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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Jan. 27 - 3:41 pm
Wed. 01/27/21
Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board to Meet
State of Oregon - 01/27/21 2:21 PM

January 27, 2021

Salem, Oregon- The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board (EPAB) will meet at 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, February 3, 2021. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public.

This is a special EPAB meeting to address agenda items that are deemed time sensitive. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory boards’ website: https://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/Meeting-Documents.aspx.

What:        Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

When:       Wednesday February 3, 2021, 10:30 A.M. – 11:30 A.M.

Where:      Microsoft Teams (Click here to join the meeting)

Call Toll free: 1-503-446-4951 | Participant pin code: 2065-16136#

Who:         Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

The legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 276A.270-276. The board will advise the State Chief Information Officer (CIO) on key decisions and strategic choices about how the state CIO manages and operates the state’s web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the internet. The board provides oversight to specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the State Chief Information Officer’s E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board’s advice, the state CIO wants to make the Oregon web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for Oregonians to interact with state government. 

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Online benefits application system unavailable this weekend while upgrades are made (Date Correction)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/27/21 1:56 PM

Salem, OR – The state’s online application systems for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits will be unavailable from 5 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 29 until Monday, Feb. 1, at 7 a.m. This downtime is to support an upgrade to the state’s eligibility determination system, known as ONE, to add more benefit options and expand the system to more Oregonians.

 

Beginning Monday, Feb. 1, residents across the state will be able to use the upgraded ONE system to apply online for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits with a single application. They also will be able to renew their coverage, monitor communications about their benefits and update their case information online.

 

The project is a joint effort between the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

 

"We are really pleased to be entering the last phase of this major technology upgrade," said ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. "Oregonians across the state can now apply for multiple programs with one online application without having to leave their homes."

 

The ONE system upgrade, which began in July 2020, has been implemented in phases. This is the final phase in this statewide upgrade.

 

This final phase will expand the combined cash, childcare, food and medical benefits online application option to the Portland metro area and surrounding counties.

 

Starting Feb. 1, 2021, all Oregonians will have the option to apply for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits over the phone, online or in person at any local Aging and People with Disabilities, Area Agency on Aging or Self-Sufficiency Programs office that provides those benefits.

 

Please visit the ODHS Benefits and Assistance page to learn more about the programs available to qualifying Oregonians. For more information about the ONE upgrade, go to benefits.oregon.gov.

 


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Jan. 27, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/27/21 1:21 PM
2021-01/3986/141952/2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1974_(1).jpg
2021-01/3986/141952/2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1974_(1).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/3986/141952/thumb_2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1974_(1).jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Jan.27, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Caption:
Mill City, Ore. - Jan. 25, 2021 - An aerial view of Direct Temporary Housing for Mill City survivors from the wildfires of 2020. Photo by FEMA. 
File: Mill City Aerial View 2.png

Blue River, Ore. - September 30 2020 - The process to remove damaged trees has begun. The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes and vehicles in Blue River, Oregon. Photo by David Yost/FEMA.
2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1974.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/3986/141952/2020-30-09_4562_ORFires_BlueRiver_1974_(1).jpg , 2021-01/3986/141952/Mill_City_Aerial_View_2.png

Oregon ends 2020 with the lowest number of children in foster care in 15 years
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/27/21 12:59 PM

(Salem) – Despite the challenges of the global COVID-19 pandemic and historic wildfires, the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division was able to reduce the use of foster care to a historic low, return all children placed at out-of-state residential treatment facilities to Oregon and decrease the use of temporary lodging.

On Jan. 1, 2021 there were 6,144 children in foster care, the lowest number of children in care in 15 years.

“We all know that infants, children, adolescents and young adults do best growing up in a family that can provide love, support, lifelong learning, shared values and important memories,” said Child Welfare Director Rebecca Jones Gaston. “That is why we are committed to doing everything we can to provide the necessary supports to help families safely stay together and decrease the use of unnecessary foster care.”

Key Child Welfare Division data and accomplishments for 2020:

  • Decreased the number of children in foster care by 11% compared to 2019.
  • Eliminated the usage of out-of-state residential treatment facilities since July.
  • Decreased the use of temporary lodging by 66% percent in the last twelve months. (Temporary lodging is the temporary placement of a child in a hotel room because there is not an appropriate placement immediately available. )
  • Decreased the average wait times at the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline (ORCAH) by 46 percent from 8.07 minutes in 2019 to 4.33 minutes in 2020.
  • Family reunifications in 2020: 1,934
  • Adoptions finalized in 2020: 811
  • Guardianships finalized in 2020: 355

Oregon Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation

In 2020, the division began a series of discussions with its workforce, community partners, and Oregon Tribal Nations about what the division can and should do to support and preserve families and ensure that children in Oregon grow up in safe and loving homes.

What grew from these collaborative discussions was the Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation. The Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation brings a racial equity and anti-racism lens to every aspect of the work of the division and emphasizes that it will work to prevent maltreatment and the need for foster care, support families, and keep children in their homes whenever possible.

Support and training for foster providers is available statewide

As of Dec. 31, 2020, there were 1,344 foster providers enrolled in KEEP Fostering, a program for Oregon that went statewide in 2020. Available virtually, KEEP Fostering is an evidence-based support and skill enhancement program for foster and kinship parents. It offers culturally specific support for foster providers caring for Tribal children, LGBTQIA+ children, as well as support in Spanish and American Sign Language.

Family First Prevention Services Act in Oregon

Oregon’s Family First Prevention Services prevention plan was submitted to the United States Children's Bureau for review on Nov. 6, 2020. Learn more about Oregon’s prevention plan here. The prevention plan is the first step toward Oregon's goal of transforming the child welfare system to one that is prevention-oriented by providing supports and services to family before foster care is necessary.

Fatality Review and Prevention Efforts

The Fatality Prevention and Review Program was created in February 2020 to increase the independence and transparency of child safety and fatality reviews through the Critical Incident Review Team (CIRT) process. In 2020, 88 child fatalities were reported to the division and 34 of those cases met the criteria for a CIRT.   

The CIRT conducts reviews into child fatalities when the victim, their siblings or other children living in the household have had previous interactions with the Child Welfare Division within 12 months of the fatality. The CIRT is focused on identifying whether any systemic issues contributed to the fatality and if so, how they can be addressed and corrected to prevent future fatalities. Key safety and prevention initiatives implemented in 2020 included training related to suicide prevention, safe sleep for babies, and how to respond to chronic neglect for child welfare staff. Also, in 2020, the division joined the National Partnership for Child Safety, a collaborative group of leaders and critical incident review teams from 26 jurisdictions across the country with a mission to improve child safety and prevent child maltreatment fatalities.

How to support children and families in Oregon

Support children and families in Oregon by becoming a resource (foster) parent for children in foster care.

The MyNeighbOR program helps meet the essential needs of children, families, and young adults impacted by foster care. Learn how to provide support.

About the ODHS Child Welfare Division

The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division is committed to transforming itself to better support the individual needs of families and to best serve Oregon’s children and young people. Read the Child Welfare Division Vision for Transformation to learn more.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Oregon Community Foundation Announces 2021 Priorities Aimed at Building Stronger, More Equitable Communities Throughout Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 01/27/21 11:00 AM
OCF 2020 Accomplishments
OCF 2020 Accomplishments
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6858/141942/thumb_OCF-2020-recap-graphic-v2.png

Oregon Community Foundation Announces 2021 Priorities Aimed at Building Stronger, More Equitable Communities Throughout Oregon

OCF focuses investments on critical systems and infrastructure needed to support Oregon communities for years to come

Portland, Ore. – January 27, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) today announced 2021 priorities that build upon the foundation’s commitment to support Oregon communities through the COVID-19 pandemic and build a better Oregon where everyone can thrive. The announcement follows the latest wave of economic pain brought on by a pandemic that continues to intensify.

In response to unprecedented challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires, alongside increased visibility of historical and current systems of racial injustices, OCF builds upon significant shifts last year to ensure resources are deployed where they are needed most as the foundation transitions into 2021.

“Communities throughout Oregon continue to struggle with food insecurity, job losses, small business closures, children struggling to learn and the devastation of entire towns impacted by COVID-19 and wildfires,” said Max Williams, OCF president and CEO. “We have seen how these crises are compounding existing inequities, resulting in disproportionate impacts on Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), low-income Oregonians and struggling rural communities,” he added.

Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently - distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. 

Williams noted that every sector of society that OCF supports is grappling with the need for systems change: education, arts and culture, housing, business infrastructure, health care, and more. Recognizing that community organizations are the heroes on the front lines of addressing these changes, he recommitted OCF to deepening efforts, in partnership with community, to deliver relevant, timely support to help Oregonians in need.

He pointed to four impact areas in 2020 where OCF, alongside partner funders, business leaders and individual donors delivered overwhelmingly generous and critical response.

  • Meeting Urgent Basic Needs of Oregon Communities: Established early in 2020, in collaboration with partners throughout the state, the Oregon Community Recovery Fund rapidly deployed $87.7 million grants to 1,350 community-based organizations at the front lines of the Coronavirus outbreak. Recognizing the disproportionate health, social and economic impacts for BIPOC and rural communities – OCF directed more than 40% of the COVID-recovery funds to BIPOC-led or focused organizations.
  • Stabilizing Small Businesses: Small businesses in Oregon make up about 99.4% of all businesses and employ 55% of Oregon’s employees. Many small businesses such as childcare centers, restaurants, and other businesses reported they would not remain open and retain employees without immediate assistance to pay their operating costs. The Oregon Small Business Stabilization Fund, launched in March 2020, awarded $2.6 million in grants to organizations that assist small businesses across the state. Forty-one percent of the grants were awarded to organizations that specifically serve women or people of color-owned businesses. Grant recipients used the funds to make small grants or loans to businesses in their communities.  
  • Providing Relief for Artists Devastated by COVID-19 Impact:  The depth of financial loss in the arts and culture community has been staggering. The creativity of artists and cultural organizations is vital to building the collective hope and inspiration needed to process the trauma, grief and loss of the past year. Eight collaborating funders and many individual donors distributed $5.25 million in funds to 400 arts organizations and 646 individual artists.

According to OCF, the challenges of the past year also presented opportunities for the foundation to strengthen how it is addressing deep and widening disparities among Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and rural Oregonians to create positive systemic change that strengthen our state.

“To effectively dismantle systems of oppression and create equitable opportunities and advancement, we must invest in local organizations leading the work in our communities,” said Sonia Worcel, the OCF chief community impact officer. “A stronger, more equitable future is achievable for Oregon if we work together to address root causes of these inequities, and philanthropy can play a strategic and leveraged role to make this happen.”

To that end, Worcel forecasted priority focus areas in the years ahead for OCF that will encompass grant making, research, a strengthened policy and advocacy agenda and concerted efforts in community engagement approaches that lead to more equitable and responsive systems supporting Oregon families.

  • Protect Our Houseless Neighbors: Affordable housing availability in Oregon has only been exacerbated by the pandemic and wildfires. OCF is advocating to increase federal funding for affordable housing and investing in community-driven solutions like Project Turnkey, the $65 million public/private/community-convened effort to convert hotels and motels into non-congregate shelter, and ultimately into transitional/permanent supportive housing units.
  • Ensure Kids Thrive: OCF is advocating for significant investment in the nation’s childcare system to help families access quality, affordable care they’ll need to return to work and for the economy to thrive. OCF supports retaining recent investments in state equity plans for African American, Latinx, and Native American students; the Student Investment Account of the Student Success Act; additional investments in early learning programs and an expansion of a Black Student Success initiative launched in 2019.  
  • Prepare for Long-Term Wildfire Recovery: The Community Rebuilding Fund was established at OCF at the request of Governor Kate Brown and launched in partnership with OCF, Meyer Memorial Trust and The Ford Family Foundation in response to the wildfires that started on Labor Day. Working in shared purpose, resources will support the communities that were impacted by the fires and recognizing that recovery will be a multi-year process. The fund will support community-led, equitable investments for a stronger, more resilient Oregon.
  • Support Disproportionately Impacted Communities: OCF research outlined in a new report, ‘Cornerstones: Economic Mobility and Belonging in Oregon’ helps identify key areas of investment and policy change needed to create more high opportunity neighborhoods in Oregon: economically integrated neighborhoods, high-quality schools, living wage jobs, and increased social capital. Findings inform OCF grantmaking, programs and advocacy and will serve as a working framework to bring communities together in shared purpose to address economic and racial equity. In 2021, OCF’s responsive grantmaking program will continue to support Oregon communities with a sharpened focus on the most pressing challenges: the impact of COVID-19, promoting racial justice, wildfire recovery and the underinvestment and lack of infrastructure in under-resourced rural and marginalized communities across the state. 

“In wave after wave of crises throughout 2020, OCF’s ecosystem of good emerged as a reflection of Oregon’s better angels - resilient in the face of great difficulty - responding with urgency and priority to the disproportionate impacts faced by communities, said Williams. “The magnitude of pressing needs in our state will continue for months and years to come, and we are relying on this sense of community and generosity to meet the moment.”

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change.

For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: OCF 2020 RoundUp 2021 Forecast 01 27 2021 , OCF 2020 Accomplishments , 2021-01/6858/141942/Greensprings_RFD_Volunteers_071318805.jpg , 2021-01/6858/141942/Greensprings_RFD_Volunteer_153319814.jpg

PUC Approves Deadline Extension to Continue Offering Higher Subsidies on Telephone or Broadband Service for Low-Income Oregonians
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 01/27/21 10:15 AM

SALEM, Ore. – In June 2020, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) was allocated $3.5 million in federal Coronavirus Relief Fund dollars for the Oregon Lifeline Program to temporarily increase the discount on telephone or high-speed internet service for eligible low-income households, which expired December 30, 2020. Yesterday, the PUC approved to extend the deadline to continue offering substantial discounts through June 30, 2021.

“The decision to extend the increased subsidy to benefit those experiencing financial hardships due the pandemic was an easy one,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “These funds lessen the burden on low-income Oregonians, and provides them an affordable option to retain voice or broadband internet service to keep them connected to family, friends, and resources.”

Oregon Lifeline, a federal and state government program, typically provides a $7 per month discount for telephone or high-speed internet service with participating companies. Through June 2021, qualifying Oregonians can receive a discount of $12 per month, a more than 70 percent increase in the subsidy.

Oregonians receiving benefits from select public assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or Medicaid may qualify. Residents may also qualify if their total household income is at or below 135 percent of federal poverty guidelines.

For additional information about the Oregon Lifeline program or to request an application, call 800-848-4442, weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., email at spf@state.or.us">puc.rspf@state.or.us or visit www.lifeline.oregon.gov.

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FBI Launches National Effort to Find Person Who May Have Information Regarding the Identity of a Child Sexual Assault Victim (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/27/21 9:49 AM
Jane Doe 43 photo c
Jane Doe 43 photo c
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/3585/141947/thumb_janedoe43c.jpg

The FBI is sending out a national alert, seeking the public’s assistance to identify an unknown woman who may have critical information pertaining to the identity of a child victim in an ongoing sexual exploitation investigation. Photographs and an informational poster depicting the unknown individual, known only as Jane Doe 43, are attached and can be found online at the FBI website at http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/ecap

Video of the unidentified female, Jane Doe 43, shown with a child was first seen and likely created in October of 2019.

Jane Doe 43 is described as a White female with dark hair between 20 and 30 years of age. She is heard speaking English in the video.

There is no specific indication that Jane Doe 43 has ties to Oregon. However, given the nature of the investigation, the FBI is releasing this information and these images nationally in hopes of locating her.

Anyone with information to provide should submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov/, or call the FBI’s toll-free tip line at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324). The public is reminded no charges have been filed in this case, and the pictured individual is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

This individual is being sought as part of the FBI’s Operation Rescue Me and Endangered Child Alert Program (ECAP) initiatives, both of which represent strategic partnerships between the FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Operation Rescue Me focuses on utilizing clues obtained through in-depth image analysis to identify the child victims depicted in child exploitation material, while ECAP seeks national and international media exposure of unknown adults (referred to as John/Jane Does) who visibly display their faces and/or other distinguishing characteristics in association with child pornography images.

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Attached Media Files: Jane Doe 43 poster , Jane Doe 43 photo c , Jane Doe 43 photo b , Jane Doe 43 photo a

Tue. 01/26/21
College Place Public Schools Announces Retirement of Long-Time Board Member Doug Case
College Place Sch. Dist. - 01/26/21 9:00 PM

College Place Public Schools Board Member Doug Case has retired from the board after eleven years of service (2009-2020).  Doug served for many years as the Board Chair and was instrumental in the 2012 School Construction Bond that saw the district add College Place High School, a new Davis Elementary School, Sager Middle School (formerly Meadowbrook Intermediate School site), and a new transportation facility.  When Mr. Case joined the district in 2009, district enrolment was nearly 500 students and now proudly serves over 1600. 

CPPS Board Chair Mandy Thompson stated, “On behalf of the board, I would like to extend a big thank you to Doug Case for his service on the CPPS School Board.  His dedication to, and knowledge of the community, along with his leadership have been a huge assets throughout his time of service.  Doug will be greatly missed and we wish him the very best.”

The entire school district appreciates Doug’s years of service and wishes him the best as he plans to use the time to spend with family and to pursue some of his own personal goals.  Superintendent Jim Fry stated, “Coming into the district I saw quickly Doug’s love and commitment to the students and community of College Place.  He has been a tremendous mentor for me, and overall asset to the community.  Doug has put in countless hours in ensuring the very best for the city and children of College Place.  Best wishes on a well-earned retirement from the board.”

College Place School District seeks an interim replacement for District #4 (at large) School Board Position to finish the term expiring November 2021.  Interested applicants must reside within the District boundaries; supply a written biography and a statement as to why they are interested in running for the Board position.  See our web page www.cpps.org for boundaries map, Board Policy 1114 and 1114P.  All information must be received by February 10, 2021 EOD to the District office 1755 S College Avenue College Place, WA. 99362. Candidates will be publically interviewed at the February 23, 2021 Board Meeting at 6:00PM. Please contact the District office at 509-525-4827 with any questions.


Updated: Oregon reports 796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/26/21 6:39 PM

Jan. 26, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 22 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,904, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 796 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 139,355.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,422 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,178 doses were administered on Jan. 25 and 7,244 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 25.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 325,473 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 589,200 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 308, which is 12 fewer than yesterday. There are 70 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (21), Clackamas (100), Clatsop (11), Columbia (8), Coos (2), Crook (8), Curry (2), Deschutes (70), Douglas (20), Harney (9), Hood River (8), Jackson (49), Jefferson (1), Josephine (14), Klamath (19), Lake (3), Lane (50), Lincoln (6), Linn (12), Malheur (16), Marion (61), Morrow (1), Multnomah (195), Polk (11), Sherman (1), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (18), Union (6), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (37) and Yamhill (31).

Oregon’s 1,883rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Jan. 25 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,884th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Crook County who tested positive on Jan. 16 and died on Jan. 22 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,885th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Coos County who tested positive on Dec. 19 and died on Jan. 24 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,886th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Jan. 23 at St. Charles Bend hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,887th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Jan. 25 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,888th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 14 and died on Jan. 23 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,889th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Hood River County who became symptomatic on Jan. 12 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Jan. 22 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,890th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 24 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,891st COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Jan. 23 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,892nd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 23 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,893rd COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 21 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,894th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Jan. 21 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,895th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 7 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,896th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Jan. 25 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,897th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 125 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,898th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 22 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,899th COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Dec. 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,900th COVID-19 death is a 35-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,901st COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 20 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,902nd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 22 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,903rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 1 and died on Jan. 18. Location of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,904th COVID-19 death is a 27-year-old woman in Hood River County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 23 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. She had no underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 01/26/21 5:38 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021, at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on the federal Continued Assistance Act (CAA) that extends and provides additional federal unemployment benefits, and more on Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Jan. 27. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/930/141941/01.27.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Committee to score recreation grant applications Feb. 2-5
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/26/21 3:49 PM

RE-SENDING WITH CORRECTED WEB LINK FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT GRANT PROGRAM: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-lggp.aspx#2 

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The Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee will conduct a series of virtual meetings Feb. 2-5 to hear from grant applicants and rank proposed parks and recreation projects around the state. The meetings will be conducted via Zoom and are open to the public.

Applicants to the Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) will present their proposed projects to the committee for review. The committee will evaluate and score all applications and create a priority ranking list of projects to be funded. The priority ranking list will be forwarded to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission for final review and approval.

Meetings Schedule:

  • Feb. 2: 8 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
  • Feb. 3: 8 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
  • Feb. 4: 8 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
  • Feb. 5: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m.

A schedule listing applicants and their specific presentation times is posted on the Local Government Grant Program web page at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-lggp.aspx#2. A link to register to view the Zoom meeting is also posted at the site.

The LGGP provides grant assistance for public park and outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Eligible LGGP applicants include cities, counties, park and recreation districts and port districts. The LGGP Advisory Committee consists of 10 volunteer members who represent various constituents across the state.

The program was established in 1998 under the Parks and Natural Resources Fund. The program is funded by a portion of Oregon Lottery dollars and administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD).


Leader of Portland-Area Prescription Drug Trafficking Scheme Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/26/21 2:48 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland man was sentenced to federal prison today for his role in a conspiracy to distribute oxycodone fraudulently obtained from local pharmacies.

Chase Adam Conway, 36, was sentenced to four years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in June 2018, agents from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) began investigating Conway. They learned that Conway, who had a long history of committing drug frauds, was enlisting female runners to fraudulently obtain oxycodone from pharmacies in the Portland area. Conway would deliberately seek out runners who were heavily addicted to oxycodone and willing to risk criminal liability in exchange for a portion of the prescriptions filled or a small amount of cash.

Conway obtained medical prescription paper and used a home printer to place the names and DEA registration numbers of real doctors on the prescriptions. He would then provide his co-conspirators with fraudulent identification to use in conjunction with the fake prescriptions at various pharmacies. After obtaining the oxycodone pills, Conway redistributed to them for profit to large quantity vendors and street customers.

In the fall of 2018, agents tracked Conway’s car and obtained evidence from several pharmacies where he and his accomplices filled prescriptions. In February 2019, agents executed a search warrant on Conway’s rented room and mobile phone, seizing prescription paper, lists of runners and pharmacies, doctors’ names and DEA numbers, and dozens of communications call logs and text messages with various co-defendants.

On October 6, 2020, Conway was charged by criminal information with conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute oxycodone and, one week later, he pleaded guilty. As part of his plea agreement, Conway is also subject to a $10,000 money judgement.

This case was investigated by the DEA. It was prosecuted by Kemp Strickland, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Richland School Zones Active Tomorrow -- Motorists Use Caution
City of Richland - 01/26/21 1:21 PM
2021-01/5957/141930/school_safety_image.jpg
2021-01/5957/141930/school_safety_image.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/5957/141930/thumb_school_safety_image.jpg

Richland middle schools begin in-person learning tomorrow in a hybrid schedule. School zone safety beacon lights will be flashing throughout the day during times of transit. Please use caution and remember to slow down in school zones.

The City of Richland has a school safety page that links to the hybrid school flash times and also provides a map that identifies safe walking routes for each elementary school in Richland.

For more information, see www.ci.richland.wa.us/saferoutes.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/5957/141930/school_safety_image.jpg

Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports two in-custody deaths
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/26/21 12:48 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 26, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 65 and 75 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the fortieth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 26, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the forty-first AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. Oregon's prisons have not escaped the devastating impacts of COVID-19. More than half of DOC's incarcerated population have been identified as COVID-19-vulnerable, based on community standard criteria. Generally, incarcerated people are in worse health than their peers in the community, and Oregon has one of the oldest incarcerated populations in the country. DOC employees will continue to work to bring outbreaks under control as positive cases in prisons not only impact employees and AICs, but also the surrounding communities.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines is determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC works with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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YSD Elementary Students Donate to the Red Cross Via Earned "THINK Points"
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 01/26/21 9:00 AM

On Thursday, January 28 at 1:00 PM students, teachers, and administrators from these schools will virtually award their checks to the local branch of the Red Cross.

Registration link: https://edgenuity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_DuLrFvANTka54VVcyiPzkQ

Date: January 28, 2021

Time: 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm PST

Description: Join us to celebrate the students and schools that donated their Imagine Math THINK Points to the American Red Cross! We'd like to recognize all the amazing students of Yakima School District who completed their math problems in support of the Red Cross Wildlife Relief Fund. Learn how your donations have impacted your community as we present a donation to the Red Cross.

Information about this special event:

This past school year, two Yakima elementary schools (Ridgeview and Whitney) have utilized Imagine Math to help students learn math even while learning at home. Imagine Math is an award-winning, online computer program designed to help students gain mastery and confidence in mathematics.  

 Within the program, students earn “THINK Points” by completing math problems. Students can donate these THINK Points to select charities.  

 Due to the Wildfires of 2020, students from over 160 School Districts in California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska, had the opportunity to donate their THINK Points to a Wildfire Relief Fund. 

 From over 160 School Districts, 8 top-performing schools were selected to donate the funds to their local Red Cross. Whitney and Ridgeview were two of the eight! This came because while in the first year of using the program, Whitney and Ridgeview students have led their schools to be Top-3 in Washington State in usage, lessons attempted, and lessons passed within Imagine Math.   

 This remarkable feat has been made possible through the tireless efforts of teachers at both schools and the enthusiastic support of the administrative teams at Ridgeview Elementary (K.C. Mitchell–Principal, Trina Hovsepian–Vice Principal, Jennifer Henson–Instructional Facilitator) and Whitney Elementary (Kim Newell–Principal, Brandon Hunt–Vice Principal, and Teresa Blondin–Instructional Facilitator). 

 On Thursday, January 28 at 1:00 PM students, teachers, and administrators from these schools will virtually award their checks to the local branch of the Red Cross.  


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Chinese Shipping & Shopping Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/26/21 9:00 AM
TT - Chinese Shipping - GRAPHIC - January 26, 2021
TT - Chinese Shipping - GRAPHIC - January 26, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/3585/141463/thumb_TT_-_Chinese_shipping_-_GRAPHIC_-_January_26_2021.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against Chinese shipping and shopping scams.

According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, bait and switch cases by online Chinese vendors targeting Oregonians have increased by 30 percent since June 2020. They account for 65 percent of all online shopping scams reported to the FBI in Oregon.

The scam usually starts with victims buying items from vendors they think are located in the U.S. From there, the bad actors do one of two things.

In the first version of the scam, the victim orders an item online, but instead of receiving that item he ordered he receives a package of small, lightweight materials such as disposable face masks, stickers, or plastic trinkets. Once the vendor generates a shipping tracking number, it can provide that information to the payment processor (such as PayPal) so that the processor will release funds to the seller. At the same time, the seller is able to minimize its shipping costs due to the light weight nature of the package.

In another version of this scam, the vendor sends an item that is loosely-related to the one purchased, claiming that was the item the buyer had ordered. This is an attempt to convince consumers they had mistaken their orders and accept the switched item. Consumers who requested refunds received offers of partial refunds if the victim returned the item to an address in China.

In these cases, shipping costs to China almost always exceeded the refund amounts, discouraging consumers from completing the refund. Notably, many of the victims reported the packages they were sent actually showed sender information originating in the United States, so there should have been be no need to return the item to China. Additionally, no invoices or order information were included in the packages so any returns could not have been attributed to that particular customer. 

To protect yourself, make sure you research vendors – particularly those who advertise through social media platforms or through unsolicited messages. Use a credit card to pay and pay through a reputable payment processing platform. Make sure whatever platform you use has strong refund and dispute processes.

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Chinese Shipping - AUDIO - January 26, 2021 , TT - Chinese Shipping - GRAPHIC - January 26, 2021

Cascadia Anniversary a Good Reminder to be Earthquake Ready
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/26/21 8:33 AM

Note to media: OEM Geologic Hazards Program Coordinator Althea Rizzo is available for interviews 8:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. today.

Salem, OR— January 26, 2021—The 600-mile fault line of the Cascadia Subduction Zone runs from northern California to British Columbia, bringing with it potential danger of devastation to communities along the West Coast by the effects of a high-magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunamis.

Although it’s been 321 years since the last Cascadia event, and the chances are far and few between, 2020 reminded us that anything can happen and to be prepared for the unexpected.

“Oregon is one of the most earthquake-prone areas in the continental United States, and over the years, we have had many quakes – large and small,” said Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards program coordinator for Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management.

Rizzo says there have been more than 40 earthquakes in the last 10,000 years along the Cascadia fault, some as few as 190 years apart or as long as 1200 years apart. The last earthquake that occurred in this fault was on January 26, 1700, with an estimated 9.0 magnitude.

“Oregon certainly has the potential for a 9.0+ magnitude Cascadia quake, and a tsunami of up to 100 feet in height,” said Rizzo. “It’s a good idea to be ready.”

Earthquakes can strike suddenly, without warning and at any time of the year. Any and all preventative or warning resources can help to mitigate loss of lives, severe injury and devastating infrastructure damage.

Earthquake shaking may be so strong that running or crawling is not possible. The safest action to take during an earthquake is drop, cover, and hold on.

    • DROP where you are, onto your hands and knees – this position protects you from being knocked down and allows you to stay low and crawl to shelter if nearby.  If no shelter is nearby, crawl next to an interior wall (away from windows).
    • COVER your head and neck with one arm and hand; if a sturdy table or desk is nearby, crawl under it and hold on with one hand. If there is no table or desk near you, maintain a crawling positon to protect your vital organs and be ready to move if necessary. 
    • HOLD ON until shaking stops. You are more likely to be injured if you try to move around during strong shaking.

Guidelines on what to do if you are disabled or in other locations than a familiar place such as home, work or school (in a high rise, in a stadium/theater, outdoors, driving, etc.) are available at shakeout.org.

Oregon Office of Emergency Management has many tools and resources to be prepared for a Cascadia quake and other disasters. For more information, visit www.oregon.gov/oem/2WeeksReady.


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Fatal Crash on Hwy 140E - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 01/26/21 7:59 AM

On Monday, January 25, 2021 at approximately 3:00 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 140E near milepost 32.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Nissan PU, operated by William Springer (41) of Beatty, was westbound when it lost control on icy roads and rolled down an embankment.

Springer sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Passenger, Michelle Thomasson (51) of Beatty, was transported to Sky Lakes Medical Center for injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff's Office, Bonanza Fire Department, and ODOT.


Mon. 01/25/21
Yakima School District Bond Refinancing Saves Taxpayers Over $2.8 Million
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 01/25/21 5:30 PM

As reported at today's school board meeting, the Yakima School District has taken advantage of unprecedented low bond interest rates to save taxpayers money.  A recent refinancing authorized by the Board of Directors will result in savings of $2,868,230 for taxpayers over the next 10 years. In the issuance of refunding bonds on Wednesday, January 20th, the District garnered a very low rate of just 0.87% on the new bonds, a new low for the District.  This compares to 5.00% on the bonds being refinanced. 

“This was a great opportunity to demonstrate good fiscal stewardship and save our taxpayers a significant amount of money,” said Superintendent Trevor Greene.  He emphasized that the savings will go directly to taxpayers through lower future tax collections. “This is an incredible saving that will now stay in our community and local economy, rather than go to pay interest on outstanding bonds,” said Greene.

Although there has been substantial volatility in the bond market due to Covid 19, the Interest rates on these types of bonds reached historic lows over the past few months according to Becky Nissen, the District’s Executive Director of Financial Services. “We have been monitoring the market closely over the past six months and working diligently to refinance these bonds; we are pleased to be able to provide this savings to the district taxpayers,” said Nissen.

“Compared to the old rate on the bonds of 5.00%, the new rate of 0.87% is rather astounding.  I am sure most homeowners with a mortgage would like to get that rate.” Nissen notes.

Superintendent Greene and District Board note that it is nice to have this great news during a challenging time for many in the area.


Richland Seeks Interested Citizens for Board and Commission Vacancies
City of Richland - 01/25/21 3:31 PM

The City of Richland has vacancies on four (4) of its boards and commissions. Richland residents are encouraged to apply for the following: 

• Arts Commission

• Board of Adjustment

• Code Enforcement Board

• Parks and Recreation Commission, both Adult and Youth positions

The Arts Commission and the Parks and Recreation Commission has both adult and youth position vacancies. All boards and commissions typically meet once per month, or as needed.

This is a great opportunity to learn how your city operates and to help shape its future. For further details on these positions or to apply, visit www.ci.richland.wa.us/bccvacancies and scroll to the Current Vacancies page. Applications will be accepted from January 25, 2021, through February 8, 2021.

Here is a brief description of each board and commission:

Arts Commission supports City Council by encouraging and supporting the arts within Richland to improve the quality of life, strengthen economic development, and revitalize the community. It is an advisory body to City Council and staff to provide expertise on visual, performing, and literary arts to enrich the cultural life of the community.

Board of Adjustment conducts public hearings and makes decisions on applications for special use permits; grant permits when requirements are fully met; grants or denies variances to the regulations or restrictions in the Richland Municipal Code (RMC) when the variance is in harmony with general purposes and intent of the RMC; hears and decides on appeals to administrative interpretations of the city's zoning code.

Code Enforcement Board conducts hearings on civil violations of the Richland Municipal Code (RMC); determines whether a civil violation of the RMC has occurred; assess monetary penalties in instances where it has been determined that civil violations of the RMC have occurred; adopts rules of procedure for hearings concerning civil violations of the RMC; conducts hearings on appeal of any notice of civil trespass issued pursuant to Chapter 2.34 RMC; performs such other duties and provide such additional information, assistance and advice to the City Council as the City Council may request or direct.

Parks and Recreation Commission Advises the City Council based on public input of City-provided facilities, civic beautification in order to enhance the quality of life, environmental and cultural preservation, and programs for recreation.

For more information, please contact, Jennifer Rogers, City Clerk (509) 942-7389


Missing child alert -- Mataya Gearhart, a foster child, is missing and in danger
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/25/21 12:33 PM
A photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart
A photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/973/141900/thumb_Mataya_Gearhart_2.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Mataya Gearhart, age 17, a foster child who went missing from Portland. on Jan. 23, 2021. She is believed to be in danger.

Mataya Gearhart is believed to either be in Portland or to have traveled out Oregon, possibly to California. She may be traveling in a Lexus with a 23-year-old man.

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) asks the public to help in the effort to find her and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her or have information about her.

Name: Mataya Gearhart
Pronouns: She/Her
Date of birth: Nov. 7, 2003
Height: 5’06
Weight: 180 pounds
Eyes: Dark brown
Hair: Black, shaved
Other identifying information: Mataya wears wigs over her shaved head
Portland Police Bureau Case #2122550
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1411708

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: A photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart , A photo of missing child Mataya Gearhart

Stocking Stuffer Yields $75,000 Prize
Oregon Lottery - 01/25/21 11:56 AM
Photo of winner Contessa McConnell
Photo of winner Contessa McConnell
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Every holiday, Contessa McConnell’s sister buys Oregon Lottery Scratch-its as stocking stuffers. And this year, McConnell is very happy the tradition continued!

“We were sitting around on Christmas Eve,” said McConnell, of Klamath Falls, “and my brother was scratching his Scratch-it he got from our sister, so I thought I would join him.”

McConnell began scratching her “Reindeer Riches” Scratch-it. “My mom asked me what I was doing, and I told her I thought I’d won,” said McConnell. “I took out my phone and used the Lottery’s app and scanned the ticket and it said I’d won $75,000! Both my brother and sister were giving me a hard time since either one of them could have gotten my ticket.”

McConnell made the trip to Salem to claim her prize January 21. Her sister had purchased the winning ticket at Sherm’s Thunderbird Market in Klamath Falls.

To protect the health and safety of its employees and the public, the Oregon Lottery has temporarily closed the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices. Officials with the Lottery continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely. If players have a winning ticket, they can fill out a claim form on the Oregon Lottery website, https://oregonlottery.org/about/claim-prizes , and then mail in the signed ticket and claim form.

Players who have winning tickets of $50,000 or more, will need to make an appointment to come to the Oregon Lottery office in Salem. Call 503-540-1000 for assistance. As always, players should be certain to sign the back of their tickets.

Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

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Attached Media Files: Photo of winner Contessa McConnell

Oregon reports 435 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/25/21 11:51 AM

Jan. 25, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 435 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,882, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 435 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 138,587.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,390 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,182 doses were administered on Jan. 24 and 1,208 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 24.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 308,051 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 492,450 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 320, which is 10 more than yesterday. There are 75 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (46), Columbia (1), Coos (11), Crook (1), Deschutes (21), Douglas (12), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (25), Josephine (10), Lake (4), Lane (36), Lincoln (5), Linn (7), Marion (48), Morrow (1), Multnomah (105), Polk (6), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (20), Union (3), Wasco (6), Washington (50) and Yamhill (9).

Here is more information on the deaths reported today:

Oregon’s 1,881st COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Jan. 23 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,882nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 14 and died on Jan. 23 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Statement by U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams on Racist and Threatening Letters Sent to Community Leaders, Activists
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/25/21 11:39 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy. J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, released the following statement on racist and threatening letters sent to Portland area community leaders and activists:

"We are aware that some Portland area community leaders and activists have, in recent months, received racist letters threatening violence against them, their families, or people they know. I want to reassure the community that the U.S. Attorney’s Office takes these threats very seriously and, together with our partners at the FBI and U.S. Postal Inspection Service, are engaged in an active investigation to determine who is responsible for creating and sending these letters and to evaluate criminal wrongdoing.

We need the public’s help to keep our communities safe and protect all Oregonians. To that end, we urge you to submit any information you have about these or other threats of violence. Tips can be submitted directly to the FBI’s Portland Field Office by calling (503) 224-4181 or by visiting tips.fbi.gov. While our investigation is ongoing, we must respectfully decline further comment.”

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Attached Media Files: PDF Statement

New jobs website launches for growing developmental disabilities field
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/25/21 8:41 AM

The Office of Developmental Disabilities Services launched a website, ImpactOregon.careers, focused on available positions in the developmental disabilities field throughout Oregon.

Job seekers in Oregon will find hundreds of available jobs, ranging from direct care to administrative and managerial positions. In addition to the job postings, Impact Oregon also has a career profiles section, which highlights the way this field has room for growth and opportunity.

Job seekers statewide can browse available listings based on location, wage range and experience level. The goal of Impact Oregon is to reach Oregonians passionate about helping others who may not even be aware that this field exists.

“The developmental disabilities field has never had a centralized place where people can learn about careers and find opportunities,” said Lilia Teninty, director of the state’s Office of Developmental Disabilities Services.

“We need people who are passionate about issues of equity, social justice and excited to support people with disabilities to achieve their goals in this field.

ImpactOregon.careers is a project of the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services but focuses on jobs available from independent provider agencies that provide direct support to more than 30,000 Oregonians with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Nationally, and in Oregon, there is a critical shortage of direct support professionals to support people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. According to the 2020 Case for Inclusion Report, there is a 9 percent vacancy rate nationally, with a 43 percent turnover rate of direct support professionals. By 2026, the industry will need almost 50 percent more DSPs than are needed today.

ImpactOregon.careers is one way that the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services is addressing this demand for workers.

Providers have struggled with a worker shortage, particularly in the area of direct support professionals who provide essential care and supports to Oregonians with developmental disabilities.

Horizon Project serves more than 150 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in Umatilla County, providing supports and services to assist with community integration and independence. Chief Executive Officer Terri Silvis said the agency is always recruiting for direct support professionals and has an average position vacancy rate that hovers between 8 and 10 percent.

“Many potential employees simply don’t know that organizations like Horizon Project exist nor that we provide on-the-job training and professional development,” she said. “Impact Oregon helps educate and inform people about professional development opportunities in their communities which helps further stabilize our workforce.”

About ODDS: The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services provides leadership to support persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities to live as full participants in their communities. Oregon is recognized nationally as an innovative leader in developing community-based services for individuals with I/DD. Oregon’s system has the benefit of a strong advocacy community, one that has a long history and firm commitment to supporting people with I/DD to live as independently as possible in their communities.


Sun. 01/24/21
Testing reveals third case of UK COVID-19 variant in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 01/24/21 2:59 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority was notified today that a person in Washington County has tested positive with the variant COVID-19 virus strain originally detected in the United Kingdom.

The person has a known travel history outside of the United States during their exposure period.

This is the third known case in Oregon of the United Kingdom variant strain, also known as strain B.1.1.7 or SARS-CoV-2 VOC 202012/01. Close contacts to the person have been identified and notified.

Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been detected in the U.S. and globally. The CDC provides case data information in the United States.

This strain is considered to be more contagious. OHA recommends that all Oregonians take the following steps to slow the spread of COVID-19.

  • Maintain six feet of physical distance;
  • Wear a face covering when outside the house;
  • Practice good hand hygiene;
  • Avoid any gatherings with people you don’t live with;
  • People who experience symptoms — even mild ones — are urged to consult with a medical provider quickly to get instructions on how to care for yourself and your household members and whether to get tested.

Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports one in-custody deaths (Update - One death)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/24/21 11:58 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 23, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away in the infirmary. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 75 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-ninth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. Oregon's prisons have not escaped the devastating impacts of COVID-19. More than half of DOC's incarcerated population have been identified as COVID-19-vulnerable, based on community standard criteria. Generally, incarcerated people are in worse health than their peers in the community, and Oregon has one of the oldest incarcerated populations in the country. DOC employees will continue to work to bring outbreaks under control as positive cases in prisons not only impact employees and AICs, but also the surrounding communities.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines is determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC works with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Oregon reports 582 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/24/21 10:40 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,880, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 582 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 138,168.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 14,755 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,243 doses were administered on Jan. 23 and 3,512 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 23.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 300,662 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 492,450 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 310, which the same as yesterday. There are 80 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (49), Coos (26), Crook (9), Curry (1), Deschutes (31), Douglas (14), Harney (1), Hood River (9), Jackson (47), Jefferson (4), Josephine (20), Klamath (26), Lake (5), Lane (49), Lincoln (6), Linn (18), Malheur (3), Marion (72), Morrow (3), Multnomah (78), Polk (18), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (16), Union (5), Wasco (2), Washington (59) and Yamhill (7).

 

Here is more information on the deaths reported today:

Oregon’s 1,878th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 21 and died on Jan. 20 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,879th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 14 and died on Jan. 22 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,880th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Jan. 22 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

 

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

582

5

Benton

1,820

14

Clackamas

12,039

141

Clatsop

707

5

Columbia

1,076

18

Coos

1,009

15

Crook

661

13

Curry

325

5

Deschutes

5,194

40

Douglas

1,774

45

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

217

1

Harney

181

6

Hood River

985

21

Jackson

7,169

96

Jefferson

1,738

25

Josephine

1,845

36

Klamath

2,550

46

Lake

253

5

Lane

8,767

113

Lincoln

1,033

17

Linn

3,212

49

Malheur

3,201

55

Marion

16,740

248

Morrow

966

10

Multnomah

29,114

464

Polk

2,581

40

Sherman

47

0

Tillamook

370

2

Umatilla

6,992

73

Union

1,151

17

Wallowa

99

3

Wasco

1,119

23

Washington

19,279

179

Wheeler

20

1

Yamhill

3,299

48

Grand Total

138,168

1,880

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

Electronic Lab Results (ELRs) Received 1/23

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

16

2

18

11.1%

Benton

176

8

184

4.3%

Clackamas

985

67

1,052

6.4%

Clatsop

147

14

161

8.7%

Columbia

76

0

76

0.0%

Coos

324

29

353

8.2%

Crook

58

14

72

19.4%

Curry

21

0

21

0.0%

Deschutes

561

23

584

3.9%

Douglas

155

11

166

6.6%

Gilliam

4

0

4

0.0%

Grant

32

0

32

0.0%

Harney

5

2

7

28.6%

Hood River

166

8

174

4.6%

Jackson

501

42

543

7.7%

Jefferson

47

2

49

4.1%

Josephine

77

13

90

14.4%

Klamath

74

7

81

8.6%

Lake

150

4

154

2.6%

Lane

2,429

110

2,539

4.3%

Lincoln

83

8

91

8.8%

Linn

307

15

322

4.7%

Malheur

71

1

72

1.4%

Marion

875

83

958

8.7%

Morrow

16

2

18

11.1%

Multnomah

2,317

102

2,419

4.2%

Polk

164

15

179

8.4%

Sherman

5

0

5

0.0%

Tillamook

36

4

40

10.0%

Umatilla

207

21

228

9.2%

Union

9

2

11

18.2%

Wallowa

6

0

6

0.0%

Wasco

163

6

169

3.6%

Washington

1,723

83

1,806

4.6%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

377

12

389

3.1%

Statewide

12,364

710

13,074

5.4%

 

Total ELRs Received


Sat. 01/23/21
Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 01/23/21 10:00 PM

On Saturday, January 23, 2021 at approximately 1:01 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle collision on Hwy 101 near mile post 53.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Clubwagon van, operated by Robert Muzzy (69) of Nehalem, was southbound and went into the northbound lane colliding with a Nissan Rogue operated by Leeanna Sutton (63) of Rockaway Beach.  

Muzzy and Sutton both sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office, Rockaway Beach Fire Department, Rockaway Beach Police Department and ODOT.

Updated: Corrected county table
Oregon Health Authority - 01/23/21 2:46 PM

Jan. 23, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 775 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 13 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,877, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 775 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 137,600.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 15,461 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,151 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 22 and 4,310 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 22.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 285,914 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 492,450 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 310, which is seven fewer than yesterday. There are 83 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

Note: Updated information is available about Oregon’s 1,798th COVID-19 related death, which was reported Jan. 16 as a 71-year-old man in Jackson County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.

Because of this error we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 1,865 today.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (25), Clackamas (51), Columbia (7), Coos (12),  Crook (7), Deschutes (43), Douglas (10), Gilliam (1), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (49), Jefferson (7), Josephine (7), Klamath (19), Lake (4), Lane (75), Lincoln (8), Linn (15), Malheur (9), Marion (94), Morrow (1), Multnomah (112), Polk (29), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (35), Union (6), Wasco (12), Washington (106) and Yamhill (25).

Here is more information on the deaths reported today:

Oregon’s 1,865th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Jan. 16 and died on Jan. 21 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,866th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 21 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,867th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 21 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,868th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 16 at Boise VA Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,869th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Jan. 3 and died on Jan. 21 at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,870th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 21 and died on Jan. 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,871st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 11 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,872nd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 2 and died on Jan. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,873rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 11 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,874th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Jan. 21 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,875th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Jan. 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,876th COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 11 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,877th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Jan. 16 at Good Shepherd Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

6,655

1,574

8,229

19.1%

Benton

86,557

2,746

89,303

3.1%

Clackamas

300,626

17,034

317,660

5.4%

Clatsop

23,547

1,186

24,733

4.8%

Columbia

28,247

1,377

29,624

4.6%

Coos

25,692

905

26,597

3.4%

Crook

10,515

898

11,413

7.9%

Curry

6,842

251

7,093

3.5%

Deschutes

112,852

6,965

119,817

5.8%

Douglas

43,623

1,506

45,129

3.3%

Gilliam

756

28

784

3.6%

Grant

3,020

170

3,190

5.3%

Harney

2,278

179

2,457

7.3%

Hood River

22,088

1,241

23,329

5.3%

Jackson

140,320

8,951

149,271

6.0%

Jefferson

12,957

1,506

14,463

10.4%

Josephine

36,936

1,767

38,703

4.6%

Klamath

32,973

2,576

35,549

7.2%

Lake

2,016

278

2,294

12.1%

Lane

281,295

9,145

290,440

3.1%

Lincoln

31,029

2,017

33,046

6.1%

Linn

88,849

5,915

94,764

6.2%

Malheur

15,759

4,503

20,262

22.2%

Marion

227,471

23,607

251,078

9.4%

Morrow

4,853

1,109

5,962

18.6%

Multnomah

687,460

40,793

728,253

5.6%

Polk

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

582

5

Benton

1,817

14

Clackamas

11,989

141

Clatsop

707

5

Columbia

1,075

18

Coos

983

15

Crook

652

13

Curry

324

5

Deschutes

5,171

40

Douglas

1,759

44

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

217

1

Harney

180

6

Hood River

976

21

Jackson

7,122

95

Jefferson

1,734

25

Josephine

1,826

36

Klamath

2,524

46

Lake

248

5

Lane

8,724

113

Lincoln

1,027

17

Linn

3,194

49

Malheur

3,198

55

Marion

16,668

247

Morrow

963

10

Multnomah

29,040

464

Polk

2,563

40

Sherman

47

0

Tillamook

369

2

Umatilla

6,976

73

Union

1,146

17

Wallowa

99

3

Wasco

1,117

23

Washington

19,216

179

Wheeler

20

1

Yamhill

3,294

48

Total

137,600

1,877

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

ELRs Received 1/22

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

44

4

48

8.3%

Benton

611

31

642

4.8%

Clackamas

1,554

59

1,613

3.7%

Clatsop

92

2

94

2.1%

Columbia

145

6

151

4.0%

Coos

146

10

156

6.4%

Crook

56

3

59

5.1%

Curry

90

0

90

0.0%

Deschutes

524

23

547

4.2%

Douglas

184

7

191

3.7%

Gilliam

2

0

2

0.0%

Grant

7

0

7

0.0%

Harney

5

1

6

16.7%

Hood River

139

3

142

2.1%

Jackson

842

38

880

4.3%

Jefferson

45

3

48

6.3%

Josephine

237

20

257

7.8%

Klamath

191

24

215

11.2%

Lake

98

3

101

3.0%

Lane

1,857

62

1,919

3.2%

Lincoln

159

8

167

4.8%

Linn

556

23

579

4.0%

Malheur

54

4

58

6.9%

Marion

1,281

108

1,389

7.8%

Morrow

21

0

21

0.0%

Multnomah

3,502

127

3,629

3.5%

Polk

358

30

388

7.7%

Sherman

2

0

2

0.0%

Tillamook

59

2

61

3.3%

Umatilla

157

29

186

15.6%

Union

55

5

60

8.3%

Wallowa

6

0

6

0.0%

Wasco

89

10

99

10.1%

Washington

2,214

123

2,337

5.3%

Wheeler

2

1

3

33.3%

Yamhill

483

30

513

5.8%

Statewide

15,867

799

16,666

4.8%

 

Total ELRs Received

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

6,639

1,572

8,211

19.1%

Benton

86,381

2,738

89,119

3.1%

Clackamas

299,641

16,967

316,608

5.4%

Clatsop

23,400

1,172

24,572

4.8%

Columbia

28,171

1,377

29,548

4.7%

Coos

25,368

876

26,244

3.3%

Crook

10,457

884

11,341

7.8%

Curry

6,821

251

7,072

3.5%

Deschutes

112,291

6,942

119,233

5.8%

Douglas

43,468

1,495

44,963

3.3%

Gilliam

752

28

780

3.6%

Grant

2,988

170

3,158

5.4%

Harney

2,273

177

2,450

7.2%

Hood River

21,922

1,233

23,155

5.3%

Jackson

139,819

8,909

148,728

6.0%

Jefferson

12,910

1,504

14,414

10.4%

Josephine

36,859

1,754

38,613

4.5%

Klamath

32,899

2,569

35,468

7.2%

Lake

1,866

274

2,140

12.8%

Lane

278,866

9,035

287,901

3.1%

Lincoln

30,946

2,009

32,955

6.1%

Linn

88,542

5,900

94,442

6.2%

Malheur

15,688

4,502

20,190

22.3%

Marion

226,596

23,524

250,120

9.4%

Morrow

4,837

1,107

5,944

18.6%

Multnomah

685,143

40,691

725,834

5.6%

Polk

46,098

3,221

49,319

6.5%

Sherman

981

43

1,024

4.2%

Tillamook

9,815

329

10,144

3.2%

Umatilla

44,458

7,178

51,636

13.9%

Union

8,718

900

9,618

9.4%

Wallowa

1,753

59

1,812

3.3%

Wasco

22,522

1,182

23,704

5.0%

Washington

431,637

27,063

458,700

5.9%

Wheeler

289

19

308

6.2%

Yamhill

86,461

4,529

90,990

5.0%

Statewide

2,878,275

182,183

3,060,458

6.0%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Testing reveals second case of UK variant of COVID-19 in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 01/23/21 2:34 PM

January 23, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Testing reveals second case of UK variant of COVID-19 in Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority was notified yesterday that a person in Yamhill County tested positive with the variant COVID-19 virus strain originally detected in the United Kingdom.

The person has no known travel history.

This is the second known case in Oregon of the United Kingdom variant strain, also known as strain B.1.1.7 or SARS-CoV-2 VOC 202012/01. State and county public health officials are investigating the possible sources of infection. The strain has been detected in several states.

Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and globally during this pandemic. The CDC provides case data information in the United States.

This strain is considered to be more contagious. OHA recommends that all Oregonians take the following steps to slow the spread of COVID-19.

  • Maintain six feet of physical distance;
  • Wear a face covering when outside the house;
  • Practice good hand hygiene;
  • Avoid any gatherings with people you don’t live with;
  • People who experience symptoms — even mild ones — are urged to consult with a medical provider quickly to get instructions on how to care for yourself and your household members and whether to get tested.

##########


Fri. 01/22/21
Updated: Oregon reports 877 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths and OHA corrects slide shown at press event today
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/21 5:47 PM

Jan. 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 877 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 22 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,865, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 877 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 136,839.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 16,763 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,341 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 21 and 4,422 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 21.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 270,453 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 487,700 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 317, which is 12 fewer than yesterday. There are 79 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

New quarantine guidelines for fully immunized people

People who have been fully immunized and have let at least 14 days pass following their last dose of the vaccine are no longer required to quarantine if they have had close contact with someone with COVID-19. Those who are fully immunized should still monitor themselves for symptoms of COVID-19 during the 14 days after exposure, and if symptoms develop, they should isolate and seek testing. Persons who have been fully vaccinated should continue to follow measures to protect themselves and others, including maintaining six feet of physical distance, avoiding crowds, washing hands often and wearing a mask. Please see OHA’s updated COVID-19 Investigative Guidelines.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (24), Clackamas (71), Clatsop (8), Columbia (15), Coos (10), Crook (14), Curry (1), Deschutes (28), Douglas (18), Grant (4), Hood River (5), Jackson (33), Jefferson (9), Josephine (15), Klamath (17), Lake (3), Lane (90), Lincoln (5), Linn (9), Malheur (11), Marion (101), Morrow (7), Multnomah (136), Polk (24), Umatilla (52), Union (9), Wallowa (1), Wasco (3), Washington (138) and Yamhill (15).

Oregon’s 1,844th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 1 and died on Jan. 20 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,845th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,846th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Jan. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,847th COVID-19 death is a 46-year-old man in Harney County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 20 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,848th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Harney County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 20 at St. Luke’s Meridian Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,849th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Jackson County who died on Jan. 4 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,850th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 1 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,851st COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 18 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,852nd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Jan. 11 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,853rd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 2 and died on Jan. 19 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,854th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 8 and died on Jan. 19 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,855th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 20 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,856th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 11 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,857th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 12 and died on Jan. 16 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,858th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 20 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,859th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Dec. 20 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,860th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 12 at OHSU Health Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,861st COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 15 at St. Luke's Boise Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,862nd COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 29 and died on Dec. 26 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,863rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 20 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,864th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 10 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,865th COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 17 and died on Jan. 21 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

OHA corrects slide shown at press event today

A slide shared at today's press event has been updated. The slides here provide correct information, showing when people 75 and older will be eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet Jan. 28
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/21 4:50 PM

Jan. 22, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet Jan. 28

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: January 28, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and introductions (1:00-1:10); updates (1:10-1:35); Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) screening measure development update (1:35-2:00); Kindergarten Readiness: Social Emotional Health Measure Pilot (2:10-2:40); 2021 specs updates (2:40-2:55); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet Jan. 26
Oregon Health Authority - 01/22/21 4:49 PM

Jan. 22, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet Jan. 26

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: January 26, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 815 5641, Password: 958409.

Agenda: Welcome and Roll Call/Introductions (1:00-1:05); Review agenda and approve minutes (1:05-1:10); Public comment (1:10-1:20); Level set review of 2021 measure menu and workplan for January to May 2021 (1:20-1:30); Measure presentation: Preventative Dental measure recommendations (1:30-2:00); Policy regarding contact during meetings (2:10-2:20); Begin discussion on reviewing measures for 2022 measure menu (2:20-3:00); wrap up/adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Department of Corrections reports two in-custody deaths
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/22/21 2:39 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 21, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at the facility. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 70 and 80 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-seventh AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 22, 2021. He was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-eighth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. Oregon's prisons have not escaped the devastating impacts of COVID-19. More than half of DOC's incarcerated population have been identified as COVID-19-vulnerable, based on community standard criteria. Generally, incarcerated people are in worse health than their peers in the community, and Oregon has one of the oldest incarcerated populations in the country. DOC employees continue to work to bring outbreaks under control as positive cases in prisons not only impact employees and AICs, but also the surrounding communities.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines is determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC works with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Hospitals Express Doubts About Governor's Latest Vaccine Plan
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 01/22/21 1:43 PM

                       HOSPITALS EXPRESS DOUBTS ABOUT GOVERNOR'S LATEST VACCINE PLAN

Adding teachers first will delay doses for seniors; with limited supply hospitals concerned the state can’t deliver on promises after                                                                                          raising hopes  

Lake Oswego, Ore. – January 22, 2021 – The following is a statement from Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals & Health Systems:

“We are deeply concerned that the Governor, by expanding eligibility to teachers and other school employees in addition to seniors aged 65 and older, is increasing demand for the vaccine far beyond available supply in some regions. Since the state does not control the vaccine supply, Oregonians are being asked to take it on faith that the state can keep to the Governor’s timeline.

In some regions of the state, supply can meet the demand. It is important that these areas are free to move ahead with their vaccination efforts. However, it is critical that all Oregonians understand that given current supply, some hospitals will be unable to meet the demand for vaccinations. Hospitals are constrained by the available supply and are obligated to focus on the Governor’s prioritized eligibility list.

Some regions of the state have not completed vaccinating the Phase 1(a) population, but beginning next week the majority of supply will go to teachers. It will take several weeks to get through teachers in the Portland metro area based on current supply, and that does not include vaccinating the remainder of Phase 1(a). Adding 80-year-olds on Feb. 8 and then other age bands in the weeks after that will compound this problem.

At 15,000 doses a week in the Portland metro area, we should all be honest about the fact that there will be significant wait times for vaccines and that completing our efforts will take many, many months unless supply increases.

Setting unreasonable expectations will not speed up vaccinations but will lead to confusion on the part of Oregon seniors, and will increase the operational burden borne by hospitals tasked with explaining to those who believe they have a place in line that they will have to wait even longer.

If you are in a prioritized population in February in the Portland metro area, it is likely you will not get a vaccination for weeks, or maybe even months, after the date you are prioritized. If you have concerns or challenges in scheduling, please do not call hospitals. We are doing the best we can with the supply we have and following the directives from the Oregon Health Authority and the Governor’s Office.

Our hospitals and community partners have made great strides in creating vaccine programs from scratch with virtually no state or federal help, including funding. We are concerned that the current plans will add stress and potential chaos to these efforts as facilities are inundated with anxious residents seeking the vaccine.”

                                                                                          ###

About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/1635/141841/FINAL_Vaccine_Announcement_01_22_2021.pdf

40 projects addressing community needs through the arts receive $180,000 in Arts Build Communities grants awards
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/22/21 11:37 AM
A scene from an Open Hearts Open Minds production of “Twelfth Night” at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville.
A scene from an Open Hearts Open Minds production of “Twelfth Night” at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/1418/141831/thumb_Open_Hearts_twelfthnite_banner.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Using the arts as a means to address community need is the focus of 40 projects awarded a total of $180,000 through the Oregon Arts Commission’s FY2021 Arts Build Communities grant program. The Arts Build Communities program targets broad geographic impact and arts access for underserved audiences in Oregon.

Projects funded include Applegate Regional Theatre’s drive-in venue where audiences can enjoy musical concerts and theater performances from the comfort and safety of their cars; Portland Playhouse’s live-streamed performances and trauma-informed talkbacks that break down cultural norms about Black masculinity; and The Next Door’s metal art sculpture project with local youth in The Dalles.

“This program provides financial support to arts and other community-based organizations for projects that address a local community problem, issue or need through an arts-based solution," said Arts Commission Vice Chair Jenny Green, who led the review panel. “Local citizens employ creative thinking and collective response to identify a local need and provide an arts-based solution.”

The grants also spark and leverage many other investments and resources, serving as a catalyst for greater economic and civic impact, said Green.

In recent years Arts Build Communities projects attracted more than $600,000 in additional investment, much of it representing salaries paid to artists and others as well as products and services purchased in the funded communities.

Arts Build Communities grants are made possible through a funding partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

The FY2021 recipients are:

Anima Mundi Productions, Phoenix: $3,888

To support the creation, performance and recording of "Six Feet Apart: Stories of Resilience and Transformation,” a new work of choral music based on Oregonians’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Funds will engage the Resonance Ensemble, a professional 16-voice choir based in Portland. A streaming video and a document archiving all of the collected stories will be available online free to the public.

Applegate Regional Theatre, Inc., Veneta: $5,311      

To support Drive-in Music and Theater on the Fields, which includes a drive-in venue for audiences to enjoy musical concerts and theater performances from the comfort and safety of their cars. Funds will be used to purchase a flatbed trailer to use as a stage, a stage cover, stage and audience lighting, parking signage and other event services.

Ashland High Arts Advocates, Ashland: $3,551           

To support the Student Arts Mentoring Project, providing individual and small group arts mentoring to low-income grade 6-12 students in the Ashland area. Funds will be used for artist fees, art supplies and transportation.

Blue Mountain Community College, Pendleton: $3,863          

To increase Native American cultural representation on campus through art, books, media and programming featuring contemporary Native American artists. Funds will be used to purchase artworks and develop programming that describes the artworks’ significance to foster a more welcoming college environment, with a focus on art as a means of cultural awareness and representation.

Cascade School of Music, Bend: $3,000

To support the Musical Explorers Outreach Program, which offers off-site classes and performances for the community with a focus on  reaching populations with limited access to live music or music education, including students from the Latino community and seniors in assisted living facilities. Funds will support teacher salaries, instrument rentals for students in need and facility rentals.

Cascadia Chapter of National Association of Composers, Portland: $4,777

To support “Fierce, Fabulous, and Fully Coiffed,” a multidisciplinary drag extravaganza to take place in fall 2021 at the Clinton St. Theater. This over-the-top theatrical show combines the sassy, tragicomic magnificence of top-caliber drag art with new music centering on a range of LGBTQ+ lived experiences, challenges, perspectives, art forms and attitudes. Funds will be used for artist fees, venue rental, tech, admin, publicity fees, sets and costumes.

CoHo Productions, Ltd, Portland: $4,856

To support the Virtually Connected initiative, outfitting the CoHo theatre to live-stream and broadcast productions to keep artists employed and audiences connected in these trying times. Communities will have the ability to access the vitally supportive and community-building power of local and live art, building bridges across a socially distanced world to increase empathy and counteract isolation. Funds will be used for necessary equipment and employee costs associated with live-streaming theatrical productions.

Color Outside the Lines, Portland: $5,776

To support the Covid19 - Art Heals Project, which revolves around three primary initiatives: distributing art supply kits to youth in need;  offering online streaming art classes to underserved youth; and a seven piece outside mural series with local Portland BIPOC artists in collaboration with at-risk youth. Funds will be used for art supplies, artist costs and production of the community services.

Community Alliance of Lane County, Eugene: $3,000

To install a Latin-themed mural in downtown Springfield and hold associated activities to promote it. Members of Citywide and Escudo Latino (Latinx community group), Latinx business owners and Latinx individuals will participate in online design sessions with the muralist and Citywide youth will participate in the mural painting. Funds will be used for painting and promotion.

Community Vision, Portland: $3,297

To support Connecting Communities, Fostering a Collective Voice to connect people with disabilities with culturally specific groups to create art that will be displayed in their gallery and community. Funds will be used for staff time to coordinate the project, materials for the participants and display costs for the exhibitions.

Ditch Projects, Springfield $5,581

To support Ghost Rider: Performing Fugitive Indigeneity, a multi-part exhibition and publication project, , featuring paintings and writing by Klamath Modoc artist Ka’ila Farrell-Smith and a series of prints and video screenings from her collaborations with Ascend Indigenous Womxn Fine Art Collective, the Tiny House Warriors and Signal Fire Indigenous Artist Retreat. Funds will be used for artist fees, exhibition materials, a publication and project oversight.

Drexel H. Foundation, Vale: $4,313

To support Reunite for Vale’s Public Art to enrich the city streetscape with public art created by all sectors of the community. COVID has isolated community members and the creation of a joint project will reconnect them. The 2021 project resulted from planning by high school youth, artists, community leaders, the Drexel Foundation and Vale’s City Mayor. Funds will pay for artists fees, marketing and  art supplies.

Elkton Community Education Center, Elkton: $3,000

To support Trash to Treasure, a grassroots art and economic development initiative to create a recycling infrastructure in a rural community that has lost public services. The project will offer multi-generational workshops on creating art from recycled materials and culminate in an 8 by 8 public art installation, using tile from locally recycled plastic. Funds will be used for instructors, fees, framing materials, hanging hardware and tile production.

Emerald Empire Art Association/Emerald Art Center, Springfield: $3,000

To partner with Springfield Public Schools to offer after-school art workshops for 80 4th and 5th grade students. Four workshops, offered at the Emerald Art Center and online, are designed to ignite curiosity and encourage self-expression, culminating in a special exhibit in EAC’s gallery. Topics proposed offer both timely themes of culture and place as well as mediums attractive to children. Funds will be used to provide scholarships for up to 24 children qualifying for free or reduced lunch.

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene: $5,874

To support the Online String Academies, which will provide free or very low cost online beginning strings instruction to up to 150 3rd, 4th and 5th graders in the Eugene 4J School District. Funds will be used to support artistic staff fees, instrument purchases, administrative staff fees and online platform membership fees.

Fishtrap Inc, Enterprise: $5,270   

To support The Big Read, a community-wide shared reading experience. The 2021  selection is "In the Heart of the Sea" by Nathan Philbrick. Funds will be used for promotional costs, screening fees, speaker honoraria, supplies and to purchase books to be made available free to community organizations.

Friendly House, Portland: $3,000

To support Friendly House Virtual Community Nights, engaging community members in virtual arts-based activities to reduce social isolation, encourage creativity, support local artists and build a stronger community. Funds will be used for arts and craft supplies, instructor fees and tablets with data plans to be distributed to qualifying low-income participants without access to the required technology.

Future Prairie, Portland: $5,749

To support “Future Prairie Radio,” a weekly podcast that examines the future of art, design and culture through the eyes of marginalized artists. Funds will be used to compensate hosts, guests and the production team, as well as to procure music and music rights, local and digital advertising, transcription services and technology.

Grande Ronde Symphony Association, La Grande: $3,834

To support SOAR- String and Orchestral Arts Revitalization, an after school string instruction program with the La Grande School District. Funds will be used to assist in supplementing four instructor consultants serving more than 60 students in 3rd through 8th grades.

Hollywood Senior Center, Portland: $3,168

To support online Poetry Power sessions, a therapeutic poetry writing program for older adult survivors of elder abuse. Poetry Power supports healing and growth through compassionate listening and facilitating creative expression in a safe and supportive environment. Funds will be used for key personnel, administration, recruiting and training volunteer writing mentors, outreach to participants and materials for Poetry Power sessions.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene: $5,776

To support Celebrating and Connecting Latinx Artists throughout Lane County.” Funds will be allocated to artist fees for community cultural events, a stipend for an Arte LatiNext coordinator, artist professional development trainings and expanded Fiesta Cultural marketing outside of Eugene.

Literary Arts Inc, Portland: $3,000

To support participation from two Woodburn high schools in Literary Arts’ Youth Program activities. Funds will be used to cover ticket and book costs for students to attend Portland Arts & Lectures author talks and fees surrounding the College Essay Mentoring Project.

Media-Rites, Portland: $4,095

To produce an enhanced staged reading with movement of “iHula” by Ryan Okinaka, followed by community discussion and an art fair at IRCO's Asian Family Center. Funds will be used to compensate artists, directors, choreographers, community panelists, transportation and lodging for the playwright, venue rental and administrative fees for organizers.

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland: $5,610           

To support a Teatro Milagro UNIDAD Social Justice Theatre Residency in Baker City. Funds will be used for teaching artists curriculum development, coordination with community partners, video production of workshop materials and other related program expenses.

Morpheus Youth Project, Portland: $6,977        

To support creative workshops for youth at MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility in Woodburn, serving more than 100 young men with limited access to creative outlets. Workshop topics include visual art, music, audio production and podcasting. Funds will be used to purchase art supplies and audiovisual equipment and to provide stipends to guest artists.  

My Voice Music, Portland: $4,915

To support Let’s Write a Song Together, a program serving 100 youth in residential and outpatient programs in Portland and Woodburn. Youth will write and record a song that will culminate in the release of a song compilation and online release party. Funds will be used to pay teaching artists, sound engineers, recording equipment, printing/ design and other costs associated with the compilation release.

Northwest Classical Theatre Collaborative, Inc., Portland: $5,119

To support a tour of the west coast premiere of Tony and Olivier winner Richard Eyre's vibrant, modern language, 90-minute translation of Henrik Ibsen's “GHOSTS.” The work will be accompanied by live music for culturally underserved populations in Multnomah, Clackamas, Umatilla, Marion, Coos, Washington, Wallowa, Yamhill and Lake counties. Funds will be used for artist fees, transportation and hotel costs.

Open Hearts Open Minds, Portland: $4,370

To support Theatre @ Coffee Creek, an arts program for inmates of Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville. The women in the program will produce a theatrical piece to perform for invited guests, family, friends and other residents. Funds will be used for facilitator fees, guest artist fees, travel reimbursement, costumes, properties, photography/video production, books and scripts, musical equipment and repair, refreshments and shared administrative costs.

Orchestra Next, Eugene: $3,911

To support the ON Academy which includes classes on digital audio workstation techniques; panel discussions on What it Means to be a Responsible Content Creator in this Virtual World; classes and instruction for individual instrumentalists; and mentorship opportunities for students to record and interact with teachers directly. Funds will be used for artist fees and to purchase technology to provide access to underserved communities.

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland: $3,000

To support Moves After School, an enrichment arts program with two school partners, Beach Elementary and Faubion Elementary. Funds will be used to support teaching artist fees to design and implement the program in winter and spring 2021 semesters, with digital resources and a return to in-school activities when possible.

Oregon Supported Living Program Arts and Culture Program, Eugene: $5,426

To support the Creative Outreach Program in Lane County. The program will provide art instruction, studio access, one-on-one mentorships and remote creative access to adult artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities experiencing isolation and loss of participatory arts programming due to COVID-19. Funds will be used for program re-development, outreach, instructor salaries and art supplies.

Outside the Frame, Portland: $6,171

To support Go Forth and Film, through which unhoused youth can create short films, train on advanced film equipment and gain professional skills. Funds will be used to support the equipment manager, guest film instructor fees, peer mentor stipends and workshop materials.

Portland Playhouse, Portland: $5,352

To support the Triggered Life Residency, three weeks of live-streamed performances and trauma-informed talkbacks that break down cultural norms about Black masculinity for the general public, local schools and therapeutic facilities. Funds will be used for production and streaming costs, artist fees, project management and evaluation.

Portland Street Art Alliance, Portland: $5,392

To support the new Mural District initiative in the Central Eastside Industrial District. Specifically these funds will facilitate more inclusive community involvement in the process of mural making. Funds will be used to hire mural assistants from Ground Score and Voz Worker Center to provide un-housed and day laborers with professional training opportunities in mural painting activities.

Rainmaker Craft Initiative, Portland: $4,491

To support the Diversity in Craft Initiative, focused on creating a more diverse, equitable, inclusive and accountable craft community. Funds will be used to support programming designed by Joe Robinson, owner of East Creek, implemented at his ceramic facilities in Willamina. Funds will pay stipends to three artists to engage the leadership program, materials and fuel for three wood firings, and administrative costs.

Rural Klamath Connects, Malin: $3,517

To support Placemaking and the Art of Story Catching, storytelling and oral history training for youth and community members including high-level technical documentation and an interactive audio tour for residents and visitors. Funds will be used for artist's fees, artistic services, arts instruction and supplies.

Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, Otis: $4,575

To support the  Community Arts Project, which provides in-school monthly arts literacy programming to approximately 500 students in Tillamook county through Nestucca Valley and Girabaldi schools. Funds will be used to support art literacy instructors, a program coordinator and art supplies for students.

The Artback, Eagle Creek: $4,432

To support the A Camino Largo, Paso Corto Mural. The mural will be painted on the north wall of Dollar General in downtown Estacada and reflect the lives and cultures of the Latinx population and persons of color in the community. Funds will be used for NovaColor paint and supplies, scaffold rental, community meetings and workshop, and artists fees.

The Next Door, Inc., Hood River: $3,888

To support The Dalles Art Project Open Door, a metal art sculpture project located outdoors in The Dalles, led by Gorge-based metalwork and sculpture artist MacRae Wylde. Young people will participate in workshops facilitated by Wylde to create their own drawing depicting the theme “hope.” Wylde will take the youth’s drawings, arrange them in a collage and create a metal freeze cut-out that will surround the base of the sculpture. Funds will be used for artist fees, materials and installation.

Third Angle New Music Ensemble, Portland: $5,877

To support Third Angle’s Soundwalk Series, six soundwalks by six artists, presented with Portland Parks & Recreation between January and June 2021. The soundwalks will be free and introduce audiences of all ages to new modes of listening to the world around them. Funds will be used for artist fees, materials, technical support, marketing and project management.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at:  www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: A scene from an Open Hearts Open Minds production of “Twelfth Night” at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville. , The cast and crew of a pre-COVID episode of Future Prairie’s “Future Prairie Radio,” a weekly podcast that examines the future of art, design and culture through the eyes of marginalized artists in Portland. , A student happily receives her violin and music during the Eugene Springfield Youth Orchestras’ recent Instrument Pickup Day. , A 2019 exhibit celebrating the artwork created during the Student Arts Mentoring Project, led by Ashland High Arts Advocates. , A promotional image for Anima Mundi Production’s (Phoenix) “Six Feet Apart: Stories of Resilience and Transformation,” an innovative multimedia work of choral music based on the real-life experiences of Oregonians during COVID-19.

Historic cemeteries commission to meet February 5
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/22/21 10:33 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via online meeting on Feb 5 at 1:00 p.m. The agenda includes project planning, the abandoned cemetery care permit process, and legislative and other updates. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


DPSST Publishes Enhanced Database Detailing Certification Actions Against Law Enforcement Officers
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/22/21 10:19 AM

There are two critical components of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) mission that work together to promote excellence in Oregon's public safety professions -- delivering quality training and upholding professional standards. DPSST training helps public safety providers protect their communities. Upholding professional standards helps safeguard the integrity of Oregon's criminal justice system by ensuring that front-line providers of public safety services meet and maintain all established training, physical, emotional, intellectual and moral fitness standards.

In addition to statutes set by the Oregon State Legislature, DPSST's overall mission is guided by the 24-member Board on Public Safety Standards and Training, and its five discipline-specific Policy Committees. The Board and Committees are integrally involved in establishing the certification and training standards for Oregon’s 43,000 providers of public and private safety services. The Board and Committees also review discretionary cases involving violations of the established moral fitness standards by Oregon law enforcement officers. The Board and Committees meet publicly on a quarterly basis. Membership rosters, and meeting agendas, minutes and schedules can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/Pages/default.aspx   

DPSST trains and certifies more than 5,600 full-time police officers in Oregon who work for city, county, state, tribal and university police departments, as well as approximately 4,100 corrections officers, 1,000 9-1-1 dispatchers, 600 parole & probation officers and 75 liquor/marijuana regulatory specialists. DPSST also regulates our State’s fire service professionals, private security providers, private investigators and polygraph examiners. 

In August, 2020, DPSST published an online database of final DPSST Professional Standards actions taken against Oregon’s public safety providers. This database was created to comply with HB 4207 which passed during a special session of the Oregon Legislative Assembly. The database included the names of all public safety officers and dispatchers who have been the subject of a DPSST certification action, their employing agency (when applicable), and a link to the DPSST investigation and Final Order occurring on or after June 30, 2020 (The effective date of HB 4207).

Effective immediately DPSST has expanded the information available through this database to include a list of all open professional standards cases, as well as the disposition of each case as it works through the professional standards review process. The database will also include links to all DPSST-created reports used for and relating to the decision making involved in each case.

The updated database, along with a list of professional standards actions occurring before the passage of HB 4207 can be found on-line at https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/cj/pages/cases.aspx (Please note, DPSST is actively adding case documentation for cases that are currently open or recently closed. We expect that project to be completed by February 1st.)

DPSST Professional Standards Director Linsay Hale said "The DPSST, along with our public safety partners, our elected officials and the citizens of our State, takes the accountability of our public safety providers seriously. The transparency of the processes established to safeguard that accountability is key to ensuring we build, re-build and maintain legitimacy and trust in our systems. Making key information relating to the enforcement of the standards affecting our State’s law enforcement officers publically available is one more step towards ensuring all interested parties are aware of the decisions being made by our agency and its governing Board, and more importantly how and why those decisions are made.”


Thu. 01/21/21
Weekly COVID-19 cases decline, deaths surge
Oregon Health Authority - 01/21/21 5:05 PM

Jan. 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly COVID-19 cases decline, deaths surge

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report was released today and showed a slight decline in daily cases and a sharp decline in positive tests.

OHA reported 7,860 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Jan. 11 through Sunday, Jan. 17, a 4% decrease from the previous week.

There were 332 persons hospitalized for COVID-19.

COVID-19 related deaths surged to 195, the highest weekly toll to date, following a previous pandemic high from the prior week.

There were 129,723 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Jan. 10 through Jan. 16. The percentage of positive tests dropped to 5.9%.

People age 20 to 49 have accounted for 54% of COVID-19 cases, while people 70 and older have accounted for 77% of deaths associated with the virus.

Today’s COVID-19 outbreak report shows 208 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.


Oregon reports 849 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/21/21 4:32 PM

Jan. 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 849 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 11 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,843 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 849 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 135,973.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 14,951 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 8,699 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 20 and 6,252 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 20.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 253,711 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 479,325 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 329, which is seven fewer than yesterday. There are 87 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Pediatric Report released

Today, OHA issued a report analyzing the case data of pediatric COVID-19 cases in Oregon since the beginning of the pandemic.

As of Jan. 5, there had been 119,488 confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 in Oregon. Pediatric patients — defined as people under 18 years old — accounted for 13,328, or 11.2%, of the total cases. There had been seven cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C).

There was a dramatic rise in daily COVID-19 pediatric cases in late October and mid-November with cases levelling out somewhat by the end of 2020.

The report indicates that while pediatric case counts have increased, pediatric patients remain far less likely than adults to develop severe cases of COVID-19.

Only 0.9% of pediatric patients have been hospitalized at some point during their COVID-19 illness. Comparatively, 6.2% of adults with COVID-19 have been hospitalized.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (24), Clackamas (71), Clatsop (7), Columbia (1), Coos (10), Crook (2), Deschutes (32), Douglas (22), Gilliam (1), Harney (1), Hood River (8), Jackson (42), Jefferson (6), Josephine (21), Klamath (18), Lake (1), Lane (97), Lincoln (11), Linn (23), Malheur (18), Marion (87), Morrow (11), Multnomah (123), Polk (18), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (35), Union (6), Wallowa (1), Wasco (11), Washington (110), Yamhill (26).

Oregon’s 1,833rd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,834th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Jackson County who died on Dec. 28 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,835th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Jackson County who died on Jan. 3 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,836th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Jan. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,837th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Dec. 31 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,838th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,839th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 17 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center—Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,840th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 9 and died on Jan. 17 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,841st COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 6 and died on Jan. 20 at Oregon Health Science University. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,842nd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Jan. 3 and died on Jan. 6 at Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,843rd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee narrows recommendation, plans further discussion
Oregon Health Authority - 01/21/21 4:31 PM

Jan. 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee narrows recommendation, plans further discussion

PORTLAND, ORE. – Oregon’s 27-member COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee (VAC) met for its third official business meeting on Jan. 21 and discussed how to sequence populations in a way that centers on those most likely to experience both health inequities and the worst effects of COVID-19.

The committee agreed that data shows disproportionate impacts on communities of color, especially Black, African American, Latino/a/x, Pacific Islander, and Indigenous, Tribal and urban-based Native populations, along with people managing chronic health conditions.

Due to structural racism and inadequate access to culturally and linguistically responsive health care, communities of color experience higher rates of chronic health conditions, which may go undiagnosed.

VAC discussion centered on whether to consider communities of color and people with chronic medical conditions in sequential order or to start with people who meet multiple criteria. Kalani Raphael, M.D., Oregon Pacific Islander Coalition, stated, “Chronic health conditions are more common in minority communities. [Starting with chronic conditions] targets the most vulnerable people within our communities and it is one approach to this very, very complicated problem.”

Kelly Gonzales, Ph.D., representing Oregon Health & Science University, Portland State University and the urban Native community stated, “I don’t agree with removing BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) as the first priority. I think it whitewashes the structural racism and systemic racism that we are trying to center. By centering on BIPOC people and then including chronic conditions, there is an overlap there.”

Other considerations included focusing on migrant and seasonal farm workers due to the upcoming agricultural season, the need to keep categories broad enough so that vaccine doses aren’t wasted — especially in rural areas — and the reality that Oregon doesn’t anticipate enough vaccines to immunize all recommended groups in a short time frame.

At its Jan. 28 meeting, the VAC is expected to make a final recommendation, aided by analysis from Oregon Health Authority, on implementation and allocation scenarios.

The next optional information session will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 26, from 5:30-6:30 p.m., and the next formal VAC meeting will be held on Thursday, Jan. 28, from 10 a.m. to noon.

Vaccinations in Oregon

So far, 238,759 doses of vaccines have been administered in Phase 1a, which includes health care workers, residents and staff in long-term care facilities, group homes and home care for people with disabilities among others. Gov. Kate Brown has confirmed that teachers and education staff, as well as adults 65 and older (phased by age group) will be prioritized in Phase 1b.

OHA is  providing daily updates on administered doses of COVID-19 vaccines in Oregon on its vaccination data dashboard

The dashboard provides weekday updates on the number of people vaccinated, both by state and by county, along with key demographic information showing the race, ethnicity, sex and age of everyone who has been vaccinated.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 01/21/21 3:29 PM

On Thursday, January 21, 2021 at approximately 8:05 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 140W near milepost 43.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Hyundai Santa Fe, operated by KC Brock (36) of Central Point, was eastbound  attempting to pass a truck and trailer, in a no passing zone, and struck a westbound Dodge Dakota operated by Charles Lundy (53) of Klamath Falls.

Brock sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Kevin Morris (27) of Central Point, passenger in Hyundai Santa Fe, was transported by air ambulance to the hospital with injuries.

Lundy and his passenger, Betty Bishop (59) of Medford, both sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Rocky Point Fire / EMS and ODOT

 


Washington State Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Absconding Supervision and Failing to Register as a Sex Offender
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/21/21 3:04 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Vancouver, Washington man was sentenced to federal prison today for failing to comply with sex offender supervision and registration requirements designed to protect the community from predatory acts, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Joseph Alonzo Lugo, 50, was sentenced to one year and one day in federal prison and five years’ supervised release. As a condition of his post-prison supervision, Lugo will be required to undergo sex offender treatment and mental health counseling.

According to court documents, Lugo was required to register as a sex offender after pleading guilty in state court, in August 2017, to communicating with a minor for immoral purposes and, less than a year later, pleading guilty to second-degree child molestation. In the latter case, Lugo sexually abused a family member younger than five and served 11 months in prison. He was released in September of 2019 and stopped registering as a sex offender in December of 2019.

On December 31, 2019, Lugo absconded from Washington State supervision and took up residence in Eugene. Shortly thereafter, U.S. Marshals Service deputies began investigating Lugo’s whereabouts and, on April 14, 2020, located him at a house in Eugene. The deputies’ investigation revealed that Lugo had interacted with several children at the house while in non-registration status, though the investigation revealed no evidence of additional sexual offenses. Lugo was arrested on April 14, 2020.

On April 13, 2020, Lugo was charged by criminal complaint with failing to register as a sex offender. He pleaded guilty on October 15, 2020.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Marshals Service. It was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney William M. Mclaren and Certified Law Student Kara Greenaway.

The United States Marshals Service is the federal government’s primary law enforcement agency for sex offender and fugitive investigations. The United States Marshals Service has implemented an aggressive strategy across the nation, including complex sex offender investigations and multiagency enforcement operations. Protecting children in our communities is a critical part of the multiagency sex offender mission in Oregon.

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. The act provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States. SORNA strengthens the nationwide network for the protection of the community.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

I-84 eastbound freeway now open in eastern Oregon (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 01/21/21 2:39 PM

I-84 EASTBOUND is now open in eastern Oregon between La Grande and milepost 323, 19 miles east of Baker City. The route was closed earlier due to two truck crashes near mileposts 318 and 323. Travelers should expect winter conditions throughout the region. Road closure and delays can happen at anytime. Please check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368 for update conditions. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941.


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/21/21 12:58 PM
Robert L. Bennett
Robert L. Bennett
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/1070/141805/thumb_Bennett_R.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Robert Lee Bennett, died the morning of January 21, 2021. Bennett was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

 

Bennett entered DOC custody on January 15, 2019, from Marion County with an earliest release date of March 5, 2048. Bennett was 41 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Robert L. Bennett

DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/21/21 12:44 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 21, 2021

Contact:  Mona Riesterer
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on February 9, 2021 @ 10:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

The Correction Policy meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2. Approve November 10, 2020 Meeting Minutes

3. Approval of Proposed Parole & Probation Field Training Manual

     Presented by Chris Enquist

4. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0085: Supporting Rule Change for Adoption of the 2021 Parole and Probation Officer Field Training Manual

     Presented by Jennifer Howald

5. Administrative Closures

     Presented by Linsay Hale

6. Desteni Felton DPSST No. 45595; Baker County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Linsay Hale

7. Brian Davis DPSST No. 25612;  Not Affiliated

     Presented by Linsay Hale

8. David Duwelius DPSST No. 46066; Department of Corrections/Two Rivers Correctional Institution

     Presented by Linsay Hale

9. Spencer Higgins DPSST No. 48698; Jackson County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Linsay Hale

10. Chris Keyser DPSST No. 35121; Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Linsay Hale

11. James Mahoney DPSST No. 43650; Department of Corrections/Powder River Correctional Facility

     Presented by Linsay Hale

12. Amyr Motlagh DPSST No. 58470; Lane County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Linsay Hale

13. Loren Peters DPSST No. 55373; Department of Corrections/Deer Ridge Correctional Institution

     Presented by Linsay Hale

14. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0100: Fallen Law Enforcement Memorial Eligibility Criteria – Review of Comments

     Presented by Jennifer Howald

15. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0015, 259-008-0290, 259-008-0300 and 259-008-0310: Moral Fitness Standards Relating to Discrimination – Review of Comments

     Presented by Jennifer Howald

16. Department Update

17. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting May 11, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon Department of Corrections reports three in-custody deaths
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/21/21 11:12 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 20, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 70 and 80 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-fourth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 21, 2021. He was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-fifth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died January 21, 2021. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19 and was between 70 and 80 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the thirty-sixth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. Oregon's prisons have not escaped the devastating impacts of COVID-19. More than half of DOC's incarcerated population have been identified as COVID-19-vulnerable, based on community standard criteria. Generally, incarcerated people are in worse health than their peers in the community, and Oregon has one of the oldest incarcerated populations in the country. DOC employees will continue to work to bring outbreaks under control as positive cases in prisons not only impact employees and AICs, but also the surrounding communities.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID-19 to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC has begun administering COVID-19 vaccinations – eventually offering to all DOC staff, contractors, Oregon Corrections Enterprises employees, and AICs. Prioritization of vaccines is determined by guidance from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the Governor’s Office.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Updated: Oregon reports 704 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 24 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/21/21 10:20 AM

Jan. 20, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 704 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 24 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 24 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,832, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 704 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 135,142.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 13,694 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 8,570 vaccine doses were administered on Jan. 19 and 5,124 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Jan. 19.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 238,760 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccinations were administered by Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 436,250 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 336, which is eight more than yesterday. There are 90 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

NOTE: Death details are being reviewed and will be posted in an updated version of this press release.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (21), Clackamas (36), Clatsop (6), Coos (12), Crook (7), Deschutes (38), Douglas (17), Harney (3), Hood River (6), Jackson (38), Jefferson (7), Josephine (15), Klamath (16), Lake (4), Lane (53), Lincoln (4), Linn (26), Malheur (29), Marion (83), Morrow (4), Multnomah (99), Polk (22), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (53), Union (7), Wallowa (1), Wasco (6), Washington (60) and Yamhill (26).

Oregon’s 1,809th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Crook County who tested positive on Jan.10 and died on Jan.15 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,810th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan.12 at St. Charles hospital in Bend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,811th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan.16 at St. Charles hospital in Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,812th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Jan. 4 and died on Jan. 15 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,813th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,814th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on Jan. 17 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,815th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 10 and died on Jan. 18 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,816th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 7 and died on Jan. 18 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,817th COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 7 and died on Jan. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,818th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 16 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,819th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Jan. 18. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,820th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 16 and died on Jan. 17 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,821st COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Dec. 22. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,822nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Jan. 14 and died on Jan. 18. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,823rd COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on Jan. 17 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,824th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 14 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,825th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 13 and died on Jan. 14 at Santiam Memorial Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,826th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 5 and died on Jan. 17 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,827th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,828th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Umatilla County who died on Jan. 8 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,829th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Umatilla County who died on Jan. 9 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,830th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Dec. 30 at Trios Health Southridge Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,831st COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Washington County who died on Dec. 12 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,832nd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Jan. 14 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


DPSST Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/21/21 10:06 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 21, 2021

Contact: Mona Riesterer  
              (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on January 28, 2021 at 9:30 a.m.  at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

 Teleconference Information:

Dial-In: 888-273-3658

Participant Code: 4711910

1. July 8, 2020 Meeting Minutes

Approve minutes

2. Malcus Williams (DPSST #33171) – Ashland Police Department; Supplemental Application for Discretionary PSMF Benefits

Presented by Linsay Hale

3. Nomination of New Chair

4.  Next meeting – TBD

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Public Safety Memorial Fund Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Beware These COVID-Related Scams in 2021
Umpqua Bank - 01/21/21 9:35 AM
Kathryn Albright, EVP Global Payments & Deposits, Umpqua Bank
Kathryn Albright, EVP Global Payments & Deposits, Umpqua Bank
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/6798/141671/thumb_Head_Shot_2018.jpg

Since the onset of the pandemic, criminals have used tactics like identity theft and social engineering to defraud government and healthcare programs and illegally cash in—and the new year has brought some new material for them to keep up their scams.

COVID-19 vaccines. New PPP loans. Expanded government assistance. All are positive developments toward addressing the pandemic’s impact, but they also afford opportunities for criminals to fraudulently exploit.

The Threats Continue

On December 21, federal agencies alerted the public regarding the high potential for fraud during the pandemic, especially now that a vaccine is available. Meanwhile, fraudsters are continuing their global phishing and spoofing campaigns, baiting victims with bogus promises of COVID-19 testing, grants, and prescription cards in exchange for personally identifiable information (PII).

“Given the impact COVID-19 has had on all of our lives, it’s no surprise that fraudsters are using it to target peoples’ money and sensitive information,” says Kathryn Albright, Global Payments & Deposits Executive with Umpqua Bank. “But if you know what kinds of red flags to be aware of right now, it can really help protect your business, and you personally, in the long-run.”

Beware of These Scams

  • Recorded phone calls (“Robocalls”) offering the chance to avoid lines and get vaccinated sooner for a set price (e.g., $79.99).
  • Advertisements and price gouging for the sale of fake or potentially dangerous (and unapproved, illegitimate) COVID-19 “medicine” or treatments.
  • Solicitations, whether in person or via text, email, or phone, asking you to provide account information (financial or medical), click an unfamiliar or unexpected link, or visit an unfamiliar webpage in order to “sign up” for treatment.
  • Bogus “contact tracers” who reach out to unsuspecting victims and ask for PII (e.g., Medicare number or financial information) or attempt to collect payment for scheduling a test. Legitimate contact tracers don’t need such information or payment.

Tips to Note

According to the AARP, the key points federal officials want the public to understand when it comes to preventing such scams are:

  • Go to a trusted source for vaccine information (e.g., your doctor or local health department).
  • Don’t buy a vaccine or treatment off the Internet.
  • The vaccine is provided at no cost, although providers may charge a fee for administration (that can be reimbursed).
  • Ignore any solicitations about the vaccine that are delivered to you via text message, social media, phone call, email, or in person, because health officials are not contacting eligible people using these methods.
  • Don’t give money or any type of PII to an unexpected or unfamiliar party contacting you about COVID-19, because fraudsters can use such information to defraud healthcare organizations and commit identity theft.

Remain Vigilant

For additional information regarding the COVID-19 response and updated vaccine distribution details, visit trusted sites like CDC.gov and the FDA vaccine web page periodically—and exercise caution regarding unexpected or unfamiliar communications on the topic.

If You See Something, Say Something

“Fraudsters are adapting fast, and even the smallest amount of fraud can quickly become a scam epidemic,” says Albright. “Try to stay ahead of the fraud game and always keep a healthy skepticism; hyper-vigilance is necessary, even regarding an unexpected opportunity for COVID-19 treatment, as it’s often said, ’If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.’”

Contact your local law enforcement agencies if you think you’ve received fraudulent communication regarding COVID-19 treatment. If you suspect that your Umpqua Bank account has been compromised, contact our Customer Resource Center at (866) 486-7782 as soon as possible for assistance.

 




Attached Media Files: Kathryn Albright, EVP Global Payments & Deposits, Umpqua Bank

Corporate Activity Tax registration totals more than 20,000
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/21/21 9:09 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners that once they have more than $750,000 in commercial activity in 2021, they have 30 days to register for the Corporate Activity Tax unless they have already registered.

Registration for CAT is a one-time requirement, however, and businesses that registered in 2020 do not have to register again.

Registrations for Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax have topped more than 20,000 in its first year. Through Wednesday, 20,546 businesses had registered for the CAT, which was created by the Oregon Legislature in 2019 to raise funding for education.

The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon. It applies to all types of business entities including those located inside and outside of Oregon.

The CAT is measured on a business’s commercial activity, the total amount a business realizes from transactions and activity in Oregon.

Businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million will have Corporate Activity Tax to pay. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

Taxpayers expecting to owe $10,000 or more for 2020 must make estimated payments. Fourth quarter 2020 estimated payments are due February 1. Returns are due April 15.
For tax year 2021 and beyond, taxpayers expecting to owe $5,000 or more must make estimated payments. Estimated payments for 2021 are due April 30, August 2, November 1, and January 31, 2022. Returns are due April 15.

Training aids to assist with registration, calculating the tax, and making payments can be found on the CAT page of the agency’s website.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.


Recent wind and rain storm a severe reminder for flood insurance especially in wildfire damaged areas
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/21/21 8:43 AM

Salem – Last week’s flash flooding is a severe reminder to consider flood insurance, especially in wildfire damaged areas.

Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States. Just one inch of water can cause more than $25,000 in damage to your home.

The Labor Day wildfires left much of the Willamette Valley and southern Oregon prone to flash flooding after the fires burned up the vegetation that absorbs rainwater and holds soil in place.

A typical homeowners or renters policy does not cover flood damage. Oregonians can purchase coverage through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and a few private insurers. There is a 30-day waiting period.

“Our hearts go out to all of the Oregonians affected by the recent storms, and we are urging everyone in or near wildfire damaged areas to consider buying flood insurance,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner and Department of Consumer and Business Services Director, Andrew Stolfi. “Unfortunately, it will take years for the vegetation to recover from these wildfires, making these areas prone to flash flooding for the foreseeable future.”

All Oregonians, especially those who live in or near wildfire damaged areas, are encouraged to visit floodsmart.gov or contact their insurance agent to ask about flood insurance.

To learn more about how insurance covers damage from different types of storms, visit the Division of Financial Regulation’s storm damage page.

If you have questions about your insurance, contact your insurance company or agent for more information. If you still have questions or concerns, the division’s consumer advocates are here to help. Oregonians can contact the division’s advocates three ways:

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee - Meeting Canceled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/21/21 8:37 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 20, 2021

Contact:   Mona Riesterer  
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Meeting Cancelation

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for February 16, 2021 has been canceled. The next Private Security/Investigator Policy meeting is scheduled for May 18, 2021 at 1:30 p.m.


M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Announces Record Year of Giving
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 01/21/21 7:45 AM

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Announces Record Year of Giving

Foundation awards $20.6 million at quarterly meeting, $75.9 million granted in 2020 including $26.3 million to Washington nonprofits

 

For Immediate Release

 

(Vancouver, WA) – With the publication of its Fall 2020 Grants Report today, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust announced both a record quarter and a record year of giving as the organization celebrated its 45th anniversary serving the Pacific Northwest.

 

  • At the Fall 2020 Grants Meeting, Murdock Trust Trustees approved 70 grants totaling $20.6 million, including 20 grants totaling $6.2 million to nonprofits serving the Washington region. 
  • Over the course of 2020, Trustees approved 474 grants for $75.9 million, including 167 grants totaling $26.3 million to Washington nonprofits.
  • Since opening in 1975, the Murdock Trust has awarded more than 7,300 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion.

 

“This is a milestone that is inspiring, but also bittersweet, for our organization,” said Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We are moved because this is a testament to the hard work of our team and the foresight and wisdom of our benefactor, Jack Murdock. But it is also a somber moment because a significant part of our giving is related to the COVID-19 response and the historic events of 2020 that have been devastating for many.”

 

In addition to the Trust’s quarterly Strategic Grants program, the nonprofit foundation introduced two emergency support programs by invitation in 2020 focused on the COVID-19 pandemic response and recovery from the historic wildfire season.

 

“There is no question that 2020 was one of the most challenging years for our organization, but in many respects, it was also one of the most rewarding” said Moore. “Like many of our peer foundations, our Trustees recognized that the needs of the communities we serve would be on a scale and pace unlike anything we had seen before. They committed early in 2020 to increase our projected grantmaking and programming budgets and respond in ways that support those on the front lines of need in a timely fashion across the Pacific Northwest.

 

“Though we are heartbroken by the loss and destruction faced by so many, we are heartened and inspired by the rapid, people-focused pivots and innovations introduced by the nonprofit community to serve those in need. We are grateful to have played a small role in their work and for all the trusted partners and leaders across sectors who have worked to serve the common good.”

 

A Trend of Breaking Records

 

Grantmaking in 2020 marks the third time in four years the Murdock Trust set a personal best for community investment, previously achieving new highs in 2017 ($57 million) and 2019 ($67 million). Leaders at the Murdock Trust attribute this growth to both overall trends of the economy and the organization’s approach to its work in response to the enhanced needs of our communities in the PNW.

 

“Our effectiveness as an organization relies on a few factors,” Moore explained. “First and foremost, it is a tribute to the incredible work of the nonprofit sector. We like to say that ‘the fruit of our labor grows on the trees of others.’ We would not be able to make these grants if there were not a wide array of individuals and organizations committed to serving the diverse needs of our region.”

 

“It’s also a reflection of the dedication and commitment of our own grants and program team. We believe in a very personal, very relational approach to our work. Our Program Directors personally visit and meet with every grant applicant. While these in-person conversations had to pivot to virtual platforms due to social distance protocols, they remained committed to connecting with and engaging every organization directly. Our team has never worked harder or given more of their time and energy than they did in 2020.”

 

“But it is also a testament to our incredible investment team. Our generosity is a function of the assets we steward and the investment managers with who we partner. While we wish that we could fund every organization we meet, we must operate thoughtfully and strategically within our resources. Our investment team brings a unique, relational approach to how we manage our endowment. A method founded by our first Chief Investment Officer, Jim Martin, and that has continued under our current CIO, Elmer Huh, has helped our organization consistently provide great returns which has then allowed us to increase our investments in the community.”

 

45 Years of Service

 

In addition to the record-breaking milestone, 2020 also presented another reason for the Murdock Trust family to celebrate as the nonprofit foundation marked 45 years of service to the Pacific Northwest.

 

“Moments like this really give us an opportunity to reflect on the magnitude of the thoughtful investment Jack Murdock made into our community,” said Kimberly Thornbury, senior program director for enrichment, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. In her role, Thornbury works directly with grant applicants as well as oversees the Trust’s enrichment programming and much of the Trust’s work in convening senior leaders across sectors. “To think that decades after he passed away, his work and vision continue to change lives in positive and meaningful ways through our grantmaking, enrichment programs and convenings is incredible.

 

“We had hoped to visit in-person with many of our past grantees and partners to celebrate their work, but those plans obviously had to be put on pause to keep everyone safe and healthy. But our team is looking forward to seeing our partners face-to-face once the experts tell us it is safe and vaccines are distributed broadly. Perhaps we’ll be hosting a 46-and-a-half-year anniversary party instead!”

 

For more information on the organizations served by the Murdock Trust and our grantmaking process, visit murdocktrust.org.

 

 

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 7,300 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

 

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