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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Jul. 17 - 8:10 am
Tue. 07/16/19
State Announces Federal Funding Awards for Affordable Housing
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/16/19 5:11 PM

SALEM, OR - Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is excited to announce funding awards of $45,569,423 to build and preserve 636 homes through the awards of federal 9% Low Income Housing Tax Credits, HOME, and National Housing Trust Fund resources, which leverage local, state, and private investments. Eleven developments were approved by the Oregon Housing Stability Council to receive funding.


“No Oregonian should worry about having a safe, stable place to sleep,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Families need homes that are more than just four walls and a roof, with rents that don’t mean choosing which bill to pay or what to do without this month. I am grateful that these resources will allow 636 families to rest easy in an affordable home.”


This latest round of awards brings OHCS to a record number of homes in the development pipeline – more than 9,800 affordable homes are in progress across the state. Oregon’s Statewide Housing Plan (oregon.gov/ohcs/pages/oshp.aspx) set a five-year goal to triple the development pipeline of affordable rental housing up to 25,000 homes.


“This is a big step toward meeting the ambitious goals of the Statewide Housing Plan,” said OHCS Director Margaret Salazar. “These developments bring us that much closer to closing the affordable rental housing gap and reducing housing cost burden for Oregonians.”

The developments that received awards are listed below, with full details available online: www.oregon.gov/ohcs/DO/docs/07-12-2019-Affordable-Housing-Awards.pdf.

  • Applegate Landing in Lebanon, 36 homes
  • Bridge Meadows in Redmond, 40 homes
  • Carnelian Place & Phoenix Crossing in Bend, 71 homes
  • Colonia Paz I in Lebanon, 24 homes
  • Going 42 in Portland, 55 homes
  • The Mary Ann in Beaverton, 54 homes
  • Oregon City Terrace in Oregon City, 48 homes
  • Patriot Heights in Stanfield, 53 homes
  • River Road Affordable Housing in Eugene, 60 homes
  • Rogue Valley Apartments in White City and Eagle Point, 76 homes
  • Rose Bowl in Portland, 71 homes
  • Snowberry Brook II in Ashland, 71 homes
     

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 19
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/19 3:56 PM

July 16, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 19

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; public testimony; follow-up to questions from June meeting; select 2020 measure set; adjourn.

When: July 19, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln) (421 SW Oak St, Portland, OR, 97204) Suite 775, Transformation Training Room. The public also may join remotely via webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, or .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Board of Forestry meets July 24 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/19 3:52 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in Salem on July 24 at 9 a.m. This month’s meeting agenda includes:

  • A presentation on activities of the Committee for Family Forestlands and discussion of key issues and future policy needs.
  • An update on the 2019 fire season.
  • Testimony from the Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee.
  • Consideration of and determination on the petition for Forest Practices Act rulemaking on protection requirements for coho salmon resource sites.
  • An update on the department’s current fiscal and budgetary status.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. The meeting is open to the public, with the exception of the executive session scheduled from 11 a.m. until noon.

Public comment will be accepted on agenda topics and at the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. Written comments may be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">Boardofforestry@oregon.gov in advance of the meeting. A livestream option and meeting materials are available online at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

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The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.


DPSST Parole & Probation Officer Firearms Training Revision Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/16/19 3:43 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 15th, 2019

Contact:                Chris Enquist
                             503-378-2309

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Parole & Probation Officer Firearms Training Revision Workgroup will hold a regular meeting on July 30th, 2019 from 11:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in room A235 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Welcome
  2. Review of History of Firearms Training for Parole Officers
  3. Discussion of Scope of Revision
  4. Review of Staff Recommendations
  5. Discussion and Decision on September Pilot Program
  6. Workgroup Goals and Future Tasks
  7. Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Parole & Probation Officer Field Training Manual Revision Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Northwest Association for Blind Athletes Announces Camp Spark for Children with Visual Impairments in Washington and Oregon
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 07/16/19 2:12 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Billy Henry, Founder, President/CEO Director
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes
703 Broadway St, Ste 600
Vancouver, Washington 98660
Local Phone: 1-360-718-2826

Toll Free: 1-800-880-9837
http://www.nwaba.org
henry@nwaba.org">bhenry@nwaba.org

 

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes Announces Camp Spark for Children with Visual Impairments in Washington and Oregon

 

Vancouver, Washington—July 16th, 2019—Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is excited to announce as of July 9, 2019, NWABA is officially rebranding camp programs to Camp Spark. Formerly known as Camp Abilities Oregon and Camp Abilities Washington, Camp Spark enables NWABA to scale and enhance the camp program and has officially been adopted as NWABA’s sixth core program. Camp Spark will transform lives of individuals who are blind and visually impaired through sport.  Camp Spark offers comprehensive sports programming for individuals of all ages with visual impairments in a camp setting.

 

In two weeks, we will be hosting our first Camp Spark summer session in Tacoma, Washington.  The purpose is to empower individuals who are blind or visually impaired, break the cycle of dependence and ill health that is unnecessarily associated with visual impairments, and build their self-belief that they can take control of their own quality of life and use their many talents to actively contribute in their communities. Campers will participate in a variety of sports and recreational activities including goalball (a sport specifically developed for individuals with visual impairments), 5-a-side soccer, judo, tandem cycling, kayaking, track & field, and numerous others.

 

This will be the fourth year that NWABA has offered summer camp for children with visual impairments across the state. These one-week summer sessions will provide 1:2 sport instruction for each camper.  These children vary in socioeconomic status, ethnic background, and level of skills and abilities. Camp Spark in Washington will be hosted at University of Puget Sound’s campus from July 29 to August 3, 2019. Washington’s camp will impact 38 campers from across Washington ages 9-14. Camp Spark in Oregon will be hosted at the Linfield College campus in McMinnville, OR from July 21 to July 26, 2019. Oregon’s camp will impact 36 campers from across the state ages 8-15 years old. This camp is offered at no cost to campers and their families.

 

"Our Board of Directors is extremely excited to offer these truly transformational programs to children and youth with visual impairments. Camp reaches far beyond participating in sports, and acts as a catalyst to help campers gain the confidence, self-esteem, friendships, and independence they need to achieve success in all areas of life.” said Founder, President/CEO, Billy Henry.

 

Camp Spark’s Oregon session is partially funded by the Oregon Blind and Visually Impaired Student Fund, and Camp Spark’s Washington session is partially funded by Washington State Department of Services for the Blind. However, additional support is critically needed to deliver a successful camp. Donations to support Camp Spark are accepted by mailing a check to PO BOX 65265, Vancouver, WA, 98665 or making an online gift at www.nwaba.org. Please indicate that your donation is to support camp programs. For more information on Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, please contact Billy Henry at 1-360-718-2826, or visit www.nwaba.org

 

About NWABA:
The mission of Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is to provide life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. A group of students who were visually impaired formed the association in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were participating in sports and physical activity. Today, NWABA is a rapidly expanding 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides more than 1,500 children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments tailored programming which improves self-confidence and self-esteem, promotes independence, creates an inclusive community of supporters, and builds the skills necessary to succeed in all areas of life including school and employment.

 

For information: http://www.nwaba.org  or
Contact: henry@nwaba.org">bhenry@nwaba.org
Phone:  1-360-718-2826

###


Veterans' Town Hall Meeting Set for Next Week at Pendleton Convention Center (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/16/19 1:35 PM
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1082/126132/thumb_DSC_8786.jpg

Kelly Fitzpatrick, director of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, will hold her first veterans’ town hall meeting in Pendleton next week.

“I really look forward to this opportunity to meet members of the eastern Oregon veteran community and learn about the concerns, issues and challenges facing veterans and their families in this part of the state,” Fitzpatrick said.

She will also answer questions and share the latest updates regarding ODVA programs and initiatives, as well as veteran-related developments from the 2019 legislative session.

The Veterans’ Town Hall event will begin at 6 p.m. Friday, July 26, at the Pendleton Convention Center. It will also be recorded and livestreamed on the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ Facebook page for the benefit of those who are not able to attend in person.

The following day, and in the same location, ODVA and over 60 partnering organizations and agencies will be joining together for the Fifth Annual Veteran Benefit Expo, the state’s largest veteran resource event, which is being held in eastern Oregon for the first time.

The purpose of the Expo is to provide a one-stop shop for Oregon veterans of all eras and walks of life to learn about and access the full range of their earned benefits. The event will offer resources from many different benefit areas, including health care, claims assistance, finance, home loans, long-term care, mental health, education, business and recreation.

The Expo is free and requires no pre-registration. The event will be open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 27 at the Pendleton Convention Center.

For more information about the Expo, visit www.expo.oregondva.com




Attached Media Files: Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.

Area Man Sentenced to 110 Months in Federal Prison for Bank Robbery
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/19 1:13 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Dannie Kay Alston, 67, was sentenced today to 110 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for robbing four Oregon and Southwest Washington banks in a four-week period beginning in August 2017. Alston has no known permanent residence.

On February 21, 2019, Alston pleaded guilty in federal court to the following bank robberies:

  1. August 7, 2017; Chase Bank in Vancouver, Washington; collecting $2,300
  2. August 15, 2017; Wells Fargo Bank in Medford, Oregon; collecting $4,690
  3. August 24, 2017; Wells Fargo Bank in Salem, Oregon; collecting $1,317
  4. September 9, 2017; First Interstate Bank in Roseburg, Oregon; collecting $3,441

In each of his robberies, Alston attempted to disguise his identity by wearing sunglasses and some type of ball or ski cap. He communicated with the targeted bank tellers primarily through handwritten notes or signs. At his last robbery, in Roseburg, witnesses were able to provide a description of Alston’s getaway vehicle, leading to his quick arrest by the Oregon State Police. Police recovered the note used in the Roseburg robbery, a starter’s pistol with loaded caps, a Taser, sunglasses, wig and $3,441 cash from Alston’s person and vehicle.

Alston is a career offender with a criminal history spanning five decades and four states. He has previous burglary convictions in California and Texas, robbery convictions in California, Florida and Oregon, as well as assault, theft and narcotics convictions.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Alston to pay $11,748 in restitution.

This case was investigated by the FBI, Clark County Washington Sheriff’s Office, Medford Police Department, Oregon State Police and Roseburg Police Department. It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

ATF, DEA and U.S. Border Patrol Operation leads to the arrest of 15 people involved in methamphetamine and heroin drug trafficking in Eastern Washington
DEA Seattle - 07/16/19 11:43 AM

SPOKANE, Wash. – Early this morning, the Bureau Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) led a large-scale enforcement action targeting a methamphetamine and heroin drug trafficking organization with ties to a Washington State based street gang identified as the Eastside Familia Norteno (ESF).  Over 300 law enforcement officials, including federal agents and state and local officers executed 19 federal search warrants located in Grant, Yakima and Adams Counties. 

On July 10, 2019, a federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Washington returned an indictment charging 16 individuals for conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and heroin. The lead defendants in this case are Luis Manuel Farias-Carendas, 40, of Moses Lake, and Joshua Isaac Stine, 34, of Ephrata, who are accused of being the leaders of the drug trafficking conspiracy. Both were taken into custody today. Twelve others named in the indictment are also in custody pending an initial appearance in federal court in Spokane, Washington. They are: 

Patrick Elliot Pearson, 47, of Moses Lake

Cristian Misael Gomez, 23, of Grant County

Luis Manuel Ramirez, 25, of Moses Lake

Zacarias Martinez-Garza, 23 of Moses Lake

Mariano Ruiz-Balderas, 19, of Moses Lake

Jesse Leon Manion Jr., 55, of Moses Lake

Heather Elaine Keating, 41, of Moses Lake

Leonel Caballero, 62, of Warden

Forrest Walker Herzog, 34, of Moses Lake

Amy Jo Dygert, 33, of Moses Lake

Michael Edward McLaughlin, 59, of Ephrata

Jesus Valenica-Morfin , 31, of Yakima

One additional person, Tomas Gomez, 49, of Los Angeles, Calif., was also arrested during the operation and charged by federal complaint. 

The 15 individuals were arrested in the following cities: 11 in Moses Lake, one in Ephrata, two in Yakima, and one in Warden.  At this time, agents and officers have seized pound quantities of methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin, over 50 firearms and U.S. currency.

This investigation is a continuation of law enforcement efforts in December 2017, which focused on violent drug traffickers who were operating in Grant County.  The earlier investigation resulted in 24 individuals who have pled guilty in federal court and eight pounds of methamphetamine, 10 vehicles, $25,000 and more than 80 firearms were seized.    

The following agencies provided significant assistance for today’s enforcement action: ATF, DEA, USBP, United States Marshals Service, Homeland Security Investigations, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Grant County Sheriff’s Office, Moses Lake Police Department, Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team, Washington State Patrol, Idaho State Police, Adams County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement Against Drugs, Yakima Police Department, Columbia River Drug Task Force, North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force, Warden Police Department, Ephrata  Police Department and Quincy Police Department.

The case is being prosecuted by Caitlin Baunsgard, an Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington.

An Indictment Contains Mere Allegations That an Individual Has Committed a Crime.  Every Individual Is Presumed Innocent Until and Unless Proven Guilty Beyond a Reasonable Doubt in a Court of Law.


Girl Scouts of the USA Launches 42 New Badges to Mobilize Girls to Change the World
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 07/16/19 11:14 AM

Girl Scouts of the USA Launches 42 New Badges to Mobilize Girls to Change the World

By exploring topics like high adventure in the outdoors, coding, space science, and more, girls take control of their own leadership experiences. 

July 16, 2019—Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) today reveals 42 new badges exclusively for girls in grades K–12 that allow them to make their own choices about how they want to experience and influence the world. The badges enhance the organization’s existing girl-led programming, offering girls everything from adventuring in the snow or mountains to learning how to use coding to solve problems they care about. Girl Scout programming has long promoted independent decision making, which helps girls develop agency, challenge themselves to move beyond their comfort zones, and build confidence in their leadership abilities.

Among the 42 new offerings are Outdoor High Adventure badges that feature, for the first time in Girl Scouts’ history, two distinct activity options, letting girls choose how they want to earn each badge. Giving girls choices is important for developing their sense of self, their own voice, and gender equality—research from the World Bank Group shows that increasing women’s agency and decision-making abilities is key to improving their lives, communities, and the world. And research shows that Girl Scouts are more likely than other girls to take an active role in decision making (80% vs. 51%).

In addition to existing badge offerings, girls in grades 6–12 can now pursue:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
     
  • Three Space Science badges, through which girls explore topics such as the universe and their place in it, properties of light, and inspiring careers in space science (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
     
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
     
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge events in select areas this fall. At these events, which will take place October 19, girls will learn crucial cybersecurity skills by completing challenges such as running traceroutes and identifying phishing schemes (funded by Raytheon).

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face). 
     
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell Technologies).

“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a rock climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.” 

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

At Girl Scouts she’ll discover who she is, what she’s passionate about, and what she wants to achieve—both today and in the future. Join or volunteer at www.girlscouts.org/join.

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We're Girl Scouts of the USA
We're 2.5 million strong—more than 1.7 million girls and 750,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

“Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts” is based upon work supported by NASA Science under cooperative agreement No. NNX16AB90A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 37 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:Employment in Oregon June 2019
Oregon Employment Department - 07/16/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate 4.1 Percent in June 

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in June, essentially unchanged from 4.2 percent in May. Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for 32 months, dating back to November 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate was little changed at 3.7 percent in June.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has been at or near record low levels for nearly three years. Of those unemployed in June, nearly half were either new or returning to the labor force. At 46.9 percent, the share of unemployed who were entrants was the highest since May 1999. Another 38.5 percent were unemployed due to a job loss. The remaining 14.7 percent had voluntarily left their previous job and were looking for work.

In June, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 900 jobs. The jobs gain in June followed a revised loss of 200 jobs in May. Monthly gains for June were strongest in professional and business services, which added 1,200 jobs, and in manufacturing, which added 900 jobs. Two industries with large losses in June were leisure and hospitality (-1,000 jobs) and retail trade (-900 jobs). Other sectors were close to their usual seasonal pattern of job gains or losses for June.

Looking at longer-term trends, Oregon’s economy continued to grow rapidly. Since June 2018, total nonfarm payroll employment was up 46,100 jobs, or 2.4 percent. Oregon’s job growth rate over the past 12 months was faster than the U.S. job growth rate of 1.5 percent.

The most rapid gains over the past year were in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+4,500 jobs, or 6.9%) and construction (+7,100 jobs, or 6.8%). Job gains were widespread, with three other major industries each adding between 2.6 percent and 3.7 percent to their jobs base in the past 12 months. These industries were manufacturing (+7,100 jobs, or 3.7%), professional and business services (+8,800 jobs, or 3.5%), and health care and social assistance (+6,800 jobs, or 2.6%). During that time, none of the major industries cut a substantial number of jobs, although three industries showed little change: retail trade; financial activities; and mining and logging.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, July 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 13th.


Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.


The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/930/126114/Employment_in_Oregon--June_2019--Press_Release.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against the One-Ring Scam (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 07/16/19 10:00 AM
TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019
TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/3585/125940/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment.  This week: building a digital defense against the “one-ring” telephone scam.

It seems like most of us get those annoying calls from telemarketers and scammers these days. Your phone rings and rings and rings. Often, these are calls come from a lovely robotic voice informing you that you “missed an important payment.” Or, perhaps, the voice on the other end of the line is congratulating you on that “expense-free vacation” that you just won. In both scenarios, the scammer will try to get you to pay money to settle the non-existent debt or to pay for a small processing fee for that free trip. Later you discover later that you were taken.

While these kinds of telephone scams are not new, our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) are warning the public about a new variation that is popping up across the nation. It’s called the “one-ring” scam. Here’s how it works: you get a phone call from a number you do not recognize, and then the call drops after only one or two rings. The fraudster is counting on your curiosity – and maybe fear that the call you missed is really important. The goal is to get you to call the number back because, in reality, the scammer is calling from an international toll number. If you call back, you will likely receive per-minute toll charges ... and who do you think collects those funds? You are right if you guessed the scam artist.

So what can you do to avoid being a victim of this scam?

  • Do NOT call back numbers that you do not recognize, especially those that appear to come from overseas.
  • If you have received these calls, report the number to the FTC at www.donotcall.gov
  • Frequently check your phone bill for unusual or suspicious charges

As always, if you have been a victim of an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019 , TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/19 9:25 AM

On Monday, July 15, 2019 at approximately 10:30 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 279.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2003 Yamaha Motorcycle, operated by Robert Killough (52) of Bandon, OR. was traveling south on Hwy 101 when it left the roadway and crashed.

Killough sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Department, Bandon Police Department, Bandon Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT.


Mon. 07/15/19
Pedestrian dies while crossing I-205 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/15/19 8:06 PM

On Monday, July 15, 2019 at approximately 5:05 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a pedestrian hit by a vehicle on I-205 near mile post 12.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the pedestrian was headed east crossing the northbound lanes of I-205. The pedestrian was struck by a 2019 Ford Cargo Van operated by Steven Stewart (56) of Donald, OR.

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. He will not be identified until next of kin can be notified.

Stewart remained on scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Clackamas County Fire Department, and ODOT


Final health insurance rate decisions lower 2020 premiums by $44 million
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/15/19 4:34 PM

(Salem) - The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation issued final rate decisions for small businesses and individuals who buy their own health insurance.

Final health insurance rates for the 2020 individual market have been lowered 1 percent on average from the division’s preliminary rate decisions, and 2 percent from the original requests filed by insurance companies in May. The final rates lower 2020 premiums by approximately $44 million from the original requests submitted by health insurance companies.

“Our collaborative rate review process has been key to building a stable health insurance market that enabled us to limit the individual market rate increase to an average of 1.5 percent,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “The Oregon Reinsurance Program has also continued to show its value, keeping individual rates 6 percent lower than they would be without the program. We are grateful to the legislature for passing and our stakeholders for supporting the six year extension of this important program.”

The division’s transparent rate review process brings insurance companies, the division, and the public together to review health insurance rates. The collaborative process ensures all data are thoroughly reviewed and considered before rates are charged to consumers.

Several factors, such as medical costs, federal policy changes, the Oregon Reinsurance Program, and federal risk adjustment payments are considered to make sure rates will adequately cover health care costs.

Individual market 
The division issued final decisions for seven companies in the individual market with average rate changes ranging from a 3.2 percent decrease to an 8.9 percent increase, for an average increase of 1.5 percent. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $436 to $530 a month.

The preliminary rates included reductions for HeathNet and Kaiser. The final decisions include reductions for Bridgespan (2.8 percent increase lowered to 1.4 percent) and Providence (2.1 percent increase down to 0.0 percent rate hold). Regence was the only company to see a rate increase moving from 3.9 percent to 5.5 percent.

The rate changes are company-wide averages based on premiums for plans before financial assistance through Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace is taken into account.

All Oregonians who purchase their own insurance are encouraged to apply for assistance through the Marketplace for 2020, even if they did not qualify last year. In 2019, Oregonians who received help with the costs of their health insurance paid on average $140 a month.

Open enrollment for 2020 plans is from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15.

Small group market 
In the small group market, the division issued final decisions for nine companies with average rates ranging from a 2.3 percent decrease to an 11.7 percent increase. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $321 to $394 a month.

Final rates include reductions from the preliminary decisions for five of the nine small group insurance companies.

See the chart for the full list of final decisions.  

Insurance companies have 21 days to request a hearing before the final rates are set for 2020.

More information for each insurance company can be found at oregonhealthrates.org. A complete premium comparison table for each county based on ages 21, 40, and 60 will be posted online in August.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.

 


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/15/19 3:16 PM
Llaneza
Llaneza
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1070/126101/thumb_Llaneza.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Lindsey Llaneza, died the morning of July 15, 2019.  Llaneza was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla, and passed away in the infirmary at TRCI. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified. 

Llaneza entered DOC custody on April 15, 2004, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of June 23, 2021.  Llaneza was 65 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. 

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include repair and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Llaneza

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet July 28-29 in Baker City
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/15/19 8:00 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Baker City July 28-29.  

On July 28, Commissioners will gather at 1:00 p.m. to tour heritage sites surrounding the historic downtown.

On July 29 a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Geiser Grand Hotel at 1996 Main Street, Baker City, OR 97814. The agenda includes reports on 2018 grant and MentorCorps programs, long-term planning, approval of Cultural Trust partner funds, and reports by commissioners. 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.


Sun. 07/14/19
Fatal Crash Highway 30 -- Baker County -- Corrected Date
Oregon State Police - 07/14/19 6:50 PM

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday morning’s single vehicle double fatal crash on Highway 30 in Baker County. 

On July 14, 2019 at about 2:30 AM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle double fatal crash on Highway 30 near milepost 45.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet Malibu, operated by Jesse Butler, age 30, from Baker City, was traveling eastbound on Highway 30.  The Chevrolet Malibu failed to negotiate a left curve and crashed through the guardrail causing extensive damage to the guardrail. The Chevrolet Malibu rolled several times and traveled approximately 200 feet and struck a utility pole. 

Butler was ejected and died from injuries at the scene.  A passenger, Travis Culbertson, age 36, from Baker City, also died from injuries sustained in the crash. 

Highway 30 was closed for several hours during the investigation.  

OSP was assisted by the Baker County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, Baker Fire, Haines Fire and Oregon Trail Electric Co-op. 

No photographs for release. 


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Fri. 07/12/19
Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet July 19 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/19 12:26 PM

July 12, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet July 19 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce.

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the Taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary.

When: July 19, 2019 from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland Oregon Room 1A. The public can also call into a listen-only conference line: 1-888-278-0296 access code: 843163

Program Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, or ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

https://bit.ly/2LP46up


Missing Oregon State Hospital patient has been found
Oregon Health Authority - 07/12/19 10:29 AM

July 12, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141,ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us
Oregon State Police PIO, osppio@state.or.us

Missing Oregon State Hospital patient has been found

The Eugene Police Department has located the patient reported missing yesterday by Oregon State Hospital. Please reference OSP Case Number SP19-246525.

On July 11 at 9:25 p.m., a Eugene police officer took the patient into custody. The patient is currently awaiting transport back to the hospital in Junction City.


Fatal Crash Highway 228 near Brownsville -- Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/12/19 8:57 AM
2019-07/1002/126046/Highway_228.jpg
2019-07/1002/126046/Highway_228.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1002/126046/thumb_Highway_228.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Thursday afternoon’s two vehicle fatal crash on Highway 228 near Brownsville. 

On July 11, 2019 at about 1:40 PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of an injury crash on Hwy 228 near milepost 2.5.

Preliminary Investigation revealed that a Jeep Cherokee operated by, Michael McDaniel, age 69, from Brownsville, was traveling westbound on HWY 228 near milepost 2.   For unknown reasons the Jeep Cherokee drifted over the center line and struck an eastbound fully loaded Kenworth log truck, operated by Bradley Crowson, age 48, from Springfield.

McDaniel died at the scene as a result of injuries sustained in the crash.  Crowson received only minor injuries.

Highway 228 was closed for approximately 4 hours during the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by local fire/ems, ODOT and the Linn County Sheriff’s Office. 

Photograph provided by OSP. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/1002/126046/Highway_228.jpg

Director Ray selected as Henry Toll Fellow for 2019
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 07/12/19 8:10 AM

Department of Revenue Director Nia Ray has been named a 2019 Henry Toll Fellow. Each year, The Council of State Governments (CSG) names 48 of the nation’s top officials from all three branches of state government as fellows.

The Henry Toll Fellowship, named for CSG founder Henry Wolcott Toll, is one of the nation’s premier leadership development programs for state government officials. Each year, the fellowship gathers state leaders to strengthen their leadership and create a strong national network.

Fellowship alum Representative Janelle Bynum says this about Nia: “Oregon is investing in growing its bench of high-quality leaders and Director Ray fits the bill. Her testimonies before committees and interactions with the Legislature have garnered her an immense amount of respect among members and professional staff.”

Oregon Department of Administrative Services Director Katy Coba said, “Ms. Ray has come to be known as a leader who can advance important initiatives and move organizations forward. Part of this is attributed to her ability to engage and collaborate with internal and external stakeholders, as well as to balance interests while seeking resolution to complex issues.”

Department of Revenue Deputy Director Satish Upadhyay said, “This is a huge testimony to Nia’s leadership and contributions to Oregon State Government. It’s a tremendous honor.”

Director Ray joins an elite group of past Oregon officials to receive this fellowship including judges, state legislators from both chambers, and Governor Kate Brown.

The program runs August 23–27 in Lexington, Kentucky.


Thu. 07/11/19
Fatal Crash Highway 211 near Molalla -- Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/11/19 8:36 PM
2019-07/1002/126041/20190711_165601.jpg
2019-07/1002/126041/20190711_165601.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1002/126041/thumb_20190711_165601.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Thursday afternoon’s two vehicle fatal crash on Highway 211 near Molalla. 

On July 11, 2019 at about 3:20 PM, OSP troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Highway 211 near South Mackburg Road. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Saturn Ion, operated by Tyler Bracken, age 18 and passeger Eric Santos, age 18, both from Beaverton, were traveling southbound on Highway 211. Bracken attempted to pass several vehicles in the northbound lane on a blind corner.  A Ford F250 pickup, operated by Craig Buche, age 53, from Molalla, was approaching in the northbound lane of travel.  Bracken veered to the right, applied his brakes, overcorrected and lost control.  The Saturn Ion travelled onto a soft shoulder and began sliding across both lanes of travel and was struck by the Ford F250 pickup. 

Bracken was transported by air-ambulance to Oregon Health Science University for life threatening injuries and Santos was pronounced deceased at the scene after life saving measures were perfomed.  Buche did not sustain any injuries during the crash. 

Highway 211 was closed for approximately 4 hours during the investigation. 

OSP was asssited by Clackamas County SO, ODOT, Molalla Fire District and Molalla PD.

The investigation is continuing

Picture courtesy of OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/1002/126041/20190711_165601.jpg

See3Slam Tournament to Close a Portion of George Washington Way (Photo)
City of Richland - 07/11/19 5:47 PM
2019-07/5957/126027/road_closure.jpg
2019-07/5957/126027/road_closure.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/5957/126027/thumb_road_closure.jpg

The Fourth Annual See3Slam 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament is happening in Richland this weekend. The festivities will close George Washington Way to thru traffic near John Dam Plaza beginning Friday, July 12, at 6:00 p.m., through Sunday, July 14, at approximately 7:00 p.m. The event includes food vendors, an outdoor movie on Friday, a pancake feed each morning, and a Saturday evening concert.  

Motor vehicles entering Richland and traveling north on George Washington Way toward Swift Boulevard will be directed to turn left on Jadwin Avenue. Motorists traveling south, from North Richland will detour east at Swift Boulevard.  While this stretch of roadway will be closed to through traffic, businesses, Howard Amon Park, and the boat launch will remain open and accessible from both Newton Street and Lee Boulevard.

The parking lot on Knight Street at John Dam Plaza will also close. Event participants are encouraged to park at the Federal Building Parking lot or at the corner of Lee and Jadwin. 

The 3 on 3 tournament takes place on Saturday and Sunday beginning at 8:00 a.m. There are 270 teams registered. The outdoor movie at the HAPO Community Stage is "Captain Marvel,” rated PG, and it will begin at dusk. Event details are available at www.see3slam.com.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/5957/126027/road_closure.jpg

Oregon State Hospital seeks missing patient (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 07/11/19 4:42 PM
Troy Irick
Troy Irick
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/3687/126037/thumb_Troy_Irick.JPG

July 11, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us
Oregon State Police PIO, osppio@state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital seeks missing patient

A 35-year-old Oregon State Hospital psychiatric patient, Troy Irick, was reported missing Thursday. Anyone seeing Irick should call 911 or the Oregon State Police at 800-452-7888. Please reference OSP Case Number SP19-246525.

Irick is not considered to be an imminent danger to himself or others. He is accused of unauthorized departure. The OSP is conducting an investigation to help locate him. Irick should not be approached.

Irick was admitted from Coos County to the Junction City campus of Oregon State Hospital Sept. 9, 2017. Irick was found guilty except for insanity on the charges of unlawful use of a weapon and menacing.

He was last seen at approximately 1:45 p.m., on the grounds of the Laurel Hill Center, 2145 Centennial Plaza, Eugene, where he was attending a group activity. Irick asked to use the restroom and left the immediate area.

Hospital officials, who reported the missing patient to state and local law enforcement agencies, described Irick as a male, 5 feet 7 inches tall, 156 pounds, with short brown hair, a brown beard and blue eyes. When last seen, he was wearing gray sweat pants and a hooded sweat shirt.

Any future news releases will be issued by the OSP.

https://bit.ly/32ozaa4




Attached Media Files: Troy Irick , Troy Irick

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 18 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 07/11/19 3:35 PM

June 12, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 18 in Salem

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: July 18,1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital Callan Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, access code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include a legislative update, a hospital capacity update, employment opportunities for patients, diabetic care at OSH and listing OSH policies on its website.

Details:The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

Program Contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

For more information, please visit the board's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, 711 TTY, or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Life Flight Network Announces Partnership with WhidbeyHealth to Add Air Ambulance Service to the Growing Region (Photo)
Berg & Associates - 07/11/19 1:25 PM
Life Flight Network will station a helicopter equipped to act as a mobile intensive care unit, like the one pictured here, at its Whidbey Island base.
Life Flight Network will station a helicopter equipped to act as a mobile intensive care unit, like the one pictured here, at its Whidbey Island base.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/6329/126029/thumb_WhidbeyIslandBasePhoto.jpg

Aurora, Ore., July 11, 2019— Life Flight Network, the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, is partnering with WhidbeyHealth Medical Center to open a new base in Island County, Washington. The base will be operational in late summer 2019. The 24/7 air medical helicopter, pilot and medical crew will be based on location at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center, serving not only Coupeville and nearby communities, but also the broader Puget Sound Region including the San Juan Islands.

“We’re proud to partner with the exceptional providers at WhidbeyHealth and to work alongside local emergency responders in serving the health care needs of Island County residents,” said Life Flight

Network CEO Michael Griffiths. “At the core of our expansion in Washington is our mission to provide ICU- level transportation in a safe, compassionate, efficient and expeditious manner. With 41 years serving the state of Washington, we’re honored to add this new base and partnership to our service area.”

This second northwest Washington location expands capacity for Life Flight Network’s Port Angeles base, where demand is growing and the relationship with the local EMS community is strong. The two service areas will support each other when the demand for timely response for air medical transport is high.

“Our partnership with Life Flight Network will further enhance local services available for our patients and communities and allow us to provide access to even more specialized care,” said Ron Telles, WhidbeyHealth CEO. “We’re proud to be their partner, and we welcome Life Flight Network to Whidbey Island.”

In addition to serving Island County and neighboring rural communities, the new base will strengthen emergency medical response for the state’s population center. Seattle is the fastest-growing metropolitan area in the nation this decade, growing by nearly 19 percent and adding more than 114,000 people since 2010. The broader Puget Sound region, including Island, Jefferson, Kitsap, King, Snohomish, and Skagit counties, is expected to gain at least 1.9 million people by 2050, for a total of nearly 6 million residents.

“Partnering with Life Flight Network to provide locally-based air medical transport is an unequivocal advantage to both WhidbeyHealth EMS and our community,” said Sean LaVine, Assistant Manager of WhidbeyHealth EMS. “Life Flight Network’s exemplary history of providing safe and compassionate care is consistent with the WhidbeyHealth mission. We welcome Life Flight Network and look forward to working with them.”

The Whidbey Island base brings the total of helicopters serving the region from three to four. By comparison, the Phoenix, AZ metro area – a comparable-sized urban area with more than 4 million residents today – has eight helicopter bases serving its two-county landlocked region (Maricopa and Pinal counties).

“Helicopter air ambulance response is an essential health care service for a fast-growing urban area with traffic congestion among the worst in the country in addition to some of the most challenging landscapes due to large bodies of water,” said Dr. Jim Bryan, Life Flight Network Medical Director.

“During a medical emergency, every second counts. Helicopters are uniquely suited to respond to emergencies over bodies of water and during peak traffic times, when gridlock challenges ground ambulances to move quickly and safely.”

Life Flight Network will station an Agusta-Westland AW109E helicopter at its Whidbey Island base. The AW109E is an Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) capable aircraft, allowing safe operation in a range of weather conditions. The AW109E is one of the fastest light helicopters available and can cruise at 172 miles per hour. Each Life Flight Network helicopter is equipped with the medical equipment necessary to act as a mobile intensive care unit, with the ability to perform a multitude of highly skilled medical functions during transport, including video laryngoscopes, ICU level ventilators, and blood products for emergency transfusions.

Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air ambulance service and membership program with almost 600 employees. The new base will create nearly 20 new jobs on Whidbey Island. The aircraft will be staffed 24/7 with an ICU-level nurse, experienced paramedic, and a highly skilled pilot. In addition to the medical staff based in Coupeville, Life Flight Network employs a full time dedicated medical director and associate medical directors to oversee the high level of quality medical care provided across its service region. Life Flight Network serves the western United States, including Alaska, from bases throughout the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West.

Life Flight Network offers memberships for a $65 annual fee. Members incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of its reciprocal partners. To request more information about the membership program, or if organizations would like an in-person presentation, contact the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

ABOUT LIFE FLIGHT NETWORK

Life Flight Network, a not-for-profit air medical service, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS) and the National Accreditation Alliance of Medical Transport Applications (NAAMTA). Life Flight Network is the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States. Its service area covers the western United States, including Alaska. Life Flight Network is headquartered in Aurora, Oregon. For more information about Life Flight Network or to become a member, visit www.lifeflight.org.




Attached Media Files: Life Flight Network will station a helicopter equipped to act as a mobile intensive care unit, like the one pictured here, at its Whidbey Island base.

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II Opens at the Oregon Historical Society July 12
Oregon Historical Society - 07/11/19 12:17 PM

PHOTOS & PRESS KIT: http://bit.ly/fftrtfpresskit

Portland, OR – On Friday, July 12, the Oregon Historical Society is proud to open a new special exhibit called Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II. Produced by The National WWII Museum, the exhibit features artifacts, photographs, and oral histories that highlight some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African Americans during World War II, both overseas and on the Home Front.

In the years before World War II, African Americans in many parts of the country were treated as second-class citizens. The government condoned discriminatory practices and denied African Americans many rights and liberties through laws that kept them in positions of inferiority. Due to the landmark Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision in 1896, the United States was a nation where “separate but equal” was law in many states. In addition, many military leaders declared African Americans unfit to serve in combat. However, once the war began, thousands rushed to enlist, determined to fight for freedom, while still being denied equality at home.

On display through January 12, 2020, Fighting for the Right to Fight illustrates how hopes for securing equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated noncombat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for “Double Victory” that laid the groundwork for the modern Civil Rights Movement.

“The Oregon Historical Society is very proud to work with The National WWII Museum to ensure that this important and compelling exhibit could be seen and experienced in the Pacific Northwest,” said Oregon Historical Society Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk.

Through myriad interactive experiences, visitors will discover the wartime stories of individual service members who took part in this journey of extraordinary challenge, from unheralded heroes to famous names, including Alex Haley (US Coast Guard); Sammy Davis Jr. (US Army); Benjamin Davis Jr. (US Army Air Forces); Medgar Evers (US Army); and more.

The centerpiece of the exhibit is an original eight-minute video about the famed 332nd Fighter Group (better known as the Tuskegee Airmen), who in many ways became the public focus of African American participation during the war. Television personality Robin Roberts narrates the piece, whose own father flew with the Tuskegee Airmen during the war.

Including personal accounts from members of the 332nd Fighter Group, the video provides an overview of how their success in battle became a great symbol of bravery, helping refute notions that African Americans were inferior performers in the military, especially in roles requiring advanced training. Lieutenant Colonel William Holloman III recalls his leader Colonel Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.’s encouragement: “He said, ‘America’s watching you.’ He instilled in us a pride that I don’t think was there before we went in the service.”

Additionally, Fighting for the Right to Fight will feature two medals representing the seven African Americans who were awarded the Medal of Honor in 1997, the bittersweet result of a long investigation by the US military on discriminatory policies in the awarding of combat medals. The exhibit will also provide in-depth coverage of lesser-known events and service, such as that of the USS Mason, the first American ship to have a predominately African American crew.

A national advisory committee, including the late Dr. Clement Alexander Price of Rutgers University, helped frame the exhibition. The committee, led by cochairs Dr. John Morrow of the University of Georgia and Claudine Brown of the Smithsonian Institution, helped advise on the exhibition’s narrative arc and content. To view artifacts and images from the exhibit, and to access educator resources and lesson plans, visit righttofightexhibit.org.

Fighting for the Right to Fight will be on exhibit July 12, 2019 through January 12, 2020. The Oregon Historical Society’s museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday from 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. Admission is $10, and discounts are available for students, seniors, teachers, and youth. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.

 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

 

About The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world – why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today—so that future generations will know the price of freedom, and be inspired by what they learn. Dedicated in 2000 as The National D-Day Museum and now designated by Congress as America’s National WWII Museum, it celebrates the American spirit, the teamwork, optimism, courage and sacrifices of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and served on the Home Front. For more information, call 877-813-3329 or 504-528-1944 or visit nationalww2museum.org.

 


Lake Oswego Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Distributing Fentanyl From China Leading to Overdose Death
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/11/19 12:01 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Joseph Richard Caruso, 34, a prolific darknet narcotics vendor residing in Lake Oswego, Oregon, was sentenced today to 87 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for illegally distributing fentanyl that was linked to a 2017 fatal overdose in Wisconsin.

“A highly-coordinated effort by four law enforcement agencies led to Mr. Caruso’s arrest less than two days after his most recent inbound fentanyl package was discovered. It’s this sort of nimble and decisive law enforcement work that’s required to keep synthetic opioids off of our streets and prevent additional overdoses,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I applaud the tremendous work of everyone involved in this case.”

“This sentence is a significant step forward in eliminating deadly drugs from our community,” said Brad Bench, Special Agent in Charge of HSI Seattle. “Fentanyl is an extremely deadly substance. Blatant disregard for the safety of those who could have come into contact with it will not be tolerated. This case is a testament to the hard work HSI, and our law enforcement partners, do every day to combat these drugs from making it to our streets.”

According to court documents, on November 19, 2017, a U.S. Postal Inspection Service inspector discovered a suspicious package addressed to Caruso at the U.S. Postal Service Portland Air Cargo Center. The package was transported to the Portland Police Bureau’s Drugs and Vice Division for further examination in a safe environment. Wearing a ventilated hood for protection, a Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) agent assigned to the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Interdiction Taskforce opened the heat-sealed package and found a clear Ziploc baggie containing a fine powdery substance. A test conducted the following day at the Oregon State Police Laboratory confirmed the substance was cyclopropylfentanyl, a power opioid and Schedule I controlled substance.

Investigators removed the cyclopropylfentanyl from the package and replaced it with an inert powder similar in appearance. On November 21, 2017, they conducted a controlled delivery of the package with the inert powder to Caruso’s residence in Lake Oswego. Shortly thereafter, Caruso was observed retrieving the package from his apartment postal box. HSI agents and other task force officers confronted Caruso and placed him under arrest.

On April 3, 2019, Caruso pleaded guilty to one count of distributing a controlled substance resulting in death. At sentencing, he was ordered to forfeit more than $764,000 and a 2013 Audi A4 sedan.

This case was investigated by the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Interdiction Taskforce, Homeland Security Investigations, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Portland Police Bureau Drugs and Vice Division. It was prosecuted by Scott M. Kerin and Julia E. Jarrett, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The Oregon HIDTA program was established by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in June of 1999. In 2015 the program expanded into Idaho and was renamed the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA. The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA consists of 14 counties and the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Counties in the HIDTA include Oregon’s Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Umatilla and Washington counties, and Idaho’s Ada, Bannock and Canyon counties.

Drug abuse affects communities across the nation, and opioid abuse continues to be particularly devastating. The CDC reports that from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdoses. In 2016, 66% of drug overdose deaths involved an opioid. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury or death in the United States. In Oregon, the total number of deaths related to drug use increased 11 percent between from 2013 to 2017, with 546 known drug related deaths in 2017.

If you or someone you know suffers from addiction, please call the Lines for Life substance abuse helpline at 1-800-923-4357 or visit www.linesforlife.org. Phone support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also text “RecoveryNow” to 839863 between 8am and 11pm Pacific Time daily.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Happy Valley Man Sentenced to 57 Months in Federal Prison for Distributing Fentanyl and Possessing a Machine Gun
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/11/19 10:09 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Johnell Lee Cleveland, 37, of Happy Valley, Oregon, was sentenced today to 57 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for distributing cyclopropyl fentanyl, possessing a machine gun and money laundering.

According to court documents, in March 2018, the Portland Police Bureau (PPB), FBI, and IRS executed a series of search warrants on Cleveland’s residence in Happy Valley, his storage unit in Clackamas, Oregon and a stash house in Vancouver, Washington as part of an ongoing investigation of Cleveland, a suspected distributor of oxycodone pills in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area.

During the search of Cleveland’s home in Happy Valley, investigators seized $27,372 in cash, seven firearms, a ballistic vest, and more than 300 suspected oxycodone pills wrapped in two plastic baggies. One of the firearms seized was a fully-automatic machine gun with a drum magazine. In Cleveland’s garage, investigators found a white Mercedes-Benz with exterior bullet holes believed to be involved in a December 2017 downtown Portland shooting that left one man critically injured.

In searches of Cleveland’s storage unit and the Vancouver stash house, investigators found an additional $124,040 in cash, more than 900 additional suspected oxycodone pills and more than $100,000 worth of jewelry and Rolex watches. Laboratory tests revealed that the suspected oxycodone were in fact counterfeit pills made with cyclopropyl fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid.

On March 22, 2019, Cleveland pleaded guilty to one count of conspiring to distribute cyclopropyl-fentanyl, one count of possessing a machine gun and two counts of money laundering. As part of his plea, Cleveland agreed to abandon any interest in the seized firearms and forfeit all criminally-derived proceeds as identified by the government.

Cleveland is currently awaiting trial in Multnomah County Circuit Court for attempted murder with a firearm related to the December 2017 shooting in Portland.

This case was investigated by PPB, FBI and IRS Criminal Investigation. It was prosecuted by Peter Sax and Benjamin Tolkoff, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release