Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Fri. Feb. 26 - 2:31 pm
Fri. 02/26/21
Oregon reports 336 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/26/21 2:06 PM
2021-02/3687/142837/OHA_Powerpoint_for_Press_Conference_2.26.21.png
2021-02/3687/142837/OHA_Powerpoint_for_Press_Conference_2.26.21.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3687/142837/thumb_OHA_Powerpoint_for_Press_Conference_2.26.21.png

Feb. 26, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 336 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,206, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 336 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,878.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 30,594 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 22,353 doses were administered on Feb. 25 and 8,241 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 25.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 911,648 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,177,945 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 152, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 34 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (7), Clackamas (20), Columbia (5), Coos (15), Curry (8), Deschutes (17), Douglas (19), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (16), Jefferson (1), Josephine (14), Klamath (9), Lane (28), Linn (12), Malheur (2), Marion (38), Morrow (2), Multnomah (47), Polk (10), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (8), Union (6), Washington (38) and Yamhill (8).

Note: Due to a server error, a large volume of electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) were not processed until after business hours yesterday. Today’s test counts include all ELRs received yesterday. Case counts are lower than anticipated because local health departments were not able to create cases from positive ELRs that were received after hours.

Oregon’s 2,205th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 10 and died on Feb. 24 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,206th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 23 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

In today’s news conference, OHA mistakenly reported the current percentage of Oregon seniors vaccinated was one in three. That is an error. The correct percentage is one in four, or 25%. OHA regrets this miscalculation.

Today, OHA also provided updates on Oregon’s vaccination program and vaccination eligibility:

  • Vaccine eligibility will open to people 65 and older on March 1. We expect to have been allocated enough vaccines to immunize at least 75% of all seniors by March 29, weeks ahead of our original timelines.
  • The first members of the general public will be eligible for the COVID vaccine no later than June 1 and remaining groups of the general public on July 1.

A revised sequencing infographic highlights the updates (attached).

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/3687/142837/OHA_Powerpoint_for_Press_Conference_2.26.21.png

Arizona Accountant Charged with Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/26/21 11:48 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A former certified public accountant and former chief financial officer of a McMinnville, Oregon company faces federal criminal charges after allegedly evading $99,000 in personal income taxes, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Kent Jensen, 58, a resident of Gilbert, Arizona, has been charged by criminal information with two counts of felony tax evasion.

According to court documents, in 2014 and 2015, Jenson, who also previously worked as an auditor with an international accounting firm and a financial consultant for a business in Milwaukie, Oregon, allegedly set up several nominee companies and nominee bank accounts to conceal most of his personal income from the IRS. Jensen arranged for his financial consulting clients to pay his consulting fees to these nominee companies. He then deposited the funds into nominee bank accounts and used the proceeds for personal expenses. In 2014 and 2015, Jensen submitted fraudulent personal income tax returns that substantially underreported his personal income and the taxes owed.

“Now that the tax filing season has begun, and tax revenues are right now being used to assist Americans through the COVID pandemic, cases like this are a reminder that all taxpayers have a lawful duty to file accurate tax returns and pay their fair share of taxes,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “This office and the IRS will aggressively investigate and prosecute anyone who criminally abuses the tax system.”

Jensen faces a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release for each of two counts of tax evasion. He will be arraigned on March 18, 2021 before a U.S. Magistrate Judge.

This case is being investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation. It is being prosecuted by Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal information is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

College Place Public Schools & Eden's Pantry Food Box Distribution Wednesday, March 3rd
College Place Sch. Dist. - 02/26/21 11:05 AM

Cascadia Produce LLC in collaboration with Eden's Pantry and College Place School District No. 250 have agreed to partner to distribute federally funded Farmers to Families USDA Combination food boxes of exclusively American products (produce, dairy, and protein) to food insecure populations in the community.  The boxes weigh approximately 30 pounds and will be distributed for free to food insecure individuals and families.

A distribution date has been scheduled for Wednesday, March 3, 2021 at the Eden’s Pantry location, 

212 SW 4th Street, College Place, Wa.  Distribution will begin at 8:00am and end when all 336 boxes have been distributed.  This will be a drive through event with volunteers placing boxes of food directly into trunks of automobiles.  COVID safety protocols will be observed.  

 

Be sure you arrive early as boxes are limited and are expected to be distributed quickly.


2021 Hotel Motel Grant Funds Available
City of Richland - 02/26/21 10:27 AM
2021-02/5957/142821/hotel_motel_with_webpage.png
2021-02/5957/142821/hotel_motel_with_webpage.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/5957/142821/thumb_hotel_motel_with_webpage.png

Each year the City of Richland receives funds from the room tax imposed upon hotels and motels located within the City. These funds can be retained by the City or can be expended for a narrow range of projects and activities established by State law. Also referred to as Lodging Tax, these funds are distributed to eligible projects and events located within the City of Richland on an annual basis.

Applications are typically accepted in the Fall of each year for the following year's events. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, staff were forced to postpone solicitations for 2021 events/projects until now. 

To be considered for funding, proposals must meet criteria as established in State law (RCW 67.28.1815) “…used solely for the purpose of paying all or any part of the cost of tourism promotion, acquisition of tourism-related facilities, or operation of tourism-related facilities…”

For more information visit www.ci.richland.wa.us/hotelmotel or call 509-942-7730.

The deadline to apply is March 12, 2021.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5957/142821/hotel_motel_with_webpage.png

PSA Request: Yakima School District Conference Week Schedule Update
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 02/26/21 10:15 AM

PSA Announcement Request: Spring parent conferences, which were set to take place for elementary and middle school students from March 29-April 2, 2021, will be canceled due to the district's transition from remote learning to hybrid learning. Schools will not follow the early release times outlined in the District's 2020-2021 Instructional Calendar rather will continue to follow the hybrid learning schedules for elementary and secondary schools.

YSD 20-21 Instructional Calendar

Hybrid Learning Schedules

#end


Oregonians respond to cultural community's need by donating record $5.2 million to Cultural Trust in 2020
Oregon Cultural Trust - 02/26/21 10:06 AM
"All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.
"All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1171/142818/thumb_Portland_Winter_Light_Festival_Jamie_AM_Crawford.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Donations to the Oregon Cultural Trust surpassed $5 million for the first time ever in 2020, as generous Oregonians responded to the cultural community’s urgent need due to losses suffered during the pandemic. The $5.2 million in donations represents a 13 percent (close to $605,000) increase over 2019 and will support grant awards to cultural organizations across the state this summer.

“We asked Oregonians to help us protect Oregon culture and their response exceeded our expectations,” said Cultural Trust Executive Director Brian Rogers. “These funds will go a long way in helping us support the cultural community’s recovery in 2021.”

“It’s extraordinary that, despite the challenges we all faced last year, so many Oregonians stepped up to support our arts, history, heritage and humanities,” said Cultural Trust Board Chair Niki Price. “It’s a testament to how much we value our great quality of life and the more than 1,500 cultural organizations that contribute to it every day. We are incredibly grateful.”

The $5.2 million fundraising total includes 11,161 donations, a 17.5 percent increase over 2019, and 2,028 new donors. It also includes a record $537,909 raised through an ongoing partnership with the Willamette Week Give!Guide.

“Our partnership with Give!Guide is one of the cornerstones of our campaign,” said Rogers. “It is a great way for people to learn about the Cultural Trust and the tax credit, bringing in 994 new donor households this year alone.”

More than half of the money raised will be distributed directly to Oregon’s nonprofit cultural community this summer; the remainder will grow the Cultural Trust permanent fund. Cultural Trust grants are distributed through five Statewide Cultural Partners – Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Humanities and the Oregon State Office of Historic Preservation – as well as to 45 County/Tribal Cultural Coalitions, who regrant the funds in their communities, and directly to cultural nonprofits via Cultural Development Grants.

The 78 projects supported by Cultural Development Grants in FY2021 include:

  • The preservation and sharing of Hawaiian traditional cultural practices online and in person by Kapi Oanuenue in Ashland;
  • The development of an interactive digital media channel for nonprofits and independent mediamakers by Open Signal in Portland;
  • A series of cultural programs to reengage the community after months of COVID shutdown by the Tower Theatre Foundation in Bend;
  • The production of “From the Streets to the Symphony,” a documentary about the collaborative composition of new music by houseless young filmmakers and Oregon Symphony creative chair Gabriel Kahane with Outside the Frame in Portland;
  • The restoration of Native American access to First Foods and other cultural plants of significance in Southwestern Oregon by the Indigenous Gardens Network at Southern Oregon University in Ashland;
  • The development of the first Oregon Online African American Museum by Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem; and
  • Access to media arts for historically underserved Black students to exercise their imaginations, develop a voice and prepare stories for public dissemination through the Journalistic Learning Initiative in Eugene.

For a full list of Cultural Trust grant projects, including links to Cultural County Coalitions and several hundred county projects they are funding this year, visit www.culturaltrust.org.

The exclusive contracted partner for the Cultural Trust’s 2020 fundraising campaign was Bell+Funk of Eugene.

# # #

The Oregon Cultural Trust was established by the Oregon Legislature in 2001 as a unique means to reward Oregonians who invest in culture. Oregonians who donate to a cultural nonprofit and then make a matching gift to the Cultural Trust receive a 100% state tax credit for their gift to the Trust.




Attached Media Files: "All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.

Motorists should avoid OR 7, OR 245 and U.S. 26 near Sumpter and Austin areas
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/26/21 9:38 AM

Travelers are caution to avoid OR 7, OR 245 and U.S. 26 near the Sumpter and Austin areas in Baker, Grant and Malheur counties due to extreme winter weather. This includes blowing snow with near zero visibility, heavy snow, unplowed roads, and drifting snow across the lanes creating extremely hazardous conditions. Please stay home until conditions improve. If you do travel, stay on main highways, as other routes will likely be worse.

“I cannot see 20 feet in front of me,” said one plow driver. Weather conditions can change at any time, Continue to check TripCheck.com for update conditions, or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon, dial 503-588-2941.


Oregon's Project Turnkey Gains Momentum: $11.4 Million in Additional Grants Brings Three More Motel Properties Online to Provide Lodging for Displaced Community Members (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 02/26/21 7:30 AM
NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon
NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6858/142770/thumb_NW_Coastal_Housing_1014-NE-Highway-101-Lincoln-City-OR-Building-Photo-LargeHighDefinition.jpg

Oregons Project Turnkey Gains Momentum: $11.4 Million in Additional Grants Brings Three More Motel Properties Online to Provide Lodging for Displaced Community Members

Project Turnkey Provides Grants for Properties Located in Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City

Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City, Ore. – February 26, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) today announced that Project Turnkey is gaining momentum with three additional grants awarded to properties in Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City.

Corvallis Housing First (CHF) was selected to receive one of the next Project Turnkey grants, in the amount of $2.475 million in state funds to purchase and transform a 24-room hotel in Corvallis, Oregon. Priority will be given to the most vulnerable members of the Corvallis community who are unhoused, including people with disabilities, veterans, people of color and seniors.

"We are so excited for this opportunity to provide more safe shelter options during the pandemic and permanent supported housing to people experiencing chronic homelessness in our community," said Andrea Myhre, Executive Director of Corvallis Housing First, This project came together because of good planning as well as partners and volunteers working tirelessly to come up with new solutions for getting people into housing.”

Located at 1480 SW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR 97333, CHF anticipates the facility to be in use beginning in March 2021.

Lane County Human Services was also selected to receive a Project Turnkey grant, in the amount of $5.56 million in state funds to purchase and transform a 50-room hotel in Eugene, Oregon. Priority will be given to wildfire evacuees.

The Holiday Farm Fire was absolutely devastating to thousands of residents along the McKenzie River,” said Lane County Commissioner Heather Buch. Six months later and people are still struggling to find acceptable temporary housing. Project Turnkey is an incredible investment and will provide a lot of families with a safe place to live while they work through the rebuilding process.”

Located at 599 East Broadway, Eugene, OR 97401, Lane County Human Services anticipates the facility to be in use beginning in March 2021.

Northwest Coastal Housing (NWCH) in Lincoln City is another Project Turnkey grant awardee, slated to receive $3.348 million in state funds to purchase a 42-room hotel along Highway 101 in Lincoln City, Oregon. Priority will be given to community members displaced by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire.  

"This is wonderful news for survivors of the Echo Mountain Fire,” Claire Hall, Board of County Commissioners for Lincoln County and Chair of Oregon Housing Stability Council, said. North Lincoln County's critical housing shortage was exacerbated by the fire. Too many individuals and families are still living in their vehicles, are doubled up with friends or relatives, or in other unstable situations. This will give them a safe, long-term place to work on rebuilding their homes and their lives."

Located at 1014 NE Hwy 101, Lincoln City, OR 97367, NWCH anticipates the new Phoenix Rising NW” to be in use beginning in March 2021.

We at Northwest Coastal Housing are so grateful for this opportunity to help our neighbors impacted by the wildfires, COVID and other crisis by providing temporary lodging complete with service navigation.  Our goal is to ease the trauma, provide our occupants with lodging, help them to stabilize and breathe,” stated Sheila Stiley, Executive Director of Northwest Coastal Housing.  Our agency was established to advocate for and support community efforts addressing housing needs.  This is an unconventional and innovative way of accomplishing just that, which seems to be a growing trend when responding to crisis, and we could not have succeeded without overwhelming support from our partners.”

Earlier this month OCF announced the first Project Turnkey grant of $4.2 million in state funds for Options for Helping Residents of Ashland (OHRA) to purchase and transform an Ashland motel. The new OHRA Center anticipates beginning to safely house community members negatively impacted by wildfires and COVID-19 pandemic beginning in March 2021.

Now that the application window has closed, the Project Turnkey Advisory Committee is doubling down on efforts to review and move highly-qualified applicants through the due diligence process,” said Megan Loeb, Program Officer, Oregon Community Foundation. We have a strong pipeline of nearly 30 applicants and are excited to see more projects awarded in the weeks ahead.”

When funds became available from the state for this project, OCF convened a diverse statewide advisory committee to create an equitable review process of all applicants. Working with urgency, and with counsel from real estate development experts, the selection committee has condensed a complicated real estate transaction into a 6-8-week process.

The scale of this humanitarian crises for unsheltered Oregonians is enormous,” said Dr. Ernesto Fonseca, CEO, Hacienda CDC and Project Turnkey Advisory Committee Member. Project Turnkey is one innovative and cost-effective solution that brings affordable housing in record time to people in critical need.”

OCF has been studying root causes of Oregons dual crisis of homelessness and affordable housing for two years, beginning with research commissioned from ECONorthwest, Homelessness in Oregon” which provided statewide analysis of the disproportionately large homeless population in Oregon.

About Project Turnkey

The Oregon Legislature allocated a total of $65 million for Project Turnkey for the purpose of acquiring motels/hotels for use as non-congregate shelter for people experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness. Two discrete funds were provided by the state: one totaling $30 million to be awarded in counties and tribal communities impacted by the 2020 wildfires; and one totaling $35 million for the remaining 28 counties in the state. Oregon Community Foundation is administering both funds through an application and selection process, with guidance from an Advisory Committee of state, local, and community stakeholders. For more information, please visit Project Turnkey online.

About Corvallis Housing First

Corvallis Housing First (CHF) was founded in 2007 (as the Corvallis Homeless Shelter Coalition) to provide solutions for ending homelessness and achieving self-sufficiency. CHF provides housing and services for individuals experiencing homelessness in the Corvallis community. For more information about CHF, please visit: corvallishousingfirst.org.

About Lane County Human Services

Lane County Human Services administers a range of programs that support people in communities—veterans, seniors, children, youth and families—during challenges and transitions in their lives. The resources offered by Lane County Human Services and its public and nonpro?t partners open new doors to an entire network of services, providing help and creating opportunities. For more information about Lane County Human Services, please visit: lanecounty.org.

About Northwest Coastal Housing

Based in Newport, Oregon, Northwest Coastal Housing (formerly known as the Community Development Corporation of Lincoln County) was established in May 1991. NWCH is a nonprofit organization committed to developing affordable housing, advocating for and supporting community efforts that enhance affordable living options. NWCHs mission is to provide affordable, safe, decent, and stable housing with compassion and integrity”.  For more information about NWCH, please visit: nwcoastalhousing.org.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

###




Attached Media Files: Project Turnkey FAQ , Project Turnkey News Release_CorvallisLANECOUNTYLincolnCity_02 26 2021 , Project Turnkey Graphic , NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon , Corvallis Housing First Corvallis Oregon , ProjectTurnkey Map for 02 26 2021 Announcement CorvallisEugeneLincolnCity , ProjectTurnkey ALL Sites Map as of 02 26 2021 AshlandCorvallisEugeneLincolnCity , Generic Motel Facade ProjectTurnkey

Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 02/26/21 7:29 AM

On Thursday, February 25, 2021 at approximately 7:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 227.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a commercial motor vehicle with double trailers had became disabled on the northbound shoulder of Hwy 101.  Previous to becoming disabled the CMV was operated by Anthony Prom (50) of Seattle, WA.  

A Chevrolet S-10 pickup, operated by Frank Martinez (77) of Lakeside,  traveled onto the shoulder and crashed into the rear of the CMV combination. 

Martinez sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Prom was not injured.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Department, Hauser Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, ODOT, and Southern Oregon Public Safety Chaplains. 


Thu. 02/25/21
ShakeAlert(R) Helps Oregonians Prepare for the Unpredictable
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/25/21 3:12 PM
OEM is coordinating the rollout of ShakeAlert in Oregon with state, federal and local partners.
OEM is coordinating the rollout of ShakeAlert in Oregon with state, federal and local partners.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3986/142794/thumb_ShakeAlert_USGS_ShakeAlert_Black_RGB_TM.png

Salem, OR – February 25, 2021 – Wildfires, floods, volcanoes and earthquakes: Oregon has its share of natural hazards. Each of these hazards presents unique challenges, but one of the biggest challenges for earthquake preparedness is unpredictability. Earthquakes strike without warning, causing widespread damage in a matter of seconds.

Fortunately, there is a preparedness tool, ShakeAlert® Earthquake Early Warning, coming to Oregon on March 11. ShakeAlert does not predict earthquakes. Rather, it uses a network of sensors to detect an earthquake that has just begun. Data from the sensors are used by ShakeAlert processing centers to calculate the estimated quake magnitude and intensity. Alert distribution providers (e.g. operators of purpose-built apps) create an alert which can be delivered to wireless devices – in a matter of seconds – potentially reaching device users before the shaking does. In the seconds between receiving an alert and feeling shaking, people can protect themselves by dropping, covering and holding on.

“One of the reasons earthquakes are unpredictable is due to a phenomenon called ‘stick-slip,’” explains Jenny Crayne, an educator with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), which is supporting outreach and education related to ShakeAlert. The push and pull of plate tectonics puts pressure on rocks within the earth. But rather than glide smoothly along, the rock “sticks,” held fast by friction. Sooner or later, and without notice, pressure overcomes this friction and the rock “slips,” resulting in an earthquake.

By studying past earthquakes and by mapping and monitoring movement along plate boundaries and faults, seismologists can identify areas, like the Pacific Northwest, with a high earthquake hazard, explains Crayne. Seismologists can also look at recurrence interval (the average amount of time between quakes) to estimate the likelihood of an earthquake occurring in the future. But probabilities aren’t predictions; no one knows exactly where the next earthquake will occur, or when.

This is why ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning is such a valuable preparedness tool. By rapidly detecting earthquakes and deploying alerts, the System can offer live-saving seconds for individuals. ShakeAlert-powered alerts can also be used to trigger automated actions such as closing a gas valve or slowing a train. These actions can prevent cascading infrastructure failures in the aftermath of an earthquake.

ShakeAlert is an easy-to-use tool. Beginning March 11, 2021, mobile devices in Oregon will be able to receive ShakeAlert-powered alerts via Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA), just like a severe weather or AMBER alert. All WEA alerts, regardless of type, behave the same. The device makes a distinctive notification sound and the alert pops up in a text window on the screen. Some devices with text-to-voice capability may read out the message text.

In the case of an earthquake alert, the WEA text will read: “Earthquake Detected! Drop, Cover, Hold On. Protect Yourself. -USGS ShakeAlert.” This message is available in Spanish for phones set to receive alerts in that language.

ShakeAlert-powered alerts can also be delivered through purpose-built apps; newer Android phones have ShakeAlert capacity built into the operating system, offering a third alert delivery route.

“ShakeAlert can offer critical seconds of advance warning before we feel the impacts of shaking from an earthquake,” says Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps. “These precious seconds allow people to take protective actions to increase their chances of being disaster survivors rather than disaster victims.

                                                                                                # # #

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer. Contact David Cardona, OEM Language Access Coordinator, at 971-719-1183 or email david.cardona@state.or.us. We accept all relay calls or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: OEM is coordinating the rollout of ShakeAlert in Oregon with state, federal and local partners. , OEM is coordinating the rollout of ShakeAlert in Oregon with state, federal and local partners. , OEM is coordinating the rollout of ShakeAlert in Oregon with state, federal and local partners.

Oregon reports 553 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/25/21 1:52 PM

Feb. 25, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 553 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,204, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 553 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,554.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 22,841 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 15,684 doses were administered on Feb. 24 and 7,157 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 24.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 881,206 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,170,595 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 156, which is six fewer than yesterday. There are 38 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (12), Clackamas (46), Columbia (4), Coos (26), Crook (2), Curry (5), Deschutes (10), Douglas (27), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (75), Jefferson (9), Josephine (13), Klamath (6), Lane (51), Lincoln (3), Linn (16), Malheur (4), Marion (58), Morrow (3), Multnomah (66), Polk (12), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (17), Union (4), Wasco (1), Washington (61) and Yamhill (14).

Oregon’s 2,195th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,196th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,197th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Feb. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,198th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Feb. 5 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,199th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Feb. 7 and died on Feb. 23 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,200th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 1 and died on Dec. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,201st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 23 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,202nd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 19 and died on Feb. 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,203rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Dec. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,204th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 5 and died on Feb. 15 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Updated: Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/25/21 1:46 PM

February 24,2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,194, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. yesterday.

Oregon Health Authority reported 437 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. yesterday today, bringing the state total to 154,062.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported that 22,406 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 14,502 doses were administered on Feb. 23 and 7,904 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 23.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 858,481 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,133,695 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 162, which is three fewer than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA publishes new web tool listing vaccine providers

OHA has added a new dashboard tool showing sites verified by the Oregon Immunization Program to receive and administer COVID-19 vaccines.

Being displayed on this dashboard does not mean sites have received COVID-19 vaccine doses, are administering COVID-19 vaccines onsite or have COVID-19 vaccines in their inventory. The new dashboard tool shows progress in enrolling potential COVID-19 vaccine providers across the state.

The tool is not meant to be used for scheduling. Go to the COVID-19 vaccine webpage to learn more about vaccinations, to sign up for eligibility notifications and to find vaccination providers in your county.

Weekly COVID-19 data and outbreak reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Report shows sharp decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,260 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 21 — a 35% decrease from last week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations fell 42%, dropping from 272 to 159.

COVID-19 related deaths also decreased from 114 to 17, which represents the lowest weekly death toll since the week of June 29–July 5.

There were 70,200 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 14 through Feb. 20, which represents a steep decline from the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was 3.5%.

People age 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

The COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 74 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (22), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (16), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (28), Jackson (27), Jefferson (7), Josephine (20), Klamath (4), Lane (33), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (33), Morrow (5), Multnomah (55), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41) and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,163rd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 6 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,164th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Jan. 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,165th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Feb. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,166th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 9 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,167th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 29 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,168th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,169th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,170th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 13 and died on Feb. 3 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,171st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,172nd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 23 and died on Feb. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,173rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,174th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Marion County who died on Jan. 23 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,175th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 2 and died on Jan. 23 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,176th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on Jan. 30 and died on Feb. 6 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,177th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 22 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,178th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Feb. 16 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,179th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Jan. 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,180th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Feb. 5. The location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,181st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 31 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,182nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 7 and died on Jan. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,183rd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,184th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Feb. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,185th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Dec. 31. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,186th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 24 and died on Feb. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,187th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Washington County who died on Feb. 2 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,188th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Multnomah County who became symptomatic on Dec. 29 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Jan. 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,189th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 4 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,190th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Feb. 17 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,191st COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 31 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,192nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Jan. 26 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,193rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Yamhill County who died on Jan. 7 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,194th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 15 and died on Feb. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/25/21 1:39 PM
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/4939/142789/thumb_PGAM_logo.png

(PLEASE NOTE: RESENDING WITH UPDATED/CORRECT INFO. PLEASE DISREGARD EARLIER VERSION)

 

For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders - public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts throughout Oregon. Since that time, over $111 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

###




Attached Media Files: Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo

March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month
Oregon Lottery - 02/25/21 11:52 AM
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/4939/142774/thumb_PGAM_logo.png

For the 19th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment, and recovery services.  This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is always important to us, as we highlight a ‘hidden’ addiction that millions of Americans face, including one in every 38 Oregon adults,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes.

“This year, we bring special attention to problem gambling, given the stress, isolation and financial uncertainty of so many Oregonians throughout the pandemic,” said Hynes. “Some can be tempted to seek hope through jackpots and escape from everyday problems via other gambling options. More widespread legalized online betting, day trading, and even video gaming apps have caused harm for more people this year. We want people to know that they’re not alone, and that there is effective, free and confidential help available for them as well as their loved ones.”

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders – public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Outreach continues to be challenging because of the pandemic.  People are isolated at home and the need for online gambling resources and options for treatment are critical. Visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) tend to increase during March as result of the focused marketing and social media outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery Senior Manager Product Market Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Problem Gambling Services Manager Greta Coe, with Oregon Health Authority’s Health Systems Division, notes the COVID pandemic has made this “a very trying and isolating time for many people.” Because of this, she says, it was important for Oregon Problem Gambling Resource (OPGR) and other local community sources to ramp up their outreach activities and media presence to address the increase in gambling activity and addiction.

“We’ve expanded our efforts to build awareness that gambling is an activity that comes with risks,” said Coe, “and it’s crucial we provide both free education and judgment-free treatment for those who develop gambling problems, as well as resources for those impacted by a loved one’s gambling.”

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts. Since that time, over $100 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling issue, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment resources or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org. 

About the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is the state affiliate to the National Council on Problem Gambling. Its purpose is to promote the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to minimize gambling related harm. Board members include stakeholders from the gaming industry, the treatment and prevention field, the recovery community and state and county administrators.

###




Attached Media Files: Problem Gambling Awareness Month logo

Lori Wyman named Pacific Power's new Regional Business Manager for Walla Walla area
Pacific Power - 02/25/21 8:59 AM

Media Contact: 503-813-6018

Lori Wyman named Pacific Power’s new Regional Business Manager for Walla Walla area
She steps in as Pacific Power’s Bill Clemens retires after 39 years of service

WALLA WALLA, Wash.—Feb. 25, 2021—Lori Wyman is stepping in as Regional Business Manager for Pacific Power in Walla Walla and other southeast Washington communities as Bill Clemens, a long-time Pacific Power leader in the area, retires

For the last 5 years, Wyman has served in the same capacity in Northeast Oregon, which she will continue to support as she takes on the Walla Walla area. Wyman will begin working closely with customers and businesses of all sizes across the region with a focus on supporting each community’s energy needs and opportunities.

“I look forward to becoming involved in the unique SE Washington communities with their long histories and vibrant futures, “ said Wyman. “Working with customers and local leaders, my goal is to discover even more areas where Pacific Power’s partnership can fortify community goals and make our customers lives better.”

Pacific Power serves over 30,000 customers in SE Washington and 40,000 in Umatilla and Wallowa counties in Oregon. Wyman will be the main contact for all government, community and business organizations.

Wyman joined Pacific Power in 2016. Previously, she spent 19 years with Puget Sound Energy. She served on the King County Utility Coordination Council and played a key role in the Municipal Department, as well as other responsibilities over the years.

Clemens plans to stay in the area after retirement and remain active in the community he has made his home since 1989. Over the years, Clemens worked for Pacific Power in Portland, Roseburg, Hood River, Bend, Walla Walla, Sunnyside, and back to Walla Walla.

“Our customers and the partnerships we create to build local community prosperity are the reason we are in business,” said Scott Bolton, senior vice president for external affairs and customer solutions. “Delivering exceptional service is a team effort across our company and depends on effective communication, a close working relationship with our operations professionals, and always being in tune with our customers’ needs. We have been honored to benefit from Bill’s hard work and wisdom over the decades and look forward to extending and deepening this community partnership in SE Washington with Lori in the years to come.”

 

####

About Pacific Power: Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.


District sets March dates for high school return to in-person learning
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 02/25/21 7:56 AM
2021-02/1288/142761/Wade_Smith.jpg
2021-02/1288/142761/Wade_Smith.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1288/142761/thumb_Wade_Smith.jpg

WALLA WALLA – Following nearly a one-year break from in-person learning amidst the COVID pandemic, high school students will begin returning to campuses Monday, March 8 utilizing the AM/PM hybrid model.

\A significant decline in local COVID cases over the past two months according to data provided by the Walla Walla County Department of Community Health allowed the district to shift to the green stage of its reopening plan. Ninth grade students will be on campuses first, beginning Monday, March 8, with 10th-12th grade students returning Wednesday, March 10.

“This phased approach will allow our ninth grade students to have two days on campus without upper grade level students to get orientated to their new schools,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “For many of these students, it will be their first time in our high schools.”

Based on guidance released by Governor Inslee and the Washington State Department of Health, schools are encouraged to reopen for high school instruction when cases drop below 200 cases per one hundred thousand population over 14 days. That ratio, when applied to the Walla Walla and College Place communities, equates to approximately 115 new cases over a two-week period to enter the green stage, the same threshold the Walla Walla School Board and Walla Walla Valley Education Association agreed on to begin returning high school students back to campus. As of Feb. 22, combined case counts between the two jurisdictions were at the 110 mark and falling.

The district recently performed a 3rd party on-site safety audit at each secondary school site. The audit concluded the district had the safety protocols and processes in place to safely return to AM/PM hybrid in-person learning.

“This week we’ll begin addressing specific staff safety accommodations necessary and begin to communicate safety protocols and schedules to our families," said Superintendent Smith. “We are excited to welcome our high school students safely back on campus and appreciate the community for helping curb the spread of the virus by wearing masks, social distancing and limiting gatherings.”

The district will continue to monitor COVID cases closely and work with local health officials to continue keeping schools safe. To learn more about the district’s Safely Reopening Plans, please visit www.wwps.org.

###




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1288/142761/Wade_Smith.jpg

Wed. 02/24/21
Walla Walla Public Schools accepted to WA State Learn to Return COVID testing program
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 02/24/21 5:25 PM
2021-02/1288/142758/Amy_Ruff.jpg
2021-02/1288/142758/Amy_Ruff.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1288/142758/thumb_Amy_Ruff.jpg

WALLA WALLA – Walla Walla Public Schools will have access to free COVID-19 testing services for students and staff as part of the new Learn to Return partnership with the Washington State Department of Health (DOH), Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and Health Commons. Test supplies and support are provided at no cost to the school district. Rapid results provide results within 15 minutes utilizing a self-administered, shallow nasal swab test. Additionally, the district will have access to a non-invasive saliva based PCR test, considered the “gold standard,” receiving results typically within 48 hours.  

“Testing is one critical element of an effective COVID response, allowing positive cases to be identified, isolated, and contact-traced,” said WWPS Director of Health Services Amy Ruff. “Everyone should be able to access a same-day test when needed, with a quick turnaround time, enabling prompt action to be taken.”

Ruff said there is tremendous value of testing within schools. “Offering testing to students and staff can give insights into virus prevalence in the school community, reduce anxiety of returning staff and students, and bolster community access so nobody is quarantined at home unnecessarily simply because they are unable to access a test.”

“Combined with other mitigation strategies, like practicing six feet of physical distancing, using face coverings, keeping students in smaller cohorts, maximizing/improving ventilation, and practicing good hygiene and disinfection habits, testing in schools will help build confidence in safer in-person learning,” said Ruff. “Our testing program will dramatically decrease the risk to our learning community and supports our ability to continue serving students in person.”

The Learn to Return program provides free access to tests for three primary purposes:

  1. A same-day diagnostic test for staff or students with symptoms or possible exposure.
  2. Access to diagnostic PCR testing, considered to be the “gold standard” for COVID identification.   
  3. Regular voluntary testing for school staff.

Walla Walla Public Schools plans to roll out its testing program by early March. Consent for testing will be required for all students, and will be available online and at each school.

###




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1288/142758/Amy_Ruff.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Feb. 24, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/24/21 5:09 PM
2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg
2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3986/142743/thumb_50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Feb.24, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Captions:

Talent, Ore. - February 11, 2021 - Crews gather at the Talent Mobile Home Park to test for asbestos. Once the area is deemed free of asbestos, teams will begin to remove ash and debris. This site will hold temporary FEMA housing. Photo by Oregon Department of Transportation. 
File: 50934991142_8f49f5a534

Talent, Ore. - February 11, 2021 - In partnerhsip with FEMA's Direct Housing Mission, Talent Mobile Estates is being prioritized for cleanup to provide temporary housing for community members in need. Photo by Oregon Department of Transportation.
File: 50934863931_4dd888af34




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/3986/142743/50934863931_4dd888af34_o.jpg , 2021-02/3986/142743/50934991142_8f49f5a534_o.jpg

Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 5:08 PM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,194, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 437 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,062.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 22,406 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 14,502 doses were administered on Feb. 23 and 7,904 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 23.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 858,481 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,133,695 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 162, which is three fewer than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA publishes new web tool listing vaccine providers

OHA has added a new dashboard tool showing sites verified by the Oregon Immunization Program to receive and administer COVID-19 vaccines.

Being displayed on this dashboard does not mean sites have received COVID-19 vaccine doses, are administering COVID-19 vaccines onsite or have COVID-19 vaccines in their inventory. The new dashboard tool shows progress in enrolling potential COVID-19 vaccine providers across the state.

The tool is not meant to be used for scheduling. Go to the COVID-19 vaccine webpage to learn more about vaccinations, to sign up for eligibility notifications and to find vaccination providers in your county.

Weekly COVID-19 data and outbreak reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows sharp decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,260 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 21 — a 35% decrease from last week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations fell 42%, dropping from 272 to 159.

COVID-19 related deaths also decreased from 114 to 17, which represents the lowest weekly death toll since the week of June 29–July 5.

There were 70,200 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 14 through Feb. 20, which represents a steep decline from the previous week. The percentage of positive tests was 3.5%.

People age 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 74 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

Details on today’s reported deaths will be published later.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (22), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (16), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (28), Jackson (27), Jefferson (7), Josephine (20), Klamath (4), Lane (33), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (33), Morrow (5), Multnomah (55), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (15), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41) and Yamhill (6).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Former Grass Seed Company Manager Charged in Scheme to Defraud Simplot and its Customers
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/24/21 4:04 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Christopher Claypool, 52, of Spokane, Washington, the former general manager of the Jacklin Seed Company, a producer and marketer of grass seed and turfgrass based in Liberty Lake, Washington, has been charged by criminal information with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and money laundering as part of multiple schemes to defraud Jacklin’s former owner, the J.R. Simplot Company, and its customers.

As general manager of Jacklin, Claypool oversaw the company’s product sales to domestic and foreign distributors. Jacklin contracted with independent growers in Oregon for the production of proprietary grass seed varieties and fulfilled orders from a distribution facility in Albany, Oregon. Differences in grass seed yield rates resulted in the over-delivery of some varieties and underproduction of others.

At some point between 2013 and 2015, Claypool and other Jacklin employees realized that growers’ preference for higher-yield grasses was creating substantial shortages of lower-yield varieties Jacklin had contracted to deliver to its customers. Claypool and a colleague who oversaw product fulfillment at the company’s Albany distribution facility recognized that these shortages would either cause Jacklin to fail to deliver on its existing contracts or require Jacklin to pay a premium to growers to acquire necessary inventory, substantially eroding company profits. Claypool and his colleague anticipated that either result would negatively affect their careers.

From January 2015 and continuing until at least the summer of 2019, Claypool and his colleague directed Jacklin employees, at the Albany facility and elsewhere, to fulfill customer orders with different varieties of grass seed than the customers had ordered, to conceal such substitutions from the customers, and to invoice the customers as though no substitutions had taken place. Claypool and his colleague referred to this scheme as “getting creative.”

To conceal the unauthorized substitutions, Claypool and his colleague directed Jacklin employees to package the substitute seed varieties with false and misleading labels. They also directed employees to invoice the customers under the original terms of their contracts, notwithstanding the unauthorized substitutions. As a result of this scheme, Jacklin invoiced customers for more than $1.1 million of grass seed the company never delivered.

In addition to the undisclosed seed substitutions, Claypool engaged in several other fraudulent schemes while serving as Jacklin’s general manager. In one scheme, he directed an accomplice to create a limited-liability corporation (LLC) to pose as an independent grass seed broker. Claypool and a colleague conspired to route a portion of Jacklin’s overseas sales through a competing grass-seed seller based in Jefferson, Oregon. The company would, in turn, add its own mark-up to the sales and kick back outsized commissions to Claypool through his accomplice’s LLC. From December 2018 through August 2019, Claypool generated more than $369,000 in fraudulent commissions.

In a third scheme, Claypool conspired with the owner of an independent travel agency in Spokane to inflate the purported costs of Claypool’s international business travel. Claypool traveled overseas extensively for business and had authority to approve his own travel expenses. In lieu of using Simplot’s contract travel agency, Claypool booked his flights through the independent travel agent. The agent booked economy and other lower-cost fares for Claypool, but created fake first-class bookings on the most expensive comparable itineraries in order to generate inflated invoices that he transmitted to Simplot, through Claypool, for payment. In total, the agent overbilled more than $500,000 for international airfare, the majority of which Claypool ultimately received in kickbacks from the agent.

In the most lucrative fraud scheme, Claypool directed Simplot’s payment of more than twelve million dollars in “rebates” and “commissions” to entities that were posing as foreign sales partners but were, in fact, fronts for Claypool’s coconspirators in embezzling those funds.  The coconspirators then transmitted part of their ill-gotten gains from accounts in Hong Kong to real estate investments in Hawaii under Claypool’s control.  Years later, Claypool sold the real estate and wired the proceeds to investment accounts in Spokane as part of an elaborate money laundering operation.

Claypool faces a maximum sentence of 70 years in prison, fines of more than $15 million, and 5 years’ supervised release. His arraignment has not yet been scheduled.

This case is being investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Inspector General. It is being prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal information is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Utility Regulators Extend Customer Protections
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 02/24/21 3:28 PM

OREGON UTILITY REGULATORS EXTEND CUSTOMER PROTECTIONS
COVID-19 late fee and disconnection moratorium extended through June 30
 

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) approved an extended moratorium on disconnections for electric and natural gas customers of investor-owned utilities as Oregonians continue to experience financial hardships due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The moratorium, previously set to expire on April 1, was extended to June 30.

 The PUC extended the moratorium to waive late fees and discontinue energy service disconnections due to nonpayment for customers of Portland General Electric (PGE), PacifiCorp, Idaho Power, NW Natural, Cascade Natural, and Avista, through June 30, with the first 15-day late notice to be issued no earlier than June 15.  

As of December 2020, the number of electric and natural gas customers with past-due balances of investor-owned utilities had increased to just over 97,000 customers who are 90-plus days behind in paying their energy bills. This is a 272 percent increase when compared to data prior to the pandemic. Additionally, the total amount of past due balances for residential customers has increased to $48.3 million, a 631 percent increase.

“As the economic impacts of the pandemic continue, the extension of the moratorium provides families continued access to essential utility services at a time that so many are struggling to make ends meet and relying on these essential services to attend school and work,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “This extension, however, does not mean that utility service can be provided at no cost. Paying what you can now or getting connected with energy assistance programs will help avoid large balances once the moratorium ends.”

To further benefit Oregonians, the PUC directed investor-owned electric and natural gas companies to file arrearage management program plans for approval. PGE’s program has been filed and approved by the PUC, while the plans for the remaining investor-owned utilities will be reviewed at a special public meeting scheduled for March 23. These programs, which would go into effect April 1, offer additional options for energy customers experiencing difficulty in paying their utility bills. Funding for these programs is limited to one percent of each utility’s 2019 Oregon retail revenues, or approximately $39 million overall.

Customers having difficulty paying their utility bills should contact their service provider directly for information on arrearage management programs, payment plan options, and programs specific for qualifying low-income customers. For additional information, contact the PUC at puc.consumer@state.or.us or call 503-378-6600 or 800-522-2404.

The PUC will hold a follow-up public meeting in mid-May to further review the impacts of the pandemic on energy customers.

# # #

The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.

 

 


Oregon Health Policy Board meets March 2 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 2:39 PM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079,  philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets March 2 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: March 2, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602657497?pwd=emhzUnJsK1EzWk5rV0VpYTdjU3VrQT09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,,1602657497#,,,,,,0#,,306554#

Agenda:

  1. Welcome, OHPB Roll Call and Minutes Approval
  2. Director’s Update
  3. Legislative Update
  4. Retreat Follow-up
  5. Cost Growth Target: 2021 Workplan
  6. Public Comment
  7. Committee Membership
  8. Oregon’s Hospital Community Benefit Program

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (live captions)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Florence restaurant fined $18,150 for COVID-19 violations, including willfully exposing workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/24/21 11:12 AM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1073/142734/thumb_DCBS_Logo_-_RGB.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined a Florence restaurant $18,150 for three violations of standards designed to protect employees from the coronavirus disease. In one of the infractions, The Firehouse Restaurant willfully continued to potentially expose workers to the virus, despite a public health order limiting the capacity of indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The citation resulted from an inspection initiated in response to multiple complaints about The Firehouse Restaurant (its legal name is McKenzie Brown Corp.). The division conducted the inspection by phone. That decision was made after an investigation of social media posts and websites discovered the potential for armed people to block access to the business.

Moreover, the investigation showed that some extremist groups were encouraging people to engage in violence against Oregon OSHA compliance officers if they visited the site.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty for the willful violation. That is twice the minimum penalty for such a violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding public health measures.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that choose to comply with workplace health and safety standards.

“Throughout the pandemic, we have consistently helped employers understand and follow health and safety rules. Most employers are choosing to do the right thing in the face of immense challenges,” Wood said. “We thank them for their ongoing efforts as we work to defeat this disease. As for the vocal few that continue to defy standards and to put their workers at risk, we will continue to carry out our enforcement work.”

Altogether, Oregon OSHA cited three violations of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, The Firehouse Restaurant purposely chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as Extreme Risk. It was a willful violation. Oregon OSHA proposed a discretionary penalty of $17,800.
  • The restaurant failed to develop and implement an infection control plan. Such a plan could include redesigning the workspace to enable physical distancing and reducing the use of shared surfaces and tools. It was a serious violation, carrying a proposed penalty of $175.
  • The restaurant did not conduct any COVID-19 risk assessment to identify potential employee exposure to the virus and to address how to reduce such exposure. It was a serious violation, carrying a penalty of $175.

The inspection of The Firehouse Restaurant found the business committing the violations on or about Dec. 26 and continuing to do so afterward. The inspection included an interview with Kylie McKenzie, manager of the restaurant.

McKenzie said she originally closed the business to the public, but later decided to re-open it, even though she was aware the decision went against measures to prevent the spread of the disease in an extreme-risk county.

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

2020 Corporate Activity Tax returns due April 15
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 02/24/21 10:15 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners that businesses with commercial activity in excess of $1 million in 2020 must file a CAT return by April 15.

Businesses with more than $1 million in taxable commercial activity will have Corporate Activity Tax to pay. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

Revenue has honored good-faith efforts to comply with the CAT by businesses negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Penalties will not be assessed for underestimated quarterly payments or for not making a quarterly payment for the Corporate Activity Tax, if businesses did not have the financial ability to make the estimated payment.

However, payment of 2020 CAT liability is due in full April 15. Businesses can, with good cause, seek an extension to file. An extension to file is not an extension to pay tax owed.

One-time registration
The Department of Revenue reminds business owners that once they have more than $750,000 in commercial activity in 2021, they have 30 days to register for the Corporate Activity Tax unless they have already registered.

Registration for CAT is a one-time requirement, however, and businesses that registered in 2020 do not have to register again.

CAT registrations topped more than 20,000 in its first year. That number continues to grow as new businesses begin to reach the $750,000 threshhold in 2021. Through Tuesday, 21,149 businesses had registered for the CAT, which was created by the Oregon Legislature in 2019 to raise funding for education.

2021 quarterly payments
Taxpayers expecting to owe $5,000 or more in Corporate Activity Tax for tax year 2021 must make estimated quarterly payments. Estimated payments for 2021 are due April 30, August 2, November 1, and January 31, 2022. Returns are due April 15.

Training aids to assist with registration, calculating the tax, and making payments can be found on the CAT page of the agency’s website.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.


Oregon Health Authority Issues Joint Statement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation on COVID-19 Data
Oregon Health Authority - 02/24/21 8:59 AM

Feb. 24, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Authority Issues Joint Statement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation on COVID-19 Data

The Oregon Health Authority reports that the addition of approximately 1,400 COVID-19 laboratory reports from Umatilla County on Saturday, Feb. 20 will not affect the county’s risk level status. The past cases covering a seven-month period had been investigated and had previously not been electronically recorded by the agency.

OHA has been receiving weekly data from Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. In the fall of 2020, after the state agency moved away from manual data entry toward the electronic file submission an error occurred, which did not include tabulating the 1,400 records from Yellowhawk in its state COVID-19 case count. OHA regrets the error and has since been working closely with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to prevent these errors from happening again.

“The accurate collection and accounting of all COVID-19 case data informs OHA’s ongoing response to COVID-19, and we are committed to informing the public when we identify any oversight,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state public health officer and epidemiologist. “When we identified the issue, we worked to correct our methods of capturing case data, and we want to thank the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation for the work they are doing to provide their case and investigation data to us.”

As an entity of a sovereign nation, the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center is not required to report COVID-19 test results to OHA but chose to report their data weekly since the beginning of the pandemic.

“We decided to be transparent with our data because we realize this will be an important part to fighting the virus and protect not only residents of the Umatilla Indian Reservation but our community, county and state,” said Lisa Guzman, chief executive officer for the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center.

As OHA reported, these test results date from June 2020 through January 2021. The cases were appropriately investigated and interviewed at the time of their positive test. The test results had been shared electronically with OHA during that time by the Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center’s laboratory but were not captured by OHA due to data processing issues.

The county’s reopening metrics are not being changed or impacted because of the addition of the new case data. County Risk Levels are updated every two weeks in response to how COVID-19 is spreading in communities, at the county level.

Currently, Umatilla County is listed at an extreme risk level based on having 446 cases per 100,000 residents. The county will be in high risk level starting Feb. 26, as countywide case rates dropped to 191 cases per 100,000 from Feb. 7 to Feb. 20. Risk Levels take effect on Friday and remain in effect for the next two weeks while this process repeats.

OHA acknowledges the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s ongoing efforts to boost community immunity among its members, employees, employee family members and non-Indian residents who live on the reservation. Today is the second day of a mass vaccination event being held with the help of the Oregon National Guard. The tribe received 975 doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from the Indian Health Service for the event.

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are members of the Oregon Emergency Response System, which coordinates state resources in its response to emergencies involving multi-jurisdictional cooperation.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 02/24/21 7:59 AM
2021-02/1002/142722/IMG_5744.jpg
2021-02/1002/142722/IMG_5744.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1002/142722/thumb_IMG_5744.jpg

On Tuesday, February 23, 2021 at approximately 2:45 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 36.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota SR5 pickup, operated by Paula West (64) of Klamath Falls, was eastbound when it lost control and collided with a westbound Dodge Grand Caravan operated by Mary Wolf (63) of Chiloquin.

West was transported to the hospital.

Wolf sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

There were two passengers in the Dodge - David Burton (37) of Chiloquin was transported to the hospital and a juvenile female was transported, by air ambulance, to the hospital.

OSP was assisted by Rocky Point Fire and EMS, Klamath County Fire District 4, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/1002/142722/IMG_5744.jpg

Tue. 02/23/21
College Place Public Schools Board Approves Land Purchase for Future School
College Place Sch. Dist. - 02/23/21 8:30 PM

In a unanimous vote of support tonight, the College Place Public School Board of Directors approved a $1.6 million land purchase of forty acres in College Place.  The Board had been saving funds to secure the future site for some time while it worked on finding the right piece of land.   The entire purchase of the land and all of the associated costs will be paid out of district savings and will not involve any added costs to local taxpayers.

The City of College Place and College Place Public Schools have continued to see significant growth and based on the city’s five-year plan is expected to continue and will largely surround the new site location.  CPPS has seen an average of nearly 6% enrollment growth each of the past seven years and sees this continuing based on city planning, construction permits, and development plans.  Superintendent Jim Fry said, “We have continued to see the growth in College Place because it is a very desirable location to live and raise a family.  I am appreciative to the board for their diligent work in their planning for this growth and their prudence with state and local dollars to enable us to make this purchase without increasing local taxes.  We will be positioned to be right in the middle of an area of significant growth with a beautiful new school in the future.”

The property is located approximately one-half mile southeast of the District’s current high school, middle school, district office site.  The acreage, which is currently farmland, c be utilized by the district for athletic practice fields until the time that the district is prepared to build its next school.  The district has already performed a number of pre-evaluative steps including an initial appraisal, water rights assessment, and access evaluation.  The district expects that it may be ready for a new school proposal in the next 6-10 years.

“We have already added six new classrooms at Davis Elementary this year to support our enrollment growth and this land will give us some certainty for our long term planning.  The growth will continue to come and we have been excellent caretakers of public funds and will continue to make sure we are doing the very best for the children and community of College Place,” stated CPPS Board Chair Mandy Thompson on the purchase.

The proposed property will have to undergo a very strict due diligence period evaluation to ensure that it will meet with all the state and local requirements for building a school in the future.  The processes include conducting soil, engineering, geotechnical, wetland, and a myriad of other studies, which are set to begin immediately and could take up to four months.  Additionally, the school district will need to work with other property owners to gain the needed easements for road access to the property.  “We have done a lot to get to this point and have a lot of work to do before this done.” Fry said, “But, when it is, we will be well poised to handle the growth in College Place for years to come.”


Oregon reports 528 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 3:05 PM

Feb. 23, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 528 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are eight new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,162, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 528 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 153,645.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 14,917 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,235 doses were administered on Feb. 22 and 5,682 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 22.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 836,075 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,092,385 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 165, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 44 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (17), Clackamas (47), Clatsop (4), Columbia (12), Coos (11), Crook (6), Curry (3), Deschutes (34), Douglas (29), Grant (1), Harney (4), Hood River (2), Jackson (46), Jefferson (9), Josephine (17), Klamath (11), Lane (40), Lincoln (3), Linn (8), Malheur (5), Marion (37), Morrow (4), Multnomah (55), Polk (12), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (20), Union (5), Washington (64) and Yamhill (15).

Note: Oregon’s 1,450th and 1,509th COVID-19 deaths, reported on Dec. 30, 2020 and Jan. 5, 2021, are the same person. Because of this error, we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 2,155 today.

Oregon’s 2,155th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Dec. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,156th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Feb. 18 and died on Feb. 21 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,157th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Feb. 19 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,158th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Feb. 6 and died on Feb. 22 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,159th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 20 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,160th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,161st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 22 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,162nd COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Deadline extended for SNAP recipients to request food replacement
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/23/21 2:35 PM

Deadline to apply: March 5, 2021

SNAP recipients living in one of the nine counties below who experienced food loss or had to destroy food due to the recent power outages can apply for replacement food benefits. Replacement benefits are available for regular and emergency SNAP allotments.

Counties with an extended deadline:

  • Benton
  • Clackamas
  • Hood River
  • Linn
  • Marion
  • Multnomah
  • Polk
  • Yamhill
  • Washington

“We appreciate the ability to extend the deadline for Oregonians to request replacement benefits,” said Self-Sufficiency Programs Director Dan Haun. “This extension is critical as many people are still without power or assessing the ability to provide food for their households.”

How to apply

“We encourage SNAP recipients applying for replacement benefits to stay home and make their request by phone or email. The health and safety of Oregonians and staff is still a top priority, and we want to limit in-person visits to reduce exposure to COVID-19,” director Haun stated.

More information is available online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/Replacement%20-Benefits.aspx.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance, and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


Oregon OSHA faults, fines restaurant in Florence for willfully exposing workers to COVID-19
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/23/21 2:07 PM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/1073/142704/thumb_DCBS_Logo_-_RGB.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined The New Blue Hen, a restaurant in Florence, $17,800 for willfully continuing to potentially expose workers to the coronavirus disease. The business did so despite knowing it was violating a public health order limiting the capacity for indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The fine was the result of an inspection opened in response to multiple complaints about The New Blue Hen. The inspection was carried out despite several people – including one carrying a firearm – who blocked the business’ entrance and threatened compliance officers.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty, which is twice the minimum penalty for a willful violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding public health measures.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that choose to comply with workplace health and safety standards.

“Most employers are choosing to do the right thing,” Wood said, “even as they face very real economic hardships. As for those relatively few employers who are working against our shared project to defeat this disease, we will continue our enforcement work in the interest of accountability.”

Oregon OSHA cited one violation of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, The New Blue Hen purposely chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as Extreme Risk. It was a willful violation. Oregon OSHA proposed a discretionary penalty of $17,800.

Because of safety concerns, two compliance officers were assigned to open the inspection. When they arrived at the restaurant Jan. 4, they were met by several people standing outside the entrance of the business, one of whom carried a firearm.

The compliance officers identified themselves and asked to speak with the business owner. They were threatened and told to leave. The officers politely left. As the officers walked to their cars, the people outside the entrance followed them. The people shouted at the officers as the officers left the parking lot.

The inspection of The New Blue Hen – doing business as Little Brown Hen – found the employer committing the violation beginning on or about Dec. 26, 2020, and continuing to do so afterward. The inspection included visual confirmation of indoor dining and a Jan. 5 phone interview with owner Stacey Brown, who said she understood the public health rules regarding the spread of the disease in Lane County.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Oregon State Police Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Taking of Cow Elk - Wheeler County
Oregon State Police - 02/23/21 1:56 PM

The Oregon State Police is requesting the public’s assistance to help identify the person(s) responsible for unlawfully shooting and killing a cow elk in Wheeler County. 

On Thursday, February 18, 2021 Oregon State Police Troopers discovered the remains of an unlawfully killed cow elk in the northern Fossil Unit, on USFS Road 25 near the 150 spur (Henry Creek area).  The kill was fresh and was believed to have been shot and taken at night, during the evening hours of February 17.  Additionally, an ATV or UTV was utilized to transport the elk upon Henry Creek Road traveling down to the junction with Kahler Basin Road, north of the town of Spray. 

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact Sr. Trooper Brian Jewett through the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-980-6081.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges.

The Oregon Hunters Association offers rewards to persons, through their T.I.P. fund, for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) for illegal possession, killing, or taking of bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, elk, deer, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, furbearers and/or upland game birds and water fowl. T.I.P. rewards can also be paid for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of game fish, and/or shell fish, and for the destruction of habitat.

In addition rewards may be paid for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) who have illegally obtained Oregon hunting/angling license or tags. People who “work” the system and falsely apply for resident license or tags are not legally hunting or angling and are considered poachers.

Rewards:

Bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose $1,000

Elk, deer, antelope $500

Bear, cougar, wolf $300

Habitat destruction $300

Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags $200

Game fish, shell fish $100

Upland birds, waterfowl $100

Furbearers $100

Preference Points:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points- Cougar

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


***TIME CHANGE*** Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 02/23/21 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, at 2 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on the federal Continued Assistance Act (CAA) that extends and provides additional federal unemployment benefits, economic and workforce-related trends and more on Wednesday, Feb. 24 at 2 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Feb. 24. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/930/142684/02.24.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely March 2, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 10:55 AM

Feb. 23, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us  

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely March 2, 2021

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday March 2, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269 or by teleconference at (872) 240-3212, access code 706-039-269. Please note only council members may speak until the public comment time.

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meetings Feb. 24th
Oregon Health Authority - 02/23/21 10:50 AM

Feb. 23, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, Philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us , (media inquiries)

Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meetings Feb. 24th

What: The Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is holding its first meeting.

To achieve the goals of the Health Care Cost Growth Target Program, data submitters, stakeholders and the public must have confidence that the data collected and reported by the program are valid and reliable. The purpose of the Health Care Cost Growth Target TAG is to ensure that the processes involved in developing data submission specifications and health care cost growth measurement are appropriate and transparent.

The TAG is not a decision-making body: it is an advisory body providing a venue for discussion, brainstorming and solution finding.

When: February 24, 2021. 10:00 AM - noon  

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or conference line.

To join by Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1615311783?pwd=TWVOek83M012V0xCTVN4QkdPalBwQT09 One tap mobile +16692545252,,1615311783#,,,,053372# US (San Jose)

Agenda: Welcome and Introductions. Overview of the Health Care Cost Growth Target Program and Implementation Committee recommendations. Review TAG charter and workplan. Introduce intent, timeline, and process for developing data submission template and specifications, and temporary rules. Wrap up.

There will not be a public comment period held during this meeting. Please submit any public comment at: e.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us">HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us

For more information, please visit the TAG website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/cost-growth-target-tag.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at 971-283-8107, 711 TTY, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense When Buying a Pandemic Puppy (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/23/21 9:00 AM
TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC
TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/3585/142256/thumb_TT_-_Pandemic_Puppies_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against getting taken to the dog house!

Pandemic puppies -- and, that matter, kittens -- are a real thing. More people are working at home, and the kids can't -- or won't -- leave the house. Your whole family is desperate for the unconditional love that a little fur ball will bring.

Wanting and finding, though, can be two different things. Some shelters are running low and breeders can have months-long waiting lists. To fraudsters, this presents a golden opportunity. According to the Better Business Bureau, it has received reports of about $3 million in losses to this scam in just the past year.

Here in Oregon, we are seeing a couple main versions of this scam. Almost all involve a fake website or ad selling a puppy or cat that is in another state. The victim sends money for the animal (usually by Zelle, PayPal, or CashApp). To make the deal more lucrative for himself, the scammer may also tell the victim he needs to purchase refundable insurance to ship the animal. In a new twist, some families are paying even more fees for a supposed special shipping crate to meet COVID restrictions or for a non-existent COVID vaccine for the pet.

Here's how to protect yourself:  

  • If possible, find your pet locally.

  • If you do purchase a pet online, make sure you find a reputable breeder or organization. Look for a long history of work, references, and certifications through breed-specific clubs or a national kennel club. Do not count on a fancy website as an indicator -- anyone can make a good looking site these days.

  • Do a reverse image search of any photo of your new pup to make sure the seller isn't using the same picture across multiple sites. 

  • If you can't meet the pup in person, ask for a video chat with the seller and the pup before paying.

  • Use a credit card or payment platform with good dispute resolution policies. Never pay with cash, wire transfer, or gift cards.

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI's Internet Crime Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Pandemic Puppies - AUDIO - February 23, 2021 , TT - Pandemic Puppies - GRAPHIC

Mon. 02/22/21
Oregon reports 324 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/22/21 12:48 PM

Feb. 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 324 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, keeping the state’s death toll at 2,155, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 324 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 153,134.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 18,907 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 13,790 doses were administered on Feb. 21 and 5,117 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 21.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 821,311 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 167, which is one more than yesterday. There are 47 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (8), Clackamas (25), Columbia (3), Coos (18), Curry (10), Deschutes (11), Douglas (14), Harney (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (43), Jefferson (4), Lane (12), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (83), Polk (12), Tillamook (1), Union (1), Washington (32) and Yamhill (10).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution, a new infographic featuring the differences between OHA’s vaccine tools and other useful information.


Top PNW banker expands Umpqua Bank's expertise to support growth strategy for larger mid-size companies
Umpqua Bank - 02/22/21 10:25 AM
Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director
Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6798/142665/thumb_Dave_Ericksen.jpg

Umpqua Bank Hires Dave Ericksen to Build Upper Middle Market Banking Team

PORTLAND, Ore. (February 22, 2021)—Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), announced today the addition of Dave Ericksen to its Pacific Northwest (PNW) middle market banking leadership team as senior vice president and middle market director. Recognized as one of the PNW region’s leading corporate bankers, Ericksen strengthens Umpqua’s capacity to support the growth and evolution of the region’s large middle market companies.

According to Richard Cabrera, evp and head of Umpqua’s middle market banking division, Ericksen’s hire is part of Umpqua’s strategy to recruit top bankers and market leaders across its West Coast footprint to expand access to the sophisticated expertise needed by complex, high-growth enterprises, particularly during a period of continued economic uncertainty.

“Businesses have persevered through tremendous disruption and many have adapted in ways that position them for growth as the economy stabilizes. A trusted, capable banking partner has never been more critical to their continued success,” said Cabrera. “Dave brings uncommon expertise and skill to our team of bankers and his addition illustrates the high priority Umpqua has placed on helping our customers gain a competitive advantage through periods of both economic expansion and contraction.”

Before joining Umpqua, Ericksen contributed to the success of US Bank and Key Bank over his more than 25 years in banking. Most recently, he served as an enterprise banker at Key Bank, where he successfully helped drive that institution’s growth in a variety of key sectors, including health care, metals & recycling, and food and beverage, among others.

“Dave is a highly-regarded banker with long-standing connections to our region’s industries, economy, and companies,” said Jonathan Dale, evp and Pacific Northwest executive of middle market banking. “Throughout his career, Dave has established trusted relationships with middle market business owners, helping them finance growth, optimize working capital, and automate cashflow. His leadership experience and forward-thinking approach to understanding a business’ vision and objectives will complement Umpqua’s high-touch client experience.”

Ericksen earned a B.B.A. in Accounting & Finance from Pacific Lutheran University and an Executive Leadership Certification from University of Washington. He’s also a graduate of Pacific Coast Banking School, and during his career has held licenses as a Certified Treasury Professional (CTP), an Oregon Life & Health Insurance professional, and a Series 6 & 63. Ericksen currently serves on the board of Portland Opera.

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the sixteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to small businesses. A subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, Umpqua Investments, Inc., provides retail brokerage and investment advisory services in offices throughout Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada.

 




Attached Media Files: Dave Ericksen, SVP Middle Market Director

Sun. 02/21/21
Oregon reports 111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 02/21/21 1:08 PM

Feb. 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,155 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 111 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 152,818.

Note: Due to a server error, a large number of electronic lab results (ELR) were not processed yesterday. As a result, today’s case and ELR totals are lower than usual and the total for tomorrow is expected to be higher than usual. The backlog of ELRs is currently being processed.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,202 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,894 doses were administered on Feb. 20 and 3,308 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 20.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 802,404 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 166, which is three more than yesterday. There are 44 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (4), Columbia (9), Coos (9), Curry (3),  Deschutes (11), Douglas (21), Jackson (2), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lake (1), Lane (13), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Washington (3), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 2155th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on Feb. 20 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

629

7

Benton

2252

16

Clackamas

13198

170

Clatsop

766

6

Columbia

1217

21

Coos

1356

18

Crook

765

18

Curry

397

6

Deschutes

5849

58

Douglas

2333

51

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

221

1

Harney

266

6

Hood River

1057

29

Jackson

8117

108

Jefferson

1921

27

Josephine

2267

48

Klamath

2753

54

Lake

374

6

Lane

10046

121

Lincoln

1121

19

Linn

3534

55

Malheur

3331

58

Marion

18183

280

Morrow

1031

13

Multnomah

31534

514

Polk

2981

42

Sherman

52

0

Tillamook

403

2

Umatilla

7581

80

Union

1264

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1218

25

Washington

20867

209

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3717

62

Statewide

152,818

2,155

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

There is no single-day ELR table for yesterday due to the ELR processing error that occurred.

Cumulative ELRs 

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

7842

1529

9371

16.32%

Benton

102100

3297

105397

3.13%

Clackamas

334789

18404

353193

5.21%

Clatsop

25893

1243

27136

4.58%

Columbia

31443

1534

32977

4.65%

Coos

29955

1379

31334

4.40%

Crook

11810

997

12807

7.78%

Curry

7909

316

8225

3.84%

Deschutes

126267

7483

133750

5.59%

Douglas

50560

1925

52485

3.67%

Gilliam

887

28

915

3.06%

Grant

3298

176

3474

5.07%

Harney

2534

207

2741

7.55%

Hood River

24700

1314

26014

5.05%

Jackson

159710

10217

169927

6.01%

Jefferson

14742

1629

16371

9.95%

Josephine

43145

2127

45272

4.70%

Klamath

37036

2782

39818

6.99%

Lake

2423

356

2779

12.81%

Lane

341070

11152

352222

3.17%

Lincoln

34262

2133

36395

5.86%

Linn

102629

6474

109103

5.93%

Malheur

17476

4545

22021

20.64%

Marion

253862

25502

279364

9.13%

Morrow

5393

1189

6582

18.06%

Multnomah

771133

43377

814510

5.33%

Polk

52572

3644

56216

6.48%

Sherman

1083

47

1130

4.16%

Tillamook

10930

359

11289

3.18%

Umatilla

49990

7859

57849

13.59%

Union

9775

950

10725

8.86%

Wallowa

2004

72

2076

3.47%

Wasco

26094

1277

27371

4.67%

Washington

483296

29161

512457

5.69%

Wheeler

331

20

351

5.70%

Yamhill

98413

5074

103487

4.90%

Statewide

3,277,356

199,778

3,477,134

5.75%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

 

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases


Sat. 02/20/21
Oregon reports 536 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/20/21 1:20 PM

Feb. 20, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,154, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 536 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 152,711.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 25,602 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 20,646 doses were administered on Feb. 19 and 4,956 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 19.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 781,202 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 924,575 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

Weather-related issues during the past week may cause changes to daily number trends reported by OHA in its updates on the cumulative number of doses administered, the daily number of administered doses and the number of doses delivered to Oregon. OHA remains in regular contact with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updates on delivery schedules and to ensure Oregon doses are safely delivered to Oregon vaccination sites. Doses scheduled for delivery this past week may ship out this weekend or early next week due to winter weather issues impacting shipments coming from Memphis, TN. 

If you are scheduled for a vaccination and have questions about potential delays or disruptions, check with your scheduled vaccine provider for the latest updates.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 163, which is 13 fewer than yesterday. There are 51 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (5), Clackamas (26), Clatsop (2), Columbia (10), Coos (14), Crook (5), Curry (7),  Deschutes (15), Douglas (20), Hood River (2), Jackson (38), Jefferson (4), Josephine (18), Klamath (5), Lake (5), Lane (41), Lincoln (1), Linn (6), Malheur (5), Marion (55), Morrow (6), Multnomah (69), Polk (15), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (72), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (66) and Yamhill (17).

Umatilla County has a higher than anticipated case count due to approximately 1,400 backlogged test results received on Feb. 19. These test results were from June 2020 through Jan. 2021. Cases were investigated and interviewed locally at the time of their positive test but were not electronically reported to OHA.

Oregon’s 2,150th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 23 and died on Feb. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,151st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Feb. 18 and died on Feb. 18. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are still being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,152nd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 29 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,153rd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 17 and died on Feb. 18 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,154th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Feb. 7 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

629

7

Benton

2,248

16

Clackamas

13,196

169

Clatsop

766

6

Columbia

1,208

21

Coos

1,347

18

Crook

765

18

Curry

394

6

Deschutes

5,839

58

Douglas

2,312

51

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

221

1

Harney

266

6

Hood River

1,057

29

Jackson

8,115

108

Jefferson

1,918

27

Josephine

2,266

48

Klamath

2,752

54

Lake

373

6

Lane

10,033

121

Lincoln

1,120

19

Linn

3,533

55

Malheur

3,331

58

Marion

18,171

280

Morrow

1,031

13

Multnomah

31,526

514

Polk

2,978

42

Sherman

52

0

Tillamook

403

2

Umatilla

7,580

80

Union

1,264

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1,218

25

Washington

20,866

209

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3,716

62

Statewide

152,711

2,154

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) received Feb. 19, 2021

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

20

1

21

4.76%

Benton

536

5

541

0.92%

Clackamas

834

15

849

1.77%

Clatsop

39

0

39

0.00%

Columbia

97

14

111

12.61%

Coos

246

17

263

6.46%

Crook

17

3

20

15.00%

Curry

30

6

36

16.67%

Deschutes

301

7

308

2.27%

Douglas

215

15

230

6.52%

Gilliam

4

0

4

0.00%

Grant

1

0

1

0.00%

Harney

10

0

10

0.00%

Hood River

86

0

86

0.00%

Jackson

359

32

391

8.18%

Jefferson

100

4

104

3.85%

Josephine

169

15

184

8.15%

Klamath

35

1

36

2.78%

Lake

5

1

6

16.67%

Lane

2,129

32

2,161

1.48%

Lincoln

74

0

74

0.00%

Linn

342

5

347

1.44%

Malheur

25

5

30

16.67%

Marion

593

54

647

8.35%

Morrow

17

1

18

5.56%

Multnomah

2,003

42

2,045

2.05%

Polk

175

13

188

6.91%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.00%

Tillamook

21

0

21

0.00%

Umatilla

92

3

95

3.16%

Union

14

0

14

0.00%

Wallowa

3

0

3

0.00%

Wasco

121

0

121

0.00%

Washington

1,467

62

1,529

4.05%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.00%

Yamhill

178

12

190

6.32%

Statewide

10,363

365

10,728

3.40%

Cumulative Electronic Laboratory Reporting

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

7,842

1,529

9,371

16.32%

Benton

102,062

3,297

105,359

3.13%

Clackamas

334,746

18,402

353,148

5.21%

Clatsop

25,893

1,243

27,136

4.58%

Columbia

31,435

1,533

32,968

4.65%

Coos

29,950

1,379

31,329

4.40%

Crook

11,808

997

12,805

7.79%

Curry

7,875

316

8,191

3.86%

Deschutes

126,249

7,481

133,730

5.59%

Douglas

50,536

1,923

52,459

3.67%

Gilliam

887

28

915

3.06%

Grant

3,298

176

3,474

5.07%

Harney

2,534

207

2,741

7.55%

Hood River

24,698

1,314

26,012

5.05%

Jackson

159,709

10,217

169,926

6.01%

Jefferson

14,741

1,629

16,370

9.95%

Josephine

43,142

2,127

45,269

4.70%

Klamath

37,036

2,782

39,818

6.99%

Lake

2,421

356

2,777

12.82%

Lane

340,959

11,144

352,103

3.16%

Lincoln

34,262

2,132

36,394

5.86%

Linn

102,582

6,474

109,056

5.94%