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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Sat. Jun. 12 - 8:00 am
Fri. 06/11/21
Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:30 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24

What: A public Zoom meeting for the Research and Leadership Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, June 24, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting.  Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 453 2659 Passcode: 710824.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:08 PM

June 11, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 308 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,587.

Information from today’s media briefing

This morning, Gov. Kate Brown and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist with OHA, provided an update on Oregon’s ongoing COVID-19 response. Gov. Brown highlighted Oregon’s continued progress in reaching her goal of having at least 70% of all eligible Oregonians vaccinated and in closing the equity gap in vaccinating Oregon’s communities of color. Dr. Sidelinger discussed the highly protective benefits provided by COVID-19 vaccines, noting that virtually every patient now requiring hospital care from a COVID-19 illness has been unvaccinated.

Watch more about that here and read the press conference talking points here.

CDC data tracker issue update

OHA has relied on a daily U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) data update to report the number of people who need to receive a COVID-19 vaccination to reach Oregon’s goal of vaccinating 70% of people 18 and older.

Unfortunately, CDC is experiencing an issue with the data feed that contributes to its COVID data tracker dashboard, which Oregon uses to track the state’s progress towards 70%.

CDC believes that approximately two days of data is not appearing on the CDC COVID data tracker dashboard. CDC is working to resolve the issue and anticipates having it fixed by June 15. The COVID data tracker is the only place where doses from all sources administered to Oregonians are reported, including doses administered by federal entities, as well as doses administered to people living in Oregon by providers in other states.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report shows decline in transmission

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast, which showed lower transmission of the virus through late May and projects fewer hospitalizations and daily cases through June 29.

According to the model, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at 0.66 through May 26.

At that same level of transmission, daily cases would decline to 100 daily cases and new hospitalizations would decrease to five per day over the next three weeks.

If transmission increases by 20%, new cases would decline more gradually, to 135 new daily cases, with seven new hospitalizations daily.

The modeling shows that estimated immunity from vaccination is present in four times more people than have naturally acquired immunity. Natural immunity is immunity stemming from prior infection.

A person who has had COVID-19 and recovered may not have the same level of immunity as someone who has not been infected and has been fully vaccinated, and it is unknown how long the natural immunity will last.

People who have recovered from the disease have a robust response to the vaccine. OHA recommends that people get the vaccine to increase their protection against COVID-19.

More than 2.3 million Oregonians have received at least one dose of the safe and highly effective vaccine, and 2 million have completed a vaccine series.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 24,213 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 15,926 doses were administered on June 10 and 8,987 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 10.

The seven-day running average is now 17,697 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,352,742 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,662,657 first and second doses of Moderna and 154,388 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,007,367 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,310,053 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 87,702.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 169, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 40 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,278, which is a 23.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (34), Clatsop (4), Columbia (6), Coos (1), Crook (8), Curry (2), Deschutes (14), Douglas (15), Grant (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (21), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (12), Lincoln (1), Linn (12), Malheur (2), Marion (31), Multnomah (67), Polk (5), Umatilla (11), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (37) and Yamhill (7).

Note: Due to routine data quality assurance reviews, OHA identified 19,992 duplicate negative electronic lab reports (ELRs) from April 30 to June 10, 2021, related to a single laboratory in Yamhill County. These duplicate negative ELRs were removed from the system last night. As a result, statewide and Yamhill County ELR counts have decreased and percent positivity has increased for this time period.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 2:10 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.

What: A combined public Zoom meeting for the Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Tuesday, June 15, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 072 1195 Passcode: 439535.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Toppenish Man Convicted of Murdering a Native American Woman Within the External Boundaries of the Yakama Nation
U.S. Attorney's Office - Eastern Dist. of Wash. - 06/11/21 11:03 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States Attorney’s Office

Eastern District of Washington

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: George Jacobs

Friday, June 11, 2021

 

Public Affairs Officer

EDWA.gov | @USAO_EDWA

 

ge.J.C.Jacobs@usdoj.gov">George.J.C.Jacobs@usdoj.gov

 

Toppenish Man Convicted of Murdering A Native American Woman Within the External Boundaries of the Yakama Nation

Yakima – Today, Joseph H. Harrington, Acting United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, announced that on June 10, 2021, a federal jury in Yakima, Washington, convicted Jordan Everett Stevens, an Indian, of First Degree Murder in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1111, 1153 and Discharging a Firearm During and in Relation to a Crime of Violence in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(1)(A)(iii).

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, on or about April 30, 2019, Stevens assaulted a woman in Toppenish, Washington.  A potential witness, ACM, a Native American female, was near the location of the assault and had a conversation with responding police officers.  Stevens erroneously believed that ACM provided information to the police.  On May 3, 2019, Stevens and two females drove ACM to a rural section of the Yakama reservation.  Stevens pulled ACM out of the vehicle and shot her in the head as payback for speaking with the police.  Stevens threatened to kill the female witnesses if they told anyone about the murder. 

The FBI was alerted by a family member that ACM was missing and immediately began an investigation.  In late May 2019, the FBI tracked down one of the female witnesses who identified Stevens as ACM’s killer.  On May 29, 2019, the FBI found ACM’s body in a remote area of the Yakama Indian Reservation.  Shortly after the FBI found the second female witness who confirmed what had happened to ACM.  On July 17, 2019, an Indictment was filed charging Stevens with Discharge of a Firearm During a Crime of Violence, and First Degree Murder. 

On June 7, 2021, a jury trial began at the federal courthouse in Yakima.  Multiple witnesses were reluctant to testify out of fear of retribution and refused to appear for court.  They were subsequently apprehended with the assistance of the U.S. Marshals Service and testified at the trial.  On June 10, 2021, a federal jury found the Defendant guilty of First Degree Murder and Discharge of a Firearm in Furtherance of a Crime of Violence.  A conviction for First Degree Murder carries a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment.  On June 10, 2021, the Honorable Stanley Bastian ordered a sentencing hearing to take place on September 1, 2021.    

Acting United States Attorney Harrington said, “The United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Washington commends the officers with the Yakama Nation Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Klickitat County Sheriff’s Office who investigated this case.  Their seamless partnership resulted in the successful outcome of this senseless murder.  Investigating and prosecuting cases involving Missing and Murdered Indigenous Person (MMIP) is a top priority of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Washington.   This Office is committed to prosecuting aggressively cases involving violent acts committed against Native American women who reside on Reservation lands within this District.”

“Too often, violence on the reservation results in the tragic and senseless loss of life,” said Donald M. Voiret, FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Seattle Field Office. “The FBI is committed to combatting crime on our state’s reservations. Stevens will have the rest of his life in prison to contemplate his choices.”

This case was investigated by the Yakama Nation Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Klickitat County Sheriff’s Office.  This case was prosecuted by Benjamin D. Seal and Richard C. Burson, Assistant United States Attorneys for the Eastern District of Washington

19-CR-02038-SAB


UPDATE: Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 9:55 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 370 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,291.

Interim update to release time of this daily news release

To align with the daily Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update of the numbers of people in Oregon ages 18 and older who have received at least one dose of their COVID-19 vaccine, OHA will be releasing this daily news release later in the day, beginning today.

The CDC posts the number of people in Oregon ages 18 and up who have received at least a first dose daily, generally by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

OHA then pulls the data from the CDC site at 3 p.m. Pacific time daily and subtracts the number of people ages 18 and older who have had at least one dose from Oregon’s target of 2,345,823 (70% of those 18 and over). This calculation shows how many people ages 18 and older still need to be vaccinated to achieve Oregon’s goal of 70%.

OHA will update the website banner to reflect these numbers by 5 p.m. Pacific time daily.

Note: If the CDC has not updated its website by 3 p.m. Pacific time, when OHA pulls the data, OHA communications will add a note in this daily media release and on the dashboard on the Governor’s website stating that CDC’s website has not been updated and OHA will update the banner and dashboard at 9 a.m. Pacific time the next day.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 27,113 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,182 doses were administered on June 9 and 15,931 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 9.

The 7-day running average is now 15,761 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,337,634 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,659,139 first and second doses of Moderna and 153,424 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,991,717 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,303,485 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,234.

Note: OHA is working to determine why CDC's COVID-19 vaccination update today indicates minimal change. We will have a more complete update tomorrow.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,173,680 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 173, which is nine more than yesterday. There are 41 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,328, which is a 22.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 219.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

One Community Health: collaboration is key

Tomorrow, One Community Health will be administering Pfizer vaccines in The Dalles while offering free food and live music to all who attend the event. Preventative health manager Gladys Rivera readily admits that Friday’s event is more of a celebration than a formal clinic because Wasco County has almost reached a 65% percent vaccination rate. 

Rivera attributes the clinic’s vaccination success to the organization’s great partnership with Oregon Health Authority (OHA), as well as with other community partners, including growers, employers and local businesses.  

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) deployed three mobile vaccination units throughout Oregon’s rural communities, which have successfully vaccinated more than 2,500 people across the state.  

“Collaboration is really the key to make all of this happen,” emphasized Rivera. “It’s relying on all those partners and really sharing the workload.” 

You can read more of this story on OHA’s Oregon Vaccine News blog. For more information about tomorrow’s vaccine clinic in The Dalles, contact One Community Health at 541.386.6380.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (8), Clackamas (30), Clatsop (1), Columbia (4), Coos (2), Crook (11), Deschutes (85), Douglas (17), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (15), Jefferson (1), Josephine (8), Klamath (10), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (2), Marion (35), Multnomah (59), Polk (7), Umatilla (8), Union (1), Washington (22) and Yamhill (4).

Note: Due to a delay in laboratory reporting, OHA received 767 electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) on June 9, 2021 for Deschutes County. The reports are from April 17, 2021 to June 9, 2021. As a result, case counts, ELR totals and percent positivity is higher in Deschutes County for June 9, 2021 than anticipated.

Oregon’s 2,717th death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,718th death is an 83-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 27 and died on Feb. 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,719th death is a 90-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on June 7 and died on June 8 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,720th death is an 80-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive on May 21 and died on May 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,721st death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on May 22 and died on June 8 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,722nd death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 21 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,723rd death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on April 17 and died on May 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,724th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,725th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,726th death is a 73-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive on April 13 and died on May 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #


EMD Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/11/21 8:11 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 7, 2021

Contact:   Sara Stewart
                503-378-2424

                sara.stewart@state.or.us

Notice of Special Meeting

The EMD Workgroup, a subgroup of the Telecommunications Curriculum Committee, will hold a regular meeting on June 21, 2021 from 07:00 a.m. - 09:00 a.m.  The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom for public and workgroup members who choose this option over onsite, in-person attendance.  For a link, please contact Sara Stewart at the email address listed above.  A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Check-In
  2. EMD Card Review & Comparison

              a.  Recommendations

               b.  Corrections

      3.  Next Steps

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Curriculum Committee Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Smith Creek Village at Silver Falls State Park opens June 11; lodging reservations available
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/11/21 8:00 AM

SILVERTON, Oregon—The Smith Creek Village in Silver Falls State Park is now open after a six-month closure. Silver Falls Hospitality is the new management company operating the village in an agreement with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The area was previously known as Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center.

“We’re very happy that park visitors now have these overnight options and services once again,” said Park Manager Guy Rodrigue. “Silver Falls Hospitality has hit the ground running and we’re eager to help them succeed in this new partnership.”

Cabin and lodge reservations are now available for stays beginning June 11 and beyond via a new website, www.smithcreekvillage.com. Information regarding the Foothills and Davidson Ranches, weddings, group events and meeting spaces is available by contacting Partnerships & Events Manager Shalimar at shalimar@silverfallshospitality.com.

"Hosting has become both a lifestyle and a practice for us. We started Silver Falls Hospitality with the intention of providing comfortable experiences in the outdoors," said co-owner Brooke Gerken. "We are so grateful to have been given the honor of being the stewards of this space and are looking forward to working closely with OPRD to bring our vision to life. We are stoked to be getting started and to have our guests on-site very soon!"

Big Leaf Coffeehouse will be open daily to all park visitors from 7 a.m.-11 a.m. They will be serving both hot breakfast and take+trek meal options, with a full espresso bar coming soon.

The South Falls Café at the South Falls Lodge in the park day-use area is open daily, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. The café is managed under a separate agreement with the Oregon Commission for the Blind Business Enterprise Program team.
# # #


Thu. 06/10/21
Virtual Nisei WWII Veterans' Stamp Dedication Program On Monday, June 14
Oregon Historical Society - 06/10/21 3:06 PM
2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/2861/145774/thumb_Stamp.jpg

Earlier this month, the U.S. Postal Service released its newest commemorative stamp, the “GO FOR BROKE SOLDIERS: Japanese American Soldiers of WWII” stamp. This Forever Stamp honors the little known contributions of American soldiers of Japanese ancestry (the Nisei) who served courageously during World War II. With the frightening increase in violent attacks on Asian Americans, learning about the patriotism and heroic military history of these Japanese American soldiers during World War II is critical. It teaches us that people of color have contributed to the preservation of freedom and democracy throughout the history of America, often with their lives.

Ceremonies celebrating this Forever Stamp will be or have been held across the nation. Oregon will hold its ceremony on June 14, 5:30pm at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. Due to COVID safety precautions restricting large public gatherings, the public is invited to attend virtually (vimeo.com/543729988). It will also be posted on the website www.StampOurStory.org.

Who were these soldiers and what is the meaning of the motto “GO FOR BROKE”? They were “Nisei,” American citizens born in the United States to immigrants (“Issei”) from Japan. “GO FOR BROKE” characterized their teamwork, spirit and courage. The face of a soldier and the motto of these troops is etched on the stamp. These soldiers served in combat in Europe, as linguists in the Pacific Theatre and in the post-war occupation of Japan. They numbered just 33,000 men and women but suffered huge casualties. They include one of the most decorated military units in history, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts and 21 Medals of Honor. 

While these Nisei soldiers were fighting and dying for their country, America, their grandparents, parents, spouses, children and relatives were incarcerated in American concentration camps. Solely because of their Japanese heritage, over 120,000 Japanese American citizens and others of Japanese ancestry were deemed enemies of the U.S., were ordered to leave almost everything they owned, and were imprisoned in camps surrounded by barbed wire. Four thousand Oregonians were forced to leave their homes, businesses and farms and live in one of ten American concentration camps. The loyalty of these soldiers and their families is indisputable. For more information see www.StampOurStory.org.

In 2005 the “Stamp Our Story” campaign for the “GO FOR BROKE” stamp was launched by three Nisei women in California to honor these soldiers. Support in Oregon has been ongoing since the beginning of the campaign. 

According to Doug Katagiri, son of linguist George Katagiri, veteran of the Military Intelligence Service: “This unique commemoration recognizes and reminds us of the legacy achieved by Nisei veterans of WWII. It’s impossible to overstate their sacrifices in building this legacy, fighting a war abroad while enduring racism and an extraordinary episode of national injustice at home.”

Oregonians across the state are invited to join the celebration (virtually at vimeo.com/543729988) to learn about these patriotic Japanese American soldiers and their families. For Oregonians of Japanese ancestry, it will be a long awaited opportunity to celebrate the contributions of the “GO FOR BROKE” Nisei soldiers and their ancestors.

The program will feature Honorary Chair and former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski and four generations of Nisei veterans’ descendants. Three vignettes by Asian American actors will portray stories of military service: David Loftus reading an excerpt from Harold Okimoto’s diary, the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion; Alton Chung presenting former Congressman Al Ullman’s tribute to Frank Hachiya, Military Intelligence Service; and Ken Yoshikawa, reading Art Iwasaki’s letter to the HIllsboro Argus, 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

Former Gov. Kulongoski lauded the Nisei veterans in this way: “Our Japanese American World War II veterans fought for democracy while their own families were incarcerated in concentration camps on American soil. They believed in America. We salute them. And we will not forget.”

Sponsors and supporters of the event include the Oregon Nisei Veterans, the Japanese American Museum of Oregon, the Oregon Historical Society, the Portland Japanese American Citizens’ League and the Mary Yamaguchi Foundation at the Community Foundation of Southwest Washington.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg

Knight receives 2021 Southeast Washington Association of School Administrators Community Leadership Award
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/10/21 2:04 PM
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WALLA WALLA - Local financial advisor Lawson Knight received the 2021 Southeast Washington Association of School Administrators Community Leadership award on behalf of Walla Walla Public Schools at the Washington Association of School Administrators Southeast region annual meeting in Richland June 9.  

Knight has been an active volunteer with Walla Walla Public Schools for years serving on the Bond Oversight Committee, as a Finance Department Retreat facilitator, Lincoln High School Facilities Planning Task Force member, High School Facilities Task Force member, Green Park PTA member and Strategic Planning Committee participant. He also served as the Replacement Levy chair for Walla Walla Citizens for Schools during the successful 2020 Levy approved by voters with a 72 percent yes vote.

“Our future depends on equipping our children with the skills, critical thinking and love for learning to sustain our community and society,” said Knight. “I want to be part of helping produce an educational experience that makes this possible for all children, not just mine.”

Knight was born in McMinnville, OR but was raised in Seward, Nebraska. He graduated from Central High School, Monmouth-Independence, OR in 1990 before attending Oregon State University and University of Lyon, France.

Knight is a financial advisor with Edward Jones in Walla Walla. He has also served as Executive Director of Blue Mountain Community Foundation during his time in Walla Walla. His professional resume also includes serving as Development Office and Campaign Manager for the Oregon State University Foundation.

Knight earned the Philanthropy Northwest Mary Helen Moore Volunteer-of-the-Year award in 2012. He was also honored by the Walla Walla Valley Chamber of Commerce with its Not-for-Profit Organization of the Year 2012 for his work leading the Blue Mountain Community Foundation.

“Walla Walla Public Schools is fortunate to have Lawson Knight as one of its strongest supporters,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “Lawson’s leadership and involvement helps the district realize its vision of Developing Washington’s Most-Sought After Graduates.”

Lawson and his wife, Cyndy, have three daughters; Madelyn (20), Wa-Hi graduate and sophomore at EWU, Molly (18) Wa-Hi student and Chloe (15) Wa-Hi student. He enjoys track and field, soccer, hiking, travel, cooking and volunteering.

Photo L-R: Lawson Knight receives Community Leadership award from Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith.
 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1288/145772/Lawson_Knight.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145772/Lawson_Knight_Award.jpg

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Training Subcommittee meets June 11
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 1:11 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Training Subcommittee meets June 11

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee

Agenda: Available at: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/Pages/psilocybin-services-act.aspx

When: Friday, June 11, 1-3 p.m. No public comment period available.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:56 PM

June 10, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021

What: A public meeting of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Council will learn about strategies and engagement for youth and staff from Oregon Housing and Community Services will present on housing and wraparound services.

When: Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish). https://youtu.be/loKE47aCb7c

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:30 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8

What: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda: House Bill 2076; HERO Kids; Pediatric EMS & Suicide Data; Suicide Prevention Project; EMSC Program; AmeriCorps VISTA Member Project; State EMS and Trauma Program.

When: Thursday, July 8, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603380406?pwd=TVlTdWRudlZPSWtyOUFlNmc0UXZHQT09

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1603380406#

Dial: 1-669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 338 0406

Passcode: 918677

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at www.oregonemsc.org.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/10/21 11:25 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 10, 2021

Contact:  Mona Riesterer 
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 1:00 p.m. June 23, 2021 at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

The Applicant Review Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve May 26, 2021 Meeting Minutes

3.  Shawnee Wallace, DPSST No. 61966; Curry County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

4.  Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

5.  Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – July 28, 2021 at 1:00 p.m.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


UPDATE: Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 9:45 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 16 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,716 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 269 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,933.

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations decline

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows the sixth consecutive week of declining cases and lowest since weekly case tally since last September. OHA reported 1,725 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, May 31, through Sunday, June 6. That represents a 26% decline from the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations also declined from 190 to 112. That’s also the lowest since last September.

There were 20 reported COVID-19 related deaths.

There were 72,443 tests for COVID-19 for the week of May 30 through June 5. The percentage of positive tests was 3.8%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 38% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 75% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 19 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

New Variant Labels added to OHA Tableau Dashboards

On May 31st, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a new, “easy-to-pronounce and non-stigmatizing”, labeling convention for Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest using the Greek alphabet as an easier way to discuss variants by non-scientific audiences. 

Starting today, OHA’s  COVID-19 Daily Data Update dashboard and Variants dashboard will include WHO labels added alongside with the current  labels.

OHA uses the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidelines for reporting and there are some differences between how the WHO and CDC groups variants of both classifications. 

  • The WHO groups the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants together and has given them a label of “Epsilon”. OHA will continue to follow how the CDC reports these variants separately and they will both have the “Epsilon” label added to each.
  • The CDC has also identified some Variants of Interest for the U.S. that the WHO has not. As a result, these will not have a Greek alphabet label assigned to it.

Explanations about these WHO label additions will be included in the notes at the bottom of each of the dashboards. Additional information about Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest can be found here.

OHA refreshes vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboard

Today, OHA refreshed the data for the vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboards with a new extract from ALERT IIS. The data are periodically refreshed, which allows for quality assurance and review. The data were last refreshed on April 9.

Following the refresh today, race and ethnicity data for approximately 1,200 people was updated, predominantly affecting Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native vaccination rates. County status toward the 65% vaccination goal was not affected by the data refresh, but vaccination rates for five counties decreased minimally - by 1% or less. Those counties are Baker, Benton, Clatsop, Sherman and Wheeler.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,934 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,736 doses were administered on June 8 and 9, 198 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 6.

The seven-day running average is now 15,264 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,319,302 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,651,646 first and second doses of Moderna and 152,192 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 1,951,646 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,292,591 who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,444.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,171,060 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

Hospitals across the state have received questions from the public about the need to continue to manage and limit visitation policies for patients. Unlike other public settings, hospitals are subject to special visitation requirements. The COVID-19 policies for hospitals and medical centers are based on federal rule and state law. Visitation guidance can be found here.

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 164, which is eight fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which represents no change from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,383, which is a 20.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 228.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (2), Clackamas (37), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (2), Curry (3), Deschutes (19), Douglas (14), Gilliam (1), Grant (6), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (6), Josephine (7), Klamath (4), Lake (1), Lane (10), Lincoln (3) Linn (8), Malheur (7), Marion (40), Morrow (2), Multnomah (32), Polk (7), Umatilla (7), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Washington (14), Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 2,701st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,702nd COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 29 and died on June 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,703rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 15 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,704th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died on May 19 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,705th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 24 at Portland Adventist Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,706th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,707th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on May 14 and died on June 7 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,708th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man from Hood River County who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,709th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on May 22 and died on May 26 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,710th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 24 and died on May 26 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,711th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 17 and died on June 3 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,712th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on May 3 and died on June 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,713th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on May 29 and died on June 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,714th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 27 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,715th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 3 and died on May 14 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,716th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on April 28 and died on June 7 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Superintendent Smith receives state student leadership award
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/10/21 8:50 AM
2021-06/1288/145747/Wade_Smith.jpg
2021-06/1288/145747/Wade_Smith.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1288/145747/thumb_Wade_Smith.jpg

WALLA WALLA- The Washington Association of School Administrators awarded Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith with the Student Achievement Leadership award for the Southeast region during its annual meeting in Richland June 9. 

This award is presented to WASA members who have provided leadership for the implementation of an innovation that has resulted in measurable growth in student achievement. The innovation serves as a tool for modeling new programs.  

Dr. Smith spearheaded the development of an inclusive and comprehensive strategic planning process when he arrived in 2016. Built on a foundation of stakeholder voice and equity, the plan incorporated a “We All Belong Here” vision that prioritized quality instruction, aligned systems, student supports and community partnerships. Under his leadership, graduation rates have soared to all-time highs, from 80.4% to 91.7%. Additionally, the district has virtually eliminated the graduation gap between student populations. With an unwavering commitment toward equity and access, the Hispanic/Latino graduation rate has increased nearly 20% under Smith’s leadership to 88%, 10% above the state average.

“We are focused on engaging our students and bringing their voice to the table,” said Dr. Smith. “We have developed a Superintendent’s Student Advisory Council this school year and it has really changed the way we make decisions. It allows for students to make choices for students.”

Superintendent Smith said the award is a reflection of the success of the entire school district and thanked staff, students, parents and district leaders for making this award possible. 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1288/145747/Wade_Smith.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 20 - Harney County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 8:03 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 3:55 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near mile post 152.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Subaru Forester, operated by Lillie Gray (66) of Dallas, was westbound when it moved into the eastbound lane to pass 2 motorcycles and collided with a eastbound Dodge Van operated by Rollie Brubaker (64) of Oceanside, CA. 

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Brubaker and passenger, Maria Brubaker (56) of Oceanside, CA, were transported to Harney District Hospital.

One of the motorcyclists, Neil Postal (22) of Burns, was unable to avoid the crash and was transported to Harney District Hospital.

A fourth vehicle sustained minor damage when it drove off the road and struck a highway sign to avoid the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Burns Fire Department, Harney District Ambulance, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 27 - Crook County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:29 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 8:10 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 27 near mile post 5.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Kia Spectra, operated by Clayton Gray (19) of Halfway, was northbound when it crossed the southbound lane, left the roadway, and rolled.

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A juvenile passenger was transported by Airlink to St. Charles Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Crook County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Fire Department, and ODOT


Fatal Crash on Hwy 51 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:10 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 11:45 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 51 near mile post 3.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Trax, operated by Richard Davis (74) of Independence, was southbound when it left the roadway and rolled. 

Davis sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire and Medics, and ODOT.


Wed. 06/09/21
Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - June 9, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/09/21 4:00 PM
2021-06/3986/145714/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
2021-06/3986/145714/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3986/145714/thumb_OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for June 9, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here. These updates will now be released bi-weekly with the next release on June 16, 2021.

Photo Captions:

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Wildfire Recovery Logo: Oregon Rising - Stronger Together.
File: OEM RISING LOGO JPG

FEMA Douglas County Outreach Flyer
File: FEMA Douglas County Outreach June 11.pdf

FEMA Lincoln County Outreach Flyer                                                                                                                                                  File: FEMA Lincoln County Outreach June 18.pdf




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/3986/145714/FEMA_Lincoln_County_Outreach_June_18.pdf , 2021-06/3986/145714/FEMA_Douglas_County_Outreach_June_11.pdf , 2021-06/3986/145714/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png

Lori Coyner to leave Medicaid Director role to focus on new 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government
Oregon Health Authority - 06/09/21 3:36 PM

June 9, 2021

Contact: Robb Cowie, 503-945-7849, obb.cowie@state.or.us">robb.cowie@state.or.us

Lori Coyner to leave Medicaid Director role to focus on new 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government

(Portland, Ore. – June 9, 2021) Lori Coyner, the director of Oregon’s Medicaid program, will leave her current role at the end of this month to serve as primary leader to provide strategic guidance in the development of Oregon’s next 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government. In her role, Coyner will be instrumental in forging a new agreement with health officials in the Biden administration about the way the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) delivers health care to more than 1.1 million people (or nearly 1 in 4 Oregonians).

In her role as Medicaid Director, Coyner oversees the state’s Medicaid program, which has a biennial budget of approximately $18 billion for the 2019-2021 biennium.

Oregon’s 1115 Medicaid waiver is an agreement with the federal government which provides the state flexibility to pursue innovative Medicaid reforms, such as Oregon’s coordinated care organizations (CCOs) which are accountable to local communities and incentivized to achieve specific cost-saving and health care quality outcomes (such as fewer unneeded emergency department visits). Oregon’s 16 CCOs serve more than 900,000 Oregonians on the Oregon Health Plan. Oregon’s current Medicaid waiver expires at the end of June, 2022.

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen said, “As Medicaid Director, Lori Coyner has been a catalyst in changing health care in Oregon. She was instrumental in winning timely approval of our current Medicaid waiver, developing new standards for CCOs and gaining federal agreement to our recent waivers to strengthen behavioral health services for Oregonians and give us more flexibility to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. I’m excited that she’ll remain on board to guide our next waiver.”

Dana Hittle will serve as OHA’s interim Medicaid Director. For the past two and a half years, Hittle has served as Deputy Medicaid Director, working with teams across OHA to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Oregon’s Medicaid program and its ability to deliver services to the state’s most vulnerable populations, including children in foster care and people who need behavioral health services.


UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Hwy 126E - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 06/09/21 12:38 PM

The operator is being identified as Staci Jackson (56) of Eugene.

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at approximately 11:48 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 126E near milepost 17.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Escort was westbound when it left the roadway and struck a power pole.

The operator was transported to Riverbend Hospital where she was pronounced deceased.  The name of the operator will be released when appropriate.

OSP was assisted by Emergency Medical Services and ODOT 


Beaverton Man Sentenced for Laser Assault on Federal Officer During Portland Protest
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/09/21 11:30 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Beaverton, Oregon man was sentenced today for shining a high-powered green laser at a uniformed Federal Protective Service (FPS) officer providing security at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse during a protest in July 2020.

Andrew Steven Faulkner, 25, was sentenced to three years’ federal probation to include six months of home detention and 40 hours of community service.

According to court documents, in the early morning hours of July 5, 2020, Faulkner shined a high-powered green laser at an FPS officer working as a member of the security team at the Hatfield Federal Courthouse. The officer was struck in the eye by the laser and quickly moved to avoid prolonged exposure. The officer was able to identify Faulkner and observed him shining the laser in the direction of other officers. When officers approached Faulkner, he attempted to flee, but was ultimately apprehended. The laser, a SDLaser 303 with a warning label cautioning direct eye exposure, was located in Faulkner’s possession.

On July 6, 2020, Faulkner was charged by criminal information with one count of misdemeanor assault on a federal officer. He pleaded guilty to the charge on January 13, 2021.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by FPS and the FBI. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ashley R. Cadotte prosecuted the case.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/09/21 11:13 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 124th  Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT124 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, June 11, 2021, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 124 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 

Graduating Members of Basic Telecommunications Class # BT124:

Dispatcher Artigas Bonifacio
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Bradden Cappoen
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Kevin Casey
Lincoln City Police Department

Dispatcher Tobia Cochran
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Mileena Edwards
Warm Springs Police Department

Dispatcher Shyla Feddersen
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Kirstin Fossum
Harney County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Zook Gango
Lake Oswego Police Department

Dispatcher Deena Josue
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Jasmine Lee
Springfield Police Department

Dispatcher Shannon Leib
Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Kim Lentz
Corvallis Police Department

Dispatcher Kara Minck
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Cody Mock
Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Kathleen Mossel
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Scott Naumann
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Ashley Reardon
METCOM 9-1-1

Dispatcher Emily Roadarmel
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Adam Russell
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Logan Schnoor
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Ernest Slye
Oregon State University DPS

Dispatcher Jason Stephens
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Joanna Szynal
Lake Oswego Police Department

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Jerry Granderson serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/09/21 9:58 AM
Texelle Hendricks
Texelle Hendricks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1070/145720/thumb_Hendricks_T.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Texelle Hendricks, died the morning of June 9, 2021. Hendricks was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Hendricks entered DOC custody on May 21, 2008, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of November 25, 2027. Hendricks was 86 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,600 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Texelle Hendricks

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 17 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/09/21 9:19 AM

June 9, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 17 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Approve letter of support for CDC Environmental Health grant; approve COVID immunization funding; discuss public health modernization; recruit CLHO representative for upcoming Rules Advisory Committee; hear updates on TPEP funding awards and Ballot Measure 108 funding; hear update on HIV 5-year plan.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, June 17, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Join at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607711675?pwd=S2pzRlErUUE0SjNyenhDTTlCcm1rQT09

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Top Money Tips for Recent Grads
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 06/09/21 9:09 AM

                                        Do these things to avoid debt and be financially well.

SeaTac, Washington (June 8, 2021) — Congratulations to all the awesome students who’ve just graduated from high school or college. Whew! You’ve made it through 12 or more years of school, mastering music and acing Algebra II. But as you toss your cap into the bright blue sky, remember what you learned in financial education classes offered by Washington credit unions. Now it’s time to apply those lessons and set yourself up for financial success.

Media: DOWNLOAD infographics showing top money tips for recent high school and college grads




Attached Media Files: Infographic: Top Money Tips for New College Grads , Infographic: Top Money Tips for New High School Grads , Full news release

Death Row gifting club scam prevalent in Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/09/21 9:07 AM

Salem, Ore. – The pyramid scheme has a new look and the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is warning consumers to steer clear. Gifting clubs, such as Death Row, are illegal pyramid schemes that are scamming several Oregonians. 

The Death Row gifting club, not associated with Death Row Records, was operating in Oregon last year. It advertised on social media and in online forums as a community wealth share group. More than 20 Oregonians lost their initial $1,400 investments.  

The Death Row gifting scheme promised financial returns of at least $9,000. The division was alerted to the scheme when an Oregonian reported not receiving anything in return for their $1,400 investment. The investment was not registered with the division and no one was licensed to sell investments in Death Row. Victims invested their money using a cloud-based payment platform and communicated with others about the investment during online forums for the Death Row program.

The division is still investigating the Death Row gift club. Anyone who has information about the scheme or was a victim of it are asked to contact the Division of Financial Regulation Advocacy team at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). 

“If someone invites you to join a gifting club, just say no to their high-pressure tactics and stories of high earnings,” said TK Keen, Division of Financial Regulation administrator. “The simple reality is that only a few people profit from these schemes at the expense of everyone else who ultimately lose their investments.”  

Gifting club schemes are similar to pyramid schemes because no new money is created. Members of the scheme encourage friends, family, and co-workers to give gifts of cash to higher ranking members. The only way for a person to recover the initial investment is to bring new members into the scheme.

The division has three tips to spot an illegal gifting scheme:

  • Promises of cash, gifts, or electronic payments via mail, email, or social media
  • The primary focus is to recruit new investors – no goods or services are being sold
  • No written agreements and the promoters boast about high earnings of a few people

Oregonians are encouraged to contact the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocacy team if they spot a gifting scheme or believe they are a victim of one. Advocates can be reached at 888-877-4894 (toll-free), email .financialserviceshelp@oregon.gov">dfr.financialserviceshelp@oregon.gov, or by visiting dfr.oregon.gov.  

Do not become a victim of an illegal gifting scheme. Be skeptical about investment opportunities, avoid giving your personal information to strangers, and remember – if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

For more information about investments and protecting yourself from investment fraud, visit the division’s avoid investment fraud page. 

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.  

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx


Top Money Tips for Recent Grads
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 06/09/21 9:04 AM

                                           Do these things to avoid debt and be financially well.

Tigard, Oregon (June 8, 2021) — Congratulations to all the awesome students who’ve just graduated from high school or college. Whew! You’ve made it through 12 or more years of school, mastering music and acing Algebra II. But as you toss your cap into the bright blue sky, remember what you learned in financial education classes offered by Oregon credit unions. Now it’s time to apply those lessons and set yourself up for financial success.

Media: DOWNLOAD infographics with top money tips for high school and college grads!




Attached Media Files: Infographic: Top Money Tips for New High School Grads , Infographic: Top Money Tips for New College Grads , Full news release

Tue. 06/08/21
State Land Board Approves Land Exchange to Expand Deschutes County Fairgrounds
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 06/08/21 4:13 PM

Land Board also approves easement for the replacement of Van Buren Bridge in Corvallis and other land transactions

SALEM, OR – The State Land Board today approved a land exchange between the state and Deschutes County. The transaction will allow the county to expand its Redmond fair and expo center, as well as its ability to provide emergency services.

The exchange traded 140 acres of the state’s South Redmond Tract for 137.27 acres of industrial land in Redmond, properties of equal value.

Deschutes County Commissioner Phil Chang told the Land Board the fairgrounds have been crucial for recent emergency response. More than 100,000 people have received COVID-19 vaccines on-site. Circuit court proceedings have been held at the fairgrounds to accommodate social distancing needs. The fairgrounds also provided refuge for hundreds during the 2020 fire season. Chang anticipates it will shelter future Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake evacuees.

“This land exchange will expand these possibilities—it will expand what our fairgrounds can do for our community,” Chang said.

The transaction is part of a collaborative effort between the Department of State Lands, Deschutes County, the City of Redmond and other partners to plan for the use of the South Redmond Tract, a 940-acre parcel of state-owned land southeast of Redmond. Planning has resulted in the creation of new large-lot industrial land that will enhance economic development, as well as the sale of land to the Oregon Military Department for a new readiness center. This, along with the fairgrounds expansion will support emergency services in Central Oregon.

Other Approved Items

The Land Board also approved a permanent easement for a bridge at the crossing of Oregon Route 34 over the Willamette River in Corvallis that would replace the Van Buren Bridge. The Oregon Department of Transportation applied for the easement to create a new two-lane eastbound bridge with a multi-use path. The new bridge will be built slightly north of the current structure.

Additional approved transactions included the sale of 15.23 surface acres at North Tongue Point in Astoria to Bergerson Construction, Inc. for the appraised value of $188,000, as well as an exchange of rangelands in Harney County. The state traded surface rights to approximately 164 acres for 160 acres of similarly valued privately owned rangelands. The exchange will allow for more cohesive management of the property for DSL and the private owner.

Update to the Territorial Sea Plan’s Rocky Habitat Management Strategy

DSL also presented on efforts to update the Territorial Sea Plan’s Rocky Habitat Management Strategy. The strategy supports coordinated protection and management of Oregon’s unique coastal rocky habitats by identifying sites that may be designated for marine research, education, or conservation. Efforts to date have included engagement with the public to determine priorities for rocky habitat site designations and resource protection, an update to coastwide policies that protect resources, like kelp and eelgrass, and a review of proposed sites. The Oregon Policy Advisory Council has recommended the adoption of two new designated rocky habitat sites, Coquille Point Marine Garden, near Bandon, and Cape Blanco Marine Research Area, located near Port Orford. Rulemaking by DSL and other state agencies will be needed to implement these new designations.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

###

http://www.oregon.gov/dsl


Oregon reports 307 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 3:36 PM
2021-06/3687/145705/metric.jpg
2021-06/3687/145705/metric.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3687/145705/thumb_metric.jpg

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 307 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,700, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 307 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 203,671.

Updates to County Risk Levels

Governor Kate Brown today announced updates to county risk levels under the state's public health framework to reduce transmission and protect Oregonians from COVID-19. Lane, Coos, and Wasco counties will move down to Lower Risk, and Josephine and Yamhill counties will move down to Moderate Risk, effective Wednesday, June 9.

Harney County will move up from Lower Risk to Moderate Risk due to rising case counts, effective Friday, June 11. A complete list of counties and their associated risk levels is available here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,285 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,688 doses were administered on June 7 and 10,597 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 7.

The 7-day running average is now 14,560 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,305,442 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,645,747 first and second doses of Moderna and 151,144 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,951,646 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,292,591 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 106,455. 

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,856,645 doses of Pfizer, 2,170,640 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations and visitations

Hospitals across the state have received questions from the public about the need to continue to manage and limit visitation policies for patients. Unlike other public settings, hospitals are subject to special visitation requirements. The COVID-19 policies for hospitals and medical centers are based on federal rule and state law. Visitation guidance can be found here.

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 172, which is 34 fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,446, which is an 18.9% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 228.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (5), Clackamas (35), Clatsop (6), Columbia (6), Coos (4), Crook (4), Curry (1), Deschutes (8), Douglas (21), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Jefferson (3), Josephine (7), Klamath (3), Lane (27), Linn (12), Malheur (3), Marion (35), Multnomah (31), Polk (4), Umatilla (14), Union (3), Wasco (1), Washington (45), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 2,695th death is a 71-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on May 18 and died on June 6 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,696th death is a 57-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on May 19 and died on May 31 at Legacy Silverton Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,697th death is a 93-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on May 28 and died on June 4 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,698th death is a 100-year-old man from Union County who tested positive on May 10 and died on June 4 at Grande Ronde Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,699th death is a 75-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on June 2 and died on June 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,700th death is a 70-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on May 18 and died on May 27 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon updates vaccine waste disclosure1,2,3

Oregon Health Authority recognizes that as we create more opportunities to vaccinate more people, we also increase the likelihood of leaving unused doses in a vial.

While OHA and the state’s vaccine providers continue to follow best practices to use every dose possible, we do not want that to be at the expense of missing an opportunity to vaccinate every eligible person when they are ready to get vaccinated.

Our vaccine waste table has been moved to the tableau dashboard. You can find that link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Wasted Spoiled Expired

Grand Total

Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

 

2,682

2,682

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

13,304

13,304

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

4,372

4,372

Grand Total

0

20,358

20,358

1Updated: 06/08/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/3687/145705/metric.jpg , How can counties move to lower risk?

Baker City Man Pleads Guilty in COVID-Relief Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/08/21 3:12 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Baker City, Oregon man pleaded guilty today for fraudulently converting loans intended to help small business during the COVID-19 pandemic to his personal use.

Jeremy Clawson, 32, pleaded guilty to one count of theft of public money.

Clawson took advantage of economic relief programs administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), as authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020, was designed to provide emergency financial assistance to millions of Americans and small businesses suffering the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to court documents, on August 11, 2020, the proceeds of an SBA EIDL totaling $145,200 were deposited into an Umpqua Bank account owned by Jeremy Clawson and his girlfriend. Shortly after receiving the deposit, Clawson began making multiple large cash withdrawals at the drive-through window of an Umpqua Bank in Baker City. On August 17, 2020, Clawson withdrew $49,905 in the form of a cashier’s check to purchase a 2016 Dodge Challenger. Umpqua Bank investigators detected the unusual activity and reported it to the SBA.

SBA loan documents showed that the loan was made for the benefit of Halperin Manufacturing Company in San Diego, California. Though there is no record of any such company, the loan application listed the company’s owner and claimed it employed 350 people. Investigators contacted the person listed as the owner, but that person denied owning or being affiliated with any such company. The purported owner further stated that the company’s supposed address in San Diego was that individual’s personal residence and not a commercial property with 350 employees.

In early September 2020, investigators learned that, in late August, Clawson had been arrested by the Baker City Police Department for driving under the influence, reckless driving, driving with a suspended license, and attempting to allude police. Clawson was driving the 2016 Dodge Challenger at the time of his arrest. Clawson later told authorities that he had received a large inheritance from his father, including $30,000 in cash he had on his person during a subsequent arrest.

On September 11, 2020, investigators interviewed Clawson at the Baker County Jail where he was incarcerated on an unrelated charge. Clawson claimed to have received the $145,200 from a woman with whom he had an online dating relationship. He further claimed that he didn’t know what to do with the money and, after he stopped communicating with the woman, began spending the money himself. Clawson admitted to using the SBA money to purchase the Dodge Challenger and several other vehicles.

On December 21, 2020, Clawson was charged by criminal complaint with theft of government property. Later, on February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a single-count indictment charging Clawson with theft of public money.

Federal agents seized the Dodge Challenger and approximately $50,000 in cash derived from the fraudulent EIDL pursuant to seizure warrants issued by the federal court and voluntary abandonment of funds in third parties’ possession.

Theft of public money is punishable by up to 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release. With Clawson’s continued acceptance of responsibility, the U.S. Attorney’s Office will recommend a 24-month prison sentence followed by three years’ supervised release. Clawson will be sentenced on September 13, 2021.

As part of the plea agreement, Clawson has agreed to pay $125,200 in restitution to the U.S. Treasury.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the SBA and U.S. Secret Service. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Anyone with information about fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or via the NCDF Web Complaint Form at: www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Wapato Graduates Receive First Ever State Seal of Biliteracy
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 06/08/21 2:23 PM

Good afternoon,

Please see the attached release for details regarding four Wapato High School Seniors being the first ever in the state to receive a Seal of Biliteracy for Native, Tribal or Indigenous lanaguge.

Thank you.

 




Attached Media Files: Wapato Graduates Seal of Biliteracy

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 15 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 2:20 PM

June 8, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 15 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss Equity as the Foundation of a Strategic Data Plan; article on White Supremacy and the Core Functions of Public Health; Public Health Modernization presentation; PHAB Health Equity Review Policy and Procedures.

When: Tuesday, June 15, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 969 8167 3410; passcode: XNz1kX; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/96981673410?pwd=ZGVudHUwU01iVytlQVNvVTB6anUrZz09

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-255-6370

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-255-6370 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Aug. 25
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 1:08 PM

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Aug. 25

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Agenda: TBD

When: Aug. 25, 1-4 p.m. There will be a public comment period, time permitting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


David Harrelson appointed to Oregon Arts Commission
Oregon Arts Commission - 06/08/21 10:35 AM
David Harrelson
David Harrelson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1418/145691/thumb_David_H_Headshot_2020.jpg

Salem, Oregon – David Harrelson, the Cultural Resources Department manager for The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and a Grand Ronde tribal member, has been appointed to the Oregon Arts Commission by Governor Kate Brown.

Harrelson has championed the use of his people’s ancestral art forms for the purpose of public art. His support for this work has resulted in five public art installations in the last four years throughout Northwestern Oregon. He has worked in the field of cultural resources for 10 years and before that worked as a wildland firefighter.

“We are thrilled to have David join the Arts Commission at this important time,” said Commission Chair Anne Taylor. “As we pursue ensuring greater equity and inclusion in all we do, his experience and expertise in tribal artistic practices will enhance our conversations.”

Besides supporting art in an administrative capacity, Harrelson currently approaches art as a hobby, believing that the process of creating art should be a part of everyone’s life. The primary areas of inspiration for his art include his indigenous heritage and the landscape of western Oregon.

“It is an honor to join the Oregon Arts Commission,” said Harrelson. “I look forward to lifting up indigenous artists and art forms while ensuring broad reach and accessibility of the arts statewide. No matter where you live,” he added, “you are on indigenous land. Seek out and know your area’s indigenous people and their art.”

Harrelson is active in his community and currently sits on the State Advisory Committee for Historic Preservation, is a former board member of the Chehalem Cultural Center in Newberg and was an editorial board member for Smoke Signals, a free and independent newspaper covering the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. He has a bachelor’s in history from Lewis and Clark College; some of his research interests include ethnobotany, contact era Pacific Northwest history and Western Oregon indigenous art.

His four-year term begins immediately.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: David Harrelson

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets July 28
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 10:21 AM

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets July 28

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Agenda: TBD

When: July 28, 1-4 p.m. There will be a public comment period, time permitting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Walla Walla Public Schools names 2021 Graduates of Distinction
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/08/21 9:40 AM
2021-06/1288/145685/Mike_Monahan.jpg
2021-06/1288/145685/Mike_Monahan.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1288/145685/thumb_Mike_Monahan.jpg

WALLA WALLA - Following a one-year hiatus in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Walla Walla Public Schools resumed its prestigious Graduates of Distinction program with an in-person ceremony at the Marcus Whitman Hotel Monday, June 7.

This year's honorees are:

- Elizabeth “Libby” Frazier, Class of 1973 (A retail business real estate expert who dedicates her time to serving the community)
Inspirational Staff Member: Linda Thorne, Libby’s high school sociology teacher, is her inspirational staff member.  Libby says “She was a great role model for me in the 70’s - a professional woman juggling a job and family, and excelling at everything.”

- Judith Ann Huntington, Class of 1964 (A healthcare leader who empowers nurses to better serve their communities)  
Inspirational Staff Member: Johnny Dennis, Judy’s physics and geometry teacher at Wa-Hi, is her most inspirational staff member. She remembers that “he taught his students important critical thinking and study skills that are invaluable to this day.”

- Garth Lindsey, Class of 1962 (A certified public accountant specializing in television industry financial operations)
Inspirational Staff Member: Garth chose George White, his music/choir teacher at Wa-Hi, as his most inspirational staff member. Garth says he so appreciated Mr. White’s “dedication to teaching music and his interest in his students. He instilled in me a love of music.”

- Mike Monahan; Class of 1960 (National irrigation sales leader who champions health and fitness in the community)  
Inspirational Staff Member: Wa-Hi’s famous football coach, Felix Fletcher, was Mike’s most inspirational staff member.   He says he remembers him with fondness as both coach and mentor.

- Allison Bingham, PhD; Class of 1977 (A global leader focusing on improving health to move humanity forward)
Inspirational Staff Member: Allison chose Diane Briggs, her junior high volleyball and basketball coach, as her inspirational staff member.  She has stayed in contact with her for 45 years as a friend and mentor and says Diane’s dedication and support has never wavered.

- Kathy Covey; Class of 1973 (A pioneer in social services programs who broke down barriers for women in the community)
Inspirational Staff Member: Kathy’s inspirational staff member is Tom Barbour, her high school psychology teacher who inspired her to go into the field of social work. She said, “It was as much about how and what he taught as it was about how he taught and dealt with challenging students.  He was an incredible teacher and human being,”

This is the highest honor bestowed by the school district. These individuals have distinguished themselves in their communities and careers, and they continue to bring honor to the district.

"This is the 23rd year of our Graduates of Distinction Program, established to recognize and honor the distinguished achievements of our high school graduates," said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. "In addition, we take time to pay tribute to school staff members who provided positive school experiences, and were inspirational in the lives of these graduates. Congratulations to the 2021 Graduates of Distinction."

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Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1288/145685/Mike_Monahan.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145685/Garth_Lindsey.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145685/Judy_Huntington.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145685/Libby_Frazier.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145685/Kathy_Covey.jpg , 2021-06/1288/145685/Allison_Bingham.JPG

Oregon State Fire Marshal announces 2021 Sparky Award Recipients
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/08/21 9:38 AM
Kris Babbs
Kris Babbs
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SALEM, Ore. – The Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is excited to announce the 2021 Gold and Silver Sparky Award recipients. Every year the OSFM awards the Golden Sparky award to a fire service member and the Silver Sparky award to a public member for the contributions to fire prevention and fire safety.

This year's Golden Sparky was awarded to Firefighter John Rossi, a Public Information Officer with Mt. Angel Fire. Rossi's public information and education work has elevated the community and the region's fire prevention and preparedness efforts.

"He spends countless hours installing smoke alarms for those that need it the most," Oregon Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "John's commitment to his community and service to others shines through in his work through his tireless dedication to community prevention efforts. 

Rossi has created a social media following that has allowed for great reach in the community to educate on various topics, including smoke alarms, defensible space, and burn bans.

This year, Kris Babbs, the president of Keep Oregon Green, was awarded the Silver Sparky. Keep Oregon Green is a non-profit that focuses on fire prevention across the state of Oregon. Babbs puts in countless hours and possesses a remarkable dedication to prevent fires across the state. In addition, Babbs leadership has elevated relationships among state and federal agencies. Her projects have brought OSFM and the fire service into the conversation and leveraged our programs and footprint in Oregon to further prevention and life safety.

"Oregon has never needed such an important leader in this space now and into our future," Ruiz-Temple said. "I want to thank Kris for being a friend to OSFM, the fire service, and for being a strong partner."

ABOUT THE SPARKY AWARDS

The Sparky Award is the highest award presented by the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal and been awarded to a member of the fire service and a member of the public every year since 1977. The award honors the efforts in fire prevention and fire safety education in the state of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: Kris Babbs , John Rossi

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission meets June 22-23 via conference call
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/08/21 9:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon — The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene June 22-23 via conference call.

On June 22, commissioners will attend a virtual work training session from 1-2:45 p.m.

On June 23, commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:30 a.m. to discuss real estate, legal issues, and the agency director’s performance evaluation. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. and will be open to the public.

Anyone may listen to the business meeting; instructions on how to attend will be posted on the commission web page prior to the meeting. The agenda also includes a time for public comment. Registration is required to speak at the meeting, and is available online at bit.ly/registerjunecommission. Time per speaker is limited to three minutes. Please submit written public comments by 5 p.m. June 18 to is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov.

The full agenda and supporting documents are posted on the commission web page. Notable requests:

Anyone needing special accommodations to join the meeting should contact Denise Warburton, commission assistant, at least three days in advance: denise.warburton@oregon.gov or 503-986-0719. People who plan to present oral testimony are asked to email a copy of their statement to Warburton in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Scams Targeting Doctors (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/08/21 9:00 AM
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against drug scams targeting doctors. 

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center is seeinge more and more reports of a scam that is targeting both active and retired doctors. The victim receives a call or message from someone claiming to be a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent. 

The alleged DEA agent claims that someone is using the doctor’s DEA number to illegally prescribe tens of thousands of units of opioids. The scammer tells the doctor that he or she needs to change her Social Security number and/or is subject to arrest for the illegal activity. 

If you get one of these government impersonation scam calls, here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Never respond to unsolicited or unknown calls or messages. 

  • If someone asks you for your Social Security number or other personal financial or health information, hang up. 

  • If you receive an email or text message asking you to click on a link – don’t do it. The fraudster is likely trying to get you to download malware onto your device. 

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Doctor Scams - AUDIO - June 8, 2021 , TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021

Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 06/08/21 7:36 AM

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at approximately 2:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near mile post 25.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Dodge Caravan, operated by Ronald Johnson (73) of Cave Junction, was southbound when it hit the back of a Nissan Frontier, operated by Brandi Millen (39) of Kerby, which was stopped to turn left into a private driveway.  

Johnson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased while being transported by ambulance. 

Millen was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries. 

OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire District and ODOT. 


Oregon Values and Beliefs Center Findings: Tourism in Your Community
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 06/08/21 5:30 AM

Oregonians talk about what they think of tourism and how it impacts their communities in both positive and negative ways.

COMMUNITY PLANNING, ECONOMY AND JOBS, ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, HOUSING, NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

 

From May 4th through 10th, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ values and beliefs, including their thoughts about tourism and its impact on Oregon communities. This online survey consisted of 918 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Responses were analyzed and categorized to allow for a better understanding of trends in Oregonians’ values and beliefs. The survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.9% to ±3.2% depending on how the response category percentages split for any given question. Findings will include a citation of the relevant question, which can be referenced in the annotated questionnaire and tabs at the bottom of the page.

Tourism’s Contributions: Positive and Negative

  • When asked how much tourism contributes to a randomized list of potential outcomes, Oregonians are most likely to believe it contributes a lot or somewhat to “a strong economy” (68%) and “traffic congestion” (63%). This makes up the top tier of outcomes, followed by “well-paying jobs” (50%) and “funding for public services” (50%) in tier two. No other outcome reached 50% (Q36-42).  
  • Oregonians ages 18-29 are less likely to think tourism contributes to a strong economy than their older counterparts (56% vs. 69-74%). This dynamic was flipped for the belief that tourism contributes to traffic congestion, with those ages 18-29 more likely than older Oregonians to believe it does (70% vs. 57-63%). Men and women tend to be in strong agreement on these outcomes (Q36-42).

 

Thoughts About Tourism

  • Oregonians were asked, in an open-ended format, what comes to mind when they think of tourism in general. Responses varied, with many participants viewing tourism as a mixed bag, but some common themes emerged, including these positive associations: benefits for the local economy, the draw of Oregon’s outdoors, seeing new places and having new experiences, and a return to normalcy post-pandemic. There are also some negative associations: increased traffic, crowds, risk of wildfires, and trash/litter. Below are some representative quotes (Q35).

“A pro and a con together. It gives our state income for small businesses, but it is annoying to deal with the added crowds during the summer.”
– Female, age 45-64, Native American or American Indian, Lincoln County

“An opportunity for people to explore and experience new things while adding to the local economy.”
 – Male, age 30-44, Marion County, white

“I think tourism has positives and negatives to it. I think a positive side of it is helping local businesses stay open. A negative side would be sometimes tourist do not respect our land here or may be unaware of certain precautions in areas.”
 – Female, age 30-44, Marion County, white

“I think tourism can help drive an economy if it is managed well. I am proud of my state and I want others to experience its beauty too. We have many things to see here, and I want a diversity of people visiting and living here.”
  – Non-binary or gender non-conforming, age 45-64, Washington County, white

Tourism in Oregon This Year

  • A plurality of Oregonians (41%) believes more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations resulting in more people visiting their community, compared to 27% who disagree and 32% who are unsure. The high unsure rate is likely due to the pandemic and a lack of clarity about what COVID-19 restrictions and health risks will look like in the coming months. Demographic differences are modest on this question (Q43).
  • Oregonians who responded that they believe more Oregonians will visit their community in the coming year are overwhelmingly positive about the prospect, with 76% saying they feel very or somewhat positive about it. Only two in ten (19%) feel very/somewhat negative about more Oregonians visiting their community. As before, demographic differences are minimal on this question. For example, men and women hold nearly identically positive views overall (76% vs. 75%), though men are slightly more likely to feel “very positive” (41% vs. 33%) (Q44).

Why Oregonians Feel Positively or Negatively About Tourism in Their Communities

  • Respondents who say they feel either positive or negative about having more Oregonians visit their community were asked, in an open-ended format, why they feel that way. Reasons that resonated earlier in the survey were also top-of-mind here. For example, positive impressions center on benefits for the local economy, the benefits of travel in general, and pride and respect Oregonians hold for the state’s scenic beauty. Negative responses dealt with concerns over traffic and crowding, trash and littering, the risks of COVID spread, and other public safety concerns. Below are some representative quotes (Q45-46).

Positive Opinions

“We need a boost in the economy, especially if we want to bring the country back to” where it needs to be.

– Male, age 30-44, Lane County, Hispanic or Latinx
 

“It is a beautiful place, why not share it, plus they bring in much needed money.”
– Female, age 65+, Jackson County, white

“I think travel in general is good. We shouldn’t limit who is allowed to visit and see what Oregon has to offer.”
– Female, age 18-29, Lane County, Middle Eastern or North African

“People from Oregon will respect it more.”
 – Male, age 45-64, Benton County, white

Negative Opinions

“Because they cause problems when they come to my small town, leaving their garbage all over the beach, and don't appreciate the town or it's people. They think because they come from another town they can take advantage of us, which they do, even though they are spending money. They don't care how dirty they leave the town.”
 – Female, age 65+, Tillamook County, Native American or American Indian
 

“Because they are bringing sickness and are not wearing masks or taking precautions.”

 – Female, age 45-64, Clatsop County, white
 

“Tourists bring too much traffic and then they return and buy property creating more problems.”

 – Male, age 65+, Deschutes County, white


“It's already too many. Gridlocked roads. Public indecency. Drinking and drugs. No respect for private property. Overwhelming emergency resources.”

 – Female, age 65+, Tillamook County, other ethnicity

Demographic Trends
Identifying What Unites Us and Understanding What Divides Us

  • Oregonians of color and white Oregonians disagree on several questions about tourism in their community. For example, whites are more likely than Oregonians of color to believe that tourism contributes to a strong economy for their community (70% vs. 55%). Conversely, Oregonians of color are more likely than whites to believe that tourism contributes to a lack of affordable housing (53% vs. 43%) and homelessness (41% vs. 29%) in their community (Q37-38, Q40).
  • However, there are areas of agreement. Oregonians of color and white Oregonians agree that more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations at nearly equal rates (45% and 42%, respectively), however, whites tend to feel more positive about this outcome than Oregonians of color (77% vs. 66%) (Q43-44).
  • Demographic differences are also evident when comparing the opinions of urban and rural Oregonians. High percentages of urban (75%) and rural (67%) Oregonians believe that tourism contributes to a strong economy in their community, with a slightly higher rate for urbanites. This is also the case for the belief that tourism contributes to a lack of affordable housing (53% vs. 43%), which is perhaps unsurprising given rapidly increasing housing prices in Portland and other metro areas. Urban residents are also more likely than their rural counterparts to believe that tourism contributes to well-paying jobs in their community (58% vs. 46%) and that having more Oregonians visit their community is a positive thing (84% vs. 70%) (Q37-39, Q44).
  • Similar to demographic trends among Oregonians of color and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians are roughly equal in their agreement that more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations (47% and 43%, respectively) (Q43)

This research was completed as a community service by the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center, an independent and non-partisan organization. OVBC is an Oregon charitable nonprofit corporation (www.oregonvbc.org).

For more information, please see the OVBC May 2021 Survey Annotated Questionnaire and Crosstabs.




Attached Media Files: OVBC Full May Crosstabs , OVBC Full May Annotated Questionnaire

Mon. 06/07/21
Oregon reports 125 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 5:29 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 125 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,694, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.  

Oregon Health Authority reported 125 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,374.  

Vaccinations in Oregon 

Today, OHA reported that 14,268 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,301 doses were administered on June 6 and 3,967 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 6. Note: Today’s totals include data from June 5 and 6 which was not reported due to maintenance of the ALERT Immunization Information System.(IIS) 

The seven-day running average is now 14,545 doses per day. 

Oregon has now administered 2,293,598 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,641,377 first and second doses of Moderna and 150,091 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.  

As of today, 1,939,623 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,286,813 who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 106,671. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT IIS. 

To date,?2,852,235 doses of Pfizer, 2,168,120 doses of Moderna and?299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

These data are preliminary and subject to change 

OHA's?dashboards?provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations 

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 206, which is eight more than yesterday.?There are 50 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday. 

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,512, which is a 16.9% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 238. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. 

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA issues revised quarantine guidance 

New guidance released by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) allows Local Public Health Authorities to consider a shortened quarantine period for a person with COVID-19.  

OHA is now recommending a 10-day quarantine or a seven-day quarantine with a negative COVID-19 test as acceptable alternatives. The shortened quarantine option is not recommended in high-risk settings such as long-term care facilities and other residential care settings. 

However, in all cases, a 14-day quarantine is the safest option to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others. Revised guidance for this new recommendation is being finalized. 

People who have been fully vaccinated are not required to quarantine even after exposure to a person with COVID-19. A person is considered fully vaccinated if it has been two weeks or longer since they received the final dose of their vaccine series. People who are fully vaccinated are still encouraged to isolate and seek testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19. 

Cases and deaths 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (1), Clackamas (19), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Crook (1), Deschutes (8), Douglas (5), Grant (1), Harney (2), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (4), Lane (14), Linn (6), Morrow (2), Multnomah (37), Polk (2), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (2), Yamhill (10).  

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations?? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information. 

# # # 


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets June 14
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 5:25 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets June 14

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its biannual meeting; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Presentations on modification request; overview of program evaluation; program updates.

When: June 14, 9-11:30 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Remote meeting via Zoom.

Meeting ID: 160 7480 0622

Link:  https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16074800622

Call in option: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 160 7480 0622

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Terrence Woods, State CIO, Named StateScoop GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year
State of Oregon - 06/07/21 3:45 PM

Salem, OR – On Wednesday it was announced that Terrence Woods, State Chief Information Officer and Administrator of Enterprise Information Services was named StateSoop GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year.

The annual StateScoop 50 Awards honor the best and the brightest across the United States who make state government more efficient and effective. The GoldenGov awards those who are leading state government into a new technology landscape with innovative ideas and inspiring others to get on board. Woods was chosen from thousands of individuals and projects nominated for the awards and now joins an esteemed group of individuals who work to improve and innovate in information technology.

“It comes as no surprise that Terrence would be honored with this award,” said Katy Coba, State COO. “His work for the state is incomparable and we are incredibly lucky to benefit from his skillset and drive to improve information technology in the state of Oregon.”

Woods was appointed as State CIO and Administrator of Enterprise Information Services in 2018 and brings more than 20 years of leadership and knowledge to the role. Since his appointment, Woods has established a diverse Executive Team and built the strategic foundations and enterprise capabilities for delivering on the EIS vision — “Ensuring user-friendly, reliable and secure state technology systems that serve Oregonians.” His accomplishments include publication of the EIS 2020-2023 Strategic Framework, Cloud Forward: A Framework for Embracing the Cloud in Oregon, Oregon’s Data Strategy 2021-2023, the EIS Modernization Playbook, and the continuing deployment of Microsoft 365 to all Executive Branch agencies.

Governor Kate Brown shared, “Over the last three years, Terrence has been working to advance the use of digital technology inside state agencies, while remaining focused on building relationships and strengthening our IT teams. Under his leadership, we are making progress on our goals to streamline state government and modernize our systems to better serve Oregonians. It’s an honor that our State CIO was chosen for this award.”  

The complete list of award recipients can be viewed on the StateScoop website where they will also feature interviews with award winners in the coming days.

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Oregon OSHA cites 4 employers in May for COVID-19 violations, including willful failures to protect workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/07/21 1:51 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1073/145665/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA issued citations with penalties totaling $44,600 to four employers in May, with all of the cases involving willful violations of rules designed to protect workers from potential exposure to the coronavirus disease.

The citations were issued to two restaurants, a bakery, and a wood products company in Deschutes, Wasco, Linn, and Multnomah counties, respectively. Penalties ranged from $8,900 to $17,800. Violations included willfully failing to ensure workers and customers wore face coverings indoors, and willfully allowing indoor dining despite operating in a county that was designated as an “extreme risk” for transmission of COVID-19.

The following employers were cited:

  • Obstructed View Incorporated (Cork Cellars Wine and Bistro) – Sisters – willfully chose to allow indoor dining despite a public health order limiting capacity to zero in Deschutes County.
    • Total penalty: $17,800 (citation has been appealed)
  • Loretta Birky (Country Bakery) – Halsey – willfully did not ensure face coverings were worn inside the establishment (penalty: $8,900). Also committed a serious violation by not posting the required “COVID-19 Hazards Poster” for workers to see.
    • Total penalty: $9,000 (citation has not been appealed but order is not final)
  • Last Stop LLC – The Dalles – willfully chose to allow indoor dining despite a public health order limiting capacity to zero in Wasco County.
    • Total penalty: $8,900 (citation has been appealed)
  • Creative Woodworking Northwest Inc. – Portland – willfully did not ensure face coverings were worn inside the establishment.
    • Total penalty: $8,900 (citation has been appealed)

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

For an overview of the COVID-19-related citations the division has issued since the beginning of the pandemic, visit: Oregon OSHA Citations Identified as Related to COVID-19 .       

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers free resources that involve no fault, no citations, and no penalties. They include consultation services that provide assistance with safety and health programs, and technical experts who help employers understand requirements.

More workplace guidance and resources regarding COVID-19 are available.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Covid citations list , Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Missing child alert -- ShaNai K. Daniels is missing and believed to be in danger
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/07/21 1:44 PM
ShaNai K. Daniels
ShaNai K. Daniels
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/973/145663/thumb_ShaNai_K_Daniels_2.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find ShaNai K. Daniels, age 16, a child in foster care who went missing from Clackamas on June 4, 2021. She is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find her and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her.

ShaNai is suspected to be attempting to fly to Newark, New Jersey, out of Portland International Airport. She may also be in Salem.

Name: ShaNai K. Daniels
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Dec. 27, 2004
Height: 5-foot-2
Weight: 133 pounds
Eye color: Brown
Hair: Black
Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Case #21-11593
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1422478

Anyone who suspects they have information about ShaNai’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

###




Attached Media Files: ShaNai K. Daniels , ShaNai K. Daniels

Independent arborist reviews state hazard tree removal program; finds sound operation underway, provides helpful context for future work
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/07/21 1:00 PM

In response to calls for an investigation and as part of the unprecedented effort to remove fire-damaged trees after more than a million acres burned in the 2020 wildfires, an independent arborist reviewed the intricate process underway for evaluating fire-damaged trees for safety purposes. His review finds that the certified arborists and professional foresters performing the work are qualified and the evaluation criteria and marking process are sound.

SALEM, Ore. – A Pacific Northwest arborist with more than 30 years of experience submitted his findings to the state following a thorough review of the hazard tree removal effort underway to support Oregon’s rebuilding and recovery process.

In response to public concerns and calls for an independent investigation into the work underway, Galen Wright, president of Washington Forestry Consultants, Inc., evaluated the state hazard tree removal program and its workers and drafted a report sharing these findings.

Wright’s review found that the certified arborists and professional foresters working in the field generally meet or exceed the experience and qualifications required to evaluate fire-damaged trees. The report also found that the FEMA-required criteria being used is sound for making these determinations and is being applied appropriately in the field.

“It is our finding that ODOT and the Debris Management Task Force have the necessary operational plan, protocols, contracts and requirements necessary to conduct and provide quality assurance for this hazard tree mitigation program for the 2020 Oregon wildfires. No changes are recommended to the current protocols,” said Wright in the report.

In response to public requests for urgency and a timely review process, Wright spent weeks assessing on-the-ground samples of work in the field; reviewing resumes, certifications and other qualification materials of the crews in the field; and diving into emergency response requirements currently guiding the operation.

Wright’s report gives the operation an A grade and finds 96% agreement with the total fire-damaged trees being marked, noting that more than 99% of the trees marked for removal are dead, dying, or pose a safety threat if left standing. In addition to a very small percentage of some smaller trees set back from the highway that could be potentially unmarked moving forward, Wright’s review also found that there were other stands of unmarked fire-damaged trees that should be marked for future cutting.

“We are honored to be asked to perform this important work helping Oregon families and communities recover and ultimately rebuild,” said Mac Lynde, deputy administrator for delivery and operations at ODOT and the head of the three-agency Debris Management Task Force. “We acknowledge that this is a complex and unprecedented effort with many different opinions and approaches, and we stood ready to implement any potential recommendations resulting from this report. Mr. Wright’s objective and independent findings provide a concrete direction that benefits all Oregonians and reinforces the adaptive nature of this emergency response operation. We appreciate Mr. Wright’s conclusions.”

Wright also found that the arborists and foresters under contract possess the experience and qualifications necessary to perform this work effectively. Of the more than 1,200 contracted crew members and more than 40 arborists and foresters in the field, only one arborist was identified as not fully meeting qualifications for the position due to their entry-level status, although they were a certified arborist. This staffer is not responsible for final decisions and is supervised by more senior colleagues as part of a multi-step review system where their work is routinely monitored before any cutting occurs.

The report provides a helpful snapshot of the scope and scale of trees being cut or removed in these corridors. While the state-led hazard tree operation comprises less than 1% of the total 1-million-acre fire burn area, it was found that more than half (58.3%) of the fire-damaged trees in this area are being left for conservation and monitoring purposes, per the criteria used to evaluate these fire-damaged trees.

“With our initial charge to move quickly, and knowing this work is unprecedented for Oregon, Mr. Wright’s review helps underline the good work underway while providing a roadmap for adapting other areas moving forward. While we work to ensure no more lives are lost at the hands of the 2020 wildfires, we will continue to incorporate feedback from a range of partners to make sure this work is done right and look forward to future planning conversations if this operation becomes an unfortunate new reality for Oregon,” said Lynde.

Lynde said that applying Wright’s input is a critical step toward introducing Oregon to the complex recovery task underway. In addition to Wright’s recommendations, staff and crews will continue ongoing internal program appraisals and hazard tree criteria iterations as necessary and will work with the Secretary of State’s office as part of an annual audit plan.

Additional checks-and-balances are also in place to ensure fire-damaged tree evaluations and markings are thorough and accurate. Arborists and foresters overseeing tree marking are paid hourly rather than by the tree to create a clear separation of duties and eliminate conflicts of interest. Tree cutters are liable for a $2,000 fine for each unmarked tree that is cut. ODOT incident commanders, environmental monitors, a monitoring firm acting as operation inspectors, a disaster consulting firm with expertise in FEMA reimbursement procedures, and the Army Corps of Engineers all monitor field operations daily as well.

“Our objective remains to remove only dead or dying fire-damaged trees posing a threat to human life and safety and for those trying to rebuild,” said Lynde. “We accept and welcome all feedback to help inform these efforts and will continue to investigate and take swift and corrective action in response to any reports of mismanagement for the duration of this work.”

The 2020 September wildfires go down in history as one of Oregon’s most devastating disasters, burning more than 1 million acres, destroying thousands of homes, and claiming the lives of nine Oregonians. Afterward, communities were confronted by devastation and loss, with swaths of dead burned trees blocking roads, toppling over highways and interfering with cleanup efforts. For Oregon to receive federal reimbursement as part of an emergency response operation, the Wildfire Economic Recovery Council charged ODOT and the Task Force to immediately start work removing debris from nearly 3,000 damaged home sites and the thousands of hazardous dead or dying trees surrounding these areas.

To accomplish this unprecedented effort, teams of certified arborists, professional foresters, field technicians and environmental consultants worked together with state and federal land managers and environmental regulators to draft an Environmental Protection Plan and criteria for how to evaluate each tree to determine threat levels.

While state-led work is happening only along state highways and near fire-impacted home sites, state crews and independent contractors are not the only ones performing recovery work. Many local groups and landowners, governments and utility companies are also working simultaneously in these areas. Currently, more than half (83,000) of the total estimated 140,000 fire-damaged trees have been assessed and marked, and more than a quarter (40,700) have been cut or removed.

“We recognize and mourn the lasting imprint these fires have left on Oregon as we all work together to recover and rebuild,” said Lynde. “We encourage anyone with a question or concern about any aspect of this work to call our hotline at 503-934-1700 so that we can help coordinate and find solutions together.”

READ THE INDEPENDENT FINDINGS REPORT HERE.

Watch:

For more information:

# # #

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: Independent Arborist Reviews State Hazard Tree Removal Release

Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (c) #0375, #0117, #0565, #40193, and #40194 waiver amendments
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/07/21 12:50 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: Media contact: Angela Yeager, 503-507-3479; angela.yeager@dhsoha.state.or.us

Technical contact: Joli Schroader, 503-507-2083, .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (c) #0375, #0117, #0565, #40193, and #40194 waiver amendments.

(Salem, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services is seeking public comment regarding the 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments.

The 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments are requesting to:

  • Update references from DHS to ODHS and adding Oregon to Department of Human Services throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language regarding the OHA review of ODDS quality assurance reports.
  • Update language regarding risks to be consistent throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language in performance measures.
  • Update references to the Continuous Improvement Committee to reflect current practice.
  • When an emergency has been determined by ODDS, allow face-to-face requirements for service planning meetings to be waived and signatures of service plans to be verbally or by email.

In addition to the above changes, the #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver also propose to:

  • Remove relative as an option for providing Employment Path to be consistent with current practice. No relatives are currently providing Employment Path services through these waivers.

The proposed 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments are online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Compass-Project-Waivers-Rules-Policy.aspx

Print versions of the waivers are posted in local Community Developmental Disabilities Programs (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/county-programs.aspx) and Support Services Brokerages (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Support-Services-Brokerages.aspx). Print versions may also be obtained from Joli Schroader, Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 503-507-2083, .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Interested parties are asked to submit comments via one of two methods: Send an email to odds.info@state.or.us or send written comments addressed to ODDS Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE E-09, Salem, OR 97301.

Deadline for comments is July 7, 2021. Mail responses must be received by this date in order to be considered.


OHA announces new section and manager for psilocybin programs
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 12:18 PM

June 7, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA announces new section and manager for psilocybin programs

Angie Allbee, former OHA policy advisor, to lead Psilocybin Services Section

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division has a new section to oversee the state’s new psilocybin services program, and a new manager to lead it.

Angie Allbee, who has served as senior policy advisor for OHA Government Relations, based in the External Relations Division, since 2018, has been named manager for the Psilocybin Services Section. The section, created to develop and administer psilocybin services programs as directed with the passage of Measure 109 last November, will be part of the Center for Health Protection, which houses programs that oversee health care facilities and licensing, and environmental health and regulation.

“We’re all very familiar with Angie’s hard work and commitment to public health from her current and soon-to-be-past role as the Public Health Division’s legislative senior policy advisor,” said Andre Ourso, J.D., administrator of the Center for Health Protection. “I’m looking forward to working with Angie in building the new section and implementing Measure 109.”

Allbee begins her work as section manager on June 1. She’s says she’s honored to lead the new program she hopes will bring innovative therapies to Oregonians with mental health conditions.

“I am excited to help move the agency closer to our strategic plan goal of eliminating health inequities while creating safe, effective and accessible psilocybin services in Oregon,” she said.

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board will make recommendations to OHA and the Psilocybin Services Section on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions. The board also will make recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

Allbee has worked on shaping legislative policy for almost a decade. In addition to serving as senior policy adviser for OHA Government Relations for three legislative sessions, she has served in policy roles with the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Oregon Criminal Justice Commission, Oregon House Majority Office and Oregon Legislative Assembly.

Prior to her policy work in Oregon, Allbee spent nearly a decade in the non-profit sector engaging with a diverse range of clients, including older adults, individuals experiencing disabilities, refugees, asylees, veterans and survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault—work she says “taught me that healing is an essential part of experiencing a healthy, joyful life.”

“Psilocybin therapy offers another option for healing that has been used for centuries by indigenous and tribal communities, and has generated a growing body of research over many decades,” she added. “I am honored to be part of this very important work and to ensure safe, effective and equitable access to psilocybin therapy in Oregon.”

Allbee has recently served on the Board of Advisors for the Voxapod Menstrual Equity Project and worked with community members in rural St. Thomas, Jamaica, to secure infrastructure for the Access to Safe Drinking Water Project. She received her Executive Master of Public Administration degree from the Hatfield School of Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs at Portland State University.

###


Fireworks Show to conclude Wa-Hi Commencement Ceremony
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/07/21 11:30 AM

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla High School is concluding Friday’s Commencement program at the Walla Walla County Fairgrounds with a fireworks show. The fireworks show is expected to begin at approximately 9 p.m. and continue for about 20 minutes. 

Walla Walla High School Commencement & Fireworks Show
•    Friday, June 11
•    7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
•    Fireworks show at conclusion of the ceremony – approximately 9 p.m.
•    Walla Walla County Fairgrounds Grandstands
•    Families/Students – Communicate with school officials regarding tickets to the ceremony
•    Use Tietan St. entrance and parking lot
•    LIVE STREAM LINK - http://bdnw.live/wahi
•    Principal Ron Higgins – rhiggins@wwps.org

###


California Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Distribution of Methamphetamine
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/07/21 10:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Coachella, California man was sentenced to federal prison today for transporting five pounds of methamphetamine from Coachella to Aumsville, Oregon.

Gerardo Figueroa-Felix, 36, was sentenced to 70 months in prison followed by four years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on January 7, 2019, Marion County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a call that squatters had returned to a foreclosed property in Aumsville and that there was methamphetamine inside the house. Deputies had locked the property four days prior in response to a court order. Two deputies approached the house together and spotted a white Chevrolet pickup truck with a California license plate backed into the driveway. As they approached, the deputies saw Figueroa-Felix tying up a tarp near the back of the vehicle.

One of the deputies approached Figueroa-Felix and asked why he was on the property. Figueroa-Felix produced three identification cards with his name and photograph on them. The deputy watched as Figueroa-Felix began to reach his hands into the front pockets of his jacket and ordered him to remove them. The deputy then proceeded to search Figueroa-Felix’s person and located a loaded semi-automatic Ruger 9mm handgun in his left-front pants pocket. The deputy discovered a second loaded handgun tucked into Figueroa-Felix’s waistband. Figueroa-Felix also had a double magazine pouch attached to his belt.

The investigation revealed Figueroa-Felix was a drug mule from Coachella and was paid to transport five pounds of crystal methamphetamine from Southern California to Oregon. He previously sold two pounds of methamphetamine on the Aumsville property and returned that day to sell more. Deputies seized three pounds of methamphetamine and large quantities of live .45 caliber ammunition from his truck along with another handgun.

On March 20, 2019, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a three-count indictment charging Figueroa-Felix with possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, distribution of methamphetamine, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

On March 8, 2021, Figueroa-Felix pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of methamphetamine.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Salem Police Department, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). It was prosecuted by Hannah Horsley and Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Wapato Graduating Seniors Parade
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 06/07/21 10:11 AM

Good Monday morning,

Please see the attached release with details about a highly visual and inspirational event taking place tomorrow (June 8th). 

If you have any interest in attending to cover this even please contact me.

Thank you.




Attached Media Files: Wapato Graduates Parade

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 16 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 9:51 AM

June 7, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 16 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Finalize subcommittee charter; discuss survey modernization and its relation to the subcommittee’s work; discuss timeline for discussions and deliverables; discuss measure selection criteria.

When: Wednesday, June 16, 8-9:30 a.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon OSHA will repeal parts of COVID-19 workplace rule in line with governor's announced vaccination target
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/07/21 8:52 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1073/145642/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

(Salem) – As Oregon Gov. Kate Brown  announced last week, once Oregon reaches the 70 percent vaccination threshold the state will not require masks and face coverings in almost all settings, with some exceptions following federal guidance, including airports, public transit, and health care settings. The governor has also asked Oregon OSHA to review its workplace rules and update them based on this decision.

Consistent with the governor’s decision, Oregon OSHA intends to repeal the basic face covering and physical distancing requirements of its COVID-19 rule when the state reaches 70 percent of its adults vaccinated against the virus with at least one dose. Oregon OSHA is also convening stakeholders to review its COVID-19 rules in light of the governor’s announcement and to determine whether other provisions should be repealed. Oregon OSHA expects to begin those discussions during the week of June 14.

Oregon OSHA extended its rule, which took effect May 4, to maintain risk-reducing safety measures for workers against the coronavirus. Although the rule includes several changes based on the public comments received since the rule was proposed in late January, the basic requirements are largely consistent with those that have been in place since Oregon OSHA adopted a temporary workplace rule in November of last year. The rule largely reflects the guidance produced by the Oregon Health Authority and enforced in the workplace by Oregon OSHA.

When it extended the rule in May, Oregon OSHA committed to an ongoing process to eventually repeal it. As part of that process, Oregon OSHA will consult with the Oregon OSHA Partnership Committee, the Oregon Health Authority, the two Infectious Disease Rulemaking Advisory Committees, and other stakeholders.

Learn more about Oregon OSHA’s workplace guidance and resources related to COVID-19: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/re/covid-19.aspx

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.  




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

142nd Wing memorializes late crew chief with unique F-15 artwork (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/07/21 4:30 AM
2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg
2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/962/145637/thumb_shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The 142nd Wing hosted family and friends of a late crew chief for an F-15 Eagle memorial artwork reveal, June 6, 2021. The artwork, which includes a name plaque and shark teeth, was put on the wing's F-15 Eagle (tail number 151) to honor Master Sgt. Marty Nance who served at the base for over 30 years and maintained that particular aircraft.

"In the beginning when I found out that his name was going on the jet, that was super special because it just said a lot for how everybody felt about him out here...this was like a second home, a second family," said Marty's sister, Lisa Veber.

Sergeant Nance passed away in 2018 while still an active member of the Oregon Air National Guard. Nance had an affection for shark teeth and fins throughout his life, which he incorporated into designs of his cars and his bobsledding team's "sharkmobile".

B-roll of the F-15 artwork and soundbites from Nance's sister and a fellow servicemember can be downloaded at https://www.dvidshub.net/video/800055/f-15-memorial-artwork-revealed-family-late-crew-chief


For more information, contact Steven Conklin, 142nd Wing Public Affairs, at steven.conklin.6@us.af.mil

-30-

About the 142nd Wing
The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,400 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $130 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg , 2021-06/962/145637/34121297_1882103088500399_7303240588587958272_n.jpg , U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Martin Nance, crew chief from the Oregon Air National Guard 142nd Fighter Wing, directs Capt. James Hastings, an F-15 pilot for the 142nd Fighter Wing, to stand by on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, on March 7, 2015. Sen , Oregon Air National Guard Master Sgt. Martin Nance (left) introduces his Superior Performer for the three-week Weapons Instructor Course (WIC) exercise, Staff Sgt. David Schenk (right) as the last day of training concludes at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., , Oregon Air National Guard Master Sgt. Martin Nance works to secure and tie down an F-15 Eagle assigned to the 142nd Fighter Wing after high wind warnings are issued at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 10, 2017. Over 120 Oregon Air Guardsmen are supportin , 2021-06/962/145637/210528-Z-SP755-1007.jpg

Sun. 06/06/21
Oregon reports 258 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/06/21 5:43 PM

June 6, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 258 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,694 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 258 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,252.

Vaccinations in Oregon

There is no update on vaccinations in Oregon today, due to maintenance of the ALERT IIS. Tomorrow’s update will include updated data from June 5 and June 6, 2021.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 198, which is two more than yesterday. There are 58 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,555, which is a 15.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 249.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and Deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Clackamas (41), Columbia (2), Coos (1), Crook (5), Deschutes (19), Douglas (11), Harney (1), Jackson (7), Jefferson (2), Josephine (1), Klamath (6), Lane (18), Linn (11), Marion (35), Multnomah (56), Polk (7), Sherman (1), Union (1), Washington (20), Yamhill (12).

Oregon’s 2692nd death is an 84-year-old woman from Jackson county who tested positive on May 28 and died on June 5 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2693rd death is a 57-year-old man from Multnomah county who tested positive on May 22 and died on June 4. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2694th death is a 22-year-old man from Washington county who tested positive on May 30 and died on May 31. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

After obtaining further information it was determined that Oregon’s 2688th death died at her residence, not at the hospital. We regret the error.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

982

15

Benton

3215

22

Clackamas

18540

227

Clatsop

1014

8

Columbia

1860

29

Coos

2148

37

Crook

1236

22

Curry

677

10

Deschutes

9769

79

Douglas

3677

78

Gilliam

71

1

Grant

538

6

Harney

401

9

Hood River

1210

32

Jackson

11332

146

Jefferson

2337

38

Josephine

3499

72

Klamath

4723

75

Lake

464

7

Lane

13662

155

Lincoln

1406

21

Linn

5437

77

Malheur

3580

63

Marion

23078

320

Morrow

1142

16

Multnomah

39822

608

Polk

3907

55

Sherman

65

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8469

86

Union

1477

23

Wallowa

192

5

Wasco

1432

28

Washington

26489

240

Wheeler

34

1

Yamhill

4707

78

Statewide

203,252

2,694

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 6/5

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

27

3

30

10.0%

Benton

145

0

145

0.0%

Clackamas

803

42

845

5.0%

Clatsop

87

2

89

2.2%

Columbia

85

5

90

5.6%

Coos

81

1

82

1.2%

Crook

86

7

93

7.5%

Curry

17

0

17

0.0%

Deschutes

301

22

323

6.8%

Douglas

104

7

111

6.3%

Gilliam

0

0

0

0.0%

Grant

2

2

4

50.0%

Harney

15

1

16

6.3%

Hood River

40

0

40

0.0%

Jackson

305

11

316

3.5%

Jefferson

42

3

45

6.7%

Josephine

106

3

109

2.8%

Klamath

89

11

100

11.0%

Lake

10

0

10

0.0%

Lane

476

21

497

4.2%

Lincoln

46

1

47

2.1%

Linn

247

16

263

6.1%

Malheur

50

1

51

2.0%

Marion

615

39

654

6.0%

Morrow

17

0

17

0.0%

Multnomah

1729

57

1786

3.2%

Polk

107

4

111

3.6%

Sherman

2

1

3

33.3%

Tillamook

32

1

33

3.0%

Umatilla

118

12

130

9.2%

Union

23

3

26

11.5%

Wallowa

5

2

7

28.6%

Wasco

38

0

38

0.0%

Washington

1346

41

1387

3.0%

Wheeler

3

0

3

0.0%

Yamhill

1084

21

1105

1.9%

Statewide

8283

340

8623

3.9%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12421

1886

14307

13.2%

Benton

151219

4883

156102

3.1%

Clackamas

483196

29113

512309

5.7%

Clatsop

36740

1750

38490

4.5%

Columbia

46160

2540

48700

5.2%

Coos

50333

2613

52946

4.9%

Crook

21142

1572

22714

6.9%

Curry

12093

576

12669

4.5%

Deschutes

208135

12095

220230

5.5%

Douglas

88610

4131

92741

4.5%

Gilliam

1323

49

1372

3.6%

Grant

6999

469

7468

6.3%

Harney

4573

446

5019

8.9%

Hood River

33954

1745

35699

4.9%

Jackson

233329

17118

250447

6.8%

Jefferson

21301

2172

23473

9.3%

Josephine

81498

4099

85597

4.8%

Klamath

54426

5400

59826

9.0%

Lake

6126

463

6589

7.0%

Lane

529964

16481

546445

3.0%

Lincoln

46040

2744

48784

5.6%

Linn

154653

9790

164443

6.0%

Malheur

27722

5247

32969

15.9%

Marion

375119

34550

409669

8.4%

Morrow

8008

1364

9372

14.6%

Multnomah

1126432

60499

1186931

5.1%

Polk

77500

5168

82668

6.3%

Sherman

1519

75

1594

4.7%

Tillamook

16322

669

16991

3.9%

Umatilla

71260

9469

80729

11.7%

Union

22978

1866

24844

7.5%

Wallowa

3459

195

3654

5.3%

Wasco

36631

1786

38417

4.6%

Washington

697991

43872

741863

5.9%

Wheeler

765

32

797

4.0%

Yamhill

161738

7726

169464

4.6%

Statewide

4911679

294653

5206332

5.7%

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Sat. 06/05/21
Roseburg Native Eric J. Riley Promoted Brigadier General
Oregon Military Department - 06/05/21 9:39 PM
2021-06/962/145626/P6050063.jpg
2021-06/962/145626/P6050063.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/962/145626/thumb_P6050063.jpg

Oregon Army National Guard Col. Eric J. Riley was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:00 p.m., during a ceremony at Heritage Park in Salem, Ore.

Riley is scheduled to become the Oregon National Guard’s Joint Deputy Operations Commander after completion of his assignment as commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team.  He led the unit during a mobilization to Kosovo in 2020 along with subordinate battalions mobilizing across the world, which became the second largest call up of Oregon troops since World War II. The prior mobilization of the 41st IBCT was in 2009-2010, commanded then by Col. Daniel R. Hokanson, now Gen. Hokanson, Chief of the National Guard Bureau.

In his new role, Brig. Gen. Riley will be assigned as the Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard, and will be responsible for assisting in formulating, developing and coordinating programs, policies and plans affecting the Oregon Army National Guard.  Col. Riley received his commission from California Polytechnic State University Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) in 1993. He holds a master’s degree in Strategic Studies from the United States Army War College.

Col. Riley serves as the Executive Director, Partnership for the Umpqua Rivers, Roseburg, Oregon, where leads a staff of six at the non-profit organization responsible for restoring salmon habitat and monitoring water quality throughout the Umpqua River Basin. In his role, Col. Riley establishes, builds and maintains relationships with state, federal and non-governmental organization stakeholder groups to accomplish the organization's mission. He reports to a board of 18 local community members representing a diverse natural resource perspective, and is responsible for managing fundraising while administering funding for the 100% grant funded organization.

 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS

P6050013

Oregon Army National Guard Col. Eric J. Riley has new Brig. Gen. rank pinned on his shoulders by his father Jack Riley, and wife Laurie Riley, during a promotion ceremony to Brig. Gen. at Heritage Park, June 5, Salem, Ore. Riley is transitioning from 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander to Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard. (Oregon National Guard Photo by Maj. Chris Clyne)

P6050063

Col. Eric J. Riley presents to an audience during his promotion ceremony at Heritage Park, June 5, Salem, Ore. Riley is transitioning from 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander to Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard as Brigadier General. (Oregon National Guard Photo by Maj. Chris Clyne)

P6050026

Oregon Army National Guard Col. Eric J. Riley was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:00 p.m., during a ceremony at Heritage Park in Salem, Ore.

Riley is scheduled to become the Oregon National Guard’s Joint Deputy Operations Commander after completion of his assignment as commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team.  He led the unit during a mobilization to Kosovo in 2020 along with subordinate battalions mobilizing across the world, which became the second largest call up of Oregon troops since World War II. The prior mobilization of the 41st IBCT was in 2009-2010, commanded then by Col. Daniel R. Hokanson, now Gen. Hokanson, Chief of the National Guard Bureau.

In his new role, Brig. Gen. Riley will be assigned as the Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard, and will be responsible for assisting in formulating, developing and coordinating programs, policies and plans affecting the Oregon Army National Guard.  Col. Riley received his commission from California Polytechnic State University Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) in 1993. He holds a master’s degree in Strategic Studies from the United States Army War College.

Col. Riley serves as the Executive Director, Partnership for the Umpqua Rivers, Roseburg, Oregon, where leads a staff of six at the non-profit organization responsible for restoring salmon habitat and monitoring water quality throughout the Umpqua River Basin. In his role, Col. Riley establishes, builds and maintains relationships with state, federal and non-governmental organization stakeholder groups to accomplish the organization's mission. He reports to a board of 18 local community members representing a diverse natural resource perspective, and is responsible for managing fundraising while administering funding for the 100% grant funded organization.

PHOTO CAPTIONS

Oregon Army National Guard Brig. Gen. Gregory Day presents a Brigadier General Officer Flag to Col. Eric J. Riley his during a promotion ceremony at Heritage Park, June 5, Salem, Ore. Riley is transitioning from 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander to Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard. (Oregon National Guard Photo by Maj. Chris Clyne)

P6050019

Col. Eric J. Riley swears the Oath of a Commissioned Officers presented by Maj. Gen. Mike Stencel, The Adjutant General Oregon Army National Guard, during a promotion ceremony to Brig. Gen. at Heritage Park, June 5, Salem, Ore. Riley is transitioning from 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander to Assistant Adjutant General, Oregon Army National Guard. (Oregon National Guard Photo by Maj. Chris Clyne)




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/962/145626/P6050063.jpg , 2021-06/962/145626/P6050026.jpg , 2021-06/962/145626/P6050019.jpg , 2021-06/962/145626/P6050013.jpg