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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Tue. Aug. 4 - 10:21 pm
Tue. 08/04/20
DPSST Releases Three-Year Review of Police Accountability - Action Taken Against 67 Police Officers
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/04/20 4:22 PM

There are two critical components of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) mission that work together to promote excellence in Oregon's public safety professions -- delivering quality training and upholding professional standards. DPSST training helps public safety providers protect their communities. Upholding professional standards ensures the integrity of Oregon's criminal justice system by ensuring that officers meet and maintain all established training, physical, emotional, intellectual and moral fitness standards for all public safety disciplines.

In addition to statutes set by the Oregon State Legislature, DPSST's overall mission is guided by the 24-member Board on Public Safety Standards and Training, and six discipline-specific, public safety policy committees. The board and committees are integrally involved in setting the agency's Oregon Administrative Rules, which legally guide the implementation of our statutory obligations; the board and committees also provide input into, and make decisions regarding training standards and certification requirements; they review individual certification cases; and, they help set the agency's high-level goals for the future. The board and committees meet quarterly.  

DPSST certifies more than 5,500 full-time law enforcement professionals in Oregon who work for city, county, state, tribal, university, railroad police agencies. 

Since August 1, 2017 (the effective date of Board’s expanded authority to review discretionary misconduct), 180 police officers or police officer applicants have had their eligibility for certifications reviewed (23 of those from the Portland Police Bureau). 

Of those 180 reviews, the Board took final action against 67 police officers. (62 revoked or denied - 8 from the Portland Police Bureau; 5 suspensions).

Of those 67 actions:

  • 4 involved female police officers;
  • 30 were for off-duty conduct;
  • 15 officers held Supervisory or above certifications
  • 51 had over 10 years experience as a police officer;
  • 19 over 25 years experience as a police officer
  • 12 involved alcohol or drug use;
  • 17 involved sexual conduct;
  • 4 involved domestic violence; and
  • 23 involved an element of dishonesty.

Oregon law enforcement officers who are decertified by DPSST are also entered into the the National Decertification Index (NDI) of the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST) which is a national registry of certificate or license revocation actions related to officer misconduct as reported by participating state government agencies. The NDI currently contains 28,555 actions reported by 45 certifying agencies as not all states issue certification to law enforcement officers and not all states have the ability to revoke or suspend police officer certifications, Oregon does both.

In accordance with HB 4207 passed during the recent special session of the Oregon Legislative Assembly, DPSST has created and published a statewide, online database of DPSST Professional Standards actions.  The database includes the names of all public safety officers who have been the subject of a DPSST certification action, their employing agency (when applicable), and a link to the DPSST investigation and Final Order once issued (which will include a description of the facts underlying the denial, suspension or revocation action) occurring on or after June 30, 2020 (The effective date of HB 4207). For broader transparency, a listing of all individuals who were the subject of a DPSST professional standards action prior to June, 2020 has also been published, along with a list of open, pending DPSST professional standards cases.  The database can be found on-line at https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/cj/pages/professionalStandards.aspx

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "There have been many questions and concerns raised about policing in our state and nation.  Many of the questions within our state have been regarding the training and accountability of Oregon law enforcement officers.  To address these questions, to share information, and to answer questions, DPSST held a number of virtual sessions specifically for local community leaders, elected officials, state legislators, and media.  One session addressed Oregon’s criminal justice professional standards system.  Another focused specifically on police use of force training in Oregon offered by DPSST.  And the last covered the basic police training program offered at DPSST to all newly hired city, county, state, tribal, and university law enforcement professionals.  Participants had the ability to ask questions of DPSST staff during each of these sessions."  Each of the sessions were recorded and have been posted for viewing on the DPSST webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/CJ/Pages/InformationalFiles.aspx  

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Public comments extended through Aug. 31 for updates to state rules for national register program
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/04/20 3:30 PM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is extending the date to accept public comments on proposed changes to rules governing how the state protects important historical places until 5 p.m. Aug. 31, 2020. The extension comes with a new opportunity on Aug. 18 for local and tribal governments to learn more about the proposed rules and comment on them.

The state is proposing updates to the Oregon Administrative Rules that govern how the state administers the federal National Register of Historic Places Program, which lists buildings, districts and other sites important to local, state or national history. The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) — an office of OPRD — administers the local program, which is run by the National Park Service.

In Oregon, 2,065 properties — including 133 historic districts located across the state’s 36 counties and representing many aspects of the state's rich history — are now listed in the National Register.

In the last several years, several high-profile, controversial nominations exposed problems with the National Register process, including determining owner consent and public involvement. Proposed changes seek to establish a fair and transparent process in alignment with federal requirements.

In addition to extending the comment period, OPRD will have an informational webinar at 10 a.m. Aug. 18 for government staff and leaders to learn more about the proposed rules and potential impact on communities, local governments and tribes. The webinar will be open to the public and end with an opportunity to provide public comment. Register to attend at oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PRP-rulemaking.aspx.

“Local governments and Native American tribes are a critical partner in the national register program,” said Ian Johnson, associate deputy state historic preservation officer.

The Oregon SHPO provides local governments participating in the federal Certified Local Government (CLG) Program grants to list properties in the federal National Register of Historic Places. Using SHPO grant funds, the City of Jacksonville listed the Britt Gardens and the City of Gresham listed the Roy E. and Hildur L. Amundesen House in the National Register. 

Local governments may comment on National Register nominations. Local governments participating in the CLG program may object to a nomination, ending the nomination process unless appealed. The revised rule includes updated procedures for hearing notifications, including specific provisions to notify CLGs, as well as a provision that allows the SHPO to coordinate outreach efforts with local governments. The revised rule also now includes provisions for comments from Oregon’s nine federally-recognized Native American tribes.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed changes through 5 p.m. Aug. 31, 2020. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

The full text of the proposed change is available online: oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PRP-rulemaking.aspx

Properties listed in the National Register are:

  • Recognized as significant to the nation, state or community;
  • Considered in the planning of federal or federally assisted projects;
  • Eligible for federal and state tax benefits;
  • Eligible for historic preservation grants when funds are available;
  • Eligible for leniency in meeting certain building code requirements.

National Register listing does not place any restrictions on a property at the federal level, unless property owners choose to participate in tax benefit or grant programs. State law requires local governments to review the demolition or relocation of all properties listed in the National Register at a public hearing, and allows local governments to add additional regulations following a formal public process. Learn more about the National Register of Historic Places program in Oregon at oregon.gov/oprd/OH/pages/national-register.aspx.


Kiona - Benton City School Board Scheduled a special meeting for 8/5/2020 at 6:30 PM via Zoom.
Kiona-Benton City Sch. Dist. - 08/04/20 3:26 PM

Kiona - Benton City School Board scheduled a special meeting for 8/5/2020 at 6:30 PM via Zoom. Please find the Zoom link at www.kibesd.org.


The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic is ON!
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 08/04/20 2:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                          

CONTACT: Doug Thompson, Executive Director

Email: DougT@OLSHF.org

NEWS RELEASE

The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic is ON!

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, Oregon school students and younger children still are faced with undiagnosed vision issues that can be best discovered through high quality school vision screenings. The Lions of Oregon are as focused as ever in their efforts to help young people read better and do better in school and they have a fun way to help support that mission this summer with The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic!

Golfers all over Oregon are invited to register the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation, play at their community course during the week of August 30th to September 5th, 2020, donate at least $100 per player to OLSHF, post their 4-Man Scramble or individual 18-hole score and receive over $350 in “tee prizes” including a logo polo shirt, Bluetooth sports ear buds, Bridgestone golf balls and more!

Using the USGA Slope rating of each participating 18-hole golf course, team and individual winners in the following categories will win more great golf prizes like drivers, high-tech golf bags and more!

  • Low Net Team and Individual
  • Most money raised – Team and Individual
  • High Net Score – Team and Individual
  • Best Team and Individual Costumes

What golf formats are recognized?

Almost all! Real USGA courses, community courses, mini-golf and even Wii Golf! Have fun and help children all over Oregon see to their potential so they can learn to their potential!

Please watch our commercial to learn more - https://youtu.be/H9nPwE7To0Q

To register, simply email dougt@olshf.org and he’ll get you started.

About OLSHF & the Lions of Oregon

We are the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation (OLSHF), serving communities statewide. We are driven by a promise made to American author and deaf blind activist Helen Keller. In 1925, at an International Lions Convention, she challenged Lions to focus on preventable sight and hearing issues as their primary mission. Since our formation in 1959, we have endeavored to uphold this promise by creating programs in response to the need for sight and hearing assistance. We have built upon the promise made to Helen Keller by creating a continuum of care for people who lack access to vision and hearing services.

In partnership with the Lions Clubs of Oregon and community organizations, we serve people through critical sight saving surgeries and treatments; manufacturing new eyeglasses; helping people who can’t afford eyeglasses and hearing aids, and creating the largest vision screening program in the US. Our statewide programs serve children to the elderly, giving them much needed access to optical and hearing services. In 2015, we launched the LEAP Optical Finishing Lab that allows OLSHF to manufacture high quality, low cost eyeglasses. Annually, over 2,000 Oregonians receive new eyeglasses built by our lab. Learn more at www.olshf.org or www.facebook.com/olshf.

MD-36 Lions: Lions of Oregon & Northern California are a part of an international network of 1.4 million men and women in 200 countries and geographic areas who work together to answer the needs that challenge communities around the world. Lions are best known for working to end preventable blindness, the giving of eyeglasses and hearing aids for the needy and local service projects. http://www.md36lionsclubs.org/

About Lions Clubs International:
Lions Clubs International is the largest service club organization in the world. Our 1.4 million members in more than 46,000 clubs provide humanitarian service in more than 200 countries and geographical areas around the globe. Since 1917, Lions clubs have aided the blind and visually impaired, championed youth initiatives and strengthened communities through hands on service and humanitarian projects. For more information about Lions Clubs International, visit www.lionsclubs.org.

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Prolific Southern Oregon Drug Trafficker Sentenced to 11 Years in Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/04/20 2:36 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—The leader of a southern Oregon drug trafficking organization responsible for distributing large quantities of methamphetamine and heroin in and around Klamath Falls, Oregon was sentenced to federal prison today, announced Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Rogelio Gomez-Arias, 24, of Klamath Falls, was sentenced to 135 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in May 2018, southern Oregon law enforcement began investigating Gomez-Arias’ trafficking organization. Investigators learned than an individual in Mexico supplied the organization with methamphetamine in exchange for cash and firearms, and instructed it to transport narcotics to other west coast cities and beyond.

In August 2019, investigators conducted three controlled buys with Gomez-Arias, purchasing a total of three pounds of methamphetamine. During these purchases, Gomez-Arias directed other members of his organization and openly explained his history of drug dealing. He explained in detail how he started selling small quantities of drugs and then moved up to ounces and, later, pounds. He bragged of making $500,000 in a single week and transporting drugs to other cities, including Seattle and New York. This information was corroborated when a co-conspirator was stopped on his way to New York with more than 700 grams of fentanyl.

On October 9, 2019, a coordinated, multi-agency law enforcement operation was conducted to dismantle Gomez-Arias’ drug trafficking organization. Four federal search warrants were executed in Klamath Falls and Dorris, California. Investigators seized more than 37 pounds of methamphetamine, 440 grams of heroin, 14 firearms, and nearly $50,000 in cash and arrested five co-conspirators, including Gomez-Arias.

On October 2, 2019, a federal grand jury in Medford returned a six-count indictment charging Gomez-Arias and three co-conspirators with conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute, and distribution of a controlled substance. A fourth co-conspirator was charged by criminal complaint.

On July 30, 2020, Gomez-Arias pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute and possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

Three of Gomez-Arias’ co-conspirators—Alexis Chavez-Franco, 23; Domingo Matias-Hernandez, 36; and Juan Rodriguez-Ramirez, 62—remain in custody pending trial. A fourth co-conspirator, Irving Beas Ceballos, 35, is on pre-trial release.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Gomez-Arias to forfeit the U.S. currency seized and the firearms used to facilitate his crimes.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the Basin Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team (BINET) and the Siskiyou Unified Major Investigation Team (SUMIT). It was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Committee for Emergency Fire Cost to Meet for Special Meeting August 6 Via Zoom
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/04/20 2:36 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Emergency Fire Cost Committee will meet virtually Thursday, August 6 at 1:00 p.m. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda.

The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Chrystal Bader at 503-945-7220.

Among agenda items are:

  • Fiscal Year 2020 close summary
  • Strategic Investment Proposals summary update
  • ODF Financial update
  • Committee Discussion
  • Administrator Report

This meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the end of the meeting as noted on the agenda.

The Emergency Fire Cost Committee oversees the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund (OFLPF), established by the Oregon Legislature as an insurance fund with the purpose of equalizing emergency fire suppression costs among the various Oregon Department of Forestry protection districts. The emergency funding system is designed to operate as an insurance policy whereby all districts contribute (pay premiums) into the fund so that money will be available to any individual district to pay fire suppression costs on emergency fires. More information can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Board/Pages/EFCC.aspx

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Rare Japanese American 16mm home movies, ca. 1925 -- 1960, now available for viewing online via Oregon Historical Society Digital Collections
Oregon Historical Society - 08/04/20 2:18 PM

“There’s no such thing as a bad home movie. These mini-underground opuses are revealing, scary, joyous, always flawed, filled with accidental art and shout out from attics and closets all over the world to be seen again.” — John Waters

Portland, OR – August 4, 2020 The Oregon Historical Society is excited to announce that fifteen reels of 16mm home movies, shot by the Tsuboi family, are now available for viewing on the Oregon Historical Society Digital Collections website.

Teruo Tsuboi ran, with his older brother, the Tsuboi Brothers store at 315 Burnside Street, Portland. The store sold Western style clothing, jewelry, and after World War II, added an optometrist exam room. The films document the day-to-day activities of a Japanese American family living in the Pacific Northwest over multiple generations and contain rare scenes of family life both before and after World War II.

Films include, in part: family visits to the Pendleton Round-Up, drives through the snow in downtown Portland, Rose Festival parades, a Japanese baseball team at Civic Stadium, family members posing near Mt. Hood, trips to and from Japan via ship, a brief glimpse of the ruins of the Minidoka incarceration camp, a trip to Los Angeles in 1931, and various Pacific Northwest vacations and scenes from family life.

The Japanese American Museum of Oregon has been instrumental in identifying and promoting these films. Director of Collections and Exhibits Lucy Capehart notes, “The Tsuboi films provide a magical window into Portland’s past. The films also show that Japanese Americans have been part of Portland’s social fabric for generations; participating in the Rose Festival parade, riding a bike down a neighborhood street, and playing baseball.” 

Teruo (1889–1965) and Suma Tsuboi (1889–1977) emigrated from Okayama, Japan, to Portland, Oregon, in the early twentieth century. They had four children (called Nisei, or the children of Japanese immigrants born in the United States): Teruhisa "Ted,” Akiko, Sachiko, and Kazuko.

When 16mm film first hit the consumer market in the late 1920s, it was available mainly to those who could afford the relatively high cost of film and camera. As 16mm became more affordable, with the added ability to shoot in color, it became the main method of documenting twentieth century family life, before being displaced by 8/S8mm, magnetic videotape, and digital video.

For more information on efforts being made to preserve the experiences of Asian Americans through home movies, please visit the Memories to Light project by the Center for Asian American Media.

The Center for Home Movies is another great resource that documents the importance of collecting and preserving home movies.

Short film segments and screen grabs for press purposes are available here: https://bit.ly/tsuboi.

For more information on this collection, please contact: Matthew Cowan, the Oregon Historical Society’s Archivist for Moving Images & Photography at matthew.cowan@ohs.org.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

About OHS Digital Collections

In 2015, the Oregon Historical Society embarked on an ambitious two-year project to build a digital infrastructure to create, collect, preserve, and facilitate online access to materials from our vast historic collections. Behind the scenes, these digital files are safeguarded using a series of digital preservation workflows, systems, and storage we call the OHS Digital Vault.

OHS Digital Collections provides online public access to a rich variety of materials from the OHS Research Library collections, including items from our manuscript, photograph, film, and oral history collections. Through OHS Digital Collections, we aim to enhance and promote the use of our materials for teaching, learning, and research. Materials can be accessed online at digitalcollections.ohs.org.


Optional office hour for Metrics and Scoring Committee August 7
Oregon Health Authority - 08/04/20 1:35 PM

August 4, 2020

Contact: Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to hold an optional office hour for committee members.

When: August 7, 9-10 a.m.

Where: The office hour for Metrics and Scoring Committee members will be by call-in and Zoom only. The public may join remotely through Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1611744937?pwd=Z2pFUFRWZi96cm1BOEc1dXFBejZ5UT09 and listen-only conference line at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 174 4937, password 330080.

Agenda: OHA staff are holding an optional office hour for Metrics and Scoring Committee members as outlined in the timeline and process for selecting 2021 incentive measure benchmarks and targets memorandum. This is to answer questions committee members may have on the materials in the benchmarking packet available on the committee’s webpage. Committee members are welcome to join at any time during the hour. Members of the public are welcome to listen. The committee will not deliberate during this time.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Large print.
  • Braille.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State of Oregon releases final rate decisions for 2021 health plans
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/04/20 1:29 PM

Salem — Small businesses and individuals who buy their own health insurance can now see the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation’s final rate decisions for 2021 health insurance plans. The division reviews and approves rates through a detailed and transparent process before they can be charged to policyholders.

The final decisions are based on the result of a rigorous review, which included public hearings and public comment. The division published preliminary decisions last month before the hearings. These hearings provided an opportunity for the public, health insurance companies, and the division to further review and analyze the preliminary decisions.

“We continue to be encouraged by the results of the Oregon Reinsurance Program,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner and Department of Consumer and Business Services director. “It has led to lower rate increases each year, more carriers expanding their coverage statewide, and more health insurance options for Oregonians.”

Open enrollment for 2021 plans is from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15, 2020.

Individual market
The division has issued final decisions for six companies in the individual market with average rate changes ranging from a 3.5 percent decrease to an 11.1 percent increase, for a weighted average of 1.8 percent. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $425 to $466 a month.

The rate changes are companywide averages based on premiums for plans before financial assistance through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is taken into account.

All Oregonians who purchase their own insurance are encouraged to apply for assistance through the Marketplace for 2021, even if they did not qualify last year. Approximately 72 percent of Oregonians who enrolled through the Marketplace for health coverage in 2020 qualified for help paying their premium. People who received help with the costs of their health insurance paid on average $138 a month.

Small group market
In the small group market, the division has issued final decisions for nine companies with average rates ranging from a 1.1 percent decrease to a 7.0 percent increase, for a weighted average of 3.7 percent. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $335 to $405 a month.

See our chart for a full list of final decisions

Facts for 2021:

  • All 36 Oregon counties will have at least two on-exchange options and at least three total options for its residents.
  • The Oregon Reinsurance Program continues to help stabilize the market – lowering rates by 6 percent for the third straight year.
  • COVID-19 was not considered as part of 2021 rates because it is too early to understand the effect of COVID-19 relief efforts.

Proposed final decisions for each carrier can be found at www.oregonhealthrates.org. Statewide premium comparison tables for ages 21, 40, and 60 will be posted online later this month.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.


Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media
Oregon Employment Department - 08/04/20 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wed., Aug. 5, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing on Wed. Aug. 5 at 1:00 p.m. PT. Gerstenfeld will provide an update on PUA claims processing, FOCUS PUA, adjudication and overall unemployment claims progress.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., Aug. 5. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week day updates. A recording of the video conference will be sent out shortly after the media briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/930/136687/8.05_Media_availability_Final.pdf

State Land Board to meet by teleconference August 11
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/04/20 11:47 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will meet by teleconference on Tuesday, August 11 at 10 a.m.

The Board will consider adopting permanent restrictions on overnight use, camping, and campfires for several Columbia River locations in the North Portland Harbor and Sandy River Delta areas. The Board will also consider approving actions needed to clarify ownership of formerly submerged and submersible Willamette River lands in Benton County.

The full meeting agenda and materials are available here.

Teleconference audio will be livestreamed to the DSL YouTube channel and public testimony will be accepted by email to support the public’s ability to attend and comment virtually. Testimony is accepted regarding consent and action agenda items and may be submitted before or during the meeting to oard.testimony@state.or.us">landboard.testimony@state.or.us. Guidelines for providing testimony are available here.

If you need assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or in.n.smith@state.or.us">arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.

About the State Land Board and the Oregon Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.


Secretary Bernhardt Designates Fee Free Day for Public Lands to Commemorate President Trump's Signing of the Great American Outdoors Act
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/04/20 11:34 AM

WASHINGTON – Today, President Donald J. Trump signed the Great American Outdoors Act into law, which will significantly help address the historically underfunded, multi-billion-dollar deferred maintenance backlog at our national parks and public lands. In celebration of this historic achievement, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced that entrance fees paid by visitors coming to lands managed by the Department will be waived on August 5, 2020. Secretary Bernhardt also announced that August 4th will be designated “Great American Outdoors Day,” a fee-free day each year moving forward to commemorate the signing of the Act.

“President Trump has just enacted the most consequential dedicated funding for national parks, wildlife refuges, public recreation facilities and American Indian school infrastructure in U.S. history,” said Secretary Bernhardt. “I’ve designated August 4th as Great American Outdoors Day and waived entrance fees to celebrate the passage of this historic conservation law.”

Entrance fees will be waived at all fee collecting public lands at the National Park Service (NPS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service). The Department holds fee-free days throughout the year to encourage visitation and appreciation for America’s public lands. On fee-free days, site-specific standard amenity and day-use fees at recreation sites and areas will be waived for the specified dates. Other fees, such as overnight camping, cabin rentals, group day use, and use of special areas, will remain in effect.

The remaining fee-free days in 2020 are:

NPS:

  • August 5: Great American Outdoors Act Commemoration
  • August 25: National Park Service Birthday
  • September 26: National Public Lands Day
  • November 11: Veterans Day

BLM:

  • August 5: Great American Outdoors Act Commemoration
  • September 26: National Public Lands Day
  • November 11: Veterans Day

FWS:

  • August 5: Great American Outdoors Act Commemoration
  • September 26: National Public Lands Day
  • October 11: First Sunday of National Wildlife Refuge Week
  • November 11: Veterans Day

Background

On March 3, President Trump called on Congress to send him a bill that fully and permanently funded the Land and Water Conservation Fund and restored our National Parks.  The President noted that it would be historic for America’s beautiful public lands when he signed such a bill into law. 

The Trump Administration worked with Congress to secure the passage of this landmark conservation legislation, which will use revenues from energy development to provide up to $1.9 billion a year for five years in the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund to provide needed maintenance for critical facilities and infrastructure in our national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, recreation areas and American Indian schools. It will also use royalties from offshore oil and natural gas to permanently fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund to the tune of $900 million a year to invest in conservation and recreation opportunities across the country.

Last year, the NPS welcomed 327 million visitors who generated an economic impact of more than $41 billion and supported more than 340,000 jobs. Increasing popularity of our public lands has resulted in our national parks needing upgrades and improvements for more than 5,500 miles of paved roads, 17,000 miles of trails and 24,000 buildings. This legislation finally provides a long-term solution to this significant issue for the benefit of the American people and the betterment of our public lands.

Approximately 67 million visitors annually come to BLM-managed lands, supporting approximately 48,000 jobs nationwide and contributing almost $7 billion to the U.S. economy. BLM-managed public lands offer a wide array of recreational opportunities, including hiking, hunting, fishing, camping, mountain biking, horseback riding, boating, rafting, off-highway vehicle driving, rock climbing and more.

The Service welcomes approximately 54 million people to refuges each year. Their spending generates $3.2 billion in sales to local economies, employing more than 41,000 people and providing $1.1 billion in employment income.

The Department continues to urge visitors to do their part when visiting their public lands and follow guidance provided by the CDC, state and local public health officials to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The proclamation can be found online.

###


DPSST Basic Parole & Probation Academy Equity Review Workgroup - MEETING CANCELED
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/04/20 9:28 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

August 4, 2020

Contact:                Chris Enquist
                                503-378-2309

Notice of Meeting Canceled

The meeting for the Parole & Probation Academy Equity Review Workgroup scheduled for August 12th, 2020 from 10:00a-2:00p has been canceled.  The meeting will be rescheduled for a later time.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against COVID-19 Contact Tracing Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 08/04/20 9:00 AM
TT - C-19 Contact Tracers - August 4, 2020 - GRAPHIC
TT - C-19 Contact Tracers - August 4, 2020 - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/3585/136677/thumb_TT_-_COVID-19_-_Contact_Tracers_-_August_4_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against COVID-19 contact tracing scams.

You have probably heard the term “contact tracing” quite a bit as of late. Contact tracing is the way in which health officials track who may be at risk of becoming infected with the coronavirus. If someone tests positive for the virus, health officials will work with the infected person to get names and phone numbers for those with whom they have had recent contact. The goal is to slow the spread of the virus by identifying those who may have been exposed. Once identified, health officials can provide these people with information on how to keep themselves and their communities safe. They can also give guidance about the possible need for quarantining and monitoring of symptoms.  

Of course, there are always bad actors out there who want to take advantage of an already difficult situation.  

In Oregon, contact tracers are usually hired by the state or a county health department — but they can also come from community-based organizations in some areas. The contact tracer will call you or send you a letter… not a text message or email. If you receive a text or email that claims to come from a contact tracer – be careful. Do not click on links as that can download malware onto your device, allowing the cybercriminal to steal your personal info. 

In some cases, the bad guys don’t even have to steal the information – they just ask for it. That’s why it is important for you to be able to recognize the difference between information requests you will get from legitimate tracers and the criminals.  

Legitimate contact tracers may ask you for your name, birth date, address, contact information, occupation, and whether you have symptoms. They may also ask demographic questions such as your race, ethnicity, language preference, and whether you have any disabilities. All of that is OK, and the information you provide will be protected as a private medical record and won’t be shared with other agencies. 

However, if you have someone asking for your Social Security number, bank account information, credit card number, or immigration status, hang up. That person is not a legitimate contact tracer. 

For more information on contact tracing in Oregon or if you have concerns about the legitimacy of someone who reaches out to you, visit www.healthoregon.org/contacttracing.  

If you have fallen victim to a COVID-19 scam or any other online fraud, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3.gov) at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

### 




Attached Media Files: TT - C-19 Contact Tracers - August 4, 2020 - AUDIO , TT - C-19 Contact Tracers - August 4, 2020 - GRAPHIC

Mon. 08/03/20
YSD School Board Approves Reopening Plan to be Submitted to OSPI for Approval by August 12
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 08/03/20 4:39 PM

RE: www.YSD7.org/reopeningplan

Monday, August 3, 2020: At today's school board meeting for the Yakima School District, the Reopening Plan that is to be submitted to OSPI for approval by August 12th was unanimously approved by the school board.  You can view content related to the plan, as well as a link to the comprehensive plan www.YSD7.org/reopeningplan 

Keep in mind that this plan is comprehensive and contains planning for four different stages (we left the school year in Stage A in June).  It is not an announcement of the stage that YSD will begin the school year.  That announcement is expected in the next day or two, depending on the guidelines from the Yakima Health District due out soon.


OHA Releases Weekly Testing Summary
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/20 3:57 PM

August 3, 2020

Today, OHA released its Weekly Testing Summary, showing 35,424 test results were reported during the week of July 26 – Aug. 1.  Of those test results 2,174 were positive, indicating a test positivity of 6.1 percent, one of the highest rates observed since the early pandemic.

The most recent weekly in-state theoretical testing capacity estimate is 48,000 tests for the week of July 22 based on supply, reagent and staff availability. This does not include capacity at out-of-state commercial laboratories.

OHA continues to receive widespread reports of extended turnaround time from commercial laboratories; in some cases, results are being reported up to two weeks following specimen collection.  


Portland Man Charged with Assaulting Deputy U.S. Marshal with Explosive Device During Courthouse Protest
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/03/20 3:15 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Isaiah Jason Maza, Jr., 18, of Portland, has been charged by criminal complaint with assaulting a federal officer with a dangerous weapon and willfully damaging government property during protests at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse on July 22, 2020.

According to court documents, in the early morning hours of July 22, 2020, a group of individuals gathered in an exterior entryway of the Hatfield Federal Courthouse. Several members of the group, including Maza, began removing plywood attached to the front of the building to protect its damaged glass façade. After the group successfully removed the plywood sheeting, Maza made multiple attempts to kick in the window, struck it with a metal object, and repeatedly pounded on it with what appeared to be a hammer.

Shortly thereafter, a number of people successfully removed the entire wooden structure protecting the courthouse entryway and an unknown individual broke one of the windows. After this breach, Maza walked toward the building carrying a cylindrical object. Maza then appeared to light a fuse connected to the object and place it inside the broken window. A short time later, the object exploded in close proximity to law enforcement officers exiting the building through the broken window. A deputy U.S. Marshal sustained injuries to both his legs as a result of the blast.

On July 31, 2020, deputy U.S. Marshals spotted Maza less than one block from the courthouse. Maza ran from the deputy marshals who pursued him several blocks by foot before catching and arresting him.

Maza made his first appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge and was ordered detained pending further court proceedings.

Assaulting a federal officer with a dangerous weapon is punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Willfully damaging government property is punishable by 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

This case is being jointly investigated by the FBI, the U.S. Marshals Service, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Criminal complaints are only accusations of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Fatal Crash on Hwy 395C - Harney County
Oregon State Police - 08/03/20 2:24 PM

On Sunday, August 2, 2020 at approximately 9:50 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 395C near Lost Creek Timber Rd. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Jon Meek (63) of Riverside, CA, was northbound when he attempted to pass a farm tractor pulling a bailer, operated by a juvenile male, that had just started a left turn.  The motorcycle struck the left front of the farm tractor.

Meek was transported by air ambulance to Saint Lukes Hospital in Idaho where he was pronounced deceased.

The juvenile was not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Harney District Ambulance, and ODOT.


Connect with Us!
Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council - 08/03/20 2:08 PM

WorkSource Columbia Basin Job Search Services Are Available Virtually and By Phone at NO COST to you

Kennewick, WA, August 3, 2020: Although the doors of WorkSource Columbia Basin are closed to the public due to COVID-19 safety precautions, Employment Specialists are ready to help you with your job search today.

Have you been laid off due to COVID-19? Are you looking for your next career opportunity? We can help you! Contact us to learn more and to make a FREE one-on-one appointment for assistance with:

  • Industry leading career assessments
  • Expert level résumé and cover letter assistance
  • Customized interview preparation
  • Individualized career counseling
  • Up to date labor market and wage information
  • & Referrals to community resources as needed
  • For those who qualify, one-on-one case management services are also available

Don’t need one-on-one assistance? Check out our online workshops and start your job search at www.WorkSourceWA.com.

All of this from the comfort of your own home and at no cost to you!

We know that COVID-19 has created some uncertainties; your next career move doesn’t have to be one of them. Don’t wait! Call us today at 509.734.5900.

Services are also available on our website at www.WorkSourceWA.com. Follow us on Facebook for the most up to date information and announcements.

WorkSource is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Washington Relay 711.

WorkSource es un empleador/programa con oportunidades equitativas.  Previa solicitud equipos auxiliares y servicios están disponibles para los individuos con discapacidades. Servicio de Retransmisión Washington: 711

 

For more information, press only:

Crystal Bright

Operations Manager

WorkSource Columbia Basin

509-734-5887

right@esd.wa.gov">cbright@esd.wa.gov




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/6679/136665/COVID_VSD_Press_Release_8.3.20..docx

Oregon reports 272 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/20 2:06 PM

August 3, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 328, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 272 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 19,366.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (2), Clackamas (21), Clatsop (2), Coos (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (2), Jackson (9), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (2), Lane (5), Lincoln (4), Linn (6), Malheur (3), Marion (27), Morrow (1), Multnomah (49), Polk (7), Sherman (1), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (64), Wasco (9), Washington (19), and Yamhill (27).

Oregon’s 327th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on July 6 and died on August 1. His place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 328th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 20 and died on July 29, at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


75th anniversary of atom bombing marked by new online map showing where Hiroshima peace trees are planted in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/03/20 1:20 PM
This ginkgo seedling grown from a tree that survived the atom bombing of Hiroshima was planted in La Grande's Riverside Park earlier this year to mark the 75th anniversaries of the atom bombing and the end of World War II.bombing
This ginkgo seedling grown from a tree that survived the atom bombing of Hiroshima was planted in La Grande's Riverside Park earlier this year to mark the 75th anniversaries of the atom bombing and the end of World War II.bombing
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1072/136662/thumb_Photo_1_-_La_Grande_peace_tree_planting.jpg

SALEM, Ore – This Thursday, Aug. 6 marks the 75th anniversary of the atom bombing of Hiroshima, followed in a few weeks by the 75th anniversary of the close of World War II. Just in time for these commemorations, the Oregon Department of Forestry has launched a new online map where people can find the location of 45 Oregon peace trees grown from the seed of Hiroshima trees that survived the atom bomb. La Grande and Elgin are two of 30 cities and towns around the state that received these peace trees.

The new site tells the story of how the trees came to be in Oregon, which now has one of the largest plantings of Hiroshima-origin peace trees outside of Japan. View the new site at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/ForestBenefits/Pages/Hiroshima-peace-trees.aspx

From Hiroshima to Oregon

Hiroshima survivor Hideko Tamura-Snider, co-founder of the Medford-based peace group One Sunny Day Initiatives, launched the effort to bring peace trees to her adopted state when she convinced Oregon Community Trees Board Member Michael Oxendine to obtain and grow seeds from her native city. Oxendine contacted Green Legacy Hiroshima, which collects the seeds from trees known to have survived the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima. After the seeds arrived in 2017, Oxendine germinated them and potted up the seedlings. With no facility to grow them on, Oxendine reached out to fellow OCT board members in late 2018 to find homes for the seedling ginkgo and Asian persimmon trees.

And OCT board member Jennifer Killian with Corvallis Parks and Recreation volunteered to care for the young trees for 18 months while OCT board member Jim Gersbach worked with Kristin Ramstad in the Oregon Department of Forestry to find permanent homes for the trees.

“We offered the trees first to Tree Cities USA and Tree Campus USA communities,” said Ramstad, who manages ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program. “We had a gratifying response from all parts of the state – the coast to eastern Oregon, and from the Columbia Gorge to near the California border. About three dozen entities, including schools and colleges, churches, cemeteries, parks and arboretums, were eager to obtain the trees and received them at no cost.”

Ramstad said the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting ban on public gatherings curtailed the many elaborate public ceremonies that were to be held by communities to mark the plantings. “Although planting ceremonies had to be canceled, dedicated staff or volunteers got the trees safely in the ground. Most communities are vowing to hold dedications after it’s safe to again hold public gatherings.”

OCT also provided funds to OSDI to make commemorative plaques for the trees, some of which may be unveiled at the future dedications.

Symbols of resilience, hope and peace

Gersbach said the project is a reminder that beyond the environmental benefits tree canopy provides in cities, trees also can bring a community together to reflect on life’s more meaningful aspects and values.

“We are again in a time of widespread loss of life and uncertainty due to the novel corona virus,” he said. “These seedlings’ parents leafed out from scorched trunks in the months following the atom bomb, giving hope to the bereaved survivors in Hiroshima. Their progeny serve as hopeful symbols in our current pandemic of the resilience of life.”

After learning how many communities embraced the Hiroshima seedlings, Tamura-Snider wrote that the numerous plantings “filled me with joy, remembering the long journey for both the tree[s] and myself. Thank you, people of Oregon, for your enduring faith in the future, in the resilience of life.”

                                                                                                # # #

 




Attached Media Files: This ginkgo seedling grown from a tree that survived the atom bombing of Hiroshima was planted in La Grande's Riverside Park earlier this year to mark the 75th anniversaries of the atom bombing and the end of World War II.bombing

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee meets August 7
Oregon Health Authority - 08/03/20 12:58 PM

August 3, 2020

Contact: Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation).

What: A public meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee.

When: August 7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or conference line. To join by Zoom go to https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1618334965?pwd=Y1FhVWsyM0NNUlJtYndxb2t3WDJQQT09, meeting ID 161 833 4965, password 178682. To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use +16692545252,,1618334965#,,,,0#,,178682#.

Agenda: Welcome. Agenda review. Public comment (9:15 a.m.). Taking Action workstream. Transparency conversation. Next steps.

Please submit public comment in writing to e.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us">HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us.

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP/Pages/Sustainable-Health-Care-Cost-Growth-Target.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Bartelmann at 971-283-8107, 711 TTY, ah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Finley School District to Start School Year 100% Remote Learning (Photo)
Finley Sch. Dist. - 08/03/20 11:15 AM
2020-08/1823/136653/Finley-reopening-banner.jpg
2020-08/1823/136653/Finley-reopening-banner.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1823/136653/thumb_Finley-reopening-banner.jpg

KENNEWICK, WA -- Following updated guidance from state and local health departments, Finley School District is presenting revised reopening plans to start the school year 100% online, beginning with the first day of school on September 1st. The revised reopening plan will be posted to the district website following the school board’s special meeting on Wednesday, August 5th at 3:00 PM (held virtually via Zoom). The district’s final reopening plan must be formally approved through an official resolution by the school board and submitted to OSPI no later than August 17.

The updated guidance Finley and other school systems received from the Benton Franklin Health District (BFHD) in their July 29 letter states that current county transmission rates are significantly above the acceptable metrics proposed by local and state health districts in order for our schools to consider reopening for in-person instruction.

Finley Superintendent Lance Hahn states, “Like other school systems in our area, Finley has been working in close collaboration with the Benton Franklin Health District throughout the spring school closures and over the summer.” He continues, “We greatly appreciate the collaboration from our local health district and the information they’ve provided us so that we can adjust our planning and focus our efforts on preparing Finley to start the school year in a new virtual model.”

To begin the year, Finley students in all grade levels (K-12) will participate in a 100% remote learning model that will include students logging into their classes and lessons from home.  Attendance and grading will be tracked and mandatory, and students will participate in their various classes based on the guidelines set by their teachers. While additional details on what to expect will be released over the next two weeks, Finley families should expect:

  • Communication from your student(s)’ school regarding class schedules, Chromebooks, updated school supply expectations, etc. within the next two weeks.
  • All students in K-12th grade will be issued a Chromebook in order to participate in remote learning. Multiple students in the same household will each have their own device.
  • Remote learning will include a combination of daily, teacher-led learning, as well as some “applied” learning that students should be able to complete independently.
  • Parents/guardians will only be relied on for the minimal expectations of ensuring their student(s) maintains a regular routine, providing adequate space to complete lessons, and maintaining Chromebooks as usual.
  • Students will follow a daily school schedule or routine, Monday-Friday, and will not be expected to learn in front of a computer screen or device for six hours per day.
  • Supports and additional services will be provided for special education students and those who require it, and the district will continue to work with the BFHD regarding considerations for exceptions to small group, in-person instruction (less than 5 persons) to support educationally at-risk students.

We know that there is no substitute for the face-to-face, in-person learning students receive in their classrooms, and our goal remains to return to school on-site as soon as it is safe to do so. We will continue in a 100% Remote Learning model through the first quarter of our school calendar at a minimum.  Beginning in mid-October, our district will work with BFHD to reassess current health conditions and community transition rates to determine whether cohorts of students (on a rotating A/B schedule) could return to school in-person starting November 2, 2020 (when 2nd Quarter begins).

Recognizing that starting the year with full remote learning is a new landscape for everyone involved, we are planning training and orientation opportunities for our community. Leading up to the start of school and during the first weeks of school, Finley School District will be providing multiple opportunities for our staff, students, and families to become better acquainted with our selected learning management systems, processes, and expectations. More information on the details of these trainings and orientation opportunities will be communicated by the district via our website, Facebook, and printed mailings to families.

We are committed to keeping our staff, families, and community members informed. Please continue to watch our website at www.finleysd.org/reopen.

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/1823/136653/Finley-reopening-banner.jpg

Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/03/20 9:11 AM
Patrick R. Johnson
Patrick R. Johnson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1070/136649/thumb_Johnson_P.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Patrick R. Johnson, died the evening of August 1, 2020. Johnson was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the medical examiner will determine cause of death.

Johnson entered DOC custody on October 31, 2017, from Marion County with an earliest release date of October 10, 2023. Johnson was 39 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 14,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

####

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Patrick R. Johnson

Sun. 08/02/20
OSP Requesting Information from Witnesses/Victims of Crashes/Reckless Driving - Coos/Douglas/Lane Counties (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/02/20 12:59 PM
2020-08/1002/136637/20200801_120804.jpg
2020-08/1002/136637/20200801_120804.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1002/136637/thumb_20200801_120804.jpg

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at approximately 10:37 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers were dispatched to a reckless driver and hit and run crash located on Hwy 101 milepost 233 just north of North Bend, OR.

The reporting person advised they were stopped at the traffic signal at East Bay Dr. and Hwy 101 when they were struck  from behind. The suspect vehicle, a green older Dodge 1500 pickup with a green canopy bearing CA license plate, then accelerated attempting to push the vehicle into the intersection.

None of the occupants were injured and the Dodge continued northbound on Hwy 101 driving recklessly.

OSP was notified by the Coos Bay Police Department they were investigating the same Dodge pickup for striking several vehicles while traveling north on Hwy 101 through the city of Coos Bay. 

OSP received a report the Dodge was observed at the trailhead to Siltcoos Lake, near the city of Florence, where the vehicle had intentionally struck several more vehicles and was again observed driving recklessly.

One occupant from a struck vehicle was injured and transported by West Lane Ambulance to Florence Hospital.

Oregon State Police Troopers responded to the area and located Kevin Simpson (47) of Eureka CA. on Hwy 101 near milepost 196. He was lodged a the Lane County Jail for failure to perform the duties of a driver (hit and run), reckless endangerment, reckless driving, and criminal mischief.     

The Dodge was located nearby and had crashed through a gate leading to private property and become stuck in the sand.  The Dodge was reported stolen out of Eureka, CA.

Oregon State Police is requesting information from witnesses to the reckless driving and crashes or victims of crashes to contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 541-269-5000 or OSP and leave information for Trooper Douglas Laird. 

Simpson stated that he believed he had struck 26 different vehicles.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/1002/136637/20200801_120804.jpg , 2020-08/1002/136637/370.jpeg

Oregon reports 285 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 08/02/20 12:00 PM

August 2, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 326, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 285 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 19,097.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (26), Clatsop (2), Deschutes (8), Douglas (4), Hood River (4), Jackson (15), Jefferson  (7), Josephine (2), Lane (7), Linn (4), Malheur (10), Marion (53), Morrow (8), Multnomah (48), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (20), Wasco (3), Washington (47), and Yamhill (9).

Oregon’s 326th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on June 29 and died on July 30, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

30

0

967

Benton

155

6

8,241

Clackamas

1,401

36

38,215

Clatsop

80

0

3,503

Columbia

78

0

4,311

Coos

84

0

3,930

Crook

43

1

1,702

Curry

14

0

1,015

Deschutes

537

8

17,807

Douglas

132

1

7,830

Gilliam

4

0

157

Grant

2

0

508

Harney

8

0

552

Hood River

169

0

3,581

Jackson

385

1

18,767

Jefferson

310

3

3,110

Josephine

105

1

6,658

Klamath

194

1

6,963

Lake

32

0

484

Lane

518

3

40,792

Lincoln

391

9

6,664

Linn

248

10

10,547

Malheur

673

10

3,139

Marion

2,667

67

29,510

Morrow

304

1

1,098

Multnomah

4,450

92

86,841

Polk

288

12

4,825

Sherman

14

0

243

Tillamook

28

0

2,007

Umatilla

1,996

24

8,897

Union

388

2

2,412

Wallowa

19

1

665

Wasco

161

3

3,268

Washington

2,830

23

55,952

Wheeler

0

0

137

Yamhill

359

11

9,262

Total

19,097

326

394,560

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Oregon State Police is Seeking the Public's Assistance Regarding the Unlawful Waste of a Mule Deer - Baker County
Oregon State Police - 08/02/20 6:59 AM

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking the public's help to identify the person(s)responsible for shooting a mule deer and leaving it to waste on private property at Smith Lake just outside of Baker City.  This likely occurred the evening of July 27 or the early morning hours of July 28, 2020.

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Sgt. Isaac Cyr through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (mobile) or at the local Baker City OSP Office at 541-403-7808.

 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 08/02/20 6:50 AM

On Saturday,  August 1, 2020, at approximately 1:22 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the intersection of Hwy 97 and O'Neil Hwy for a two-vehicle crash.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2004 Honda Odyssey, operated by Robert Gregg (53) of Madras, was entering Hwy 97 when it was struck by a southbound commercial motor vehicle operated by Alfonso Lopez (56) of Colton, CA.

Gregg and his passenger, Antonia Romero (46) of Madras, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

Lopez was not injured.

Hwy 97 was partially closed for several hours during the investigation.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Redmond Fire Department and ODOT.


Sat. 08/01/20
Oregon reports 330 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/01/20 12:00 PM

August 1, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 325, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 330 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 18,817.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (3), Clackamas (16), Clatsop (5), Columbia (5), Crook (1), Deschutes (12), Douglas (3), Jackson (18), Jefferson  (4), Josephine (5), Klamath (1), Lane (12), Linn (6), Malheur (17), Marion (40), Morrow (8), Multnomah (69), Polk (4), Sherman (4), Umatilla (33), Wasco (4), Washington (43), and Yamhill (15).

Oregon’s 323rd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 14 and died on July 31, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 324th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on July 26 and died on July 30, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 325th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 28. Her place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

30

0

950

Benton

154

6

8,215

Clackamas

1,377

36

37,968

Clatsop

78

0

3,479

Columbia

78

0

4,280

Coos

84

0

3,905

Crook

43

1

1,677

Curry

14

0

1,013

Deschutes

530

8

17,546

Douglas

128

1

7,754

Gilliam

4

0

157

Grant

2

0

504

Harney

8

0

550

Hood River

165

0

3,558

Jackson

370

1

18,583

Jefferson

303

3

3,076

Josephine

103

1

6,597

Klamath

194

1

6,897

Lake

32

0

482

Lane

511

3

40,262

Lincoln

391

9

6,657

Linn

244

10

10,493

Malheur

663

9

3,125

Marion

2,614

67

29,101

Morrow

296

1

1,078

Multnomah

4,403

92

86,036

Polk

286

12

4,771

Sherman

13

0

241

Tillamook

24

0

1,984

Umatilla

1,977

24

8,827

Union

388

2

2,407

Wallowa

19

1

664

Wasco

158

3

3,251

Washington

2,783

23

55,434

Wheeler

0

0

137

Yamhill

350

11

9,140

Total

18,817

325

390,799

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Fri. 07/31/20
OHA investigating 76 cases of Salmonella linked to red onions
Oregon Health Authority - 07/31/20 5:04 PM

July 31, 2020

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phdcommunications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA investigating 76 cases of Salmonella linked to red onions

PORTLAND, Ore. — State health officials are warning people not to eat onions from Thomson International, Inc., of Bakersfield, California, after 76 people in 13 Oregon counties fell ill with matching strains of Salmonella bacteria. Eighteen of the cases have been hospitalized, and none have died.

Epidemiologists at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division say the Oregon cases are part of an outbreak that has sickened more than 400 people in about 40 states as well as consumers in Canada. U.S. and Canadian public health officials implicated consumption of red onions; and the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) traced the onions to Thomson International, Inc. Although red onions are the likely source, Thomson will be recalling all varieties of onions that could have been cross-contaminated.

"People who believe they’ve gotten diarrhea from consuming red onions might want to contact a health care provider," said Emilio DeBess, D.V.M., an epidemiologist at the Oregon Public Health Division Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section. "However, most people with salmonellosis will recover without antibiotics."

People who have eaten red onions but not gotten sick do not need to seek or notify a health care provider.

"If you have any of these potentially contaminated onions, discard them and wash your hands afterwards," advised Dr. DeBess.

Each year, 400 to 500 cases of salmonellosis are reported in Oregon. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps one to seven days after exposure. The illness usually lasts four to seven days.

Although most people recover without treatment, some have severe infections. Infants, elderly people and those with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop severe illness. Salmonella may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other body sites and, in rare cases, can be deadly.

For information about the national Salmonella outbreak, visit https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/newport-07-20/index.html.

For information about the recall of onions, visit https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-newport-red-onions-july-2020.

For general information about Salmonella, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/.

Other resources:

https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/public-health-notices/2020/outbreak-salmonella-infections-under-investigation.html

https://www.inspection.gc.ca/food-recall-warnings-and-allergy-alerts/2020-07-31/eng/1596169910818/1596169916854


Tens of Thousands of Oregonians Awaiting Adjudication Could Receive Unemployment Benefits While They Wait
Oregon Employment Department - 07/31/20 3:30 PM

July 31, 2020 (Salem, Ore.) –The Oregon Employment Department today announced that it has found a way to pay benefits to thousands of Oregonians who are out of work due to COVID-19 while they wait for their claim, or “Benefits While You Wait.” This applies to Oregonians who are waiting for their claim to be reviewed by an adjudicator to determine whether they are eligible for regular unemployment or the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program.

“We are confident this group of Oregonians are eligible for benefits because they lost their job due to COVID-19, we just don’t know which program they are eligible for yet,” said Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld. “We have found a workaround that will allow us to pay benefits while their claims are being reviewed by an adjudicator. We are grateful we have figured out a way to do this because Oregonians have been waiting too long.”

The Employment Department is proactively notifying claimants who have been identified to fall into this group via email and robo calls. 

Strict laws governing unemployment insurance to prevent fraud and provide people due process require that each claim be reviewed. The Employment Department estimates that tens of thousands of Oregonians whose claims are in adjudication may be eligible for PUA if they are not eligible for regular unemployment. This pool of Oregonians could begin receiving “Benefits While You Wait.” We are going to contact people who may be able to receive “Benefits While You Wait” over the next several weeks.

Oregonians who may be eligible for “Benefits While You Wait”:

  1. Applied for regular unemployment benefits;
  2. Had their claim flagged for adjudication because the Employment Department has to determine if they meet the legal requirements to get regular unemployment benefits;
  3. They are out of work due to a COVID-19 qualifying reason (see full list below); AND
  4. Are likely eligible for PUA if they cannot receive regular unemployment benefits.

For now, people should continue filing their weekly claims as they have been. We will notify people who may be able to benefit from this approach.

The administrative workaround will work as follows:

  • As long as claimants qualify for PUA and file weekly regular unemployment claims, the Employment Department will pay these Oregonians their regular unemployment benefit amount until their claim is adjudicated. If, at the end of the adjudication process, it turns out that they qualified for regular unemployment benefits, nothing will change. They will keep getting regular unemployment benefits as long as they file their weekly claims and are eligible.
  • If it turns out they didn’t qualify for regular unemployment, then the Employment Department will move their claims into the PUA program. If their PUA weekly benefit amount is higher, the Employment Department will also send them the increase for all the past weeks they got the regular UI amount.
  • In the unlikely event this results in overpayment, the person would have to pay it back. 

“Benefits While You Wait” is not available to individuals having their claims reviewed because of past or current school work experience, people who need to prove they are legally authorized to work in the U.S., claimants who reported being out of their labor market at least 3.5 days during a week, and some other situations.

COVID-19 reasons you may be eligible for PUA:

  • You have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Or, you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are seeking a medical diagnosis.
  • A member of your household has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  • You are caring for a family member or a member of your household who has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  • Your child can’t go to school because their school is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency, and you need your child to be in school for you to work.
  • A person in your household for whom you have primary caregiving responsibility can’t go to a facility for care because the facility is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency, and you need them to be in facility care for you to work.
  • You can’t get to your workplace because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  • You can’t get to your workplace because a health care provider has advised you to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19.
  • You were scheduled to start a job but you can’t start it or can’t get to it as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.
  • You have become the main income earner for your household because the head of your household died as a direct result of COVID-19.
  • You had to quit your job as a direct result of COVID-19.
  • Your workplace is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

###

 

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-07/930/136607/FINAL_Benefits_While_You_Wait_press_release.pdf

Portland Man Charged in July 28, 2020 Arson at Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/31/20 3:17 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Gabriel Agard-Berryhill, 18, has been charged by criminal complaint with using fire to maliciously damage the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in downtown Portland on July 28, 2020.

“No legitimate protest message is advanced by throwing a large explosive device against a government building. Mr. Agard-Berryhill’s actions could have gravely injured law enforcement officers positioned near the courthouse, other protesters standing nearby, or himself,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “I applaud the ATF agents and U.S. Marshals Service deputies who worked quickly to identify Mr. Agard-Berryhill before he had an opportunity to hurt others.”

“The violent opportunists engaged in dangerous acts of violence, such as arson, need to realize there will be grave consequences,” said Russel Burger, U.S. Marshal for the District of Oregon. “Serious crimes of this nature go beyond mere property damage to the courthouse and endanger people’s lives.”

According to court documents, at approximately 11:50pm on July 28, 2020, security cameras at the Hatfield Federal Courthouse captured footage of a large incendiary object enter the building’s portico area and land near plywood sheeting affixed to the building’s façade. A few seconds later, the object exploded, igniting a fire near the building’s main entrance. Federal law enforcement personnel collected various items near the site of the explosion and sent them to a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) laboratory for further analysis.

ATF investigators reviewed social media posts from the night of the explosion and located videos of the incendiary object being thrown. The individual depicted throwing the object, later identified to be Agard-Berryhill, was a young, Caucasian male wearing a green colored vest, camouflage pants, and a mask. Investigators observed the person in other protest-related videos posted online wearing the same vest and attempting to hold a shield in front of a naked woman.

Investigators also found a post on Twitter depicting a product review for the vest. The review included a photo of a person wearing the vest who matched the description of the person seen throwing the explosive device. The review states “I got this [vest] for my grandson who’s a protestor [sic] downtown, he uses it every night and says its [sic] does the job.” Investigators later found the same photo on a Facebook page and, using law enforcement databases, were able to positively identify Agard-Berryhill.

Agard-Berryhill made his first appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge and was ordered released pending further court proceedings. Arson is punishable by up to 20 years in prison with a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years.

This case is being jointly investigated by ATF and the U.S. Marshals Service. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Criminal complaints are only accusations of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon State Police assisting with a shooting investigation- Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 07/31/20 2:31 PM

On July 31, 2020, Grants Department of Public Safety responded to Three Rivers Medical Center for a female that had been shot. The victim was identified as Julie Names (43) from Josephine County.  Hospital staff made every effort to revive the victim but were unsuccessful and she was pronounced deceased.

The Oregon State Police Major Crime Team was called and responded to the hospital.  The man, who drove the victim to the hospital, was detained and interviewed as a potential suspect.  The suspect, Travis Albins (41) of Josephine County, was arrested today and charged with Unlawful use of a Weapon and Manslaughter I.

 


Public charge rule blocked amid COVID-19 pandemic
Oregon Health Authority - 07/31/20 2:22 PM

July 31, 2020

Public charge rule blocked amid COVID-19 pandemic

A judge issued new injunctions this week blocking the public charge immigration rule during the COVID-19 pandemic. This will allow immigrant communities across Oregon and the rest of the country to access critical health care and public benefits during the current health crisis.

The injunction issued against the Department of Homeland Security prevents the agency from enforcing, applying, implementing, or treating as effective the "public charge" rule for any period during a declared national health emergency in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The rule had expanded the list of benefits that the federal government could consider in deciding whether a person can enter the United States or obtain lawful permanent residency.

"The public charge rule has worsened health disparities, especially for the Latino/a/x community, at a time when they are most hard hit by the lethal coronavirus," said Patrick Allen, Oregon Health Authority Director. "Here in Oregon many immigrant families decided not to access public benefits, even leaving their children without health insurance."

In January the Supreme Court issued a ruling that lifted an October 2019 decision to block the public charge rule, allowing it to go into effect. As a result, the Department of Homeland Security began enforcing the rule on February 24, just before the coronavirus outbreak became a nationwide pandemic.

# # #


Update on identification- OSP is seeking public assistance with unidentified deceased female- Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 07/31/20 2:11 PM

Thanks to the public's assistance, the deceased female has been positively identified as Annette Fagan (58) of Portland, Oregon.

No further information will be released. 

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, at approximately 1:02 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a deceased adult white female found on the beach between Devil's Punchbowl and Otter Rock.  The deceased female is believed to have washed up after an undetermined amount of time in the Pacific Ocean.  The deceased female has yet to be identified and the investigation is ongoing. 

OSP is seeking the public’s assistance with help identifying this person.  The deceased white adult female has blonde mid-length hair, blue eyes and believed to be between 40 and 50 years of age.  She was wearing black yoga-style pants with the logo “Wilson Lacrosse” on the hip, a white t-shirt with “Skyhawks Sports Academy” logo, and gray with orange sole Nike shoes.

Anyone with information on who this might be, or this case is urged to contact the Oregon State Police.  Call OSP dispatch by dialing OSP or 677 from a mobile phone or 800-442-0776 reference case #SP20213257. 

 


Oregon reports 373 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/31/20 1:55 PM

July 31, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 373 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 322, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 373 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 18,492.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (3), Clackamas (22), Crook (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (3), Gilliam (1), Hood River (3), Jackson (17), Jefferson (6), Josephine (1), Klamath (8), Lane (17), Lincoln (6), Linn (5), Malheur (12), Marion (44), Morrow (20), Multnomah (77), Polk (6), Sherman (1), Umatilla (40), Union (2), Wasco (2), Washington (45), and Yamhill (18).

Oregon’s 317th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 28, in her residence. The presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 318th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 7 and died on July 29. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 319th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 28 and died on July 29, at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 320th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 7 and died on July 29, at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, WA. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 321st COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 3 and died on July 30, at Legacy Emanuel Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 322nd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on June 23 and died on July 29. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.


OHA Issues Report on Pediatric COVID-19 Data

Today, OHA issued a special report analyzing pediatric COVID-19 cases in Oregon since the beginning of the pandemic.

Of confirmed and presumptive cases in Oregon, 1,755 – 10.3 percent – have been pediatric patients, defined as people under age 18. The report noted that while pediatric case counts have increased sharply, these patients are still far less likely than adults to develop severe COVID-19.

Only 1.5 percent pediatric patients have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illness. That is compared to 9.7 percent of adult COVID-19 patients.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Governor Kate Brown announces 2020 Governor's Arts Award recipients (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/31/20 1:21 PM
Portland Gay Men's Chorus
Portland Gay Men's Chorus
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/1418/136608/thumb_PGMC-Favorites-88-of-466.jpg

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today announced four artists and one organization as winners of the 2020 Governor's Arts Awards. The awardees are Darrell Grant, a jazz musician and educator from Portland; Roberta J. Kirk, a traditional artist and educator from Warm Springs; John Laursen, a writer, designer, editor and typographer from Portland; Toni Pimble, the founding artistic director of the Eugene Ballet; and Portland Gay Men’s Chorus in Portland.

"Not only do the arts enrich our quality of life and local economies, arts education is key in fostering a spirit of creativity and innovation in our youth," Governor Brown said. "The awards are a great way to celebrate Oregon's artistic treasures and honor the impact they have had on our state."

Oregon’s highest honor for exemplary service to the arts, the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards will be celebrated during a virtual ceremony at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 12, on the Oregon Arts Commission Facebook page. The ceremony is free and open to the public.

Award recipients were selected from a pool of 48 nominations received from across the state. The nominations were reviewed and scored by a diverse selection committee, which submitted its recommendations to Governor Brown for final award decisions.
 
“So many deserving artists and organizations were nominated,” said Arts Commission Executive Director Brian Rogers. “As a result, the review process was extremely competitive and we are extremely grateful to the members of the selection committee for their time and thoughtful consideration. Each of the award recipients has made outstanding contributions to the arts in Oregon and we are excited to honor them.”

Members of the 2020 review committee are: Chris Ayzoukian, general manager, Patricia Reser Center for the Arts, (Beaverton); Avantika Bawa, artist and educator, Arts Commissioner (Portland); Sue Dixon, general director, Portland Opera, 2017 Governor’s Arts Award recipient (Portland); David Harrelson, cultural resource department manager, Chachalu Museum and Cultural Center (Grand Ronde); Leah Horner, regional solutions director and jobs and economy policy adviser, Office of Governor Kate Brown; Anne Taylor, chair, Oregon Arts Commission, (La Grande); Shelly Toon Lindburg, artist, executive director, Columbia Gorge Arts in Education (Hood River); and Matt Stringer, executive director, Four Rivers Cultural Center, and Arts Commissioner (Ontario).

The 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards award object will be designed and produced by artist Jim Piper.
  
About the 2020 Governor’s Arts Award recipients:

Darrell Grant (Portland)

A tenured professor of Jazz Studies and Associate Director of the School of Music at PSU, as well as the founding Director of the Leroy Vinnegar Jazz Institute, Darrell Grant is a highly recognized leader in the musical life of the Pacific Northwest. Since coming to Portland in 1997, Grant has directed cultural exchange programs in Russia, composed commissioned works that fuse jazz and chamber music, and served as the vice president of the Board of Chamber Music America. Dedicated to civic engagement through artistry, he has driven pianos deep into state forests to support the environment, arranged protest anthems, shared the stage with Nobel Laureate Bishop Desmond Tutu, written an opera about gentrification, and now teaches an Artist as Citizen course at PSU.

Born in 1962, Grant grew up in Denver, Colorado, in a musical family. He began classical lessons at 7, discovered jazz in school, and played professional gigs as a teenager. At 17, he won a scholarship to the Eastman School of Music where he studied classical piano and deepened his love of jazz. He earned a masters in Jazz Studies at the University of Miami in 1986. In New York City, he broke into the jazz scene. In 1989, an album by his group Current Events, featuring funk, world beat and jazz, reached the Top 20 on Billboard’s contemporary jazz chart. Grant became one of New York’s most in-demand players. In 1992, he joined drummer Tony Williams’ quintet and soon after recorded his solo debut “Black Art.” As a bandleader and solo artist, he has toured throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe as well as in Turkey and Japan, in venues from La Villa jazz club in Paris to the Havana Jazz Festival. He has performed and recorded with Branford Marsalis, David Sanborn, Esperanza Spalding, John Clayton, Nicholas Payton, Jack Dejohnette, Terence Blanchard and Art Farmer.

Roberta J. Kirk (Warm Springs)

H’Klumaiyat Roberta Joy Kirk is a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS). Tenino, Wasq'u on her mother’s side and Diné on her father’s side, Kirk is widely known for her traditional and award-wining beadwork.

Kirk learned to bead by observing her older sister’s intricate work. “Beadwork and regalia making is very important to our people,” Kirk explains. “We always show ourselves to Creator in our finest wear, and so we make beautiful clothing for our children and families.” She makes beaded buckskin dresses, moccasins, beaded bags, beaded eagle fans, barrettes and buckskin burial outfits for men, women and children. Over the years, Kirk has volunteered to take on several apprentices to teach not just beadwork but the beliefs and ceremonies that make the beadwork meaningful. She has taught countless women how to do beadwork and dentalium work for regalia and everyday clothing and also has conducted several workshops on Plateau dress-making.

Kirk also serves as a traditional food gatherer for the Simnasho Longhouse. She has a degree in museology and three-dimensional arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico (1985) and has worked in a variety of museum positions, including at the Museum at Warm Springs and the National Museum of the American Indian. She was a board member for the Museum at Warm Springs from 2000 to 2020 and at present is a consultant for The High Desert Museum in Bend. From 2002 to 2019, Kirk was the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act coordinator for the CTWS Cultural Resources Department and the review and compliance coordinator. She has been awarded funding three times to serve as a master artist for Oregon Folklife Network’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program. In 2020 the national First People’s Fund awarded her a Community Spirit Award.

John Laursen (Portland)

John Laursen is a writer, designer, editor and typographer. For four decades he has owned and operated Press-22, a Portland studio specializing in the design and production of high-quality books and text-based public art projects. Among the institutions for which he has produced books and art catalogues are the Portland Art Museum, the Oregon Historical Society, Whitman College, Reed College, Marylhurst University, Oregon Health & Science University and the Regional Arts & Culture Council. His work in public art includes the creation of commemorative installations for the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission and serving on the design team for the Oregon Holocaust Memorial. The Special Collections archive at the University of Oregon’s Knight Library maintains a collection of works on paper from Press-22, which is updated periodically.

In 2002 Laursen, together with his close friend photographer and curator Terry Toedtemeier, formed the Northwest Photography Archive, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to publish books of artistically and historically important photographs from the region. Their first volume was “Wild Beauty: Photographs of the Columbia River Gorge, 1867–1957,” which they co-authored and Laursen designed. Their work on “Wild Beauty,” published in 2008, led to a major exhibition at the Portland Art Museum. The book was a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards in nonfiction, and was declared the best Northwest book of the year across all categories by The Oregonian. Laursen is currently working on the NWPA’s second volume, “Enduring Spirit: Photographs of Northwest Indians, 1855–1934.”

Laursen was born in Tacoma, Washington; as a child he lived in Washington, Oregon, Minnesota, Massachusetts, Arizona, and California. He came to Oregon in the 1960s to attend Reed College and since then has immersed himself in the history of the Pacific Northwest. In addition to his degree from Reed, Laursen holds a master’s degree in political science from UCLA.

Toni Pimble (Eugene)

Toni Pimble has been the Artistic Director of Eugene Ballet for more than 40 years. Born in England, Pimble studied at Elmhurst Ballet School. Her professional career began in Germany with notable choreographers Lothar Höfgen, Anthony Taylor, Nils Christie Michel Descombey and Miko Sparemblek. She co-founded the Eugene Ballet Company in 1978 with Riley Grannan. She has choreographed over 60 works for the Eugene Ballet Company, many of those productions involving collaborations with composers, literary and visual artists and local arts organizations including Eugene Concert Choir, Eugene Opera, Oregon Bach Festival, Oregon Mozart Players, The Shedd Institute for the Arts and the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance.

Her creative work has brought her a number of awards and fellowships, including two Oregon Arts Commission Artist Fellowship Awards and a National Endowment for the Arts Choreographer’s Fellowship Grant. Pimble’s work has been performed by Atlanta Ballet, New York City Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Washington Ballet, Nevada Dance Theatre, Oregon Ballet Theater, Ballet NY, Kansas City Ballet and Oklahoma City Ballet.

Portland Gay Men’s Chorus (Portland)

The fourth-oldest gay men's chorus in the country, Portland Gay Men's Chorus (PGMC) was founded in 1980 by two local musicians seeking to fill a social and artistic void in the community. PGMC is currently celebrating its 40th Anniversary Season and remains an important contributor to Portland's cultural life, recognized nationally for helping to revive men's choral singing by commissioning new works and performing music of high quality. PGMC's mission seeks to expand, redefine and perfect the choral art through eclectic performances that honor and uplift our community and affirm the worth of all people.

? ? ? ? ?

The Oregon Arts Commission’s mission is to enhance the quality of life for all Oregonians through the arts by stimulating creativity, leadership and economic vitality. The Arts Commission provides funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

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Attached Media Files: Portland Gay Men's Chorus , Toni Pimple. Jon Meyers photo. , John Laursen. Aaron Johanson photo. , Roberta Kirk , Darrell Grant. Thomas Teal photo.

Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - August 7, 2020
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/31/20 1:00 PM

July 31, 2020

 

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, August 7, 2020.  The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis.

 

Call-In: 1-253-215-8782 or Toll Free: 1-888-788-0099

Meeting ID: 955 2359 5676 Password: 402403

 

AGENDA:
9:00  Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 
9:05  Public Comment 
9:15  Meeting Minutes for Review –July 10, 2020
9:20  Report for the Director

10:00  Homeownership Division Updates

- Manufactured Home Replacement Program

10:30  Affordable Rental Housing Division Updates 

- Multifamily Housing Transactions

- NOFA Awards
- Permanent Supportive Housing, Year-Two Resouces

-  Affordable Rental Housing, COVID Response Funds

11:30  Housing Stabilization Division

- CSBG State Plan

- LIHEAP State Plan

- HIMIS Budget Note/ HB 5512 Update

12:15  Deputy Director’s Office Report

- HB2003: Methodology Review and Discussion

12:45  Report of the Chair
1:00    Meeting Adjourned




Attached Media Files: August Agenda

Federal agencies release final Columbia River System Operations environmental impact statement
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/31/20 9:38 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.–The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration today released the Columbia River System Operations Final Environmental Impact Statement. The issuance of the final EIS is a substantial step toward accomplishment of a priority item of the Presidential Memorandum on Promoting the Reliable Supply and Delivery of Water in the West issued in October 2018.

This final EIS documents the detailed analyses of environmental, social and economic benefits and consequences to affected resources of the alternatives considered for improved integrated operations.

The Preferred Alternative documented in the final EIS includes implementation of innovative dam operations that balance fish benefits and energy goals by spilling more water in the spring for juvenile fish passage.

If the Preferred Alternative is selected, measures it contains are anticipated to result in benefits to juvenile and adult Endangered Species Act–listed anadromous and resident fish and Pacific lamprey, while providing reliable flood risk management and flexibility for variability in climate conditions, water supply for irrigation, municipal and industry use, water, and flexibility in hydropower generation, minimizing adverse effects to the human and natural environment.

The final EIS includes the co-lead agencies’ analysis of effects of operation, maintenance and configuration of the Columbia River System, and responds to substantive comments on the draft EIS, which was released in February 2020. In all, the co-agencies hosted 6 virtual public meetings and received almost 59,000 comment letters on the draft EIS.

"The overwhelming response of Northwest tribes, the general public and other stakeholders helped us successfully complete the EIS," said Brig. Gen. D. Peter Helmlinger, Northwestern Division commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. "The analysis in the final EIS will support the Record of Decision we will release in September."

The final EIS carries forward the Preferred Alternative identified in the draft EIS with an additional measure added as a result of ESA consultations. Public, agency and tribal comments helped identify areas that needed clarity or correction. New discussions in the document reflect these inputs and public comments and the results of independent external peer review.

The co-lead agencies plan to release a joint Record of Decision in September 2020 documenting which alternative evaluated in the final EIS will be selected for implementation.

"Throughout the development of the EIS, we have listened carefully to the diverse interests across the Pacific Northwest and worked to strengthen regional cooperation, partnerships and understanding of our shared interests," said BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer. "We are committed to working with our many regional partners and customers to achieve the important goals of long-term salmon recovery and economic vitality for communities throughout the Columbia River Basin."

The final EIS is the result of more than three years of regional collaboration among the co-lead agencies and more than 30 Tribes, state, federal and county agencies in the National Environmental Policy Act process.

"Collaboration has been the cornerstone of this process. This document evaluates the necessary balance between responsible environmental stewardship and the multiple uses of the Columbia River System," said Reclamation Regional Director Lorri Gray.

This NEPA process responds to a U.S. District Court of Oregon Court Opinion and Order regarding the need to review and update management of the Columbia River System and evaluate impacts to resources in the context of new information and changed conditions in the Columbia River Basin since the last comprehensive update to the operating strategy for the Columbia River System was issued in 1995.

The document also includes, as appendices, recently completed biological opinions evaluating impacts from the Preferred Alternative on 13 species of salmon and steelhead along with other ESA–listed species under the jurisdiction of the National Marine Fisheries Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The biological opinions document ESA consultation on the continued operation and maintenance of the Columbia River System, and conclude that the Preferred Alternative is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of the species or destroy or adversely modify their designated critical habitat.

Background

Congress authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation to construct, operate and maintain the 14 federal dams as one interconnected system to meet multiple specified purposes, including flood risk management, navigation, hydropower generation, irrigation, fish and wildlife conservation, recreation and municipal and industrial water supply. The Bonneville Power Administration is authorized to market and transmit the power generated by coordinated system operations.

Built and put into service between 1938 and 1976, the Columbia River System provides valuable social and economic benefits to the region.


Fatal crash hwy 194- Polk County
Oregon State Police - 07/31/20 7:19 AM

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, at approximately 11:13 P.M., Oregon State Police responded to a death investigation on Hwy 194 near milepost 1 (Smith Rd) in Polk County. Preliminary investigation revealed a white Chevrolet Silverado, operated by David Joshua Gomez (34) of Independence, OR, was traveling southbound when for unknown reasons his vehicle left the roadway and collided with a tree down an embankment. The driver suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The Mr. Gomez was reported missing when he did not show up for work on July 30.  His family searched for him and reported him missing around 8:00 P.M. After an extensive search Officers with Independence Police Department found the vehicle two-hours later with the driver inside. No foul play is suspected. The Investigation is ongoing.

The Polk County Sherriff’s Office, Independence Police Department, Polk County Fire, and ODOT responded to assist. The highway was closed for approximately 6 hours.

 


Fatal crash hwy 101- Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 07/31/20 7:09 AM

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, at approximately 9:30 P.M., Oregon State Police responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian on Hwy 101 milepost 17.  Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet coupe, driven by Aaron Harris (29) Cannon Beach, OR, was traveling northbound when he saw a pedestrian but was unable to avoid them as they crossed into his path of travel.

The pedestrian, identified as Rachel Faith McCune (35) Seaside, Oregon, suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  Hwy 101 was closed to one lane of travel for 3 hours.  


Thu. 07/30/20
Missing child alert -- Missing infant and mother are believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/30/20 6:32 PM
Aaron Elkins
Aaron Elkins
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/973/136586/thumb_Aaron_Elkins.jpg

(Salem, Ore.) – Isaiah Moore, an infant born on July 25, 2020, went missing with his mother April Moore and her partner Aaron Elkin from Oregon City after his birth. The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) believes that Isaiah and his mother are at risk and is searching for them to assess their safety.

Oregon DHS asks the public to help in the effort to find them and to contact 911 or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233) if they believe they see them. They are believed to be in the Multnomah or Clackamas County areas, they may also be traveling in other areas of Oregon or out of state.

Name: Isaiah Moore
Date of birth: July 25, 2020
Height: Unknown
Weight: Unknown
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1397430

Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Isaiah Moore or his mother April Moore should call 911 or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

###




Attached Media Files: Aaron Elkins , April Moore , Isaiah Moore

Pavement Preservation Project Begins in South Richland (Photo)
City of Richland - 07/30/20 5:15 PM
2020-07/5957/136584/ppp_program_S_Richland_.png
2020-07/5957/136584/ppp_program_S_Richland_.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/5957/136584/thumb_ppp_program_S_Richland_.png

The City of Richland Richland’s Pavement Preservation Program begins in south Richland next week. The microsurfacing project will require brief, single-lane closures on parts of Leslie Road, Keene Road, and Gage Boulevard.

Starting Sunday, August 2, crews will work through the night, from 7:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m., to remove striping and to prepare the roadway for microsurfacing. The following streets will experience lane reductions during the preparation

•           Leslie Road, from Gage Boulevard, south to Meadow Hills Drive.

•           Keene Road, from Englewood Drive to Gage Boulevard.

•           Gage Boulevard, from Keene to west of Steptoe.

In addition, the intersection of Gage Boulevard and Keene Road will be refigured and restriped to include a bicycle lane. Motorists are encouraged to use extra caution and be aware of this new configuration.

Travel lanes will be reduced again during the surface treatment application including brief (10-15 minute) partial intersection closures.

At all times, please use caution, allow extra time for travel, and obey traffic signs and flaggers. If possible, use an alternative route during the week of the microsurfacing.

Microsurfacing is a mixture of fine aggregate, emulsified asphalt, and chemical additives. This preventative maintenance extends the life of existing asphalt while sealing it from the harmful effects of water penetration and the sun.

For more information, please see www.ci.richland.wa.us/smootherstreets.




Attached Media Files: 2020-07/5957/136584/ppp_program_S_Richland_.png

South Fork Forest Camp walk away back in custody
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/30/20 3:11 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody who walked away from South Fork Forest Camp (SFFC) is back in custody. Brandon Sykes walked away from a work crew near the summit of Highway 6 in Tillamook Monday, June 22, 2020.

Sykes surrendered himself to the Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday, July 30, 2020, at approximately 1:00 p.m.

####


Oregon reports 416 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/20 12:59 PM

July 30, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 416 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 5 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 316, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 416 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 18,131.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (7), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (4), Crook (2), Deschutes (15), Douglas (2), Hood River (5), Jackson (10), Jefferson (12), Klamath (1), Lake (1), Lane (10), Lincoln (2), Linn (4), Malheur (18), Marion (38), Morrow (9), Multnomah (61), Polk (7), Umatilla (101), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (63), and Yamhill (11).

Oregon’s 312th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 28, at Good Samaritan Health Care Center in Yakima, WA. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 313th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 27, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 314th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 28, at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, WA. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 315th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 18 and died on July 26, at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 316th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 4 and died on July 23, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Umatilla’s case counts appear to be very high due to a delay in processing their electronic laboratory reports (ELRs).

Errata: The OHA weekly report initially and incorrectly reported an increase in cases for the week of Monday, July 20 through Sunday, July 26 over the previous week. Cases actually declined to 2,241 from 2,409, a drop of about 7 percent.


OHA media availability

OHA Director Patrick Allen and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, the state’s medical director will hold their weekly media availability today at 2 p.m. Media are welcome to call in at 844-867-6163. Access code 593699.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Fatal crash on Hwy 224- Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/30/20 12:33 PM
PGE
PGE
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/1002/136571/thumb_20200728_073658.jpg

On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, at 7:19 A.M.,  Oregon State Police and Clackamas Fire responded to the report of a multiple vehicle crash on Hwy 224 near SE 197th Ave. in Clackamas County.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2007 Kia Spectra operated by Kurtiss Orcutt (51) of Milwaukie, OR. was traveling westbound and veered into the oncoming lane of travel. The Kia struck a Ford F550 traveling eastbound. The F550 was operated by Megan Scott (34) Sweet Home, OR. The F550 lost control and struck a black Acura operated by Cynthia Martin (46).  Also in the Acura was her daughter (17) from Sandy, OR. A Chevrolet PGE vehicle and an unmarked OSP vehicle were also struck receiving minor damage.

The operator of the Acura was life flighted to OHSU with critical head injuries and was later pronounced deceased at the hospital. No other injuries were reported.

The driver of the Kia (Orcutt) was arrested on scene for DUII. Citizens who witnessed the event quickly provided aid at the scene.

 




Attached Media Files: PGE , Acura

Oregon OSHA offers Spanish-language online training for ladder safety (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/30/20 11:25 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/1073/136566/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has launched a free Spanish-language online training course to help employers and workers understand and practice ladder safety.

The course, which features many video demonstrations, walks viewers through everything from the types and dangers of ladders to regulatory standards and safe practices.

“It takes solid planning and training to address the life-threatening hazards that come with using ladders while on the job,” said Roy Kroker, consultation and public education manager for Oregon OSHA. “But language barriers can pose challenges to tackling such hazards. That is why we’re offering this new tool to help break down those barriers.”

The course includes interviews with Oregon OSHA and industry experts who discuss a variety of ladder safety issues. Those issues include choosing the right type of ladder for the job; heeding the ladder manufacturer’s instructions; addressing the common hazards associated with using ladders; and following ladder safety rules.  

In fact, ladder use was the seventh-most cited Oregon OSHA standard in 2019, with 135 total violations and initial penalties totaling $105,615. The standard covers multiple requirements, including that side rails must extend at least three feet above an upper landing surface; ladders must be maintained free of slipping hazards; and they must be periodically inspected for visible defects.

The Spanish-language ladder safety training course includes the opportunity to receive a certificate of completion. Visit more Spanish-language courses. Learn about the PESO program. Learn about Oregon OSHA’s education and training services.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/30/20 8:39 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 29, 2020

Contact:  Mona Riesterer  
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Fire Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 26, 2020.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 The Fire Policy meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1,  Introductions

2.  Approval of June 9, 2020 Minutes  

3.  Travis Ballard DPSST No. F28961; FPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator and NFPA Fire Fighter I

    Presented by Kayla Ballrot

4.  Kyle Bryant DPSST No. F12984; First Responder Operations, Wildland Interface Fire Fighter, and NFPA Fire Fighter I

    Presented by Kayla Ballrot

5.  Stephen Patione DPSST No. F39669; FPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator and NFPA Fire Fighter I

    Presented by Kayla Ballrot

6.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-009-0065 – Time Extensions for Maintenance Recertification

     Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-009-0087 – Review of Accreditation Agreements

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

8.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-009-0059, 259-009-0115, 259-009-0120, 259-009-0125 and 259-009-0130 – Fire Service Professional Certification Denial and Revocation Standards and Process

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

9.  Department Update

10. Next Scheduled FPC Meeting – November 25, 2020   

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Fire Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Fire Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/30/20 8:33 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 29, 2020

Contact:   Mona Riesterer
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. on August 18, 2020.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The Private Security/Investigator Policy meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approval of the February 18, 2020 Meeting Minutes

3.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-060-0130: Adding Reference for Event and Entertainment Private Security Professional

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-060-0500 and OAR 259-061-0010: Overpayment of Amount Due

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR Chapter 259 Division 60: Updates to the Private Security Provider Moral Fitness and Denial/Revocation Standards

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Department Update

7.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – November 17, 2020 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Fire Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 

 

 


Wed. 07/29/20
DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/29/20 4:13 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 29, 2020

Contact:     Mona Riesterer
                  (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Police Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on August 20, 2020. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The Police Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve the June 18, 2020 Meeting Minutes

3.  Administrative Closures

    Presented by Linsay Hale

4.  Ryan Fauver DPSST No. 51694; Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

5.  David Sytsma, DPSST No. 50389; Lakeview Police Department

    Presented by Linsay Hale

6.  John Falkenhagen DPSST No. 53278; Medford Police Department

    Presented by Linsay Hale

7.  Matthew Higgins DPSST No. 50256; Marion County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

8.  Charles Huitt DPSST No. 45375; Marion County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

9.  Andrew Moyer DPSST No. 31899

    Presented by Linsay Hale

10. Jason Maurry DPSST No. 43487; Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

11. Glenn Palmer DPSST No. 18276; Complaint – Grant County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

12. Boyd Rasmussen DPSST No. 30542; Complaint – Union County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

13. Terry Timeus DPSST No. 17134; Complaint

    Presented by Linsay Hale

14. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0100 – Oregon Fallen Law Enforcement Memorial Eligibility Criteria

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

15. Proposed Rule Changes – House Bill 4203

    Presented by Jennifer Howarld

16. Nomination of New Vice Chair

17.  Department Update

18.  Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – November 19, 2020 at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Fire Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Summer Heat, Wildfires and Pandemics Won't Wait for You to Be Prepared. Get 2 Weeks Ready Today!
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 07/29/20 3:24 PM

The heat of summer is here across the state, and with extreme temperatures and dry conditions comes increased risks. Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management offers a few simple tips to help Oregonians keep cool, stay safe and prevent wildfires as we all navigate the continued impacts of COVID-19.

  • Staying home to prevent the spread of COVID?  Keep windows and blinds closed to stay cool indoors and make sure to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.
  • When you need to be outdoors, stay close to home, bring a water bottle with you and limit activity to early in the day or later in the evening when temperatures are cooler.
  • Heading out to cool off in the water? Plan ahead, know the risks and don’t forget those life jackets.
  • Be sure to wear face coverings when you cannot maintain a distance of at least six feet from others. Switch to a cotton bandana or scarf if your normal face covering is too heavy or thick to wear in the heat.
  • Check on family members and neighbors, especially the elderly, those who live alone or who may need special assistance. Remember, you can visit in person as long as you stay at least six feet away, but a call, text or video-chat works as well and reduces the risk of COVID exposure.
  • It’s everyone’s responsibility to help prevent human-caused wildfires. Know your local fire restrictions and always pack a water source and a shovel. If you make a campfire, be sure it’s dead out before leaving. To learn about restrictions and wildfire activities at home, at work and when you are out and about, visit www.KeepOregonGreen.org/prevent-wildfires.  

Above all, know your risks and be prepared for them. OEM’s 2 Weeks Ready initiative offers a real way each of us can help ourselves and our communities prepare for the next emergency.

2 Weeks Ready encourages Oregonians to prepare to be on their own for a minimum of two weeks. This empowers individuals and communities to count on themselves and each other, especially in the aftermath of a major disaster such as a wildfire or earthquake. It’s also a great way to mitigate the effects of events such as heat waves, power outages, and even COVID-19 as people may need to isolate at home for as long as 14 days. 

“It’s all about knowing the risk so you can plan ahead to reduce that risk,” says OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “Disasters don’t wait for us to be ready, and they can be due to any number of hazards. Preparing for disaster can be overwhelming but 2 Weeks Ready is an achievable goal. You don’t have to get there today, but you do need to start now.”

OEM has created a short video to show Oregonians the basics of a 2 Weeks Ready kit, including face coverings and hand sanitizer. Everyone’s kit will look different so be sure to customize for you and your family.

For more information on preparedness resources, visit www.oregon.gov/oem.

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DOI and USDA renew commitment to protect public safety while addressing the threat of predators to livestock and urban-rural communities
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/29/20 3:22 PM

Partnership displays importance of increased access and recreational use of public lands

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service-Wildlife Services (APHIS-WS) today renewed their partnership for alleviating human-wildlife conflicts on BLM-administered public lands. An updated Memorandum of Understanding clarifies respective roles and responsibilities for wildlife damage management and reducing predation on livestock across more than 245 million acres of public lands, mostly in the West and Alaska. The MOU will remain in effect for five years and replaces the previous agreement, signed in 2012.

“Under the Trump Administration, the BLM has increased access to and recreational opportunities on public lands. Reaffirming our partnership with APHIS-Wildlife Services allows us to take steps to protect the safety and the recreational experience of public land visitors and their pets while helping to ensure abundant wildlife,” said BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “We also recognize the livestock community, as well as those with small children and pets in the urban-rural interface areas, must be protected from attacks by dangerous predators.”

“APHIS-WS and the BLM are Federal partners who have collaborated for decades to protect people, livestock and natural resources on public lands. This newly signed MOU continues and refines that important tradition,” said Janet Bucknall, Deputy Administrator for Wildlife Services.

“Catron County has a long-standing working relationship with Wildlife Services which provides essential wildlife damage management to our livestock producers as well as our constituents across the county. We applaud the renewed commitment,” said Catron County Commissioner Anita A. Hand. “Living in a rural county with vast wide open spaces negative predator interactions can be devastating especially for our families with small children. Livestock production is crucial to our economy and the clarification of the respective roles and responsibilities is vital. We hope to see this commitment across all public lands throughout our county.” 

The MOU recognizes the importance of recreational activities on public lands. Both agencies will carefully evaluate the safety and recreation experiences of public land visitors and their pets prior to undertaking wildlife damage management activities in support of other multiple use management objectives. 

Both agencies are committed to ensuring that any wildlife damage management activity on BLM National Conservation Lands will be consistent with the requirements of designating legislation or proclamations and other applicable laws. The BLM will share relevant information for meeting these requirements during its review of APHIS-WS annual plans and will complete a Minimum Requirements Analysis for any activities APHIS-WS proposes to conduct in Wilderness areas.

“With ever increasing predator populations, it is critical that federal land and wildlife management agencies coordinate along with impacted communities to protect people, private property and wildlife like deer and elk,” said New Mexico Federal Lands Council President Don L. (Bebo) Lee.

The BLM and APHIS will continue to coordinate regularly and closely to ensure that wildlife damage management activities are analyzed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). APHIS-WS will serve as the lead agency in preparing NEPA analysis of damage-management activities and the BLM as a cooperating agency, except in situations where the BLM specifically requests APHIS-WS assistance in managing wildlife damage on public lands it administers. In these instances, the BLM will serve as lead and APHIS-WS as cooperating agency. The BLM managers will continue to review APHIS-WS wildlife damage management plans annually and provide information so these plans conform with the BLM resource management plans.

APHIS-WS’s mission is to provide federal leadership and expertise to resolve wildlife conflicts to allow people and wildlife to coexist. APHIS-WS is the federal agency with recognized expertise and authority under the Act of March 2, 1931, as amended, and the Act of December 22, 1987, for providing WDM services, which establish APHIS-WS as the lead agency for wildlife damage management activities.

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/29/20 2:14 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 29, 2020

Contact:    Mona Riesterer
                 (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Correction Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. on August 11, 2020. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The Corrections Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve June 16, 2020 Meeting Minutes

3.  Administrative Closures - Corrections

    Presented by Linsay Hale

4.  Benjamin West, DPSST No. 60954 – DOC/Coffee Creek Correctional Facility

    Presented by Linsay Hale

5.  Justen Roberts, DPSST No. 54117 – DOC/Oregon State Penitentiary

    Presented by Linsay Hale

6.  Angela Branford, DPSST No. 49984 – Washington County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

7.  Robert Conklin, DPSST No. 53852 – Harney County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Linsay Hale

8.  Benjamin Daley, DPSST No. 56374 – DOC/Oregon State Correctional Institution

    Presented by Linsay Hale

9.  Sergio Verduzco, DPSST No. 42247 – DOC/Deer Ridge Correctional Institution

    Presented by Linsay Hale

10. Joseph Yeaney, DPSST No. 25561 – DOC/Columbia River Correctional Institution

     Presented by Linsay Hale

11.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0100 – Oregon Fallen Law Enforcement Memorial Eligibility     Criteria

     Presented by Jennifer Howald

12.  Department Update

13.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – November 10, 2020 at 1:30 p.m.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Correction Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Fire Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Oregon reports 304 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/20 1:45 PM

July 29, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 304 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 311, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 304 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 17,721.

The new confirmed cases are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (1), Crook (3), Deschutes (16), Douglas (2), Hood River (7), Jackson (13), Jefferson (5), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (13), Lincoln (2), Linn (1), Malheur (20), Marion (20), Morrow (5), Multnomah (82), Polk (4), Umatilla (4), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (3), Washington (51) and Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 304th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 23, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 305th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 23 and died on July 27, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 306th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 22 and died on July 28, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 307th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 27, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 308th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Morrow County who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 21. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 309th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on June 29 and died on July 25, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 310th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 27 and died on July 28, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 311th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 21 and died on July 19. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.


Expanded County-level Data Dashboard Released

OHA published a new, expanded version of Oregon’s “COVID-19 Testing and Outcomes by County” dashboard today.

The dashboard now includes additional information on weekly trends in the percent of COVID-19 tests that have been positive by county and weekly trends in the total number of persons tested for COVID-19 by county.

These trends help us understand changes in the burden of COVID-19 in communities across Oregon.


Weekly report shows daily increase and lower positivity for COVID-19

Today, OHA released its Weekly Report, which showed that during the week of July 20–26, 42,452 people were tested for COVID-19 in Oregon, and 5.1 percent of them had a positive result, down from 6.6 percent last week.

During that week, OHA recorded 2,241 new cases of COVID-19 infection, an increase from the previous week. In addition, 27 Oregonians were reported to have died, which is a slight increase from the previous week.

Large outbreaks have contributed a diminishing proportion of recent cases, and sporadic cases (those not linked to another case) have increased, consistent with community spread.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


The Trump Administration proposes updates to oil and gas regulations
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/29/20 1:32 PM

Proposed changes ensure fair return for taxpayers and clarify regulations for producers 

WASHINGTON – In support of President Donald J. Trump’s America-First Energy Strategy, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced proposed revisions to three key regulations governing oversight of oil and gas production and reporting. The proposed regulations are designed to reduce burdensome bureaucracy, redundant recordkeeping and measurement requirements, while ensuring that taxpayers receive accurate royalties from oil and gas produced on Federal and Tribal lands.

“These proposed enhancements streamline regulations to ensure that our oversight of energy production on America’s public lands is consistent and fair,” said Deputy Secretary of the Interior Kate MacGregor.

“We’re continuing our work to ensure safe, abundant, and affordable energy for all Americans,” said William Perry Pendley, BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs. “The BLM promotes responsible and safe oil and gas development on public lands and is committed to making sure these valuable resources are reported properly and measured accurately.”

Federal royalties generated from onshore oil and gas production on Federal lands totaled nearly $4.23 billion in Fiscal Year 2019. In addition, production on Tribal lands generated nearly $1.14 billion. Revenue from production royalties are distributed entirely to Tribes and shared with the states in which those revenues are generated, making the oil and gas industry an indispensable source of revenue for schools, healthcare, infrastructure and other public services across the West. These updates support the Administration’s work to relieve burdens adversely impacting investments that generate these royalties. 

In total, oil and gas development on BLM-managed lands supported more than 300,000 jobs and contributed $71.5 billion in output to the U.S. economy in fiscal year 2018. These contributions make it critical for the agency to ensure accurate measurement and reporting of production, while reducing unnecessary and burdensome requirements to protect jobs and facilitate reliable energy production. Oil and gas measurement performance requirements have been updated to account for production volumes and risk to mismeasurement. More accurate measurement is required at higher producing leases. Such updates are necessary because vast royalties are generated from smaller, local operations that were disproportionately impacted by the previous regulations. 

The proposed rule would revise three regulations to ensure proper handling of oil and gas production, which is essential for accurate measurement, proper reporting and overall production accountability. Taken together, the proposed new rules would remove or modify unnecessarily complex and burdensome requirements, address logistical issues and eliminate inconsistencies. For example, the proposed rule reduces requirements for water-draining operations which are duplicative of existing seal requirements.

“Our goal is to ensure maximum accountability and efficiency, while making sure that operators are able to develop America’s energy resources on public lands for the benefit of the American people and local communities across the nation. We will use the feedback and information we receive from the public and stakeholders to further refine and improve this proposal before making any final decision,” Mr. Pendley said.

Through these proposed changes, the BLM will ensure accurate reporting while significantly reducing duplicative and extensive recordkeeping requirements. Further, the proposals increase grandfathering of measurement equipment and inspection frequency, where accuracy and performance has already been verified.

The rulemaking follows the BLM’s review of the 2016 final rules for conformance with Executive Order 13783 Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth, and Secretary’s Order 3349 American Energy Independence, which require agencies to ensure that regulations do not unnecessarily encumber energy production, constrain economic growth, or prevent job creation. Based upon that review, the BLM found that the revisions would streamline regulations for oil and gas operators working on Federal and Indian lands.

Publication of the proposed regulations in the Federal Register will open a 60-day public comment period. The BLM will notify the public and stakeholders when the regulations publish, as well as publicizing the opening and closing dates of the comment period and instructions on how to comment. Before finalizing any regulations, the BLM will  review and respond to substantive public comments and may use any new information gathered to help guide the development of the revisions.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Night Operations of Single Engine Air Tankers Continue
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/20 11:17 AM

JOHN DAY, Ore. — Unsettled weather patterns this week may provide an opportunity for night time use of Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs) flying from the Grant County Airport in John Day.  Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has been working with CO Fire Aviation for more than a year to develop safe protocols and guidelines for supporting ground fire resources in wildfire suppression with night time SEAT drops.  The initial training and coordination of firefighters and pilots occurred during the 2019 fire season, refresher training and flight evaluation on simulated fires were successfully completed last week.

Red Flag Warnings for critical fire weather, including thunderstorms, high temperatures, and windy conditions, were issued by the National Weather Service throughout much of eastern Oregon this week.  The increased possibility of lightning ignitions, combined with already dry wildland fuels, could result in rapidly spreading fires throughout the region.  Precipitation, which came with some of the storms, may cause fires to smolder and creep until fuels begin to dry again and fires grow quickly.  SEATs are used in coordination with ground resources to slow the spread of fire.  The aircraft is capable of dropping 750 gallons of retardant and is highly maneuverable in wildland fire situations. 

The SEAT Base, used for reloading the aircraft with fire retardant, is located at the Grant County Airport.  Use of SEATs at night will increase the air traffic at the airport during these operations.  In addition to the night time SEAT operations ODF’s multi-mission aircraft will be brought in to be used for detection of fires during both day and night shifts.  These fires may otherwise go undetected until they are much larger in size.  ODF’s Partenavia Observer aircraft is equipped with infrared and Electro-optical cameras, capable of still pictures and video, and has mapping capabilities used to locate fires and relay the information to dispatch and firefighting resources.


Oregon Cannabis Commission Patient Equity Subcommittee conference call August 4
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/20 11:09 AM

July 29, 2020

What: A conference call for the Patient Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: Roll call and opening statements; rule review – recommendations for changes to rules; break; patient care and health equity – recommendations for OLCC retail stores; legislative concepts.

When: Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2-4 p.m.

Where: By conference call at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.