earp entered DOC custody on July 15, 1982 on one count of aggravated murder out of Clackamas County. His was serving a life sentence.

Attempts to locate next of kin have not been successful. The department asks that anyone familiar with the deceased contact one of the numbers listed above. No other details are available at this time.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

####


Attached Media Files: Leroy Wayne Earp
Cultural Trust awards $2.94 million to 136 Oregon nonprofits (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 08/22/17 1:10 PM
The Florence Event Center.
The Florence Event Center.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1171/107236/thumb_florence_events_center_buildings.jpg
Salem, Ore. -- Generous spring donors lifted Oregon Cultural Trust fundraising to a new high, resulting in a record $2.94 million in grants to 136 cultural nonprofits for fiscal year 2017-18.

The awards include a total of $735,887 to the Cultural Trust's five Statewide Partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $735,887 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions -- for regranting in their communities; and $1,471,774 in competitive Cultural Development Grants to 86 cultural organizations across the state.

Funded projects include:
the "Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years" interactive exhibit and community programming by the Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem;
theater lighting and sound equipment upgrades for the Florence Events Center;
the renovation of the historic Baker Orpheum Theatre to become a community performing arts center in Baker City;
exhibits and programs that highlight the LBGTQ community and Native youth as part of a Cultural Diversity Initiative by the High Desert Museum in Bend; and
transforming a major gallery at Portland Children's Museum into The Studio - a clay, maker and multi-purpose art space for families.

"Our donors really are incredible," said Carole Morse, chair of the Cultural Trust Board. "We anticipated holding the grant budget about even this year but their generosity ensured another record year of grant making. We are so grateful for their continued commitment to protecting Oregon's treasured cultural community."

"When Cultural Trust funding goes up, we all benefit," said Brian Rogers, the Cultural Trust's executive director. "Every dollar strengthens not just our cultural economy, but the quality of life that makes Oregon so special."

The Cultural Development Grants include first-time awards to 37 organizations (43 percent) and the largest average grant amount ever at $17,050. Half of the grants go to organizations outside the Portland Metro area. Cultural Development Grants fund projects that address access, capacity, creativity and preservation.

FY2018 Cultural Development Grants recipients are:
Please note: Grant recipients are organized alphabetically by geographic region.
Those receiving a first-time grant are marked with an asterisk ().

North Coast (Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook Counties)
Astoria Visual Arts (Astoria) Capacity $7,741
Astoria Visual Arts Executive Director - Year One Support: To support the management of AVA and build organizational capacity by increasing stability, improving sustainability and strengthening programs.

Metro (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties)
APANO Communities United Fund (Portland) Access $40,000
Jade-Midway Placemaking Projects: To support the Jade-Midway Placemaking Program, which commissions local artists to create participatory, place-based projects in East Portland.

August Wilson Red Door Project (Portland) Creativity $33,402
August Wilson Monologue Project: To support free arts education that fosters creative and personal development for high school students and preserves African American culture.

Boom Arts, Inc. (Portland) Capacity $18,764
Boom Arts Core Staff Expansion - Associate Managing Director: To support the doubling of Boom Arts' core staff capacity to 2.0 FTE through the hiring of an Associate Managing Director.

Caldera Portland (Portland) Creativity $13,486
Caldera 2018 Artists In Residence Program: To support residencies for artists from Oregon and around the world who create work and lead classes for Caldera youth and the Central Oregon community.

Cappella Romana (Portland) Capacity $32,691
Hiring a full-time marketing professional for Cappella Romana: To support the hiring of a full-time marketing professional to increase new and retain existing audiences, deepening CR's cultural impact.

Chamber Music Northwest (Portland) Creativity $22,320
Beyond the Cultural Revolution: To support the 2018 Summer Chamber Music Festival, including four new commissioned works and a special focus on Chinese composers.

Circus Project (Portland) Capacity $16,790
Upgrades to Studio Space to support full theatrical circus arts productions: To add theatrical lighting to our space in order to host productions of original circus performances and reach hundreds more audience members

Clackamas County Arts Alliance (Oregon City) Capacity $20,648
Build Capacity for Arts Alliance Programs to Meet Increased Demand for Services: To support building capacity to reach new donors and diversify income streams so services can expand to meet demands of a rapidly growing population.

Classical Up Close (Tigard) Access $6,165
2018 Spring Chamber Music Festival: To support the sixth annual Classical Up Close Spring Chamber Music Festival, with free concerts presented up-close and personal all over Portland.

CoHo Productions (Portland) Capacity $18,505
Outreach Initiatives: To support the hiring of appropriate personal to staff and manage CoHo's cultural outreach programs.

Forest For The Trees, Inc. (Portland) Access $27,088
Forest For The Trees: To support planning, production, and public access to arts programming highlighting local and international artists in the Portland community.

Japanese Garden Society of Oregon (Portland) Creativity $13,815
Mirrors of the Mind- The Masks of Otsuki Koukun: To support a multi-disciplinary presentation of Japanese Noh theatre incorporating an exhibition, performances, lectures and craft demonstrations.

Kukatonon Children's African Dance Troupe (Portland) Access $9,183
Kukatonon's Collaboration with The Portland Ballet: To expand access to higher education opportunities and dance careers for low-income African Americans by integrating the fundamentals of ballet.

Leach Botanical Garden (Portland) Access $25,461
Creating a Natural Stage for Arts & Culture in Outer SE Portland: To support development of Leach's Upper Garden as a natural stage that welcomes a diverse community and inspires curiosity and creativity.

Live Wire Radio, Inc. (Portland) Capacity $13,442
Improving Live Wire's Podcast for Long-Term Audience Growth: To support vital improvements to the Live Wire podcast that will enhance the on-demand, mobile consumption experience and grow audiences.

Miracle Theatre Group (Portland) Creativity $9,408
Astucias Por Heredar Por Un Sobrino a Un Tio: To support the production of the "lost" Spanish-language play "Astucias Por Heredar Un Sobrino A Un Tio" by Fermin de Reygadas for Milagro's Season 34.

Neighbors West Northwest (Portland) Preservation $40,000
Restoration of the Chinese Gate - Phase II: To support the restoration and preservation of Portland's landmark Chinese Gate.

Northwest Children's Theater and School (Portland) Creativity $33,495
Chitra- The Girl Prince: To support the presentation of "Chitra: The Girl Prince," a world premiere original play presented in partnership with the Anjali School of Dance.

Open Signal, Portland Community Media Center (Portland) Capacity $36,152
Achieving Sustainability through Individual Giving: To support the center's first sustainable individual giving program to diversify funding and set them on the path toward long-term sustainability.

Oregon ArtsWatch (Portland) Capacity $5,317
Executive Director Position: To support an executive director position that will strengthen the infrastructure of the organization and its day-to-day functioning.

Oregon Ballet Theatre (Portland) Access $21,619
Expansion of OBT2: To support broader access to ballet through the expansion of OBT2 community engagements around the state.

Oregon Bravo Youth Orchestras (Portland) Access $8,698
Artist in Residence: To support the Artist in Residence program bringing culturally diverse, professional musicians to the underserved music students in north Portland.

Oregon Children's Foundation dba SMART (Portland) Access $9,107
Culturally-Specific Literature for PreK-3rd Graders: To support increased access to literature representing diverse cultural perspectives for children.

Oregon Children's Theatre (Portland) Capacity $10,702
Studio Classroom Expansion Project: To furnish and equipment three new studio classrooms to increase capacity to grow Oregon Children's Theatre classes and programs.

Oregon Jewish Museum & Center for Holocaust Education (Portland) Capacity $13,975
Public Program Development: To support the creation and delivery of robust new public programming by hiring a full-time public program developer.

Pacific Railroad Preservation Association (Portland) Preservation $17,818
SP&S 700 15 Year Boiler Rebuild: To support the continued operation of one of Portland's operating steam locomotives so that the public can experience Oregon's transportation
heritage.

Pacific Youth Choir (Portland) Access $5,898
PYC@Neighborhood Choirs: To support year two of PYC's neighborhood choir program to underserved communities. It will serve 150+ youth and their families in two Title 1 schools.

PHAME (Portland) Creativity $14,128
In a Single Breath: To support a multi-disciplinary performance, "In a Single Breath," that uses the art of adults with I/DD, curated and directed by Matthew Zrebski.

PlayWrite (Portland) Access $6,338
"Hear Me Now - Voices of the Unheard:" To support a series of theater workshops and performances that will engage marginalized communities with professional theater.

Portland Art Museum (Portland) Creativity $20,697
Animating Life- The Art, Science, and Wonder of LAIKA Exhibition: To support the exhibition Animating Life: The Art, Science, and Wonder of LAIKA, a survey of the artistry and technology of the Oregon-based studio.

Portland Children's Museum (Portland) Capacity $40,000
The Studio at Portland Children's Museum: To support transformation of a major gallery at Portland Children's Museum into The Studio, a clay, maker, and multi-purpose art space for families.

Portland Chinatown History Foundation (Portland) Preservation $40,000
Chinatown Museum Installation of Expanded Version of Beyond the Gate- A Tale of Portland's Historic Chinatowns: To support the preservation of the history of Oregon's Chinese by remounting the exhibition "Beyond the Gate: A Tale of Portland's Historic Chinatowns."

Portland Gay Men's Chorus (Portland) Capacity $13,370
Support the continued organizational growth and capacity of PGMC through External Relations: To support the capacity of PGMC by hiring an external relations coordinator, generating larger audiences, corporate sponsors and donor stewardship.

Portland Jazz Festival (Portland) Access $6,286
Portland Jazz Festival Jazz Goes to College Outreach: To support the celebration of Mexican music through jazz, with outreach to Portland, Oregon City, Gresham and Woodburn.

Portland Playhouse (Portland) Creativity $36,954
"Fences" by August Wilson: To support the production of August Wilson's "Fences," which will run for nine weeks, reaching a diverse audience (5,300+) including 500 youth.

Portland SummerFest (Portland) Capacity $13,221
Creating a Sustainable Future for Portland SummerFest: To support an organizational planning process that will ensure the stability and success of Portland SummerFest for the next five to seven years.

Profile Theatre (Portland) Capacity $8,535
Capacity building to establish the position of Director of Patron and Donor Relations:
To support the creation of new staff position of Director of Patron and Donor Relations to increase annual income through ticket sales and donations.

Risk/Reward (Portland) Creativity $12,210
Risk/Reward Festival of New Performance 2018: To support boundary-pushing new work by regional artists at the 11th annual Risk/Reward Festival of New Performance.

The KBOO Foundation (Portland) Preservation $29,480
50 Years of KBOO Community Radio- Archiving and Exhibition: To support KBOO's community-inclusive tribute to and preservation of 50 years of Oregonian community radio culture.

The Old Church (Portland) Preservation $37,826
50th Anniversary Exterior Painting: To support the preservation-critical exterior painting of the church's historic building.

The Portland Ballet (Portland) Capacity $6,961
Upgrade of In-Studio Theatre: To support critical upgrading of the Ballet's in-studio theatre, improving efficiency and flexibility while reducing operating costs and environmental impact.

Vanport Mosaic (Portland) Access $14,112
Vanport Mosaic Festival 2018: To support the 2018 Vanport Mosaic Festival -- a four-day multi-disciplinary program to remember, preserve and learn from the history of Vanport.

Westside Cultural Alliance (Hillsboro) Capacity $5,000
Marketing and Outreach: To support efforts to engage diverse populations through marketing and outreach in coordination with the launch of a new cultural website.

White Bird (Portland) Access $8,357
White Bird/Alvin Ailey 20th Anniversary Project: To support the public and student performances and educational outreach around Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in White Bird's 20th anniversary.

Wisdom of the Elders, Inc. (Portland) Capacity $32,430
Discovering Yidong Xinag - Discovering the Old Wisdom in Deg Xinag dialect of Athapascan:
To support Wisdom of the Elders' capacity to expand "Discovering Yidong Xinag," Wisdom's Native youth initiative and film academy in collaboration with Oregon tribes.

Write Around Portland (Portland) Access $14,245
Expanding access through creative writing workshops and publishing: To support access to creative writing in underserved communities through 20 ten-week creative writing workshops held at social service agencies.

Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington (Portland) Creativity $21,042
The Teaching Artist Studio, 2017-18: To support the professional development of 50 teaching artists in Oregon, thus enhancing their work to promote culture in our state's schools.

Youth Music Project (West Linn) Capacity $13,565
Equity in Action- Access to Tuition-Free Early Childhood Music/Art Education: To support tuition-free early childhood music/art education courses for low-income children, ages 1-5, and their parents/caregivers.

Mid-Valley (Yamhill, Polk and Marion Counties)
Historic Elsinore Theatre (Salem) Capacity $12,934
Upgrade of Stage Lighting Equipment: To support the purchase of new LED stage lighting and a movie projector to improve the visual experience of performances and reduce energy costs.

Huitzilopochtli Dancing and Teaching our Indigenous Heritage (Woodburn) Capacity $5,000
Aztec Dance Circle: To support continued access to our cultural and artistic Aztec Dance Circle program especially for low-income, migrant and underserved communities.

Lord & Schryver Conservancy (Monmouth) Preservation $11,609
Restoration of historic brick pathways at Gaiety Hollow: To support restoration of the historic brick pathways at Gaiety Hollow in Salem, the personal garden of Elizabeth Lord and Edith Schryver.

Oregon Black Pioneers (Salem) Access $23,588
Racing to Change- Oregon's Civil Rights Years: To support the development and implementation of the 2018 Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years interactive exhibit and community programming.

Salem Art Association (Salem) Access $8,510
Arts & History Immersion Project: To increase access for underserved fourth graders to experience Oregon history and art through free field trips to a house museum and art gallery.

South Valley/Mid-Coast (Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Lane Counties)
Ballet Fantastique (Eugene) Access $6,525
Passport to Dance: To support the expansion of Ballet Fantastique's Passport to Dance outreach program of dance matinees for underprivileged and rural students.

Chetco Historical Memorial Committee (Springfield) Preservation $11,272
Chetco Indian Memorial: To support Oregon's cultural heritage by preserving the remains of a prehistoric Native American site at the port of Brookings-Harbor.

Creswell Heritage Foundation (Creswell) Preservation $5,000
Creswell Schoolhouse- Condition Assessment/Prioritization and Use Study: To support the creation of a Condition Assessment/Prioritization and Use Study of Creswell's old schoolhouse by an historical architect.

Emerald Art Center (Springfield) Capacity $19,700
Increasing Financial Stability through Marketing: To support strategic investments in marketing by determining and engaging target audiences to increase financial stability and sustainability.

Friends of the Florence Events Center (Florence) Capacity $30,800
Florence Events Center Theater Sound and Lighting Upgrade: To support theater lighting and sound equipment upgrades to improve sustainability of cultural Events Center operations.

Joint Forces Dance Company, Inc. (Eugene) Access $8,663
Dance Access for Children with Disabilities: To support increased access to dance for children, primarily those with disabilities, in school and community settings through the DanceAbility method.

Lane County Historical Society (Eugene) Capacity $7,358
Building institutional fundraising capacity to conduct a successful capital campaign: To support the first year of board/staff fundraising capacity training, building toward a 2020 capital campaign for a much-needed new facility.

Newport Symphony Orchestra (Newport) Capacity $24,345
Create paid Executive Director Position: To create a paid ED position to provide for the long term sustainability of the NSO and expansion of services to underserved community members.

Oregon Bach Festival (Eugene) Creativity $31,246
The Passion of Yeshua Project: To support the commission and world premiere of a new work by Richard Danielpour to engage the community in productive, cross-cultural dialogue.

Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (Newport) Capacity $13,452
Volunteer Coordinator Demonstration Project: To support the expansion and enhancement of the use of volunteers in carrying out the programs and services of the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts.

Oregon Contemporary Theatre (Eugene) Creativity $13,391
Oregon Contemporary Theatre produces Annie Baker's Pulitzer Prize Winning "The Flick:" To support the production of Annie Baker's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "The Flick" in Oregon Contemporary Theatre's 2017-18 season.

Upstart Crow Studios (Eugene) Access $13,215
Support for continued access for all children in an inclusive theatre environment.

South Coast (Douglas, Coos and Curry Counties)
Egyptian Theatre Preservation Association (Coos Bay) Preservation $13,230
Rigging and Linesets: To support the preservation of historic (circa 1925) hand painted theatrical backdrops and improve the operational safety of related theater rigging.

Little Theatre on the Bay (North Bend) Capacity $18,453
Capital Campaign to Expand and Enhance North Bend's Historic Liberty Theatre (Phase III):
To support upgrades to the historic theatre that will enhance patron enjoyment and overall operational sustainability.

Southern (Josephine and Jackson Counties)
Jackson County Library Foundation (Medford) Access $11,432
Baby's First Book: To support the promotion of early childhood literacy by providing newborns with a keepsake book and local library information, in English or Spanish.

Rogue World Music (Ashland) Creativity $5,000
"Triple Play" Cultural Performance and Participation Events: To support a music and dance event series in Ashland Oregon featuring cultural traditions of Mexico in partnership with Ballet Folklorico of Medford.

Southern Oregon Film Society (Ashland) Access $11,567
Regional Filmmakers Project: To support regional filmmaking, giving access to youth and adults throughout rural Southern Oregon to produce and experience local films.

Southern Oregon Guild (Cave Junction) Capacity $6,326
Upgrading the Art Center: To support professional level art and creative processes by upgrading our Artist Center to a viable place to work, store needed materials and hold meetings.

Southern Oregon University Foundation (Ashland) Access $20,124
Southern Oregon University Young Artists Institute: To support at-risk and low-income students' participation in the Young Artists Institute, a multidisciplinary 10-day residential summer program.

Talent Historical Society (Talent) Capacity $6,109
Talent Museum Makeover: To support a capacity building project meant to improve the function of collections and exhibits in the Talent Museum and increase museum attendance.

North Central (Hood River, Wasco and Sherman Counties)
Columbia Center for the Arts (Hood River) Access $17,294
CCA Children's Theatre: To support the creation of a local children's theatre in a rural area.

The Dalles Art Association (The Dalles) Capacity $8,203
Facilities' Use and Preservation: To support the preservation and community utilization of the historic Carnegie Library that houses the Art Center and all of our programs.

Central (Jefferson, Deschutes and Crook Counties)
BendFilm, Inc. (Bend) Access $7,382
Access to Artists at the 14th Annual Bend Film Festival: To support travel costs for filmmakers to attend the 2017 Bend Film Festival, providing the community increased access to learn from working artists.

Deschutes Public Library Foundation (Bend) Creativity $13,070
"A Novel Idea:" To support the "A Novel Idea" community read program in its mission to broaden culture and dialogue and ensure free and open access to all residents.

High Desert Museum (Bend) Access $16,971
Cultural Diversity Initiative: To support exhibits and programs that highlight the LBGTQ community and Native youth, increasing access to underrepresented perspectives and cultures.

South Central (Klamath and Lake Counties)
Friends of Lake County Library (Lakeview) Creativity $11,211
Rural Voices on Changing Landscape: To support two artists working with community to generate a potent voice on climate change using photos, oral/written reflections, and interactive map.

Klamath Film Makers Group (Klamath Falls) Creativity $5,000
2017 Klamath Independent Film Festival: To support our local/regional filmmaking industry through exhibition and to introduce filmmakers and the community to statewide film culture.

Greater Eastern North (Umatilla, Gilliam, Morrow and Wheeler Counties)
Athena's Gem, Inc. (Athena) Capacity $39,120
Gem Theatre HVAC Project: To support the restoration of the Gem Theatre and Star Saloon in Athena, Oregon through the purchase and installation of a new HVAC system.

Northeast (Wallowa, Union and Baker Counties)
Eastern Oregon Regional Theatre Inc. (Baker City) Preservation $24,706
Baker Orpheum Theatre Pre-construction Phase: To support the renovation of the historic Baker Orpheum Theatre building for use as a community performing arts center.

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture (Joseph) Creativity $21,842
Exhibits & Complimentary Programs 2017-18: To support the JCAC's upcoming exhibits and their complimentary programs that will engage audiences with a diverse array of arts and culture events.

Wallowa Band Nez Perce Trail Interpretive Center, Inc. (Wallowa) Access $27,657
Wallowa Band Nez Perce Homeland Project: To support expanding the interactive exhibits, programs and visitor's experience at the visitor center and Nez Perce Homeland Project.

Wallowa Valley Music Alliance (Enterprise) Creativity $8,542
Summer Arts Classic- "The Geography of Music:" To support a multi-media concert in Enterprise, featuring classical music, spoken word and visual arts inspired by the geography of Wallowa County.


# # #


Attached Media Files: The Florence Event Center. , Renovations at the Baker Orpheum Theatre. , A student event at the High Desert Museum.
Oregon State Parks lifts statewide campfire ban in parks: now allowed in designated campgrounds, but local restrictions remain
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/22/17 1:09 PM
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // Aug. 22, 2017

Media Contact:
Chris Havel, Director's Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Cell: 503-931-2590

Oregon State Parks lifts statewide campfire ban in parks: now allowed in designated campgrounds, but local restrictions remain

Salem OR -- A statewide ban on open fires in state park campgrounds has been lifted effective August 22, 2017. However, local and regional fire restrictions are still in effect in many state parks, and restrictions from other authorities often apply to state parks as well. Visitors planning a trip to a state park or the ocean shore during the rest of the fire season should check http://oregonstateparks.org and public fire restrictions at http://bit.ly/oregonfirerestrictions for updates before traveling.

The now-expired statewide state park restriction affected all open flames--campfires, candles, charcoal briquettes, tiki-style torches--at every park. Even if a state park allows campfires and other open flames, every park patron should exercise extraordinary care with fire:

+ Campfires are allowed in designated fire rings only. All fires must be attended, and fully extinguished afterward.

+ Keep water and a shovel, or a fire extinguisher, within reach of any campfire at all times.

+ Watch children and pets during and after a campfire. Metal fire rings retain heat long after the fire is out.

+ In state parks, smoking is allowed in designated campsites only, and butts must be fully extinguished and put in the trash.

+ Fires on the Oregon ocean shore must be made of natural materials only (no pallets or other assembled wood), kept 3'x3' or smaller, and placed more than 25' away and downwind from driftwood and grass. A full set of beach fire rules is online at http://bit.ly/oregonbeachfirerules.

+ Remember fireworks are prohibited year-round in Oregon state parks and on beaches.

Information is posted at oregonstateparks.org, and available through the state parks information line at 800-551-6949, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. -- 5 p.m. The Oregon Department of Forestry Public Restrictions Map at http://bit.ly/oregonfirerestrictions has local restrictions and bans available by location. Other recreational fire safety tips are online at http://keeporegongreen.org/.

# # #
Homeless Count Finds Accomplishments and Challenges
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/22/17 11:01 AM
SALEM, OR -- Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) has released findings from the 2017 Point-in-Time Homeless Count (http://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/ISD/RA/2017-Point-in-Time-Estimates-Homelessness-Oregon.pdf) which took place in January. Every two years, communities across Oregon come together to identify the number of homeless individuals living in sheltered and unsheltered locations, demographic trends surrounding homelessness, and the unmet needs of homeless households.

This year, the count found 13,953 people in Oregon are without a permanent place to call home. This number represents a 6% increase, or an additional 777 people, compared to the last count in 2015. Despite an overall increase, the number of homeless veterans decreased by 9% or 121 people. Significant attention and resources have been focused towards housing veterans in Oregon and these numbers indicate progress is being made. Additionally, the Point-in-Time count found homeless youth under the age of 24 represented 1,731 people or about 12% of all individuals counted.

The Point-in-Time count attempts to capture both sheltered and unsheltered persons experiencing homelessness to provide a snapshot of homelessness in the United States. The Point-in-Time count provides us with critical information about those who cannot find a permanent place to call home on a given night. However, it does not tell the full story of homelessness in each community. Counting those impacted by homelessness is difficult due to a variety of factors and these numbers are intended to give a general sense of homeless trends in Oregon and across the country. Point-in-Time count figures are used by the Department of Housing and Urban Development to determine funding priorities and need across the country.

In an effort to address homelessness, the 2017 Oregon Legislature provided $40 million in funding to support the Emergency Housing Assistance (EHA) program and the State Homeless Assistance Program (SHAP). Both of these are used to immediately get people off the street and help them eventually find long-term, stable housing. The Legislature also approved $1.5 million to further help homeless veterans in Oregon. "The progress we're making to meet the housing needs of veterans is encouraging, and I'm proud we were able to dedicate additional funding this session to ensure every Oregon veteran has a roof over his or her head," Governor Brown said. "Still, we have much work ahead to provide safe and affordable housing options for children, seniors, and families in communities across the state."

In addition to a summary of this year's Point-in-Time count, OHCS is excited to announce the release of a new interactive information dashboard that allows users to view the Point-in-Time data by county for 2015 and 2017. This tool is available online at http://tabsoft.co/2vDk00L.
Scholarship awards boost student achievement
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/22/17 10:59 AM
(Salem) -- They've faced the loss of loved ones and the challenges that brings. They've never given up on themselves or their educational goals. They will keep moving toward those goals with help from the State of Oregon.

Three Oregon high school graduates are recipients of the 2017 Workers' Memorial Scholarship awards, the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has announced. The awards program helps family members of Oregon workers who have been fatally injured or permanently disabled to finance higher education.

Each of the recipients has different dreams and career aspirations. Each of them calls a different part of Oregon home. All of them have experienced the personal and financial shock waves that result when a parent is lost to a workplace death or permanently disabled while on the job.

The recipients are:

Dalton Lehnherr, Powers

Lehnherr graduated in 2017 from Powers High School. He plans to study web design and visual communications at Linn-Benton Community College.

His father was seriously injured in a logging truck accident. Lehnherr is receiving a $1,000 award. "It means a lot to me," he said of the award. He'll always follow his dad's advice, he said, which is to keep trying, keep your head up, and to be as positive as you can.

Adelaine Prinz, Tigard

A 2015 graduate of St. Mary's Academy in Portland, Prinz is studying graphic design at Boise State University. After obtaining her undergraduate degree, she hopes to work at a marketing company and for a nonprofit, while studying architecture.

Prinz's father died in an airplane crash while doing his job as a corporate controller. She is receiving a $1,500 award. Prinz's interest in working for a nonprofit was inspired by her volunteer work for Holt International, a Christian adoption agency based in Eugene.
Prinz said the scholarship has made room in her finances to explore other areas of her life, including giving back to others through her work for Holt. "As I navigate the last few years of college, my hopes are to engage in activities that help me in my career path and my well-being," she said.

Ston Yackamouih, Riddle

Yackamouih is a 2017 graduate of Riddle High School. He plans to study computer engineering at Oregon Institute of Technology.

His father died in a logging accident. Yackamouih is receiving a $1,500 award. Yackamouih grew up fascinated by computers. He said he remembers his dad playing video games with him before heading to work. The father and son also took trips to a local video game store to pick out new games. His dad, Yackamouih said, would be "very proud of me" to be headed to college.

"These young people have been through so much loss and heartache," said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. "While we can do little to address their loss, these awards do offer us an opportunity to support them as they pursue their future goals."

Award recommendations are made by Oregon OSHA's Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee, an advisory group with members from business, organized labor, and government. Oregon OSHA presents the awards annually to help in the postsecondary education of spouses or children of permanently and totally disabled or fatally injured workers.
The 1991 Legislature established the Workers' Memorial Scholarship at the request of the Oregon AFL-CIO, with support from Associated Oregon Industries.
The Workers' Memorial Scholarship is open to any high school graduate, graduating high school senior, GED recipient, or current college undergraduate or graduate student who is a dependent or spouse of an Oregon worker who has been fatally injured or permanently disabled while on the job. For more information about the program, go to http://osha.oregon.gov/workers/Pages/workers-memorial-scholarship.aspx.


###

About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Going Viral: Smart Phone Apps and Youth Safety Program
City of Richland - 08/22/17 10:46 AM
The Richland Police Department has teamed up with the Regional ICAC (Internet Crimes Against Children) Taskforce to offer a free "Going Viral" class for parents to better understand the online apps that are available and how they can be used to commit crimes against children.

With an increase in the use of smart phones and the continuous release of new, downloadable applications, Richland Crime Prevention Specialist Cerise Peck is teaming up with other safety organizations to offer a series of workshops to help reduce the confusion and to educate parents and other care givers about online dangers, and what to do to minimize your child's risk. This is the second class in the program, "Screenshot Series: Going Viral -- A Parent's Guide to Online Safety."

The program will be held on Wednesday, August 23, 2017, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hanford High School Auditorium, 450 Hanford Street. A previously recorded version can also be viewed at (https://youtu.be/ApIn95MfMYQ) from Richland's CityView Youtube Channel.
2017 Oregon Century, Sesquicentennial Farms and Ranches Announced
Oregon Farm Bureau - 08/22/17 10:06 AM
(Salem, OR) -- At the annual awards ceremony at the Oregon State Fair, families from across the state will receive recognition for operating as Century or Sesquicentennial (150-year) Farm or Ranch. The 2017 ceremony will be held on Saturday, August 26, 2017, at 11:00 am at the Oregon State Fair. The public recognition ceremony and awards celebration will be held in the Picnic Grove Area. Please join us for this special event that celebrates Oregon's agricultural heritage.

Nineteen farms and ranches from 10 different counties will be honored this year as Century Farms or Ranches, and one farm from Clackamas County reached Sesquicentennial status, bringing the total number of Oregon Century Farms and Ranches to 1,200 and Sesquicentennial to 39.

> Get the family narratives of all honorees here: http://bit.ly/2g2jCVP

The Century Farm and Ranch families being honored in 2017 are:

Iwasaki Bros. Inc.-Jim Iwasaki
Haskin Heritage Farm -David McCready
Kranberry Acres -David Cranick & Marci Murray
Sievers Farm -Diana Arvieux, Rosemary Wood, Trudy Stenger
Haselbacher Farms -Raymond & Mary Haselbacher
Four Ridge Orchards -David & Bonnie Brown
Cattrall Brothers Vineyard -William & Thomas Cattrall
Shady Brook Farm -Tom & Lona Bunn
Stubblefield Ranch -Lucian & Margot Turner
Belshe Ranch -James Belshe
Oak Creek Farm -Alton Coyle
Misner Family Farm -Michael & Therese Misner
Bar M Ranch -Gary & Ingrid Margason
Kee/Crofoot Ranch -Dell & Nikki Squire
Basil & Mary Stupfel -Mark Stupfel
Herring Farm -Lea Herring
Charles M. Colton & Sons -Robert, Lorene & Michael Colton
Nicholson Investments LLC -Larry Nicholson
C & S Waterman Ranch LLC -Charlie & Sharon Waterman

The Sesquicentennial Award program began in 2008 in honor of Oregon's 150th birthday celebration. Sesquicentennial awards recognize Oregon families who have continuously farmed
portions of their original family acreage for 150 years or more. Thirty-nine families have now received this prestigious sesquicentennial award.

This year's family being honored is: Voss Farms -Jeannette Voss & Julie Edy

> See the 2017 family narratives here: http://bit.ly/2g2jCVP

Every Oregon farm and ranch has a unique history and special family story. The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch program encourages agriculture families to share, with a broader audience, these stories. By promoting family stories, rich cultural heritage is passed down to future generations while educating Oregonians about the social and economic impact of Oregon agriculture.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program began in 1958 to honor farm and ranch families with century-long connections to the land. To qualify for a century or sesquicentennial award, interested families must follow a formal application process. Members of the Application Review Committee review each application against the qualifications, which include continuous family operation of the farm or ranch; a gross income from farm use of not less than $1,000 per year for at least three years out of five prior to application; and family members must live on or actively manage the farm or ranch activities. Application documentation may include photos, original deeds, personal stories, or other historic records. These records help support Oregon's agricultural history by providing valuable information about settlement patterns or statistics on livestock and crop cycles. All documents are archived for public access.

Award winners receive a certificate signed by the Governor and Director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Historic roadside signs are imprinted with the founder's name and the year the ranch or farm was established.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program is administered by the Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education. It is supported by a partnership among the Oregon Farm Bureau, the State Historic Preservation Office, OSU University Archives, and by generous donations of Oregonians.

The application deadline for 2018 is May 1.

For information about the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program, contact Andréa Kuenzi, Program Coordinator, at 503-400-7884 or cfr@oregonfb.org.

###
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Reshipping Scams
FBI - Oregon - 08/22/17 10:00 AM
Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against cyber shoplifters.

What is a cyber shoplifter? This scam -- also called a "reshipping" scam -- involves fraudsters who use stolen credit cards to buy items -- usually expensive items -- online. Instead of having the items shipped to the billing address, the fraudster sends them to what's called a "re-shipper". At the "re-shipper" location, the items are repackaged and usually sent overseas. There they can often be sold at a high price on the black market.

The victim business is typically unaware that anything is wrong until the credit card company dings the business for the fraudulent charge in an attempt to re-coup the money. At that point, the business has lost both the merchandise and the money it thought it had earned.

It's important to note that not everyone using a different billing and shipping address should be considered suspicious. After all, how many times have you bought a present for someone and had it shipped to them directly? And, you should also know that there are above board re-shipper businesses out there. The criminal groups have just figured out how to hijack this legitimate industry and turn it around for illegal profits.

So if you are running a business with an on-line ordering platform, how do you protect your bottom line? Here are some red flags to watch for:

Transactions that involve different billing and shipping addresses or overseas shipping addresses
Orders that include a large number of items
Requests for expedited shipping

How do you protect your business?

Have a system in place to monitor every transaction for suspicious activity.
Pay particular attention to those orders with different billing and shipping addresses. A simple online search may give you the answer as to whether you are sending a package to a re-shipping warehouse.
Put daily limits on how much a buyer can purchase

If you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.


Attached Media Files: TT - Reshipping Scam - ENGLISH Audio , TT - Reshipping Scam - RUSSIAN Audio , TT - Reshipping Scam - RUSSIAN Written , TT - Reshipping Scam - Spanish Audio , TT - Reshipping Scam - SPANISH Written
Chetco Bar Fire Update 22 August 2017
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/22/17 9:47 AM
Community Meeting:
There is no community meeting scheduled at this time.

Evacuations:
Curry County Sheriff's Office, in consultation with the Chetco Bar Incident Management Teams, are working to get displaced residents back into their homes as soon as possible. Evacuation orders remain in effect at this time. For current information on boundaries please visit our interactive map.

The Red Cross is staffing an emergency evacuation shelter at Riley Creek Elementary in Gold Beach 94350 6th St. Gold Beach, OR. (541)-600-6068. There is no shelter in Brookings.

Current Situation: Yesterday's weather patterns will continue throughout today and tonight with cooler temps, fog and low lying clouds. Slightly higher relative humidity's overnight (60-70%) and lighter winds slowed the fire's growth compared to previous days. We are seeing full humidity recoveries as high in elevation as 1500'. These conditions caused minimal fire perimeter growth overnight. The fire is still approximately 2.5 miles northeast of Brookings.

Brookings and Harbor area will have some low-lying smoke as a result of the fire. Air quality will improve slightly but "sensitive groups" should limit exposure to the outdoors. For more information about air quality, please visit the Oregon Smoke Blog: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

Actions: Fire crews used favorable weather conditions to their advantage to continue building direct and contingency indirect line on the south and southwestern flank of the fire, in the area between the Chetco River and Carpenterville. Structural protection resources are continuing to assess and work around structures to make them more defensible.

Donations: The citizens of this great community have shown amazing support and gratitude. Many have been bringing donations of food and other items to our base camp. Unfortunately, our efforts are concentrated on fire suppression, and we are not able to use resources to manage distribution of donations to our crews. Donations can be taken to help those in need, who have been displaced by the fire to Brookings Harbor Food Bank at 539-A-Hemlock St in Brookings. 541-469-5808.


Fire at a Glance:
Size: 98,000 acres (approx.)
Cause: Lightning
Containment: 0%
Total personnel: 788

Social Media Resources:
Twitter: @RRSNF #ChetcoBarFire
Facebook: /https://www.facebook.com/R6RRSNF/
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5385/
E-mail: chetcobarfireinfo@gmail.com
Air Quality Report: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/
Milli Fire Update 22 August 2017
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/22/17 9:32 AM
August 22, 2017 Morning Update

Fire Information number changed to 541-719-8135 effective 8AM today.

The fire remained active yesterday as it burned in the Three Sisters Wilderness south of OR242. The western edge of the fire was active on the north side of Black Crater and continued backing downslope on both flanks in the areas of Lava Lake Camp and North Matthieu Lake. Aircraft were used to monitor the fire in the Wilderness as crews continued indirect suppression actions. Firefighters made good progress in the east and southeast portions of the fire and that area is now in patrol status. Many resources from the east side were moved to support the suppression efforts on the northwest portion of the fire. Level 1 evacuation was issued for all areas between Hwy 242 and Hwy 20 and west of Cold Springs Cutoff (FS1018), which includes Black Butte Ranch.

The main concern is the active western edge of the fire. Fire managers are doing advance planning and closely looking at the potential for fire growth originating from the active western flank of the fire. It is recognized that this fire, pushed by the prevailing wind pattern, has the potential of moving north out of the Wilderness and then east toward populated areas. Fire crews are actively engaging in operations to contain the fire in this area thereby allowing residents to return to their homes.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, in consultation with its partners on the Millli Fire, are continually evaluating the need for possible changes to evacuation notices. Every effort is being made to return residents to their homes but this cannot be done until the safety of the public can be assured.

Fire behavior is expected to increase today as temperature rise and humidity lowers. Aircraft are available to assist firefighters to slow the fire's growth.

Structural task forces from the Oregon State Fire Marshal Green team are patrolling neighborhoods in the Level 3 evacuation area and assessing the Black Butte Ranch and Tollgate communities. Those crews will continue to patrol in the evacuated area and support fire operations. No structures have been destroyed in this fire.

Evacuations:
Level 3 - The subdivisions of Crossroads, Edgington/Remunda, Wildwing, Peterson Burn Road Area, and along both sides of Three Creeks Lake Road (Forest Road 16) about one mile south of Sisters from the junction of the Brooks Scanlon logging road.
Level 1- The subdivision of Tollgate, all areas between Hwy 242 and Hwy 20 and west of Cold Springs Cutoff (FS1018), which includes Black Butte Ranch.

Road Closures:
OR242 east of Cascade Crest to the junction of Forest Road 15. For further information see www.tripcheck.com

Links:
Forest Closures: There is an area closure in place in the Deschutes National Forest, due to fire activity. https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/deschutes/alerts-notices
Smoke monitoring information is available at: oregonsmoke.blogspot.com
Mon. 08/21/17
OHA State Health Assessment Themes and Strengths Subcommittee meets by webinar on September 1
Oregon Health Authority - 08/21/17 3:56 PM
August 21, 2017

What: OHA will host a meeting of the State Health Assessment Themes and Strengths Subcommittee to inform the development of the State Health Assessment.

Agenda: Review themes from existing community health assessments; discuss process and finding from Health Status Assessment subcommittee; discuss method for community engagement process.

When: Friday, September 1 from 1 -- 3 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A 10-minute public comment period is at 2:30 p.m.; comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Join the webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5366789207224162562. For audio dial the conference call line: 1-877-848-7030, Access Code: 2030826#.

Oregon's revised State Health Assessment is one of three prerequisites for public health accreditation. The assessment describes the health of the population, identifies areas for improvement, contributing factors that impact health outcomes, and assets and resources that can be mobilized to improve population health.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

###
Oregon eclipse update: stay a little longer ... avoid congestion (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/21/17 2:19 PM
Totality in Salem
Totality in Salem
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3986/107197/thumb_eclipse-totality.JPG
News release // Oregon Office of Emergency Management Joint Information Center // For Immediate Release // August 21, 2017

Media contact: Dave Thompson, Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, 503-378-3930

SALEM, Ore. --- What an amazing sight! #OREclipse was a huge success! Our thanks to Mother Nature for a most incredible Total Solar Eclipse in Oregon -- and for giving us clear skies over much of the viewing area. Working with our local, state and federal partners, as well as the media and the general public, got the word out about arriving early. People had little trouble getting to their eclipse viewing spots -- and overall had an excellent experience.
OEM, state, county and tribal agencies thank our media partners for helping share our preparedness messaging. We stressed the importance of safe travel, of preparing for delays, having adequate supplies, being mindful of fire dangers, and eclipse watchers did just that..

By being prepared and heeding requests to stay off the road, Oregonians made it possible for the state to sustain a substantial out-of-state and international visitor presence safely-- while also managing a large number of seasonal wildfires during an extremely dry summer.
We now encourage our eclipse visitors to stick around and enjoy everything our beautiful state and its communities have to offer. Oregon has abundant natural and cultural wonders to see. No glasses needed! From the Oregon Coast to the Snake River, there are millions of acres of public lands for you to explore. Stay awhile and visit recreation.gov and TravelOregon.com. .

We're seeing many eclipse viewers get on the roads now that the event is over. As a result there is heavy traffic congestion and slow going in parts of Oregon. If you must travel today, please plan your trip -- and be prepared to wait. If you're already home in Oregon, it might be best to stay put for a while. Be patient in traffic and, regardless of when you travel, ensure you have plenty of water, nonperishable foods and an emergency kit -- just in case traffic slows to a crawl in your area. Visit ODOT's Trip Check web page at TripCheck.com -- and check your entire route to make sure traffic is flowing before you head out.

Oregon's 211 information line and website at 211info.org continues to be the best source of information for Eclipse-related questions or concerns. Call 211 or go to 211info.org for answers to questions or to find help links to eclipse-related information.


###


Attached Media Files: Totality in Salem
Milli Fire Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/21/17 9:27 AM
August 21, 2017 Morning Update

The main part of the fire was active overnight and is expected to continue to burn on the west and southwest flanks as it backs into the Wilderness area. The fire grew toward Lava Lake Camp and toward North Matthieu Lake. Crews and masticators will work along OR242 today to clear heavy fuels and strengthen the control line. Firefighters on Sunday were able to make very good progress extending and strengthening handlines and dozer lines along the north, east and southeast flanks in an effort to protect private lands and communities. Aircraft made multiple water drops on pockets of burning fuel along Whychus Creek near Forest Road 16. Moderate fire behavior is expected today with possible isolated torching.
Smoke from the inversion may keep aircraft grounded this morning. The weather forecast calls for an inversion which could keep aircraft grounded. Once airborne, pilots will concentrate on water drops in the Whychus Creek drainage area. During the darkest part of the eclipse, all ground and air operations will stop for 45 minutes for crew and pilots safety.

Structural task forces from the Oregon State Fire Marshal Green team, with resources from seven counties, continue to assist ground crews and patrol neighborhoods in the Level 3 evacuation area. Those crews will continue to patrol areas until the fire threat to the structures is lessened. No structures have been destroyed in this fire.

Smoke monitoring information is available at: oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. This site provides the latest information on smoke monitoring in the area along with information regarding the effects of smoke and possible health concerns related to it.

For additional Milli Fire information call: 541-316-7711

Evacuations:
Level 3 - The subdivisions of Crossroads, Edgington/Remunda, Wildwing, Peterson Burn Road Area, and along both sides of Three Creeks Lake Road (Forest Road 16) about one mile south of Sisters from the junction of the Brooks Scanlon logging road.
Level 1- The subdivision of Tollgate.

Road Closures:
OR242 east of Cascade Crest to the junction of Forest Road 15. For further information see www.tripcheck.com

Forest Closures:
There is an area closure in place in the Deschutes National Forest, due to fire activity. For more information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/deschutes/alerts-notices ###



--
Milli Fire Information Officer

For more information, visit:
Inciweb Information System - Milli Fire
Central Oregon Fire Information
Follow the conversation on Twitter - #MilliFire
Chetco Bar Fire Daily Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/21/17 8:46 AM
August 20, 2017 8:30 a.m.

Community Meeting:
Azalea Middle School, 505 Pacific Ave, Brookings on Monday, Aug. 21, 6 p.m.

Evacuations:
Yesterday the Sheriff's Office issued an additional mandatory evacuation (Level 3) order that includes an area from the junction of Hwy 101 and Carpenterville Rd. north to the Pistol River, and east to the previous Level 3 evacuation areas. The Sheriff's Office will continue to evaluate the need for additional evacuation orders as necessary to protect public safety. Click here for an interactive evacuation map

The Red Cross is staffing an emergency evacuation shelter at Riley Creek Elementary in Gold Beach 94350 6th St. Gold Beach, OR. (541)-600-6068. There is no shelter in Brookings.

Current Situation:
Strong winds yesterday and overnight pushed the fire to the south and west. The present perimeter of the fire is in the vicinity of Nook Bar west to Ransom Ridge and north to Bosley Butte. Structure protection equipment will focus their work around homes. Unstable atmospheric conditions seen for the past several days will ease as a different weather pattern moves into the area. An infrared flight estimated the size at 91,551 acres. There will be significant smoke this weekend in the Brookings and Harbor area as a result of the fire. Air quality will fluctuate between "moderate" and "unhealthy for sensitive groups" in Brookings. For more information about air quality, please visit the Oregon Smoke Blog: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

Closures:
An area closure is in effect in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness in addition to the trail closures in place. Before you head out into the woods this weekend pleases check Inciweb or the Rouge River Siskiyou National Forest (RRSNF) homepage for all closure orders including those that pertain to the Chetco Bar Fire.

Safety Message:
Due to mandatory evacuations and heavy fire traffic travelers are encouraged to avoid highway 101.

As the eclipse approaches and traffic in the area significantly increases, please keep yourself and others safe. August is peak wildfire season in the Pacific Northwest. A small spark can rapidly become a large fire. Know fire risks and respect fire restrictions, such as campfire bans. Tread lightly and leave no trace. Leave your site better than you found it.

Fire at a Glance:
Size: 91,511 acres (approx.)
Cause: Lightning
Containment: 0%
Total Personnel: 400

Social Media Resources:
Twitter: @RRSNF #ChetcoBarFire
Facebook: /https://www.facebook.com/R6RRSNF/
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5385/
E-mail: chetcobarfireinfo@gmail.com
Air Quality Report: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/
Sun. 08/20/17
The American Red Cross Relocates Bookings Shelter to Gold Beach
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/20/17 10:03 PM
The American Red Cross continues to provide shelter and aid to people displaced by wildfires throughout Oregon.

The Red Cross shelter, established because of level 3 evacuations due to the Chetco Bar Fire in Curry County, has moved from Brookings to Gold Beach, Oregon.

The new shelter location is: Riley Elementary School, 94350 6th St, Gold Beach, OR 97444.

The move was made due to increased firefighting activity in the area of the Brookings shelter and to create more distance between the fire area and the evacuation center.

The Red Cross continues to operate a shelter in Sisters, OR due to the Milli Fire. The Sisters Red Cross Shelter is located at Sisters Middle School, 15200 Hwy 242 (McKenzie Highway), Sisters, OR. The Red Cross is partnering with the Pet Evacuation Team of Central Oregon to provide accommodations for evacuated pets. A representative from the Pet Evacuation Team will be on-site at the Red Cross shelter to answer questions and assist people coming to the shelter.


At all shelters individuals and families affected by the wildfires and in need of shelter assistance are encouraged to simply show up at one of the shelters for help and information.
Oregon eclipse update: last minute prep for E-Day
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/20/17 4:13 PM
News release // Oregon Office of Emergency Management Joint Information Center // For Immediate Release // August 20, 2017


Media contact: Chris Havel, Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, 503-378-3930

SALEM, Ore. -- Monday is E-day! The day Eclipse fans have all been anticipating for so long. The Total Solar Eclipse finally occurs in Oregon tomorrow morning starting at 10:15 a.m. on the Oregon Coast.

While the moon will surely cover the sun for a full two minutes, conditions will remain in flux here on the ground long before and after. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and its local, state and federal partners have provided information for residents and visitors who want information about changing conditions leading up to and after the eclipse.

Oregon's 211 information line and website at 211info.org has logged more than 1,700 calls and nearly 4,000 visits to the web to their eclipse web page since Wednesday. This service continues to be the best source of information for Eclipse-related questions or concerns. Call 211 or 211info.org is a great resource for answers to questions that are eclipse-related.

Prior to the eclipse, take a moment to check your eclipse viewing glasses and make sure it has an ISO logo and note that indicates the glasses meet the requirement for ISO 12312-2:2015. If your eclipse glasses do not have this certification, do not use them! Consider making a 'pinhole' viewing apparatus. Directions on how to make a pinhole viewer can be found on the OEM Facebook page at facebook.com/OMDOEM.

Traffic has been picking up in some areas of the state on Sunday, but the good news is that traffic was still moving well. Should roads become clogged, be patient and practice #SafeDriving. Continue to plan ahead. Make sure you get on the road with a sufficient supply of water, plenty of snacks and an emergency supply kit. Check traffic on your driving route by visiting the Oregon Department of Transportation's Trip Check web page at TripCheck.com. ODOT personnel are on the roads around the clock to monitor traffic and help with the flow.
Current weather forecasts indicate promising skies for eclipse viewing. However, conditions can change. The National Weather Service has created a page specifically for Eclipse viewers who want updated weather conditions in their area: www.weather.gov/eclipse.

The Office of Emergency Management's Emergency Coordination Center is fully activated to coordinate response to the growing number of wildfires in the state. OEM's online Real-time Assessment and Planning Tool, known as RAPTOR, has updated information on wildfires and any wildfire-related road closures. People can access RAPTOR through OEM's web page or they may go to www.tinyURL.com/OregonRaptor. It is important that travelers stay informed about conditions in the area in which they are traveling and take appropriate precautions.

Weather and smoke levels can vary dramatically -- even hourly -- during wildfires. Visit oregonsmoke.blogspot.com for the latest information on smoke conditions in your area. Take precautions based on your individual health needs and the smoke levels around you.
If you are traveling to Oregon, please plan to stay around for a while after the eclipse to enjoy some of the beautiful scenery and great activities our state has to offer. For information and excellent ideas, visit TravelOregon.com.

"There's a wealth of things folks can do once the two minutes of totality are over and eclipse events come to a close across the country," said Linea Gagliano, Director, Global Communications at Travel Oregon. "There are vineyards and breweries, the beach and other tremendous scenic areas. The possibilities in Oregon are endless."


###
Wildlife/pedestrians on roadway
ODOT: East. Ore. - 08/20/17 11:51 AM
Travelers can expect to see more wildlife and pedestrians along state highways due to thousands of visitors spread around rural Oregon.
"We are seeing an increase in the number of vehicle vs. animal strikes over the last few days," said ODOT District 14 Manager Paul Woodworth. "Our John Day staff notes that with visitors encroaching on farmers' fields and camping areas, deer and other wildlife are being pushed into traffic at higher rates."
Over the past few days there have been 21 animal strikes along eastern Oregon state routes, with five strikes on Thursday, five on Friday, and 11 strikes on Saturday.
The various eclipse events around the state are also resulting in increased pedestrian traffic along the highway shoulders as they move between campe sites, local communities and event activities.
Motorists are advised to be extra cautious and keep an eye out for two and four legged local residents and visitors along roadways.
Red Cross Wildfire Evacuation Shelters House More Than Two Dozen People Saturday Night
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/20/17 11:04 AM
The American Red Cross housed more than two dozen people at three shelters throughout Oregon last night. Hundreds of people have been forced to evacuate from their homes due to the Milli, Chetco Bar and Nena Springs Wildfires burning near Sisters, Brookings, and Warm Springs, Oregon.

Red Cross volunteers and staff continue to operate two shelters today in Brookings and Sisters, Oregon. Shelter addresses are as follows:

Brookings Red Cross Shelter: Brookings Harbor High School, 625 Pioneer Rd, Brookings, OR. The Red Cross is partnering with several community partners that will provide accommodations for evacuated pets and livestock. Information on these accommodations is available at the shelter.

Sisters Red Cross Shelter: Sisters Middle School, 15200 Hwy 242 (McKenzie Highway), Sisters, OR. The Red Cross is partnering with the Pet Evacuation Team of Central Oregon to provide accommodations for evacuated pets. A representative from the Pet Evacuation Team will be on-site at the Red Cross shelter to answer questions and assist people coming to the shelter.

At all shelters individuals and families affected by the wildfires and in need of shelter assistance are encouraged to simply show up at the shelter for help and information.


Attached Media Files: 2017-08/1190/107165/WildfireChecklist.pdf
Chetco Bar Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/20/17 8:23 AM
Early this morning Governor Kate Brown declared the Chetco Bar Fire burning in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest near Brookings a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the state fire marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The Office of State Marshal's Blue Incident Management Team and four structural protection task forces from Yamhill County, Lane County, Lincoln/Polk counties, and the Rogue Valley will be working to protect structures.

Approximately 300 homes are under a Level 3 Evacuation notice (Go) and another 1,000 homes are at a Level 2 (Get Set) Evacuation notice.

The Sheriff's Office has issued a mandatory evacuation (Level 3) order that encompasses Gardner Ridge Road to the Wilson Creek area, and along the Chetco River from Gardner Ridge Road to the Wilderness Retreat area. A Level 2 notice (Be Ready) has been issued from Tide Rock to Cameron Bridge and from Shady to Mt. Emily road. The Sheriff's Office will be evaluating the need for additional evacuation orders as necessary to protect public safety.

The Chetco Bar Fire has burned approximately 31,000 acres.


Oregon's conflagration may be invoked only by the Governor and allows the State Fire Marshal to dispatch structural firefighters and equipment. More information on Conflagration and Emergency Mobilization is available at OSFM website:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/2008_Oregon_Fire_Service_Mobilization_Plan.shtml.

Additional resources on surviving wildfires may be accessed at:
Wildfire...Evacuation Readiness http://egov.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Comm_Ed/WUI/wildfire_evac.doc
After the Wildfire... http://egov.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Comm_Ed/WUI/After_a_wildfire.doc

###
Sat. 08/19/17
Enjoy the eclipse and keep Oregon safe from wildfire
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/19/17 10:27 PM
SALEM, Ore. -- Thousands of people planned long ago to view Monday's eclipse from an Oregon campground. One result is that developed campgrounds in and near the path of totality are full. For those last-minute eclipse-gazers heading to Oregon's wildlands, a few simple tips can ensure a safe watching experience, according to Kristin Babbs, President of Keep Oregon Green.

First, what may look like state or federal public land might actually be private property. "Private landowners are very concerned about fire starts this time of year," said Babbs. "Many have locked their gates to protect their land from the increased visitation and potential campsite-seekers during the eclipse. We ask that travelers respect individual private property owners by not pulling over on their lands, trespassing, blocking gates, camping, collecting firewood or building campfires."

By mid-August, vegetation across much of the state is tinder dry. Add warm temperatures and low humidity, and the slightest spark or flying ember can set a landscape ablaze."

Babbs has these tips to help you enjoy Oregon's wildlands and keep them green, not just during the eclipse but all summer long:
Kick the campfire habit and pack a portable camping stove. They are usually allowed when campfires are not. For more information on campfire and other restrictions, go to www.keeporegongreen.org/current-conditions. IF campfires are allowed at your destination, make sure the fire is completely out and cool to the touch before leaving the site.
Don't park on dry vegetation. If you must pull off the road, stay on shoulder pavement or gravel. The contact from your vehicles hot exhaust system can easily ignite dry grass, weeds and brush.
No fireworks and no sky lanterns.
Lastly, do your part to ensure that your campsites are kept clean of garbage and litter. Pack it in, pack it out and leave no trace.

For more wildfire prevention information, visit www.keeporegongreen.org or visit their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages via @keeporegongreen.
# # #
Oregon eclipse update: light traffic so far, remember to use 211 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/19/17 3:35 PM
"Who should you call" cjheat sheet
"Who should you call" cjheat sheet
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3986/107154/thumb_who-do-i-call.jpg
News release // Oregon Office of Emergency Management Joint Information Center // For Immediate Release // August 19, 2017

Media contact: Dave Thompson, Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, 503-378-3930

SALEM, Ore. -- We are just two days away from Monday's Eclipse. Priorities among residents and visitors are related to traffic conditions, wildfires and smoke and how they are affecting travel. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is working with our partner agencies from around the state to provide regular updates.
Saturday saw lighter traffic than expected and travelers were urged to start heading to their destinations if they were able and had a place to stay. Traffic is expected to increase leading up to Monday's event. The best advice is: Arrive early, stay put and leave late! Visit the Oregon Department of Transportation's Tripcheck.com for the most up-to-date traffic issues.

OEM has activated its Emergency Coordination Center in order to coordinate the response to the growing number of wildfires in the state. Traveler's should take precautions and know before you go. That means knowing any wildfire conditions in your area and heeding any evacuation notices from local officials. This information can be obtained by using OEM's RAPTOR tool at http://www.tinyURL.com/OregonRaptor or the Oregon Forestry Department's website http://tinyurl.com/oregonfirerestrictions.

It's important to remember that if a gas station runs out of fuel, it is only a temporary situation. The Oregon Department of Energy assures us that fuel trucks are making deliveries around the clock. Should you encounter a fuel shortage at an area gas station, consider visiting another fuel station or return to the station that was out of fuel at a later time.

Since smoke from wildfires varies by time and location, we recommend residents and visitors visit www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com for the best and latest information about smoke conditions in your area. This web page is our multiagency site for communicating smoke information to the public. Some people -- such as those with chronic heart or lung disease, children and the elderly -- may experience health effects when the air is unhealthy. It is important to take precautions based on your individual health and the smoke levels around you.

It is vital that you use proper eye protection if you are planning to view the eclipse. If you have trouble purchasing certified eclipse safety glasses there is a simple way to make your own pinhole projector to view the eclipse. Visit the OEM Facebook page for a link to instructions on how to make a pinhole projector. That page is www.facebook.com/OMDOEM.

Please ensure that you know who to call and when. For transportation information call 511; for tourism information call 800-547-7842; for emergencies call 911 and for general information call 211 or visit 211.org. The 211.org page is a one-stop location for links to valuable information that can help travelers have a safe and enjoyable Oregon eclipse experience.


Attached Media Files: "Who should you call" cjheat sheet
Evacuation Notices Lower on the Nena Springs Fire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/19/17 10:34 AM
Warm Springs Wildland Fire Management News Release August 19, 2017

Warm Springs OR --This morning, Warm Springs Law Enforcement officers again reduced the Kah-Nee-Ta Resort Evacuation Notice to a Level 1. Charley Canyon, Webster Flat Road, South Junction, Culpus Bridge, and Wolf Point Subdivision were also reduced to a Level 2 Evacuation Notice. All roads except Webster Flat are open. If traveling , please be aware of fire traffic and drive safely.

Lighter wind today will slow fire growth. High temperatures are returning. This warmer weather will create dryer conditions. In the last two days, the fire has gained just over 19,000 acres, bringing the fire's total to 66,003 acres.

With the size growth, firefighters are now working to keep the fire west of Deschutes River; south of Highway 216; east of Highway 26, and north of BIA Road 3. They are also working to keep it out of Beaver Creek Canyon. Their priority is to keep the public and firefighter safe during these intense periods of fire growth while also protecting structures, timber, natural resources, and visual resources.

Where possible, firefighters will take advantage of opportunities to use fire to fight the fire in order to create or strengthen containment lines. Structural engines will be supporting these efforts, and ensuring the fire does not threaten structures again.

Overnight, firefighters constructed a contingency dozer line along the northern flank of the fire where the new fire growth took place. Other firefighters worked containment lines where new fire growth took place to extinguish heat 50-100 feet inside the burned area. There was no new growth last night.

A large airtanker was used yesterday evening to strategically place a line of retardant along a ridgeline where the fire crossed the Warm Springs River. The fire ran less than a half mile before this action effectively stopped the run. Two Bureau of Land Management engines also successfully extinguished a fire that had grown a ?1/4 acre across the Deschutes River. They are in place working to prevent any fires from establishing east of the river.

The Deschutes River is open to rafters; however, Bureau of Land Management river rangers will stop rafters if a helicopter comes in to dip from the River. Smoke from the Nena Springs Fire may become visible over the river.

Evacuation Notices: Charley Canyon, Webster Flat Road, South Junction, Culpus Bridge, and Wolf Point Subdivision are at a Level 2 Evacuation Notice. The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Spa is at a Level 1 evacuation notice.

Evacuation Center: The Red Cross established an evacuation center at the Warm Springs Community
Center for residents that have been evacuated.

Road Closures: Webster Flat Road is closed to all traffic.
Milli Fire Update August 19, 2017, a.m.
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/19/17 9:19 AM
Location of Origin: 9 miles west of Sisters, OR
Start date: August 11, 2017, 2:42 pm
Size: Approximately 7,814 acres
Percent Contained: 0%
Cause: Lightning
Resources Assigned: More than 400 personnel
Vegetation: Higher elevation; Mixed evergreens. Lower elevations; pinon and juniper trees, sagebrush

Gusty winds on Friday pushed the fire to the east-southeast, causing Level 3 (Go Now) evacuations of approximately 600 residents. The evacuations occurred in the Edgington/Ramuda Road and Crossroads subdivisions, and included residents living along the 16 Road, immediately to the south of the town of Sisters. The Tollgate subdivision remains on a Level 1 (Get Ready) evacuation.

Crews overnight worked to build a direct line on the leading edge of the fire, with engine crews patrolling the area and dozer crews digging fireline. Temperatures today (Saturday) are expected to be a few degrees cooler with higher humidity. However, the winds that pushed the fire on Friday will be back, with gusts up to 22 miles an hour, from around 10 am to 9 pm. Temperatures should range from 70 - 75 degrees, with humidity ranging from 22 to 26%. The wind could cause more spot fires to develop and firefighters will be actively identifying them and containing them where possible. Also, today firefighters will be working to contain the area where the fire extended yesterday and will be constructing new containment lines between the fire's edge and the communities that are threatened. Engine task forces from the Oregon State Fire Marshal's office will be working in the evacuated neighborhoods, treating spaces around homes to provide better defensible space.

There is a community meeting tonight at 6 pm at Sisters High School. Representatives of the incident management team and local agencies will be there to provide the latest information on the fire and answer questions.

Air resources have been very important in fighting this fire. Three air tankers and one VLAT (very large air tanker) have been making repeated drops of fire retardant, creating fire lines and assisting our crews in inaccessible areas. Today, we're expecting to have two Type 2 helicopters and one Type 3 in the air, with two National Guard helicopters on standby.

If you fly, we can't. There is a temporary flight restriction (TFR) area over the fire and anyone who flies a drone in the TFR could ground our air resources. Drones endanger our pilots in the air and our firefighters on the ground, who depend on air support to fight fires like this one.

Smoke monitoring information is available at: oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. Anyone concerned with the effects of smoke in the region or who has possible health concerns related to smoke can go to this site to see smoke monitoring data and get additional information.
(more)


For additional Milli Fire information call: 541-316-7711

Evacuations: For more information call 541-550-4888.
Level 3 - The subdivisions of Crossroads, Edgington/Ramuda and along the 16 Road, immediately south of Sisters
Level 1 - The subdivision of Tollgate

Road Closures:
OR242 east of Cascade Crest to the junction of Forest Road 15. For further information see www.tripcheck.com.

Forest Closures:
There is an area closure in place in the Deschutes National Forest, due to fire activity. For more information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/deschutes/alerts-notices

###
Fri. 08/18/17
Oregon eclipse update: info related to smoke, fire, vehicle fuel, eclipse glasses (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/18/17 4:40 PM
Oregon Office of Emergency Management
Oregon Office of Emergency Management
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/3986/107120/thumb_oem_logo.gif
News release // Oregon Emergency Management // For Immediate Release // Aug. 18, 2017

Media contact: Dave Thompson, Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, 503-378-3930

Salem OR -- As the eclipse quickly approaches, issues related to traffic, wildfires, and smoke are affecting travel. Rumors related to fuel, and a shortage of eclipse-rated glasses, are also prompting concerns. The Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, working with partner centers and agencies around the state, will issue regular updates starting today.

WILDFIRES
+ The State Emergency Communications Center (ECC) elevated from "enhanced watch" for the eclipse to activation at 1 p.m. on Friday in order to coordinate response to the growing number of wildfires in the state.

CONCERNS OF FUEL SHORTAGES
+ Some people have questioned whether enough fuel is available at Oregon gas stations. The Oregon Department of Energy reports fuel trucks are making deliveries around the clock. Even if a station runs out of fuel, its a temporary situation.

+ The terminals report that Oregons supply is in great shape, with no problems. Fuel haulers reinforced that. Theyre making their deliveries and not reporting any problems.

+ Should you encounter a fuel shortage at an area gas station, we recommend you visit another fuel station or return to the station that was out of fuel at a later time.

+ Stay calm fuel on!

WILDFIRE SMOKE
+ Weather and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires. This can vary not only daily, but also hourly. Smoke may also affect one part of a community but not another. This can make it difficult to provide specific health warnings, especially when conditions change quickly.

+ Since smoke from wildfires varies around the state -- and can change quickly -- we recommend residents and visitors visit the multiagency site for communicating smoke information to the public at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. This site has the best and latest information about smoke conditions in your area.

+ Some people, such as those with chronic heart or lung disease, children and the elderly may experience health effects even when the air is unhealthy for a short time. It is important to take precautions based on your individual health and the smoke levels around you. This may mean staying indoors when air quality is poor. It may also mean not exercising during these conditions.

TRAVEL DELAYS/TRAFFIC
+ Traffic into and around Oregon will increase over the next few days as more and more people arrive to view the eclipse.

+ The best advice is to get where you are going and then stay put. Arrive early, stay put and leave late is your best course of action.

+ Those wanting the best and most current information on traffic conditions around the state should visit the Oregon Department of Transportations Tripcheck web page at http://TripCheck.com.

+ ODOT also has a mobile site at http://TripCheck.com/mobile.

SHORTAGE OF ECLIPSE GLASSES
+ Some areas have reported the supply of eclipse viewing glasses is low or depleted. While genuine protective eyewear is the only safe way to directly view the eclipse, one alternative to glasses includes a homemade pinhole projector. Visit the OEM Facebook page for a link to instructions on How to Make a Pinhole Projector to View the Solar Eclipse. The OEM page is http://www.facebook.com/OMDOEM

+ For additional information on safe viewing, visit the Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology at www.oregoneyephysicians.org, and the Casey Eye Institute www.ohsu.casey.com.

REMINDER
Oregons 211 information line is the best source of information for questions regarding Eclipse issues. Resident and visitors are encouraged to call 211 or visit 211info.org for information.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Oregon Office of Emergency Management
DPSST Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/18/17 3:22 PM
For Immediate Release
August 15, 2017
Contact: Sara Stewart
503-378-2424

Notice of Regular Meeting
The Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee will hold a regular curriculum meeting at 10:00-15:30 on September 26, 2017. The meeting will be held in the conference room C221 at DPSST. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Agenda Items:

Review content drafts submitted
Make corrections/revisions to finalize drafts
Assign/delegate completion of drafts
Review next steps in the development process
Address committee member needs


Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by DPSST Telecommunications Curriculum Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Geologic mapping committee to meet August 23 in Portland
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 08/18/17 12:56 PM
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Geologic Mapping Advisory Committee will hold its annual meeting on Wednesday, August 23 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St.

The meeting agenda is available at www.OregonGeology.org

The Oregon Geologic Mapping Advisory Committee (OGMAC) helps prioritize geologic mapping in the state of Oregon to focus on areas where natural hazard and resource management issues require good geologic data. OGMAC meets annually and is made up of professional geoscientists and natural resource specialists representing federal, state, and local government agencies, academia, and private industry who have a vested interest in Oregon's geologic framework, hazards, and resources.
Red Cross Operating Wildfire Evacuation Shelters in Brookings and Warm Springs
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/18/17 12:27 PM
The American Red Cross continues to operate wildfire evacuation shelters due to wildfires affecting thousands of acres in Central and Southern Oregon.

The Red Cross has opened a shelter for wildfire evacuees in Brookings, Oregon located at Brookings Harbor High School, 625 Pioneer Rd, Brookings, OR 97415 because of the Chetco Bar Fire.

In Central Oregon, Red Cross disaster responders continue to assist people affected by the Nena Springs Wildfire near Warm Springs, OR.

The Red Cross shelter in Warm Springs remains open at the Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd, Warm Springs, Oregon.

At both shelters, individuals and families affected by the wildfires and in need of shelter assistance are encouraged to simply show up at the shelter for help and information.


The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


Attached Media Files: Wildfire Safety Tips
Nena Springs Fire Update Aug. 18 (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/18/17 9:44 AM
Nena Springs Fire crosses into Charley Canyon approximately 8pm Thursday, Aug. 17.
Nena Springs Fire crosses into Charley Canyon approximately 8pm Thursday, Aug. 17.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-08/1062/107100/thumb_Nena_Springs_Pic_18Aug_AM.jpg
Warm Springs OR -- At approximately 3:20pm Thursday, an ember from the Nena Springs Fire blew out of containment lines near Kishwalk. Driven by high winds, the fire began running in grass and brush. Two helicopters, handcrews and at least 10 engines responded in addition to 150 firefighters that were already assigned to the fire.

Winds pushed the fire over Indian Head Canyon and through Charlie Canyon, then continued move a mile east past the Kah-Nee-Ta Resort. As was planned earlier in the week, in the event an evacuation notice was issued, visitors sheltered in place. Firefighters used Route 8 to burn from the road. This successfully removed grass from around the Resort and forced the fire to stay above and away from the area. While the Resort is still at a Level 3 evacuation, the immediate threat to it is gone.

At approximately 10pm Thursday night, the fire jumped Hwy 3 at Fish Hatchery Grade. Firefighters' priority was to keep the fire from crossing the Warm Springs River and to prevent it from burning structures. As of midnight Thursday, these objectives had been met.

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Red Team, commanded by Ian Yocum, was mobilized late Thursday night. Two task forces of engines from Marion and Multnomah Counties began working with the existing organization around midnight. Yamhill and Washington Counties engines and personnel arrived this morning. These task forces bring with them a total of 79 firefighters, 19 engines and four water tenders to assist with protecting structures and building upon the work firefighters have already completed.

The fire has grown an estimated 6,000 acres bringing the total acres to approximately 46,000. A flight will occur this morning to get a more accurate account of the fire's size. It is 40% contained.

Evacuation Notices: The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Spa received a Level 3 evacuation notice Thursday evening. As was planned this week, in the event of a wildfire, visitors will remain in place. Charley Canyon, Webster Flat Road, South Junction, Culpus Bridge, and Wolf Point Subdivision are now at a Level 3 Evacuation Notice.

Evacuation Center: The Red Cross established an evacuation center at the Warm Springs Community Center for residents that have been evacuated.

Road Closures: Hwy 3 to School Flats; Hwy 8 to Ka-Nee-Ta Village; Webster Flat Road, and Culpus Bridge are closed to all traffic.


Attached Media Files: Nena Springs Fire crosses into Charley Canyon approximately 8pm Thursday, Aug. 17.
Lottery Wilsonville Payment Center Closed Monday, Aug. 21
Oregon Lottery - 08/18/17 7:58 AM
The Oregon Lottery Wilsonville Payment Center will be closed Monday, Aug. 21 due to the anticipated influx of people in the area for the day's solar eclipse. The payment center will reopen Tuesday, Aug. 22 for regular business hours of 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

The Lottery's main office in Salem will be open as usual from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###
Thu. 08/17/17
Structural resources return to the Nena Springs Fire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/17/17 9:56 PM
The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal's Red Incident Management Team and three task forces are being redeployed to assist with the Nena Springs Fire, burning on the Warm Springs Reservation, after this afternoon an ember from the fire blew out of containment lines near Kishwalk.

A Level 1 evacuation is in place for residents in Charlie Canyon.

Two helicopters, hand crews and at least 10 engines are on scene working to contain the fire.

No road closures are currently in effect, although responders ask the public to stay away from the area to allow fire traffic to move safely.