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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Fri. Sep. 17 - 10:03 pm
Fri. 09/17/21
OHA releases statement on FDA booster dose recommendation
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 5:07 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases statement on FDA booster dose recommendation

Today, officials from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) convened medical experts to discuss whether to recommend that people who’ve previously been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine should receive a booster shot to help maintain the effectiveness of their vaccinations over time.

At today’s hearing, the committee recommended that people age 65 and older and those considered at high risk of severe COVID-19 receive a booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at least six months after the second dose. The FDA is reviewing this recommendation to determine whether to add this use to the Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer vaccine.

Booster doses have not been recommended for people who received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine. It is expected that federal officials will consider booster doses for people who’ve received these vaccines in coming weeks.

The recommendations that came from today’s meeting are just the first steps in the process. No boosters will be available to Oregonians until the remaining steps in the process are completed next week. Here’s what’s next:

  • The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will review the FDA’s recommendation Sept. 22-23. The CDC Director then considers the ACIP recommendation and makes any official CDC recommendation for use of boosters. It is anticipated that ACIP will provide additional guidance on who is considered at high risk of severe COVID-19.
  • After FDA and CDC decisions, the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup meets on Sept. 24 to consider federal recommendations for implementation in California, Nevada, Washington and Oregon. Once Western States issues a recommendation, the Oregon Health Authority will support implementation.

Booster doses are expected to be widely available through pharmacies, doctor’s offices and clinics, as COVID-19 vaccine is today.

For older adults and others who live in skilled nursing facilities, their residences are equipped to provide booster doses once they are fully authorized.

Medical evidence shows that the COVID-19 vaccines remain highly effective in preventing COVID-19 associated hospitalizations and deaths.  The boosters were recommended because there was some evidence to show that the immune response the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine produces to protect against COVID-19 disease could begin to wane many months after a person was first immunized, especially in older adults. As with other vaccines, a booster shot will strengthen the body’s ability to prevent disease from the virus that causes COVID-19.

“Today’s federal review underscores the consistently rigorous scientific scrutiny that medical experts and health officials have used to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, State Health Officer and State Epidemiologist. “While we wait for today’s recommendations to be reviewed by the next panel of medical experts, we want to urge every Oregonian who hasn’t been vaccinated to get immunized against COVID-19 today. Oregon has enough vaccine in place to vaccinate people who are unvaccinated and we’re ready to provide boosters when federal and Western States officials finalize their recommendations.”

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Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/21 4:03 PM

On Thursday, September 16, 2021 at approximately 8:15 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near milepost 193. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Volkswagen Jetta, operated by Jate Frost (20) of Randlett, UT, was traveling eastbound when it rear-ended a commercial motor vehicle, operated by Ediberto Ramirez Carrillo (31) of Hermiston.

Frost sustained serious injuries and was flown via Life Flight to Kadlec Medical Center in Richland, WA. The right front passenger in the Jetta, Richard Schleicher (24) of Stockton, OK, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The rear seat passenger in the Jetta, Jesse Hopper (21) of Magnum, OK sustained serious injuries and was transported to OHSU in Portland.  Ramirez Carrillo was not injured. 

All three occupants of the Jetta were contestants at the Pendleton Roundup. The CMV was fully loaded with potatoes. 

OSP was assisted by Echo Fire Department, Umatilla County Fire District #1, Umatilla County Sheriff’s Department, Stanfield Police Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 26-Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/21 3:40 PM

On Friday September 17, 2021 at about 7:20 am, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 26 near milepost 11. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a black 1998 Ford Explorer, operated by Leah Brown(30) of Garibaldi, was travelling westbound on Hwy 26 when for unknown reasons the Explorer crossed the centerline and struck an eastbound 2016 Volvo, Albertson's Semi truck, operated by Joseph Danmyer (33) of Estacada. 

BROWN suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. DANMYER was not injured. 

Hwy 26 was closed for 4 hours following the crash.

 OSP was assisted by Hamlet Fire Department, Seaside Fire Department, and ODOT.


Oregon reports 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 3:40 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 22 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,569, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 309,841.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report projects decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast showing a projected decline in daily cases and hospitalizations through late September.

According to the report, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at .79 on Sept. 1, projecting a decline in the estimated growth of new cases and hospitalizations over last week’s modeling scenario.

At that level of transmission, the report estimates 280 cases per 100,000 people, or an average of 830 daily cases and 41 hospitalizations for the two-week period between Sept. 22 and Oct. 5.

The modeling report labeled that projection “optimistic” because the projection was based on the lowest point of transmission.

The report proposed an alternative scenario factoring in assumptions around the impacts of reopening schools and many public events scheduled during the next month. In that scenario, new cases are estimated at 350 per 100,000 people or an average of 1,060 daily cases and 51 hospitalizations over the same period.

Vaccinations remain the most effective tool for slowing the spread of COVID-19. Oregonians should wear masks when in indoor public spaces and when outdoors among crowds.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,002, which is 25 fewer than yesterday. There are 287 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

There are 58 available adult ICU beds out of 658 total (9% availability) and 369 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,246 (9% availability).

9/17/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

58

(9%)

22

(6%)

5

(5%)

19

(40%)

4

(7%)

0

(0%)

1

(2%)

7

(28%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

369

(9%)

70

(4%)

15

(2%)

137

(22%)

36

(8%)

9

(18%)

45

(12%)

57

(44%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 8,696 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 16. Of this total, 3,979 were administered on Sept. 16: 1,874 were initial doses, 1,697 were second doses and 358 were third doses. The remaining 4,717 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 16.

The seven-day running average is now 8,535 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,905,173 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,882,388 doses of Moderna and 209,164 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,698,924 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,458,176 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (25), Clackamas (252), Clatsop (12), Columbia (22), Coos (40), Crook (17), Curry (2), Deschutes (128), Douglas (59), Gilliam (3), Harney (11), Hood River (12), Jackson (115), Jefferson (14), Josephine (48), Klamath (59), Lake (12), Lane (176), Lincoln (25), Linn (128), Malheur (36), Marion (157), Morrow (3), Multnomah (218), Polk (57), Sherman (2), Tillamook (16), Umatilla (63), Union (8), Wallowa (7), Wasco (29), Washington (188) and Yamhill (127).

Oregon’s 3,548th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 5 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,549th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Aug. 31 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,550th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,551st COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 16 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,552nd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 15 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,553rd COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 12 and died on Aug. 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,554th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Aug. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,555th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 16 at his residence. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,556th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old woman from Harney County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Aug. 28 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,557th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 13 and died on Sept. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,558th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,559th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,560th death is a 95-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 6 at his residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,561st COVID-19 related death is a 43-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 16 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,562nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 15 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,563rd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 14 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3564th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 14 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,565th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,566th COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 16 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,567th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,568th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 10 at CHI St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,569th COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 14 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 3,497th death: a 36-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 12 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Secretary Haaland Outlines Next Steps to Rebuild Bureau of Land Management
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/21 1:47 PM

Announces plans to restore national headquarters to Washington, D.C.; Western headquarters will be expanded

WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland today outlined steps that the Department plans to take to rebuild and strengthen the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) following years of transition and upheaval among the workforce. These changes, which will be done in coordination with Congress, will improve the function of the bureau, help provide clarity for the BLM’s more than 7,000 employees across the country, maintain and increase access for stakeholders, and enable the bureau to better serve the American public and fulfill its mission as the steward of nearly one-fifth of the nation’s public lands.

In a meeting with BLM employees today, Secretary Haaland announced her intention to restore the BLM national headquarters to Washington, D.C., ensuring the bureau has a presence in the nation’s capital. Under this plan, the BLM’s current presence in Grand Junction, Colo., will grow and expand as the bureau’s official Western headquarters. This office will reinforce western perspectives in decision-making and have an important role to play in the bureau’s clean energy, outdoor recreation, conservation, and scientific missions, among other important work as a leadership center in the West.

“The Bureau of Land Management is critical to the nation’s efforts to address the climate crisis, expand public access to our public lands, and preserve our nation’s shared outdoor heritage. It is imperative that the bureau have the appropriate structure and resources to serve the American public,” said Secretary Haaland. “There’s no doubt that the BLM should have a leadership presence in Washington, D.C. – like all the other land management agencies – to ensure that it has access to the policy-, budget-, and decision-making levers to best carry out its mission. In addition, the BLM’s robust presence in Colorado and across the West will continue to grow.”

“The past several years have been incredibly disruptive to the organization, to our public servants, and to their families. As we move forward, my priority is to revitalize and rebuild the BLM so that it can meet the pressing challenges of our time, and to look out for our employees’ well-being,” added Secretary Haaland. “I look forward to continuing to work with Congress, Tribes, elected officials and the many stakeholders who care about the stewardship of our shared public lands and healthy communities."

The Department intends to locate the Bureau Director and other key leadership positions in the national headquarters where they can ensure coordination with Congress, other federal agencies, and stakeholders that visit Washington, D.C. Additional senior personnel will operate from the Western headquarters, as part of the more than 95 percent of BLM employees that are already located outside of Washington, D.C.

The Secretary’s vision for the BLM comes after substantive engagement with employees, Tribal consultations, and meetings with local, state, and federal leaders. The Secretary visited Grand Junction in July, and pledged to provide clarity and direction. Additional logistics and planning will occur in the months to come in close coordination with BLM employees, Congress, Tribes, and elected leaders.

The Department plans to take a number of additional steps, in coordination with leaders in Congress, to ensure that the BLM is best positioned to serve the American public. This includes establishing a new BLM Foundation – as authorized in legislation – to support the bureau’s efforts and to help build new partnerships. The BLM will strengthen the government-to-government relationship with Indian Tribes by supporting Tribal Liaisons in each state. The BLM will also seek to improve coordination and capacity to implement clean energy projects.

The previous administration relocated the BLM headquarters to Grand Junction, Colo., a move that failed to deliver promised jobs across the West and drove hundreds of people out of the agency. Of the 328 positions moved out of Washington, D.C., only 41 of the affected people relocated, with 3 moving to Grand Junction. This led to a significant loss of institutional memory and talent. The headquarters transition will be conducted with a goal of minimizing further disruption to employees and their families. Outside of the aforementioned core leadership positions, the BLM does not plan to require employees to relocate.

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U.S. Department of the Interior: The Department of the Interior (DOI) conserves and manages the Nation’s natural resources and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the American people, provides scientific and other information about natural resources and natural hazards to address societal challenges and create opportunities for the American people, and honors the Nation’s trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated island communities to help them prosper.

Bureau of Land Management: This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

 

 

 


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 23
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 12:36 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 23

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 23, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and introductions (1:00-1:10); Updates (1:10-1:25); Metrics & Scoring Committee decisions (1:25-1:40); CAHPS results (1:50-2:30); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program receives NEA and OAC funds for New Applications, Accepted through Oct 1, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Folklife Network - 09/17/21 12:35 PM
Franciso Bautista stands at his loom
Franciso Bautista stands at his loom
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/5598/148570/thumb_Bautista_Francisco_artist.png

EUGENE, Ore. – (Sept 17, 2021) – The University of Oregon’s Oregon Folklife Network has been awarded a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts plus $40,000 from Oregon Arts Commission to support Oregon’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program. 

Oregon Folklife Network is now accepting applications for the Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (TAAP) for 2022. The program offers folk and traditional master artists and culture keepers a $3,500 stipend to teach their art form to apprentices from their own communities, Tribes, sacred, or occupational groupsThe stipend supports master artists in sharing their knowledge, skills and expertise with apprentices of great promise who will be empowered to carry on and strengthen Oregon’s living cultural traditions. Artist may make public presentations through the Museum of Natural and Cultural History.

Oregon’s 2021 TAAP awards supported traditional buckaroo leatherwork by Clair Kehrberg of John Day; Mexican charro (trick-roping expert) Antonio Huerta of Springfield; Black gospel, rhythm & blues singer LaRhonda Steele of Portland; Zapotec weaving by Francisco Bautista of Sandy; Guinean drum making and tuning by Alseny Yansane of Eugene; and Asian Indian dance by Jayanthi Raman of Portland. All mentored apprentices from their own culture groups in the traditional forms noted, with OFN providing technical support as needed for socially distanced teaching, learning, and presenting.  

Oregon Folklife Network encourages applications from Oregonians practicing cultural traditions emerging from their heritage or Tribes. This program does not fund historic reenactments or cultural appropriation.

To learn more about application procedures and eligibility or to recommend a TAAP applicant, visit ofn.uoregon.edu, email ofn@uoregon.edu, or call 541-346-3820. Oregon Folklife Network staff members are available to provide application advice and will review and provide feedback on draft applications prior to submission.

Completed applications are due no later than 5 pm on October 1 at the Oregon Folklife Network, 242 Knight Library, 6204 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-6204. NOTE: This is NOT a postmark deadline.  

About Oregon Folklife Network

Oregon Folklife Network (OFN) is administered by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon and is the state’s designated Folk and Traditional Arts Program. OFN is supported in part by grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Cultural Trust, and National Endowment for the Arts. OFN works to increase public investment in cultural traditions and those who practice them.

 

About the Museum of Natural and Cultural History  

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History enhances knowledge of Earth’s environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future. With collections representing millions of years and each of the planet's continents, it's a place for digging into science, celebrating culture, and joining together to create a just and sustainable world. The museum is located on the University of Oregon campus near Hayward Field. Oregon Trail and other EBT cardholders receive admission discounts. Visit mnch.uoregon.edu or call 541-346-3024 for current hours and other admission information.




Attached Media Files: Franciso Bautista stands at his loom , LaRhonda Steele performs rhythm and blues , Antonio Huerta performs charrería , Clair Kehrberg's leatherwork, usually functional for ranch work, shows artistic excellence , Jayanthi Raman teaches Indian Classical dance , Alseny Yansane of Eugene performs Guinean drum and dance

OHA recognizes Preparedness Month by focusing on emotional health needs from disasters
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 11:40 AM

September 17, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA recognizes Preparedness Month by focusing on emotional health needs from disasters

Oregonians invited to continue ‘Honor with Action’ in face of emergencies

PORTLAND, Ore.--Oregon Health Authority joins the national observation of Preparedness Month during September, with special emphasis on emotional health resources for communities, and building social connections as public health emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires continue.

Like many of its emergency management partners, OHA encourages people in Oregon to start or continue their journey toward being prepared for emergencies. OHA’s emphasis is on helping people prepare for their health needs during and after a disaster, including reminding people to review their plans and kits to make sure they address their household’s health and medical needs.

OHA recommends:

  • Families with infants consider essential items like diapers, special items or food.
  • People who rely on regular medical care like dialysis discuss their facilities’ emergency plans.
  • People who use medical devices plan to take them as part of their evacuation kit and know how to replace them if the devices are lost during a disaster.
  • People learn about other ways to prepare for health needs during a disaster at HealthOregon.org/preparedness.

“The anniversary of the devastating wildfires that affected so many Oregonians last year falls during Preparedness Month and on top of the continuing COVID-19 pandemic,” says Steve Allen, OHA’s behavioral health director. “People often experience heightened distress surrounding the anniversary of a disaster event, so it’s a good time to recognize and work to support ourselves, our families and our community’s emotional health needs right along with our other preparedness activities.” 

Allen says Preparedness Month is a good time to empower community members to take action by preparing for the next public health emergency. That preparation can displace fear of disasters.

“Kits and plans are a starting point and what we put in them can save lives and also bring comfort,” says Allen, noting how including a few fun activities or toys can make a difference for kids.  “When it comes to protecting our emotional health, sometimes it’s about having healthy coping strategies.”

Some of these coping strategies include taking care of your body through sleep, exercise and healthy eating; taking lots of breaks to unwind or help strong feelings fade; staying informed while still avoiding exposure to too much news; and reaching out for help when needed.

Children and youth can be especially vulnerable to stress during and after emergencies. Communities can support them by encouraging them to participate in their families’ preparedness activities in age-appropriate ways. After a disaster, adults can help kids by encouraging them to share what they’re thinking, answer their questions, limit their exposure to media coverage of disasters, keep to routines, and get them support when they need it.

Emergency management professionals around the country chose the theme “Honor with Action” for this year’s Preparedness Month. After the wide range of disasters this past year, it fits well with OHA’s emphasis on emotional health preparedness and recovery.

“Our social connections are an important part of what make us resilient,” Allen says. “The pandemic, along with the wildfires disaster, has made it hard to stay connected, but it is more important than ever to re-establish connections or build new ones. Take time to honor the losses of the past year by reaching out to loved ones and neighbors. Also, reach out to survivors and see what help they need.”

If you or someone you know is thinking of harming themselves or needs help because of drug or alcohol use, call Lines for Life which is a 24/7 crisis line at 800-273-8255. Lines for Life also offers specialized support for seniors, military members, youth and those facing racial equity concerns. In addition, it provides specialized services through its COVID-19 & Oregon Wildfire Outreach Program. Find more information at www.linesforlife.org.

Other services:

# # #


D River Beach health advisory lifted Sept. 17
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 10:57 AM

September 17, 2021

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

D River Beach health advisory lifted Sept. 17

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with ocean water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County. 

The health authority issued the advisory Sept. 14 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from follow-up tests taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the ocean water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. Officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter. 

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. 

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Thu. 09/16/21
Oregon Health Policy Board meets for an educational webinar September 21 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/21 3:57 PM

September 15, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (webinar information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets for an educational webinar September 21 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: September 21, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602860593?pwd=b3dpRStJSStQSFN2K1g3bmhGeGQvUT09   

Phone audio Line: (669) 254 – 5252 Meeting ID: 160 286 0593

Passcode: 907271 Purpose: This educational webinar will update the Oregon Health Policy Board and members of the public about: 1) the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Ombuds Program role in ensuring Oregon Health Plan (OHP) member-centered care; 2) Oregon Health Plan member concerns reported to and identified by the OHA Ombuds program during the first six months of 2021 and 3) highlight key trends and Ombuds recommendations for strengthening OHP equity-based and member centered services.

Oregon Health Policy Board educational webinars are for informational purposes only. Board member attendance is optional, and no official business will be conducted.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 2,242 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/21 3:35 PM

Sept. 16, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,242 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 11 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,547, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,242 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 307,768.

Oregon Health Authority holds media briefing with Dr. Dean Sidelinger

Find a link to watch today’s media briefing here.

Here are Dr. Sidelinger’s talking points, as well as a link to today’s slides.

Oregon Healthcare Workforce COVID-19 vaccine uptake: September update

The September update to the Oregon Healthcare Workforce COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake Dashboard adds new data for all visualizations up to Sept. 5, 2021. It now includes three new license types: Psychologist at 93% vaccinated, Licensed Social Worker at 88% vaccinated and Licensed Dietitian at 80% vaccinated.

All trend weeks have been updated with the most current information, which may have been previously missing due to the lag in data reporting.

There has been an increase in overall vaccination rates for health care workers since the vaccine mandate was announced in early August.

Weekly Breakthrough Case Report

OHA’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, found that 81.3% of the 14,046 reported COVID-19 cases between Sept. 1 through Sept. 15 occurred in people who were unvaccinated. There were 2,632 breakthrough cases, accounting for 18.7% of all cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 48. Ninety breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 68 breakthrough cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 19,549 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 48. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is currently approximately five times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 4.7% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 0.9% have died. The average age of the people who died was 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The number of vaccine breakthrough cases identified in Oregon remains very small when compared to the more than 2.7 million Oregonians who have completed their COVID-19 vaccination series.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

Pediatric Weekly dashboard update

Today, OHA published its newest dashboard report of pediatric COVID-19 case data in Oregon.

This dashboard replaces the previous report and is published weekly on Thursdays with the most recent full week’s data.

Dashboard will change the reporting of neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit beds

The Hospital Capacity tab of the Daily Data Update dashboard starting today will report neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bed capacity separately. Prior to the change, NICU and PICU bed counts were combined on the dashboard summary. Reporting these bed categories individually better reflects hospital capacity for pediatric patients with COVID-19 who need intensive care.  

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,027, which is 40 fewer than yesterday. There are 286 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday.

There are 41 available adult ICU beds out of 658 total (6% availability) and 334 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,308 (8% availability). 

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 9,805 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 15. Of this total, 4,243 were administered on Sept. 15: 1,887 were initial doses, 1,756 were second doses and 555 were third doses. The remaining 5,562 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 15.

The seven-day running average is now 7,444 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,899,668 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,880,143 doses of Moderna and 208,242 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,694,868 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,453,495 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (22), Benton (34), Clackamas (84), Clatsop (47), Columbia (33), Coos (48), Crook (26), Curry (13), Deschutes (169), Douglas (81), Grant (1), Harney (14), Hood River (13), Jackson (149), Jefferson (10), Josephine (70), Klamath (68), Lake (6), Lane (184), Lincoln (20), Linn (167), Malheur (42), Marion (205), Morrow (8), Multnomah (249), Polk (42), Sherman (2), Tillamook (11), Umatilla (63), Union (31), Wallowa (4), Wasco (19), Washington (243) and Yamhill (64).

Oregon’s 3,537th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 14 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,538th COVID-19 related death is a 62-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 14 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,539th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 5 and died on Aug. 15 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,540th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 12 and died on Sept. 15. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,541st COVID-19 related death is a 59-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 14 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,542nd COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 14 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,543rd COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 14 at Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,544th COVID-19 related death is a 38-year-old man from Jackson County who died on Sept. 5 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,545th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 24 and died on May 8 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,546th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Wallowa County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Aug. 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,547th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 8 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 3462nd death, a 44-year-old man from Jackson County. He was originally reported as a Klamath County resident.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Oregon Tribes Among 12 Selected for Participation in Program Enhancing Tribal Access to National Crime Information Databases
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/16/21 1:24 PM

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Selected to Join Program

WASHINGTON—The Department of Justice has selected an additional 12 federally recognized tribes to participate in the expansion of the Tribal Access Program for National Crime Information (TAP), a program that provides tribal governments with means to access, enter, and exchange data with national crime information systems, including those maintained by the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division and the states.

“Timely access to federal criminal information can help protect domestic violence victims, place foster children in safe conditions, solve crimes, and apprehend fugitives on tribal land, among other important uses,” said Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco. “Increasing tribal access to criminal databases is a priority of the Justice Department and this Administration, and essential to many tribal government efforts to strengthen public safety in their communities.” 

“Tribal law enforcement agencies have long sought access to federal criminal databases to obtain important information that can be used to prevent violent crime in tribal communities. We are pleased that the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and Cow Creek Band of Umpqua have been selected for participation in the TAP program and look forward to more Oregon tribes being added in the future. The Justice Department and U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon are deeply committed to keeping Oregon tribal communities safe,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

The program provides training as well as software and biometric/biographic kiosk workstations to process fingerprints, take mugshots, and submit information to FBI Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) systems. With these additional tribes, there are now 108 federally recognized Tribes participating in TAP. 

TAP has been an important resource for the department’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Initiative and the Presidential Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives known as Operation Lady Justice. The Department of Justice began TAP in 2015 in response to concerns raised by tribal leaders about the need to have direct access to federal systems.

Using TAP, tribes have shared information about missing persons; registered convicted sex offenders; entered domestic violence orders of protection for nationwide enforcement; run criminal histories; identified and arrested fugitives; entered bookings and convictions; and completed fingerprint-based record checks for non-criminal justice purposes such as screening employees or volunteers who work with children. 

The following tribes have been newly selected for participation in TAP:

  1. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation
  2. Cow Creek Band of Umpqua
  3. Fort Belknap Indian Community
  4. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa
  5. Havasupai Tribe
  6. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe
  7. Menominee Tribe
  8. Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe
  9. Muckleshoot Tribe
  10. Passamaquoddy Tribe
  11. Shingle Springs Band of Miwok
  12. United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee

TAP is managed by the Justice Department’s Office of the Chief Information Officer and the Office of Tribal Justice. It is funded by the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART), the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), and the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW).

For more information on TAP, visit http://www.justice.gov/tribal/tribal-access-program-tap.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , 2021-09/6325/148526/ANNOUNCEMENT-TAP_Selection-Final_61.pdf

Oregon reports 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 46 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/21 12:13 PM

Sept. 15, 2021

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 46 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 46 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,536, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 305,560.

Media briefing on COVID-19

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, the state epidemiologist, will be available to speak to the media on the latest developments in the COVID-19 pandemic tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 16, at 11:30 a.m. (PDT). Interested media can participate via this Zoom link. A livestream—with an American Sign Language simulcast—will be available for the public on YouTube.

Note: Today, OHA will send the COVID-19 Weekly Data and COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Reports separately.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,067, which is 15 fewer than yesterday. There are 294 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six more than yesterday.

There are 50 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (8% availability) and 325 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,312 (8% availability). 

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 10,414 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 14. Of this total, 4,123 were administered on Sept. 14: 1,921 were initial doses, 1,762 were second doses and 413 were third doses. The remaining 6,291 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 14.

The seven-day running average is now 7,398 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,892,965 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,877,852, doses of Moderna and 207,465 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,690,410 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,448,407 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (37), Benton (19), Clackamas (80), Clatsop (21), Columbia (17), Coos (56), Crook (18), Curry (7), Deschutes (184), Douglas (126), Grant (9), Harney (24), Hood River (16), Jackson (146), Jefferson (23), Josephine (56), Klamath (40), Lake (15), Lane (157), Lincoln (34), Linn (109), Malheur (73), Marion (204), Morrow (8), Multnomah (164), Polk (69), Sherman (2), Tillamook (25), Umatilla (59), Union (40) Wallowa (3), Wasco (18), Washington (150), Wheeler (3) and Yamhill (57).

Oregon’s 3,491st COVID-19 related death is a 45-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 13 at Bay Area Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,492nd COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 11 at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,493rd COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept. 11 at Southern Coos Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,494th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old man from Clatsop County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 7 at Columbia Memorial Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,495th COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 12 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,496th COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 10 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,497th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 6 and died on Aug. 30 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,498th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Sept. 11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,499th COVID-19 related death is a 39-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 9 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,500th COVID-19 related death is a 43-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 5 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,501st COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept. 4 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,502nd COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 10 and died on Sept. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,503rd COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Curry County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 9 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,504th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 7 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,505th COVID-19 related death is an 89-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 13 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,506th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 8 and died on Sept. 10 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,507th COVID-19 related death is a 98-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 11 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,508th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 13 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,509th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 13 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,510th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 13 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,511th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 14 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,512th COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 13 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,513th COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,514th COVID-19 related death is a 41-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 17 and died on Sept. 11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,515th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,516th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,517th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 13 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,518th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 6 and died on Aug. 30 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,519th COVID-19 related death is a 47-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 14 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,520th COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,521st COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 7 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,522nd COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 12 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,523rd COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 9 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,524th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Wasco County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 11 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,525th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old woman from Wallowa County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Aug. 25. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,526th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Wallowa County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Aug. 20. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,527th COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old man from Wallowa County who tested positive on Aug. 15 and died on Aug. 21; location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,528th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old woman from Wallowa County who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 11 at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,529th COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Tillamook County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 10 at Adventist Health Tillamook. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,530th COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 14 at Adventist Health Tillamook. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,531st COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Aug. 30. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,532nd COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,533rd COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 14 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,534th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 12 at Good Shepherd Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,535th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Aug. 30 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,536th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 13 and died on Sept. 2 at Good Shepherd Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Baker City Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Stealing Covid-Relief Funds
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/16/21 12:08 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Baker City, Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for fraudulently converting to his own personal use federal money intended to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The parties stipulated to a two-year prison sentence for Jeremy Clawson, 32. At their joint recommendation, however, U.S. District Court Chief Judge Marco A. Hernandez reduced the sentence to ten months to account for the time Clawson had already served in Oregon state custody. Chief Judge Hernandez also ordered Clawson to serve a term of three years’ supervised release following his federal prison term.

“Recent federal relief programs, like those authorized by the CARES Act, were designed to help Americans and American small businesses navigate the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic. Mr. Clawson saw the swift rollout of these programs as an opportunity to enrich himself at the expense of Americans in need. I want to thank the U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Inspector General for their steadfast partnership and commitment to bringing Mr. Clawson to justice,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

“This case shows the American people that their law enforcement and Attorney’s Office are taking CARES act fraud seriously,” said Justin Bourne, Resident Agent in Charge of the Secret Service Portland Resident Office. “This investigation is a prime example of the Secret Service’s investigative mission; to protect the United States financial infrastructure. This case illustrates the strong partnership between the Secret Service, U.S. Small Business Administration Office of Inspector General, the Baker City Police Department and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.”

“Lying to gain access to economic stimulus funds for personal gain will be met with justice,” said SBA OIG’s Western Region Special Agent in Charge Weston King. “Greed has no place in SBA’s programs that are intended to provide assistance to the nation’s small businesses struggling with the pandemic challenges. I want to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office and our law enforcement partners for their dedication and pursuit of justice.”

According to court documents, Clawson stole economic relief funds distributed by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDLs) program, as authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020, was designed to provide emergency financial assistance to millions of Americans and small businesses suffering the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On August 11, 2020, the proceeds of an SBA EIDL totaling $145,200 were deposited into an Umpqua Bank account owned by Clawson and his girlfriend. Shortly after receiving the deposit, Clawson began making multiple large cash withdrawals at the drive-through window of an Umpqua Bank in Baker City. On August 17, 2020, Clawson withdrew $49,905 in the form of a cashier’s check to purchase a 2016 Dodge Challenger. 

SBA loan documents showed that the EIDL had been extended to the Halperin Manufacturing Company of San Diego, California. Though there is no record of any such company, the loan application listed an actual San Diego resident as the company’s owner and claimed it employed 350 people. Investigators contacted the purported owner, but that person denied owning or being affiliated with any such company and confirmed that the company’s supposed address in San Diego was the individual’s personal residence.

In early September 2020, investigators learned that Clawson had been arrested in late August by the Baker City Police Department for driving under the influence, reckless driving, driving with a suspended license, and attempting to elude the police. Clawson was driving the 2016 Dodge Challenger at the time of his arrest. Clawson later told authorities that he had received a large inheritance from his father, including $30,000 in cash he had on his person during a subsequent arrest.

On September 11, 2020, federal investigators interviewed Clawson at the Baker County Jail, where he was detained on the state charges. Clawson claimed to have received the $145,200 from a woman with whom he had an online dating relationship. He further claimed that he didn’t know what to do with the money and, after he stopped communicating with the woman, began spending the money himself. Clawson admitted to using the SBA money to purchase the Dodge Challenger and several other vehicles.

On December 21, 2020, Clawson was charged by criminal complaint with theft of government property. Later, on February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a single-count indictment charging Clawson with theft of public money. On June 8, 2021, he pleaded guilty.

During sentencing, Chief Judge Hernandez ordered Clawson to pay $125,200 in restitution to the SBA.

Clawson has been in custody since his arrest in August 2020.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Secret Service in cooperation with the SBA Office of Inspector General and Baker City Police Department. It was prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Anyone with information about fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or via the NCDF Web Complaint Form at: www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Wed. 09/15/21
Sept. 15 Oregon Employment Department Media Statement
Oregon Employment Department - 09/15/21 5:31 PM

Our next media briefing is scheduled for 1 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 29. 

Employment

Yesterday, the Oregon Employment Department released the August unemployment rate and jobs numbers for Oregon. In addition to the summary below, more details can be found in the full news release and this video recap.

Oregon’s unemployment rate had another significant drop, from 5.2% in July to 4.9% in August.

  • The number of unemployed Oregonians fell by 6,500 over the month.
  • The U.S. unemployment rate was 5.4% in July, and fell to 5.2% in August.
  • Oregon’s unemployment rate improved from its all-time high of 13.2% to below 4.9% in 17 months.
  • By comparison, after peaking at 12.3% during the Great Recession, it took Oregon’s unemployment rate more than six years (80 months) to drop below 5%.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has only been below 5.0% during two other periods of time; both were among the strongest economic expansion times in the state.

Oregon’s jobs recovery continued in August, and the labor market continued to tighten. Employers added 7,900 jobs to nonfarm payrolls. As of August, Oregon has regained 72% of the jobs lost in the spring of 2020, compared with 76% for the U.S. Employers continue adding jobs to their payrolls at a relatively fast pace. Oregon added more than 80,000 jobs in the past 8 months. 

Government added 3,500 jobs in August. These gains were concentrated in local government, reflecting public K-12 schools and public higher education staffing up for the school year and the return of in-person instruction. 

Other sectors with large gains over the month included wholesale trade (+1,400 jobs), leisure and hospitality (+1,200), and professional and business services (+1,000). Leisure and hospitality employers have added as many jobs in the past 8 months as they did in the five years (61 months) leading up to the pandemic.

Within professional and business services, the professional and technical services (architectural, engineering, computer systems design) has been the strongest part of the economy coming out of the recession. These employers had 4,300 more jobs in August 2021 than they did in February 2020. 

The only broad area of Oregon’s economy to lose jobs in August was retail trade, which dropped 1,900 jobs. Although retail has regained 9 out of 10 jobs lost in the spring of 2020, this August was the second month of job losses in retail. 

 

Back to Work Update 

The Employment Department continues focusing on helping people find jobs or new careers and assisting employers in finding talented workers. We launched our Back To Work Campaign today in partnership with WorkSource Oregon.

WorkSource Oregon and partners are coordinating job fairs and hiring events across Oregon in 24 locations. Scavenger hunts, job fairs, drive thru and virtual hiring events, and even a ‘Large Business Extravaganza’.

People can find out what events are happening in their area by contacting their local WorkSource center or at WorkSourceOregon.org. All events will follow the state and CDC guidance to make sure everyone is safe during these events. To ensure the safety of our visitors and employees and prevent further spread of COVID-19, all customers and employees must wear masks.

Employment Department employees have a deep well of experience helping people find work during and after a recession, and the dedicated and knowledgeable employees can help people find the right job or training. Additional hiring events are scheduled throughout September and the rest of the year.

HealthCare Worker Outreach

There is an urgent, statewide need to fill health care and other positions that support the health care industry, like food service, facilities and business administration.

The Employment Department is reaching out to claimants with health care experience to let them know of job openings in their field. There is also a health care hiring event in the Clackamas WorkSource Oregon center on Wed., Sept. 22

We are informing these claimants about:

  • Training at an approved institution in high-demand occupations, including assistance with tuition and other associated costs such as text books   
  • Fee payment assistance for licensure testing or preparatory classes for testing  
  • Placement in on the job training or work experiences with employers  
  • Entrance in to apprenticeship programs or other earn and learn opportunities  
  • Supportive payments that would lead to success in training  (gas voucher, for example)  
  • Paying for necessary equipment or clothing needed for a job opportunity  

For more information, people can contact their local WorkSource Oregon center.

 

Work Opportunity Tax Credit 

As employers continue competing for workers in this job-seekers' market, we want to make sure they know how to save money and expand their candidate pool.  

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit that most Oregon employers already qualify for, and it can save a business up to $9600 per new hire.  

Several factors determine how much the credit will be, including the category the new hire qualifies under, and their annual hours and wages. In Oregon, the average savings that businesses receive is about $3,000 per qualified new hire.

This credit is available to employers who are hiring individuals who face barriers to employment, and includes many broad categories of individuals including veterans, people receiving SNAP or TANF, or people recently released from prison.  

Our WOTC team can help employers start using the tax credit program. To receive the credit, they need to add two simple forms to their hiring process and then submit them online to the Employment Department through our online portal.

More information is at OregonTaxCredit.org. After submitting information using the contact form, a WOTC team member will reach out to employers within one business day. Questions? Please call 503-507-8645.

 

Unemployment Insurance Benefits

 

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)

The PUA program expired September 4, 2021, however, we know some people who may have been eligible to file for PUA benefits have not done so yet.

Because of that, the federal PUA program is giving people extra time to file their initial claim for benefits and to file for retroactive weeks. The last day to do this is Wed., Oct. 6. We encourage people to file using the Online Claim System. After Oct. 6, no one can make any changes or backdate weeks of a PUA claim.

The US Dept. of Labor requires that all people applying for PUA submit proof of employment. Our online interactive PUA Employment/Self-Employment tool can help people determine what document to submit.

 

New Temporary Benefit Eligibility Rules

The pandemic has changed the economy and how we work. Because of that, we want to make sure our benefit eligibility guidelines are updated to reflect these shifts. 

Before the pandemic, a person had to be available for two shifts a day or they could not be eligible to receive benefits. That is changing. 

Starting the week of Sept. 26, 2021, people filing for benefits must be available for suitable work for at least 40 hours per week OR one shift, if their work is shift based. 

To make sure people know about this rule change, we are notifying claimants. They also may visit our online Temporary Eligibility Rule FAQs for more information.

Some examples of when temporary rule changes allows flexibility if someone is: 

  • Providing care for others in their household
  • Helping their children with online schooling
  • Having work-related transportation issues, or
  • Facing other barriers.

If someone has barriers preventing them from returning to their work, to receive unemployment insurance benefits they must be willing to seek an alternate type of work in which they are available to work at least 40 hours per week or one shift per day.

We are hosting a webinar on the new temporary rules and PUA retroactive claim filing at 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 16. People can register online and also view past webinars.

We also will conduct listening sessions in October and November so business, labor, community organizations and others can give us feedback on these new temporary rules before we work on permanent availability rule changes.

 

One-on-One Orientation

We are partnering with WorkSource Oregon (WSO) on this temporary rule change. All people filing a new claim for benefits must complete a one-on-one orientation at a WorkSource Oregon center.

Unemployment rules are complicated, and many people have not applied for benefits before the pandemic, or it has been a long time since they have received unemployment insurance benefits. 

During this one-on-one orientation, an employment expert will work with the job seeker to review their availability to work and identify any barriers preventing them from being considered available for suitable work. We want to make sure new claimants know about this requirement, because if people do not complete their required one-on-one orientation, their benefits will stop.

Starting Thursday, Sept. 16, people can register for their WorkSource Oregon orientation using our new scheduling tool ScheduleOnce. This scheduling tool can be found at WorkSource.org by clicking on the Contact button. The tool has options to schedule virtual and in-person appointments and also to use WorkSource Oregon computers for their work searches.

 

Employer Payroll Tax Relief

The Employment Department is working to implement HB 3389, the employer payroll tax relief legislation. There are two parts to this legislation. First, it rolls back the UI tax experience rating for years 2022 through 2024 to the pre-pandemic 2020 UI tax experience rate (benefit ratio). The rate will be based on an employer’s experience rate prior to the pandemic.

Second, the relief plan allows employers who meet certain criteria to defer up to one-third of their 2021 UI taxes until June 30, 2022, without accruing interest or penalties on the deferred amount. Employers need to meet all conditions to be eligible for UI tax deferral and forgiveness.

 

Deferred Claims

The Employment Department has moved approximately 11,000 PEUC claims that had a deferred status regular Unemployment Insurance claim.

People with deferred claims had filed a claim in 2020 and filed a new claim for benefits in 2021. They qualified for a new claim; however, it was deferred and they continued receiving PEUC benefits until the PEUC claim expired Sept. 4. 

These claimants must serve a waiting week before they can receive their benefits.

 

Customer Service 

We promised throughout the pandemic to be transparent. Current data show that 93 percent of Contact Us inquiries are now resolved within seven days. We are experiencing a delay with our call data information and hope to provide an update on call wait times during next week’s media briefing. 

 

Benefits Paid

The Oregon Employment Department paid $10.9 billion in benefits to more than 616,000 people from March 15, 2020, to Sept. 14, 2021. Last week, we paid about $89 million to 115,000 people. Detailed information can be found on the media dashboard.




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/930/148508/09.15.21_media_statement_FINAL.pdf

FBI Arrests Albany Man in Threat Case (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/15/21 5:22 PM
SAC quote - Ryder threats - Sept 15, 2021
SAC quote - Ryder threats - Sept 15, 2021
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FBI agents, with the assistance of the Albany Police Department, arrested David Scott Ryder, age 64, this morning on charges of interstate transmission of a threat and stalking. The arrest, based on a criminal complaint, involved threats allegedly made to an Oregon public official.

The threats included three emailed messages between August 10, 2021, and August 23, 2021. They also included a voicemail left on an office phone on August 23, 2021.

Some of the statements included:

  • “… all the people that won’t get your FAKE [expletive] vaccine are the same ones who you will see hang you in a public place for crimes against America. Resign today!!!”
  • “I wish you would show your face you punk! I’d take your WORTHLESS SOUL from you. [Expletive] ALL DEMOCRAT COMMUNISTS like you. Resign today! I’d love to get my [expletive] hands around your neck SCUM!!!”
  • “… if you don’t call me back, I’m going to start sending threats and then we’ll get some of your [expletive] little cop friends down here to see me and I’m going to [expletive] kill them. They come in my [expletive] yard. Anybody from the state or federal come in my yard, I’ll kill them.”

Ryder made his initial appearance before a U.S. Magistrate Judge today. The judge ordered him released pending further court proceedings. 

“Threats of any kind against a public official are not acceptable in this country,” said Kieran L. Ramsey. “Anyone who has information about threatened criminal activity or violence should contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI or online at tips.fbi.gov.”

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: SAC quote - Ryder threats - Sept 15, 2021

New Plaque Honors Black Pioneer Merchant A.H. Francis; Public Dedication on Saturday, September 18 at 4pm in SW Portland (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 09/15/21 4:52 PM
A.H. Francis Plaque
A.H. Francis Plaque
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Portland, OR — On Saturday, September 18, the Lang Syne Society and Oregon Black Pioneers (OBP) will dedicate a plaque honoring Black pioneer merchant and abolitionist A.H. Francis. The public dedication ceremony will begin at 4pm at the site of Francis’s mercantile at SW Front Avenue & Stark Street (now SW Naito Pkwy & Harvey Milk Street). Francis’s store was located in one of the first brick buildings constructed in Portland. Today, the Morrison Bridge off-ramp curves through the site, and the plaque will be affixed to a concrete guardrail stanchion.

Abner Hunt Francis moved west in 1851, soon after Portland was incorporated, with his brother, Isaac B. Francis. Although they were threatened with expulsion from the Oregon Territory due to the Black exclusion laws, a petition signed by 216 Portlanders (a large portion of the population at that time) helped to thwart their eviction. Francis and his brother became successful clothing merchants, operating a prosperous store until 1861, when Francis and his wife Synda Francis moved to Victoria, British Columbia. (I.B. Francis had died in California in 1856.) 

Throughout the mid-1800s, Francis was an active abolitionist, using his position to fight for Black people from western New York to the Pacific Coast. He wrote letters to his friend Frederick Douglass about the conditions for Black people in Oregon and California, and about his resistance to Oregon’s Black exclusion laws, and Douglass published the letters in his abolitionist newspaper. Washington, D.C.-based writer Kenneth Hawkins, who wrote about Francis’s relationship with Douglass in the Winter 2020 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly in “‘A Proper Attitude of Resistance:’ The Oregon Letters of A.H. Francis to Frederick Douglass, 1851–1860,” will speak at the dedication about Francis’s first-hand documentation of life as a free Black person living in the region. Descendants of the petition signers (including several with family names that can be seen throughout Portland, such as Failing, Couch, Davis, Hoyt, and Corbett) will attend the short ceremony at the dedication site. 

The Oregon Historical Society is also scheduled to host a virtual lecture with Dr. Hawkins on Francis’s life and achievements on Friday, September 17, at 12pm via Zoom. Kimberly Stowers Moreland of OBP will join the conversation to offer remarks on the significance of Francis's accomplishments today. Even with written accounts from Francis himself, histories of the Oregon Territory and its commercial port often ignored, ridiculed, or misrepresented Francis and his work to gain equal rights for Black people in America. By bringing to light an accurate narrative of his life and those who helped and opposed him, this presentation adds critical complexity and nuance to this period in Oregon history. Visit ohs.org to register for this free virtual program. 

Kimberly Stowers Moreland, vice president of OBP and author of Images of America: African Americans of Portland, says “the A.H. Francis Building is one of the most significant contributions of African Americans to early Portland and represents an amazing story of resilience.” Portland architectural historian William J. Hawkins III (no relation to Kenneth) spearheaded the plaque effort and agreed with Moreland, calling the building “an important part of early Portland’s central core.” Multnomah County, which owns and maintains the plaque location on a Morrison Bridge off-ramp, is excited and pleased to participate in its placement.

The Lang Syne Society, a group of retired Portland business leaders, has placed 21 other historical plaques around Portland since 1960. The Oregon-shaped bronze plaques, mostly in Portland parks, celebrate people, places, and events that shaped Portland during the nineteenth century. Secretary-treasurer Ted Kaye, who leads the plaque program, said, “Amidst today’s turmoil, it is important to recall how Portlanders of 170 years ago stood up to racial bias.”


About Oregon Black Pioneers

Oregon Black Pioneers was founded in 1993 and is based in Salem. The organization researches, recognizes, and commemorates the culture and heritage of African Americans in Oregon. OBP is Oregon’s only historical society dedicated to preserving and presenting the experiences of African Americans statewide. 

 

About the Lang Syne Society

The Lang Syne Society, founded in 1914, is a group of retired Portland business leaders that has placed 21 other historical plaques around Portland since 1960. The Oregon-shaped bronze plaques, mostly in Portland parks, celebrate the city’s 19th-century people, places, and events.

 

About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 




Attached Media Files: A.H. Francis Plaque

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations and deaths decline amid ongoing surge
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/21 4:28 PM

September 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations and deaths decline amid ongoing surge

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows decreases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

OHA reported 12,997 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Sept. 6 through Sunday, Sept. 12. That represents an 11% decrease from the previous week. Since the summer surge began in early July, 79% of cases have been sporadic, without known sources.

There were 592 new COVID-19 hospitalizations, down from 1,028 last week. That marks the first drop in nine consecutive weeks of increases. While the number of new hospitalizations has decreased, this hospitalization number does not account for people who remain hospitalized from previous weeks. Over the past week, there was a slight decrease in the number of hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients as reported through Oregon’s Hospital Capacity Web System (HOSCAP), but the number of hospitalized patients is still high.

There were 120 reported COVID-19 related deaths, down from 171 reported the previous week. It was the first decrease in the weekly death toll after six weeks of increases.

There were 149,123 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Sept. 5 through Sept. 11.  The percentage of positive tests increased to 12%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 182 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

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Committee for Family Forestlands meets Sept. 22
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/15/21 4:27 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Wednesday, Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. To join the virtual meeting, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please contact Susan Muniz at 503-945-7502.

The committee’s agenda includes: 

  • Private Forest Division update
  • Fire season update
  • Landowner assistance updates
  • Work plan review & discussion
  • Partner updates

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by contacting Susan Muniz at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.


El Plan de Rescate Americano hace que la cobertura médica sea asequible: Los ahorros ampliados en la cobertura médica están ahorrando a los habitantes de Oregón miles de dólares (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/15/21 3:57 PM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
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(Salem) – En Oregon, 22.743 personas se inscribieron en cobertura médica durante el período especial de inscripción COVID-19 del 1 de abril al 15 de agosto de 2021.

  • 84 por ciento más de oregonianos se inscribieron en cobertura médica durante el período de inscripción especial de COVID-19 de 2021 que los que se inscribierondurante el mismo período de tiempo en 2020 cuando no había un período de inscripción especial para COVID-19.
  • De los habitantes de Oregón que ya estaban inscritos, 72,355 vieron una reducción promedio del 46 por ciento en la prima mensual después de la ayuda financiera debido a la expansión de la ayuda financiera del Plan de Rescate Americano.
  • Los afiliados existentes en Oregon ahora están ahorrando aproximadamente $6.1 millones más por mes en primas mensuales.

Más personas aún son elegibles para ahorros a través del Mercado. Los subsidios de la cobertura de salud de COBRA que reducen las primas de los afiliados a $0 terminan el 30 de septiembre de 2021. Las personas que actualmente están inscritas en la cobertura de salud de COBRA pueden pasar al Mercado cuando finalicen estos subsidios para evitar pagar el costo total de la cobertura de salud.

La ayuda financiera ampliada está disponible para todos los afiliados hasta el año del plan 2022. Nadie que se inscriba a través del Mercado pagará más del 8.5 por ciento de sus ingresos para la prima mensual de su cobertura de salud. El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregón ofrece un resumen rápida de los planes y ahorros para los habitantes de Oregón elegibles. La herramienta, disponible en OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop, y se ha actualizado para calcular correctamente los ahorros adicionales que ahora están disponibles para las personas que compran a través del Mercado.

Si se perdió el período de inscripción especial de COVID-19 y no está inscrito actualmente en COBRA, puede calificar para otro período de inscripción especial. Comience en OregonHealthCare.gov para llegar a la solicitud correcta o para encontrar un agente de seguros o una organización comunitaria asociada que lo ayude a completar la solicitud e inscribirse. Los agentes de seguros y los socios comunitarios brindan asistencia local personalizada sin cargo. Esta ayuda está disponible virtualmente, por teléfono y en persona siguiendo protocolos de seguridad.

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El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon, una parte del gobierno estatal, ayuda a las personas a conseguir seguro médico cuando no tienen cobertura a través de su trabajo, y no califican para el Plan de Salud de Oregon u otro programa. El Mercado es el socio al nivel estatal a CuidadoDeSalud.gov. Para obtener más información, visite CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov. 




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Oregon reports 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 46 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/21 3:31 PM

Sept. 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 46 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 46 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,536, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,069 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 305,560.

Media briefing on COVID-19

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, the state epidemiologist, will be available to speak to the media on the latest developments in the COVID-19 pandemic tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 16, at 11:30 a.m. (PDT). Interested media can participate via this Zoom link. A livestream—with an American Sign Language simulcast—will be available for the public on YouTube.

Note: Today, OHA will send the COVID-19 Weekly Data and COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Reports separately.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,067, which is 15 fewer than yesterday. There are 294 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six more than yesterday.

There are 50 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (8% availability) and 325 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,312 (8% availability). 

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 10,414 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 14. Of this total, 4,123 were administered on Sept. 14: 1,921 were initial doses, 1,762 were second doses and 413 were third doses. The remaining 6,291 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 14.

The seven-day running average is now 7,398 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,892,965 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,877,852, doses of Moderna and 207,465 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,690,410 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,448,407 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (37), Benton (19), Clackamas (80), Clatsop (21), Columbia (17), Coos (56), Crook (18), Curry (7), Deschutes (184), Douglas (126), Grant (9), Harney (24), Hood River (16), Jackson (146), Jefferson (23), Josephine (56), Klamath (40), Lake (15), Lane (157), Lincoln (34), Linn (109), Malheur (73), Marion (204), Morrow (8), Multnomah (164), Polk (69), Sherman (2), Tillamook (25), Umatilla (59), Union (40) Wallowa (3), Wasco (18), Washington (150), Wheeler (3) and Yamhill (57).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Pacific Power announces new grants supporting education and STEAM learning programs in Washington
Pacific Power - 09/15/21 2:46 PM

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces new grants supporting education and STEAM learning programs in Washington

The funding helps schools and organizations working to strengthen their communities and build brighter opportunities for the future

 

YAKIMA, Wash. (Sept. 15 2021) — An early, solid foundation in education – including the STEAM fields of science, technology, engineering, the arts and math – can benefit students and their communities for a lifetime. It’s the reason why Pacific Power is deeply committed to helping schools and organizations nurture the next generation of thinkers and doers.

As part of this commitment, the PacifiCorp Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating $630,000 in new grant funding across the six states it serves to support education and STEAM learning projects. Some of the grants will also go to help community organizations continuing to respond to COVID-related needs. This latest round of funding is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

“We believe in the power of education to create a lifetime of opportunity,” said Toni Petty, Pacific Power regional business manager, Washington. “Alongside these dedicated organizations, we’re determined to empower the next generation by creating and promoting hands-on, inclusive learning opportunities for children, teens and young adults. These curious minds will become our scientists, engineers, technicians and creators who will provide innovative solutions for the future and help guide the growth of our communities.”

The latest education and STEAM grants complement many of the ways Pacific Power and its employees are helping to foster STEAM learning in their communities throughout the year – whether launching or participating in STEAM programs and fairs, providing hands-on mentorship inside and outside classrooms, or funding virtual education opportunities to keep students connected during COVID.

The following 11 grants were given to Washington organizations:

  • Clark College Foundation for the Pacific Power STEM Scholarship Fund that helps students in traditionally underserved groups pursue careers in STEM fields.
  • Early Life Speech and Language for no-cost, individualized speech therapy to help young children succeed in school and in life. 
  • Friends of Union Gap Library and Community Center for construction of the Children’s Story Wall that will engage and encourage early readers.
  • Friends of Union Gap Library and Community Center for creation of an outdoor space for family-friendly activities, musical events and BBQ classes. 
  • Heritage University to expand scholarship support for students pursuing STEM degrees. 
  • Junior Achievement of Washington to help mitigate the financial impact of COVID-19 on the BizTown and Finance Park programs that help elementary and middle-school students learn about careers and financial literacy. 
  • Mt. Adams School District to help create a safe playground area for primary students.
  • Plus Delta After School Studios for The Club, which provides a safe, encouraging after-school space where Dayton School District K-8 students can get the homework help they need to succeed. 
  • Tri-State Steelheaders to support the Salmon in School environmental education program that provides classrooms with an aquarium and supplies so students get hands-on lessons in the salmon life cycle and watershed health. 
  • Walla Walla Community College Foundation for the Pacific Power Scholarship Fund that helps underserved students achieve a college degree. 
  • Washington State University Vancouver to expand the Pacific Power Scholarship in Renewable Energy Education program to help first-generation college students seeking careers in renewable energy.


About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created in 1988 by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six western states as Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California) and Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power. The next grant cycle is now open through Sept. 15; organizations may apply online. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

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Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update -- Sept. 15, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/15/21 1:59 PM
2021-09/3986/148483/OEM_RISING_LOGO_JPG.jpg
2021-09/3986/148483/OEM_RISING_LOGO_JPG.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/3986/148483/thumb_OEM_RISING_LOGO_JPG.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Sept. 15, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here. These updates are released bi-weekly with the next release on September 29, 2021.

Photo Captions:

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management's Wildfire Recovery logo: Oregon Rising - Stronger Together (Office of Emergency Management).

ACCESS Building Community will open a Center for Community Resilience this fall in Medford, Ore. (ACCESS Building Community).

An overview of the Debris Management Task Force wildfire recovery numbers as of Sept. 10, 2021 (Oregon Dept. of Transportation).




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/3986/148483/OEM_RISING_LOGO_JPG.jpg , 2021-09/3986/148483/DMTF_-_By_the_Numbers_091021.jpg , 2021-09/3986/148483/ACCESS_Building.jpg

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee meets Sept. 17
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/21 1:00 PM

September 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee meets Sept. 17

What: A special guest speaker presentation to the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee.

On Friday, Sept. 17, the PAB Training Subcommittee will welcome Dr. Rosalind Watts to give a presentation about her work with psilocybin-assisted treatments. Dr. Watts is a clinical psychiatrist who works with Synthesis (https://www.synthesisretreat.com/). Since she is based in London, this presentation has been scheduled in the morning to account for the time difference.

This will be the final presentation in the Training Subcommittee’s Speaker series.

Agenda: N/A

When: Friday, Sept. 17, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.oha.state.or.us">nic.riley@dhsoha.oha.state.or.us.


American Rescue Plan makes health coverage accessible: Expanded health coverage savings are saving Oregonians thousands of dollars (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/15/21 11:04 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/1073/148474/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

(Salem) – In Oregon, 22,743 people enrolled in health coverage during the COVID-19 special enrollment period from April 1 to Aug. 15, 2021.

  • 84 percent more Oregonians enrolled in health coverage during the 2021 COVID-19 special enrollment period than enrolled during the same timeframe in 2020 when there was not a special enrollment period for COVID-19.
  • Of the Oregonians already enrolled, 72,355 saw an average reduction of 46 percent in monthly premium after financial help due to the American Rescue Plan expansion of financial help.
  • Existing enrollees in Oregon are now saving approximately $6.1 million more per month in monthly premiums.

More people are still eligible for savings through the Marketplace. Subsidies on COBRA health coverage that reduce enrollee premiums to $0 are ending Sept. 30, 2021. People who are currently enrolled in COBRA health coverage can move to the Marketplace when these subsidies end to avoid paying full cost for health coverage. 

Expanded financial help is available to all enrollees through the 2022 plan year. No one who enrolls through the Marketplace will pay more than 8.5 percent of their income towards their monthly health coverage premium. The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace offers a quick snapshot of the plans and savings to eligible Oregonians. The tool, available at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop, and has been updated to correctly calculate additional savings now available to people shopping through the Marketplace.

If you missed the COVID-19 special enrollment period and are not currently enrolled in COBRA, you may qualify for another special enrollment period. Start at OregonHealthCare.gov to get to the right application or to find an insurance agent or community partner organization to help complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge. This help is available virtually, on the phone, and in person following safety protocols.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov. For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Oregon reports 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/21 10:42 AM

This news release is an updated version to include case a COVID-19 death information.

September 14, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 44 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,490, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 303,532.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,082, which is seven more than yesterday. There are 288 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 more than yesterday.

There are 48 available adult ICU beds out of 656 total (7% availability) and 337 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,282 (8% availability).

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 8,392 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 13.

Of this total, 4,301 were administered on Sept. 13: 2,307 were initial doses, 1,447 were second doses and 516 were third doses. The remaining 4,091 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 13.

The seven-day running average is now 7,403 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,886,031 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,875,138 doses of Moderna and 206,735 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,685,261 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,443,376 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (18), Benton (29), Clackamas (160), Clatsop (35), Columbia (21), Coos (72), Crook (45), Curry (17), Deschutes (119), Douglas (102), Gilliam (2), Grant (17), Harney (15), Hood River (13), Jackson (117), Jefferson (15), Josephine (44), Klamath (86), Lake (36), Lane (136), Lincoln (11), Linn (69), Malheur (99), Marion (205), Morrow (14), Multnomah (155), Polk (44), Sherman (1), Tillamook (9), Umatilla (80), Union (5), Wallowa (5), Wasco (20), Washington (160) and Yamhill (64).

Oregon’s 3,447 COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 9 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,448 COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 12 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,449 COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 12 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,450 COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 12 and died on Sept. 12 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,451 COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 10 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,452 COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 11 at Bay Area Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,453 COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Sept. 11 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,454 COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 12 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,455 COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 10 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,456 COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 12 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,457 COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man from Jefferson County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 10 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,458 COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 11 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,459 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,460 COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 12 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,461 COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,462 COVID-19 death is a 44-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on Sept. 12 and died on Sept. 13 at Providence Medford Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,463 COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 13 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,464 COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 10 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,465 COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,466 COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,467 COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,468 COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,469 COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 12 and died on Sept. 12 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,470 COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 13 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,471 COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 9 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,472 COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept. 10 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,473 COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 8 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,474 COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 10 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,475 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 7 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,476 COVID-19 death is a 24-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 13 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,477 COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 9 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,478 COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 12 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,479 COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 11 at Santiam Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,480 COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 10 at Santiam Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,481 COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 11 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,482 COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 11 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,483 COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 13 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,484 COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man from Crook County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 11 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,485 COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man from Crook County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 4 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,486 COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on Aug. 13 and died on Sept. 13 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,487 COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 12 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,488 COVID-19 death is a 45-year-old man from Tillamook County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 11 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,489 COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man from Sherman County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 10 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,490 COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man from Morrow County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 3 at Good Shepherd Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

OHA’s non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the Tableau dashboard. You can find the link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine type

Doses recalled

Non-viable, spoiled or expired

Grand total

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

 

21,351

21,351

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

 

103,778

103,778

Pfizer Comirnaty

 

51,344

51,344

Grand total

0

176,473

176,473

1Updated: 09/14/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS)

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/15/21 10:11 AM
Joshua Q. Rennels
Joshua Q. Rennels
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An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Joshua Quentin Rennels, died September 14, 2021. Rennels was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Rennels entered DOC custody on November 7, 2013, from Marion County. His earliest release date was July 29, 2023. Rennels was 46 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 13 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

 

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Attached Media Files: Joshua Q. Rennels

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet September 15
Oregon Health Authority - 09/15/21 9:38 AM

September 15, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet September 15

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 15, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1619798118?pwd=d1JRZ0QwdllGVVd6b0YyKzBvL2RiZz09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 979 8118, Password: 640865.

Agenda: Attendance for those attending by phone only; Meeting opening; General updates: PAF update, Update from HSRI, Changes to Data Submitter webpage, and APAC data use; Public Comment; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Announcing the new Celebrate Oregon! Cultural Trust License Plate (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 09/15/21 9:36 AM
Celebrate Oregon! License Plate Design
Celebrate Oregon! License Plate Design
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Salem, Oregon – A new license plate design that celebrates Oregon and the diversity of its culture will debut Oct. 1 in recognition of the Oregon Cultural Trust’s 20th Anniversary. The artwork is called Celebrate Oregon!

The artwork for the license plate, created by Liza Burns of Eugene, will also be installed as full-scale murals at the Eugene, Medford, Portland and Redmond airports through a partnership with GreenCars.com, a learning and marketplace destination for sustainable transportation. In addition, a 38-foot outdoor banner will be installed at the Northwest Film Center at the Portland Art Museum.

“The new design, built on a panorama of Oregon geography, reflects and respects the diversity of our culture at a time we need it most,” said Cultural Trust Board Chair Niki Price. “Cultural expression is how our communities define themselves – how they live their everyday lives, their traditions, their heritage, their creativity, their celebrations, their values and how they connect with one another. Our culture is the glue that can bind us together as Oregonians.”

"Oregonians value sustainability and embrace green energy,” said Tina Miller, Chief Financial Officer of Lithia Motors and GreenCars spokesperson. “Our partnership with the Oregon Cultural Trust, and sponsorship of these magnificent murals, is our way of bringing this important part of Oregon culture into the picture.”

Celebrate Oregon! is a vibrant tapestry of Oregon geography into which are woven 127 symbols representing different aspects of our collective arts, heritage, history and cultural practices. It is the result of a year-long, inclusive process that began with a group of statewide nominators sharing the creative brief with artists and designers. 

A total of 36 artists submitted statements of interest and work samples. A diverse jury evaluated the submissions and recommended 20 artists be invited to submit preliminary concepts in exchange for a $250 honorarium. An expanded jury evaluated the concepts based on criteria derived from the creative brief and unanimously recommended Burns’ design to the Cultural Trust Board of Directors, which unanimously approved it in October. Burns met with several content experts, identified through the Governor’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, to finalize symbols included in the design.  

“We knew that reflecting the breadth of Oregon culture, and how it brings us together, in one design was an extremely ambitious goal,” said Cultural Trust Executive Director Brian Rogers. “Liza’s creation does that and so much more. It captures the spirit of Oregon and also serves as an educational tool for exploring our diversity. We are incredibly proud and excited to share it with Oregonians.” 

The license plate artwork will be accompanied by an interactive visual key that explains each of the symbols and how they connect to Oregon culture, accessed via a QR code. The key will aid the design discovery while informing Oregonians about the breadth of cultures we as a people represent.

Events celebrating the unveiling of the murals are scheduled for Sept. 21 at Rogue Valley International-Medford Airport in partnership with the Medford Arts Commission; Oct. 15 at FlyRedmond; Oct. 28 at Eugene Airport; and mid-November at Portland International Airport. The artwork will also be available as a poster and a limited-edition print

The new license plate will be available beginning Oct. 1 on the Oregon DMV website, at DMV field offices and at car dealerships across the state, including Lithia’s 32 franchise dealerships.

NOTE: Photos of the license plate design, the artist at work and a mural creation video featuring the artist can be downloaded here or by pasting this URL into your browser: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/t41fr325g0by8hi/AAB0SSwY_29QT4YcS508G411a?dl=0. To learn more about the plate visit culturaltrust.org/celebrateoregon.

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testimony to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established 18 years ago by the Oregon Legislature as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. In 2020 Oregonians gave $5.2 million to the Cultural Trust, our all-time record. Sixty percent of that will go straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent will help grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

 




Attached Media Files: Celebrate Oregon! License Plate Design , Celebrate Oregon! artwork. Liza Burns, artist

Second Round of 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund Relief Deploys $1.4 Million for Fire-Ravaged Communities in Need (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 09/15/21 9:30 AM
Rebuilding_Foundation_Courtesy of SCWRF and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021
Rebuilding_Foundation_Courtesy of SCWRF and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021
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Second Round of 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund Relief Deploys $1.4 Million for Fire-Ravaged Communities in Need

Oregon Community Foundation, Meyer Memorial Trust, The Ford Family Foundation and American Red Cross Recognize Ongoing Community Needs

 

Portland, Ore. – September 15, 2021 – The 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund, a joint effort led by Oregon Community Foundation in partnership with Meyer Memorial Trust, The Ford Family Foundation and American Red Cross, today announced an additional $1,489,431 in grants to support 15 more community-based organizations throughout Oregon counties ravaged by the 2020 fires. This is the second round of funding, bringing a total of $6,163,687 to 60 organizations to date.

 

“A year ago, devastating fires ripped through our forests and towns, and Oregonians responded quickly and generously. In one year, the 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund has raised and deployed millions of dollars to support fire-impacted communities throughout Oregon,” said Max Williams, CEO, Oregon Community Foundation. “Another fire season, compounded by a new wave of the pandemic, continues to stretch already hard-hit communities across the state.”

 

Contributions to the 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund can be made online at: www.oregoncf.org/rebuilding. Oregon Community Foundation expects to award the remaining funds monthly from September-November, 2021.

 

Following is a snapshot of some of the community organizations delivering critical services to Oregonians in need:

 

Lane County

McKenzie Fire and Rescuehttp://www.mckenziefire.com/| $125,000.00

To support the Disaster Relief Logistics Center, an emergency operation center, to be prepared for a natural disaster, including emergency communication equipment to serve the McKenzie Corridor.

 

“The 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund grant will allow McKenzie Fire and Rescue to house critical supplies for any large-scale disaster, including communications equipment, firefighting equipment, sand and sandbagging equipment, and non-perishable items,” said Chief Darren Bucich, McKenzie Fire and Rescue. “In addition, the Disaster Relief Logistics Center will have a dedicated conference room that can be utilized by overhead teams in the event of a disaster.”

 

Jackson County

NOWIA Unete, Center for Farm Worker Advocacy, http://uneteoregon.org/ | $40,000.00 

To support Proyecto Bienestar (The Wellness Project), a program promoting trauma-informed fire recovery and resiliency for farmworkers and immigrant communities in Jackson County.

 

“Unete has served over 600 unique families that were directly impacted by the Almeda fire. With Community Rebuilding Fund support, Unete will continue to develop programs to build a resilient and healthy community,” said Kathy Keesee-Morales, program director for NOWIA Unete Center for Farm Worker Advocacy. “This has been instrumental in the entire community rebuilding process and we are so grateful for Community Rebuilding Fund support as well as other Rogue Valley programs.”    

 

Linn and Marion Counties

Santiam Canyon Wildfire Relief Fundhttps://santiamcanyonwildfirerelieffund.org/ | $101,250.00

To support survivors' recovery and rebuilding efforts in the Santiam Canyon.

 

“Santiam Canyon Wildfire Relief Fund of Santiam Hospital will continue providing essential funding directly to survivors as they work to rebuild their homes,” said Deana Freres, SCWRF Advisor. “When survivors encounter a rebuilding hurdle that would otherwise halt their recovery process, these dollars will be used to get them to the next step. Ultimately, this momentum boost provides a renewed sense of hope as they labor toward their goal of returning home to the Santiam Canyon.”

 

Last month, the 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund deployed $4,439,256 in grants to support 40 organizations throughout the eight fire-ravaged counties in Oregon. OCF donors contributed an additional $235,000 this summer to support rebuilding efforts as well.

 

See a complete list of grantees (as of September 15, 2021) online in OCF Press Room: https://oregoncf.org/press-room/

 

Oregon Community Foundation expects to deploy most of the recovery, rebuilding and resiliency grants by the end of November, 2021.

 

About the 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund

The 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund launched in response to Oregon’s devastating 2020 wildfire season which forever changed many of Oregon’s vibrant rural communities. Recognizing equitable, inclusive and resiliency-based rebuilding is essential, the 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund centers the needs of Oregon’s vulnerable residents most impacted – including Latino/a/x, Tribal and rural community members. The Fund supports community-led rebuilding that engages residents in shaping the future of the diverse and dynamic places they call home. The 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund is led by Oregon Community Foundation, in partnership with Meyer Memorial Trust, The Ford Family Foundation and American Red Cross and in addition to each partner, is primarily funded through individual, corporate and foundation support. To learn more, please visit: Community Rebuilding Fundhttps://oregoncf.org/grants-and-scholarships/grants/community-rebuilding-fund-grants/community-rebuilding-fund-values/.

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently - distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

 

About Meyer Memorial Trust

Meyer Memorial Trust, established in 1982, is among the largest private foundations in Oregon, with current assets of roughly $1.1 billion. Today, Meyer focuses on work in Oregon, in four areas Oregonians have identified as crucial to making the state better for all of its residents: housing, education, the environment and building community. Learn more at www.mmt.org.

 

About The Ford Family Foundation

The Ford Family Foundation was established in 1957 by Kenneth W. and Hallie E. Ford. Its mission is “successful citizens and vital rural communities” in Oregon and Siskiyou County, California. The Foundation is located in Roseburg, Oregon, with a Scholarship office in Eugene. To learn more, please visit: www.tfff.org.

 

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The American Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org.

 

The 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund, a collaborative effort led by Oregon Community Foundation in partnership with Meyer Memorial Trust, The Ford Family Foundation and American Red Cross to support Oregon counties ravaged by 2020 Labor Day fires.

 

 

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Attached Media Files: Disaster Relief Logistics Center Renderings-3_Courtesy of McKenzie Fire Rescue and OCF_09 15 2021 , 2020 Community Rebuilding Fund Grants Round II_News Release_09 15 2021 , Rebuilding_Foundation_Courtesy of SCWRF and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Rebuilding_Courtesy of SCWRF and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Community Rebuilding_Courtesy of SCWRF and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Bryan Chauran of Gates, beachie creek wildfire survivor_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Unete Center for Fam Worker Advocacy_Courtesy of UNETE and OCF_09 15 2021 , Survivors_Courtesy of UNETE and Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Farm Worker Advocacy_Truck Supplies_Courtesy of UNETE y Oregon Community Foundation_09 15 2021 , Courtesy of UNETE and Oregon Community Foundation 09 15 2021

Statewide Survey: Workplace Safety
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 09/15/21 8:30 AM

WORKPLACE SAFETY

KEY FINDINGS

From COVID-19, to extreme heat, to air quality from wildfires, Oregonians talk about workplace safety and protections.

METHODOLOGY

From August 9-17, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ perceptions of workplace safety. The questions were intended to gather preliminary data to inform more in-depth research in the months ahead. It is important to note that the survey was conducted before the Pfizer COVID vaccine received FDA approval and before many of the mask and vaccine mandates were implemented during August 2021.

The online survey consisted of 1,154 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. This survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.7% to ±2.9% depending on how the response category percentages split for any given question. Due to rounding, numbers may not add up to 100%. 

Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

KEY FINDINGS

How Do Oregonians Feel About Their Safety in the Workplace?

  • Most Oregonians feel that their workplace is doing a good job complying with workplace safety regulations (87%) (Q29).
     
  • When it comes to their safety in their place of work, one-third of Oregonians feel their safety is jeopardized by extreme heat and by the spread of Covid-19 (33% and 34%, respectively) (Q30-Q31).
    • Younger Oregonians are more concerned about their safety from the spread of Covid-19 and the extreme heat than older Oregonians. About 4 in 10 Oregonians between the ages of 18 and 44 believe that the spread of Covid-19 is jeopardizing their safety compared to about 2 in 10 Oregonians aged 55-64 (39%-40% vs. 19%) (Q30). Regarding extreme heat, 42% of Oregonians aged 18-29 and 34% of Oregonians age 30-44 feel that the extreme heat is jeopardizing their safety at work compared to 20% of Oregonians age 55-64 (Q31).
       
  • Many Oregonians feel that their safety at work is in jeopardy due to poor air quality from wildfires (41%) (Q32).
    • The youngest Oregonians polled were the most likely to feel poor air quality from wildfires jeopardizes their workplace safety, 53% for Oregonians age 18-29 compared to 32% of 30-44 year-olds and 36% of 55-64 year-olds.

Verification of Vaccination Status

  • Almost 7 out of 10 (66%) Oregonians believe that businesses should be allowed to require their employees to verify their vaccination status. Oregonians are more divided when it comes to whether businesses should be allowed to require customers to verify their vaccination status, with 55% of Oregonians in favor and 45% opposed (Q20-Q21). 
    • While the majority of Oregonians believe in businesses being allowed to require employees to verify their vaccination status, this percentage is even larger for older Oregonians. 82% of Oregonians age 75+, and 73% of Oregonians age 65-74 support businesses being allowed to verify their employees vaccination status, compared to 62% of Oregonians age 18-29, and 61% of Oregonians age 30-44.
       
    • Oregonians who have at least a 4-year degree are more likely to support businesses being allowed to require employees and customers to verify their vaccination status. 83% of Oregonians with a college degree or above support businesses being allowed to require employees to verify their vaccination status, compared to 52% of Oregonians with a high school education or below and 68% of Oregonians with some college. When looking at whether businesses should be allowed to require customers to verify their vaccination status, 75% of Oregon residents with a 4-year degree are supportive of this belief compared to 39% of Oregonians with high school education. 
       
    • Oregonians who make more than $100,000 are more likely to support businesses being allowing businesses to verify employee vaccination status than Oregonians who make below $50,000 a year (75% compared to 61%). Support for allowing businesses to verify customer vaccination status trends along the same lines, with 69% of Oregonians who make $100,000 a year and above supporting compared to 55% of Oregonians making $50,000-$100,000 a year and 50% of Oregonians making less than $100,000.
       
    • Residents of Oregon who are essential workers are less likely to support allowing businesses to verify their employees’ vaccination status than non-essential workers (59% compared to 70%).

Vaccination Requirement for Medical Facilities

  • 7 out of 10 Oregonians (70%) agree that medical facilities, including nursing homes and assisted living facilities, should be allowed to require their employees to be vaccinated (Q22).
    • Older Oregonians are more likely to support medical facilities being allowed to require their employees to be vaccinated. 87% of Oregonians age 75+ believe medical facilities should be allowed to require their employees to be vaccinated compared to less than two-thirds of Oregonians aged 44 and younger (63%-65%).

 

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

“Identifying what unites us and understanding what divides us.”

 

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, and urban and rural Oregonians. Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives. 

  • When it comes to workplace safety, in most cases BIPOC Oregonians and Oregonians living in urban areas are more likely to feel like their safety is in jeopardy (Q30-32).
    • BIPOC Oregonians are significantly more likely to feel the spread of Covid-19 puts their workplace safety in jeopardy than white Oregonians (46% compared to 33%), and slightly more likely to express the same concerns about extreme heat (39% vs. 32%) and poor air quality due to wildfires (49% vs. 40%).
       
    • Oregonians from urban areas are more likely to feel that the spread of Covid-19 and extreme heat jeopardize their safety in the workplaces than Oregonians from other areas (Covid: 44% vs. 24-31%; extreme heat: 42% vs. 22-32%).
       
    • Oregonians from areas considered rural-changing-to-suburban are more likely than those living in other areas to say their workplace safety is in jeopardy due to poor air quality as a result of wildfires (53% vs. 33-43%). Oregonians living in rural areas are the least likely to feel poor air quality from wildfires jeopardizes their workplace safety (33%).
       
  • BIPOC Oregonians are less likely than white Oregonians to support allowing businesses to verify the vaccination status of their employees or customers. Interestingly, the gap between BIPOC and white Oregonians who support employee vaccine status verification is wider than the gap between those who support customer verification (BIPOC: 61% vs. white: 67% compared to BIPOC: 52% vs. white: 56%) (Q20-Q21).
     
  • Oregonians living in urban areas are the most supportive of allowing businesses to verify vaccination status, although more than half of those living in all areas support allowing businesses to verify the vaccination status of their employees (54-73%) (Q20).
     
  • A majority of Oregonians in most areas of the state also support allowing businesses to verify customer vaccination status, with the exception of those living in rural areas (rural: 46% vs. 51-61%) (Q21).
     
  • BIPOC Oregonians of color are more likely than white Oregonians to be uncertain whether medical facilities, including nursing homes and assisted living facilities, should be allowed to require their employees to be vaccinated (11% vs. 7%), while white Oregonians are more likely to support allowing these requirements (71% compared to 62%) (Q22). 
     
  • Urban and suburban Oregonians are significantly more likely to support allowing medical facilities to require their employees to be vaccinated (74-77%) compared to those living in rural or rural-changing-to-suburban areas (58%-62%), but a majority of those in all areas are supportive (Q22).

Results also available on OVBC website: Workplace Safety - Oregon Values and Beliefs Center (oregonvbc.org)




Attached Media Files: OVBC August 2021 Crosstabs , OVBC August 2021 Annotated Questionnaire

60% of LGBTQ+ older adults experienced discrimination in the past year, study says
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/15/21 8:15 AM

Salem, OR  ̶  Nearly 60% of older adults  ̶  who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, Two Spirit and non-binary as well as sexual or gender diverse (LGBTQ+)   ̶  report experiencing discrimination within the past year and 24% experienced abuse. Of those who experienced abuse, 76% did not report it, according to a study commissioned by the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS).

Risk of discrimination was high among:
• Asian and Pacific Islanders at 94%; 
• Black/African Americans at 91%; and
• Native American/Alaska Natives at 86%.

Over half of participants reported having unmet needs for at least one service, including aging, social, medical and health services, and/or social support services in the past year.

These findings are based on responses from 1,402 demographically diverse participants in research led by Karen Fredriksen Goldsen, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, who is a national expert on aging in communities that are underserved.  The study, which was the first of its kind in Oregon, sought detailed input from adults 55 and older on the needs and supports of Oregon’s LGBTQ+ older adults.  Survey participants were also asked to highlight strengths within the state’s various LGBTQ+ communities.

“This survey has set a standard for how state agencies can work with the community to identify challenges and strengths. With community input, agencies can develop impactful strategies, programs, services, and resources to meet those needs,” Goldsen said.

The ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities supported this research to help strengthen and direct its future program development, community education and advocacy efforts.

Among the other findings: 
• 21% of participants do not disclose their sexual or gender identity to healthcare, aging or other service providers. 
• 21% experienced suicidal ideation in the past year, which is significantly higher than the general population.
• One-third have difficulty paying bills or buying nutritious meals due to financial instability., with elevated risks observed among those who are younger, people of color, those living with HIV, and those living in communities at heightened risk.

But, resilience reported among LGBTQ+ older adults was also high. Some findings include:
• More than 70% of LGBTQ+ older adult participants have three or more people they can count on for social and emotional support.
• The majority are actively engaged in LGBTQ+ communities through helping others, 79%; receiving help, 62%; and being involved in advocacy activities, 60%.
• Participants who are 75 and older reported the highest resilience.

“Older adults in Oregon are increasingly diverse, but we lacked data to guide us on what they are experiencing and how to best overcome disparities,” said Jane-ellen Weidanz, Administrator of the Long Term Services and Supports Unit within the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities. “This research will be instrumental in helping us understand the greatest needs and how to build upon the strengths that already exist in our communities.” 
The Oregon LGBTQ+ Older Adult Survey had widespread support from many community organizations and LGBTQ+ advocates. The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services, the Oregon LGBTQ+ Aging Coalition and SAGE Metro Portland were instrumental in advocating for the project. Other community partners supporting the research include:
• Aging Well of Cascade AIDS Project
• Alzheimer’s Association
• AARP Oregon
• EngAGE NW
• HIV Alliance 
• Metropolitan Community Church of Portland
• Oregon Home Care Commission
• Pride Foundation
• Quest Center for Integrative Health.

Read the full report: Oregon LGBTQ+ Older Adult Report or Executive Summary

Learn more about The Goldsen Institute.  


Tue. 09/14/21
Oregon reports 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/21 3:17 PM

September 14, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 44 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,490, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,040 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 303,532.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,082, which is seven more than yesterday. There are 288 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 more than yesterday.

There are 48 available adult ICU beds out of 656 total (7% availability) and 337 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,282 (8% availability).

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 8,392 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 13.

Of this total, 4,301 were administered on Sept. 13: 2,307 were initial doses, 1,447 were second doses and 516 were third doses. The remaining 4,091 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 13.

The seven-day running average is now 7,403 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,886,031 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,875,138 doses of Moderna and 206,735 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,685,261 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,443,376 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (18), Benton (29), Clackamas (160), Clatsop (35), Columbia (21), Coos (72), Crook (45), Curry (17), Deschutes (119), Douglas (102), Gilliam (2), Grant (17), Harney (15), Hood River (13), Jackson (117), Jefferson (15), Josephine (44), Klamath (86), Lake (36), Lane (136), Lincoln (11), Linn (69), Malheur (99), Marion (205), Morrow (14), Multnomah (155), Polk (44), Sherman (1), Tillamook (9), Umatilla (80), Union (5), Wallowa (5), Wasco (20), Washington (160) and Yamhill (64).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

OHA’s non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the Tableau dashboard. You can find the link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine type

Doses recalled

Non-viable, spoiled or expired

Grand total

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

 

21,351

21,351

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

 

103,778

103,778

Pfizer Comirnaty

 

51,344

51,344

Grand total

0

176,473

176,473

1Updated: 09/14/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS)

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Notice of informal hearing proposed for new psychiatric hospital in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/21 1:44 PM

September 14, 2021

Contact:  Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Notice of informal hearing proposed for new psychiatric hospital in Wilsonville

What: An informal hearing on the draft recommendation proposing approval of a 60-bed psychiatric hospital to be located in Wilsonville.

Agenda: Testimony from the applicant, Universal Health Services, and affected parties, Legacy Health, Providence Health & Services, Mental Health Alliance of Portland, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).

When: Monday, Sept. 20, 1 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Zoom meeting. Visit https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1612272086?pwd=M2dSL2E2QVp5WG5nZzhaZS9QUVFXZz09

Background:  The purpose of the Certificate of Need program is to provide reasonable access to quality health care, at a reasonable cost and control health care capital expenditures

Program Contact: Pam Krecklow, Certificate of Need program coordinator, 971-334-6377, ecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us">Pam.L.Krecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pam Krecklow at 971-334-6377, 711 TTY, or ecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us">Pam.L.Krecklow@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 14
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/21 1:43 PM

Sept. 14, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 14

OHA issues advisory due to high bacteria levels

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

  • Stormwater runoff.
  • Sewer overflows.
  • Failing septic systems.
  • Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters will be re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).


Local Man Pleads Guilty for Bank Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/14/21 12:02 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland man pleaded guilty today for perpetrating a bank fraud scheme whereby he used a residential property he did not own as collateral for obtaining a bank loan worth more than $316,000.

Alireza Zamanizadeh, aka Ali Zamani, 63, waived indictment and pleaded guilty to bank fraud.

According to court documents, on or about February 17, 2017, Zamanizadeh filed a quitclaim deed in Deschutes County, transferring a residential property in Bend, Oregon to his business for one dollar without the property owner’s consent. A quitclaim deed is a document used to quickly transfer the ownership of real property from one party to another. 

Zamanizadeh then used the property as collateral for obtaining a loan worth $316,092. Zamanizadeh forged the property owner’s signature on a statement verifying the property transfer as required by the mortgage lender and title company processing the loan.  Based on Zamanizadeh’s false representations, the mortgage company approved the loan and transferred the funds to Zamanizadeh’s bank account.

On June 14, 2021, Zamanizadeh was charged by criminal information with bank fraud and aggravated identity theft.

Bank fraud is punishable by up to 30 years in prison, a $1 million fine, and three years’ supervised release.

Zamanizadeh will be sentenced on January 4, 2022 before U.S. District Court Judge Anna J. Brown.

As part of the plea agreement, Zamanizadeh has agreed to pay $400,000 in restitution to his victim and has transferred a second residential property in Clark County, Washington back to the victim.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation with assistance from FBI and is being prosecuted by Katherine A. Rykken, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Sextortion Crimes (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/14/21 11:25 AM
TT - Sextortion - GRAPHIC - September 14, 2021
TT - Sextortion - GRAPHIC - September 14, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/3585/148440/thumb_TT_-_Sextortion_-_GRAPHIC_-_September_14_2021.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against sextortion crimes. 

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is warning about a large increase in the number of sextortion complaints. Sextortion happens when someone threatens to distribute your private and sensitive material if their demands aren’t met. Oftentimes, the fraudster demands additional sexual images, sexual favors, or money – creating financial and emotional distress for the victim. 

In just the first seven months of this year, IC3 has received more than 16,000 sextortion complaints. The losses have topped $8 million. Almost half of these extortion victims were in the 20-39 age group. Victims over the age of 60 years are also prime targets. 

Most adult victims report the initial contact with the fraudster is mutual and made using dating websites and apps. For kids, the contacts can come through online games or social media platforms that young people tend to use. 

Soon after the initial encounter, the fraudster requests the interaction be moved from the website or app to another messaging platform. The fraudster either threatens that he already possesses embarrassing photos, or he instigates the exchange of sexually explicit material. He often encourages the victim to participate via video chat or to send their own explicit photos. 

Immediately after the victim complies, the fraudster blackmails the victim and demands money to prevent the release of the photos or videos on social media. He may also demand more and more images. The fraudster often gains access to the victim's social media accounts or contact information and threatens to send the images to the victim's family and friends. 

How to protect yourself: 

  • NEVER send compromising images of yourself to anyone, no matter who they are or who they say they are. 
  • Do not open attachments from people you do not know. Links can secretly hack your electronic devices using malware to gain access to your private data, photos, and contacts. There is also malware that can control your web camera and microphone without your knowledge. 
  • Turn off your electronic devices and web cameras when not in use. 

If you are receiving sextortion threats: 

  • Remember you are not alone as thousands are victimized by this scam. 
  • Stop all interaction with the extortionist and do not be embarrassed or afraid to contact law enforcement. 

Additional information on sextortion is available here:  

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.   

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Sextortion - AUDIO - September 14, 2021 , TT - Sextortion - GRAPHIC - September 14, 2021

Oregon reports 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths, surpasses 300,000 cases
Oregon Health Authority - 09/14/21 10:44 AM

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

September 13, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths, surpasses 300,000 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,446 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 301,504.

The 32 new deaths and 4,700 new cases reported today include data reported by counties for the 3-day period between Friday, Sept. 10 and Sunday, Sept. 12.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,075, which is 11 fewer than yesterday. There are 274 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine fewer than yesterday.

There are 62 available adult ICU beds out of 652 total (10% availability) and 316 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,264 (7% availability).

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 4,699 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 12.

Of this total, 1,170 were administered on Sept. 12: 1,170 were initial doses, 652 were second doses and 52 were third doses. The remaining 3,529 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 12.

The seven-day running average is now 7,325 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,880,337 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,873,097 doses of Moderna and 206,134 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,680,828 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,439,653 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (53), Benton (44), Clackamas (399), Clatsop (2), Columbia (53), Coos (58), Crook (26), Curry (22), Deschutes (410), Douglas (201), Gilliam (5), Grant (11), Harney (13), Hood River (11), Jackson (305), Jefferson (28), Josephine (170), Klamath (41), Lake (22), Lane (433), Lincoln (56), Linn (284), Malheur (32), Marion (457), Morrow (12), Multnomah (629), Polk (58), Tillamook (51), Umatilla (85), Union (70), Wallowa (3), Wasco (21), Washington (493) and Yamhill (142).

Oregon reported 2,142 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 10, 1,513 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 11, and 1,045 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 12.

Oregon’s 3,415th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 11 and died on Sept. 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,416th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 8 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,417th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 12 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,418th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 7 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,419th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 8 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,420th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 9 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,421st COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 10 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,422nd COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept. 8 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,423rd COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 20 and died on Sept. 8 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,424th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 3 at Roseburg VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,425th COVID-19 death is a 24-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 9 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,426th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 10 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,427th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 11 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,428th COVID-19 death is a 32-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 5 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,429th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 11 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,430th COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 10 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,431st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Sept. 9 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,432nd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 1 and died on Sept. 8 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,433rd COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 10 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,434th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 9 at Ashland Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,435th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 9 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,436th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 31 and died on Sept. 9 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,437th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 9 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,438th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 9 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,439th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman from Union County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 10 at Grande Ronde Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,440th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man from Union County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept.11 at Grande Ronde Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,441st COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man from Tillamook County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept.9 at Adventist Hospital Tillamook. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,442nd COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,443rd COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept.11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,444th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept.11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,445th COVID-19 death is a 36-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 11 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,446th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 11 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

# # #


Oregon's Unemployment Rate Drops to 4.9% in August as Oregon Adds 7,900 Jobs
Oregon Employment Department - 09/14/21 10:00 AM

Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped to 4.9% in August from 5.2% in July. This was the first time Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped below 5% since March 2020, when the rate was 3.6%. Oregon’s unemployment rate was below 5% in only two other periods since 1976 when comparable records began: during 14 consecutive months in the mid-1990s when the rate dropped to as low as 4.5%; and during the 51 consecutive months during 2016 through March 2020 when the rate dropped to a record low of 3.3% in late 2019.

The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 5.2% in August from 5.4% in July.

In Oregon, nonfarm payroll employment grew by 7,900 in August, following monthly gains averaging 10,300 in the prior seven months. Gains in August were largest in government (+3,500 jobs); wholesale trade (+1,400); leisure and hospitality (+1,200); and professional and business services (+1,000). Only one major industry cut jobs: retail trade (-1,900 jobs).

Since the low point of April 2020, at the economic depths of the COVID-induced recession, Oregon has recovered 204,700 jobs, or 72% of the jobs lost during the recession. 

Leisure and hospitality added 1,200 jobs in August, following a gain of 6,100, as revised, in July. Despite these gains, it still accounts for the bulk of Oregon’s jobs not recovered since early 2020, with 44,300 jobs left to recover to reach the prior peak month of February 2020. The industry has regained 60% of jobs lost early in the pandemic.

Employment in health care and social assistance has been relatively flat all year. This major industry recovered substantial jobs in mid- through late-2020, but is still down 10,400 jobs, or 4%, since its pre-recession peak of February 2020. Over the past year, nursing and residential care facilities has been especially weak, having lost 1,300 jobs since August 2020. Meanwhile, two component industries have expanded in the past 12 months: ambulatory health care services (+3,100 jobs) and social assistance (+1,100 jobs).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the August county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, Sep. 21, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for September on Tuesday, Oct. 19.

The PDF version of the news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit unemployment.oregon.gov.

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/930/148438/employment_in_Oregon_--_August_2021_--_press_release.pdf

Statewide Survey Findings: Climate Change
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 09/14/21 8:30 AM

CLIMATE CHANGE SURVEY

KEY FINDINGS

Oregonians answer some thought-provoking questions about their values and beliefs related to climate change.

METHODOLOGY

From August 9-17, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ perceptions of climate change. The questions were intended to gather preliminary data to inform more in-depth research in the months ahead.

The online survey consisted of 1,154 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. This survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.7% to ±2.9% depending on how the response category percentages split for any given question. Due to rounding, numbers may not add up to 100%. 

Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q35-41, 44-45, 47-74, 85). 

KEY FINDINGS

Can We Solve Major Issues Before It's Too Late?

  • Two-thirds of Oregonians think there is a small or no chance that humans can solve climate change soon enough (66%) (Q35-41). 
    • Oregonians also express pessimism about forest fires; two-thirds say that humans have no or only a small chance of addressing this issue before it’s too late (67%).
    • People are more pessimistic about forest fires and the climate crisis than about solving communicable diseases like Covid (33%), voting rights and secure elections (40%), racial discrimination (58%), or population growth (62%).
    • Oregonians are most pessimistic about our ability to solve the worsening homelessness crisis (72%) (Q37).
      • Homeowners and renters are equally likely to say humans have a small or no chance of solving this crisis before it’s too late (71%, 73%).

Which Impacts Do Oregonians Attribute to Climate Change?

  • Oregonians ascribe longer, hotter summers and droughts to climate change—at least in part (81%, 80%) (Q52).
    • College graduates are 10 percentage points more likely than high school graduates to say that climate change is to blame for hotter, longer summers (87% to 77%).
       
  • About six in ten or more Oregonians say weather events, like hurricanes and flooding, and environmental events, like forest fires, crop failures, and timber die off, are attributable to climate change (62-76%) (47-55).
    • Just over half say climate change plays a role in the rising cost of food (54%), and a plurality says it influences human migration (40%).
       
  • On a similar note, Oregonians are much more likely to blame hotter, drier weather than forest practices for increased wildfires (54% to 23%) (Q44).
    • Respondents working in agriculture or forestry were nearly split in their opinions. While 40% of these workers said climate change was the bigger culprit; 35% said forestry practices that allow excess fuel to build up were more to blame.

Oregonians and Physical or Emotional Impacts of Climate Change

  • More than one-third of Oregonians say the impacts of climate change have resulted in significant or dramatic physical or emotional impacts (38%). Another 40% have experienced slight impacts (Q85). 
    • People under 45 are more likely to report significant or dramatic impacts of climate change on their personal well-being (42%). Specifically, about one in six Oregonians under the age of 45 say that climate change has resulted in dramatic impacts (16-17%).
    • Women are more likely than men to report impacts (43% to 32%).

Taking Action

  • Six in ten Oregonians say governments and residents need to work together to mitigate the impacts of climate change (60%) (Q56). 
    • One in four residents under the age of 30 say mostly government regulations are needed to address climate change (25%), more so than other age groups (5-18%). 
       
  • Oregonians mostly favor government regulations that promote tree planting and prioritize renewable energy (81%, 80%). A strong majority also support increased restrictions on industrial emissions and tougher fuel efficiency standards (73%, 69%) (Q66-73). 
    • Nearly half of Oregonians say they aren’t sure about geo-engineering strategies, like reflective artificial clouds (47%). Strategies like this will need more media attention before people have strong opinions.
    • People also struggle to balance the benefits and risks of nuclear energy in place of fossil fuels. About one-third of Oregonians support this strategy (38%), about one-third oppose it (30%), and about one-third don’t know (32%). 
       
  • When it comes to individual actions, three-quarters of Oregonians say we should significantly reduce fossil fuel use, driving, water use, consumption of goods, and air travel by 25% or more as a matter of personal responsibility (75-83%) (Q57-65). 
    • For red meat, 64% say that people should reduce their consumption by at least one-quarter. Although representing a strong majority, this was the least popular individual action suggested.
    • Most Oregonians in all age groups agree reducing home size would be a good action for the climate (66-78%). Oregonians under 45 are more likely to say people should reduce their home sizes by half or more (48-50%).

Protecting the Environment or Economic Growth?

  • More than seven in ten Oregonians now say protection of the environment should be given priority over economic growth (77%) (Q45).
    • This figure has climbed precipitously since the 2013 Oregon Values and Beliefs Study, when 57% said environment should be a higher priority and 8% weren’t sure. In the meantime, wildfires like Beachie Creek and Bootleg have ravaged Oregon towns, and Portlanders experienced their first-ever 116-degree day.
       
  • Although most Oregonians say we should take individual actions to reduce our fossil fuel use, far fewer support a tax on fossil fuels of more than 25 cents per gallon. A scant majority (51%) say that they would be willing to pay between 25 and 50 cents more per gallon at the pump (Q74).

 

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

“Identifying what unites us and understanding what divides us.”

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, and urban and rural Oregonians.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives. 

  • There are few differences in opinion about humans’ ability to solve increasing rates of homelessness. However, urban dwellers are slightly more optimistic than people living in suburban or rural areas (64-75%) (Q40).
     
  • In rural areas, one in five residents say that hotter, longer summers are either not occurring or are not a product of climate change (21%). For urban areas, this figure stands at 12% (Q52). 
    • Although ideological differences play a role, a majority of Oregonians who identify as socially liberal (95%), moderate (75%), and conservative (57%) believe that climate change is responsible—at least in part—for hot, long summers in Oregon. 
       
  • People of color are more likely to report significant or dramatic emotional or physical impacts because of climate change, as compared to white residents (47% to 37%). 
    • Differences by area are of similar intensity. While 47% of urbanites say they have felt significant or dramatic impacts, for ruralites that figure is 31%. 
       
  • For many individual actions to reduce climate change, like flying and driving less, there are significant differences between urban and rural residents (Q57-65).
    • For example, nearly half of rural residents say people don’t really need to reduce their consumption of red meat (46%), compared to 30% of urban dwellers.
    • However, when it comes to the consumption of personal goods, between 20% and 25% of residents in all parts of the state say it isn’t really needed.
      • White people are more likely than BIPOC residents to say we don’t need to significantly reduce our consumption of goods (24% to 17%). 
         
  • Rural residents and urban dwellers agree: the environment is now more important, even if slows economic growth (73-82%). 
     
  • Yet a strong urban-rural divide still exists when it comes to taxing fossil fuels. While 26% of urban residents say they oppose increasing the price of fuel at all to combat climate change, that figure rises to 46% in rural areas (Q74). 

 

Findings also available on OVBC website: Climate Change - Oregon Values and Beliefs Center (oregonvbc.org)




Attached Media Files: OVBC August 2021 Crosstabs , OVBC August 2021 Annotated Questionnaire

Fatal Crash on Hwy 7-Baker County
Oregon State Police - 09/14/21 6:47 AM

On Monday, September 14, 2021 at approximately 3:50 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 7 near milepost 23. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a KTM 950, operated by Lawrence Drake (78) of Ashland, was southbound on Hwy 7 when it failed to negotiate a curve and left the roadway before crashing. 

Drake sustained fatal injures and was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by Baker Fire Department, Powder River Rural Fire Department, Life Flight and ODOT. 


Mon. 09/13/21
Statewide Survey Findings: COVID
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 09/13/21 8:02 PM

COVID-19 SURVEY

KEY FINDINGS

Nearly 18 months after Oregon’s first confirmed COVID case, a broad view of Oregonians’ thoughts and beliefs about COVID-19 in their communities.

METHODOLOGY

From August 9-17, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ perceptions of COVID-19. The questions were intended to gather preliminary data to inform more in-depth research in the months ahead. It is important to note that the survey was conducted before the Pfizer COVID vaccine received FDA approval, and before many of the mask and vaccine mandates implemented during August 2021.

The online survey consisted of 1,154 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. This survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.7% to ±2.9% depending on how the response category percentages split for any given question. Due to rounding, numbers may not add up to 100%. 

Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q1-Q10, Q18-25, Q36, and Q84).

 

KEY FINDINGS

Trustworthy Information

  • Scientists and doctors are the most trusted sources of information about things like Covid-19 (80%). While science agencies are trusted by many, people are much less likely to rely on these agencies as a first choice (60%) (Q1-10).
    • Even when accounting for ideological differences, media outlets were considered only a mid-tier source in terms of trust. For example, fewer than half of social liberals said NPR type media was one of their top three sources of information (49%), similar to the proportion of social conservatives who said Fox News type media sources were a go-to (41%).

Fact, Belief, Concept, or Fiction

  • While Covid-19 is widely accepted as a fact of life amongst Oregonians, 6% say it is fiction. An additional 16% prefer to characterize it as a concept or a belief (Q18). 
    • About one in three high school graduates say that Covid-19 is a fiction, concept, or belief (32%). By comparison, about one in 10 college graduates say the same (9%).
    • Educational differences are reflected in opinions about Covid-19 in the workforce. Essential workers are less likely to deem Covid-19 a fact (72%), as compared to non-essential workers (82%). 

Physical or Emotional Impacts

  • Five out of six Oregonians have experienced some physical or emotional impacts of Covid-19. A little under half of Oregonians say the impacts have been significant or dramatic (44%) (Q84). 
    • About half of essential workers say the physical and emotional toll has been significant or dramatic (49%), whereas people with non-essential jobs were less likely to report significant or dramatic impacts (40%).
    • People under 30 are even more likely to describe themselves as significantly or dramatically impacted (58%).
    • Women are more likely than men to report significant or dramatic impacts from the Covid-19 pandemic, by a margin of 16 points (50% to 34%). 

Hesitancy About the Vaccine: For Themselves vs. For Their Children

  • One in six Oregonians say they were initially hesitant to get the vaccine, but they now have it or plan to get it soon (17%) (Q19). 
    • Residents under 45 are among the most likely to report having changed their stance on the vaccine (25-26%). High school graduates and social moderates are also more likely to report a change in their attitudes (23%, 26%).
    • One in five Oregonians remain certain of their position that the Covid-19 vaccine isn’t for them (21%). These Oregonians are more likely to be under the age of 55 (23-25%) and socially conservative (41%). 
       
  • Parents are more hesitant about vaccines for children under 12 than the general population is about vaccines for adults. A little more than half say they vaccinate their young child if an FDA-approved shot were available (56%) (Q24). 
    • Parents under 30 were less likely to say they given and FDA-approved vaccine to a young child (36%), reflecting differences about vaccines by age in general. Parents under 30 are more likely to have infants and toddlers.
    • Educational attainment of parents also presented stark differences. While 39% of high school graduates say they would vaccinate a young child for Covid-19, that figure rises to 55% for those with some college and 75% for those with degrees. 
       
  • Half of parents say their children will attend school only in-person this fall (50%). While some say it will be a hybrid model (11%), even more say they will home school (13%) (Q25).
    • Home schooling is more common among two disparate groups: parents in the Portland tri-county area (18%) and parents who are socially conservative (26%).

Vaccine Mandates: Medical Facilities, Employees, and Customers

  • Despite an Oregon law to the contrary, 70% of residents think medical facilities, including nursing homes, should be allowed to require employees to get vaccinated (Q22).
      
  • More than half of Oregonians—and essential workers—think businesses should be allowed to mandate whether employees or customers are vaccinated. There is more support for employee mandates (66%) than for customer mandates (55%) (Q20-21). 
    • While a majority of essential workers support these measures, these workers are less supportive than non-essential workers overall, especially when it comes to ensuring customers follow the mandate (51%). 

Optimism for the Future

  • All in all, many people are hopeful that humans can successfully solve the challenge of communicable diseases like Covid-19. Half of Oregonians say humans have a good chance of being successful in this endeavor, or that we will certainly beat these diseases (52%) (Q36). 
    • The pessimism of Gen Z—a generation coming of age amid climate change and an historic pandemic—shows through when it comes to the outlook on controlling the spread of disease. Fewer than half of people under 30 say humans have a good chance or better of succeeding on this front (49%). Meanwhile, two-thirds of seniors 75 and older say we have a fighting chance (67%).

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

“Identifying what unites us and understanding what divides us.”

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, and urban and rural Oregonians.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives. 

  • The US has a long history of medical racism. This history may impact differences in attitudes about Covid-19 and vaccines between white residents and people of color. This survey finds that nearly one in three BIPOC residents in Oregon would characterize Covid-19 as a fiction, concept, or belief rather than a fact (29%) compared to white residents (21%) (Q18). 
     
  • BIPOC Oregonians are more likely than white Oregonians to report a dramatic impact to their physical and emotional well-being because of the Covid-19 pandemic (26% to 16%) (Q84). 
     
  • People who originally were hesitant to get the vaccine are changing their minds (Q19).
    • BIPOC Oregonians are one of the groups most likely to have changed their stance. One in four say they have since been vaccinated or plan to get the jab soon (24%). 
    • Rural residents, and those in rural areas changing to suburban, are among the most likely to remain firm in their view that the vaccine is not for them (32%, 28%). These areas are among the hardest hit by Covid-19 today. 
       
  • Opinions among parents about whether to vaccinate children under 12 for Covid-19 when an FDA-approved vaccine becomes available are vastly different by area. While seven in ten urban parents say they would choose vaccination (71%), fewer than three in ten rural parents say they would (27%) (Q24). 
    • BIPOC parents are a little more likely to express hesitancy about vaccinating young children than white parents (40% to 32%). 
       
  • Despite some shifts among BIPOC Oregonians in vaccine hesitancy, BIPOC residents remain less likely to support health care vaccine mandates overall (Q20-22). 
    • The largest difference between BIPOC residents and white residents is on the issue of vaccine mandates for employees of medical facilities (62% to 71%). 
    • BIPOC residents are also slightly less likely than white residents to support business mandates for employees and customers, by a margin of 4 to 6 points.  

Findings also available on OVBC website: COVID: August, 2021 - Oregon Values and Beliefs Center (oregonvbc.org)




Attached Media Files: OVBC August 2021 Crosstabs , OVBC August 2021 Annotated Questionnaire

Oregon reports 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths, surpasses 300,000 cases
Oregon Health Authority - 09/13/21 2:53 PM

September 13, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths, surpasses 300,000 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,446 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 4,700 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 301,504.

The 32 new deaths and 4,700 new cases reported today include data reported by counties for the 3-day period between Friday, Sept. 10 and Sunday, Sept. 12.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,075, which is 11 fewer than yesterday. There are 274 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine fewer than yesterday.

There are 62 available adult ICU beds out of 652 total (10% availability) and 316 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,264 (7% availability).

Available Beds

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 4,699 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 12

Of this total, 1,170 were administered on Sept. 12: 1,170 were initial doses, 652 were second doses and 52 were third doses. The remaining 3,529 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 12.

The seven-day running average is now 7,325 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,880,337 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,873,097 doses of Moderna and 206,134 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,680,828 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,439,653 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (53), Benton (44), Clackamas (399), Clatsop (2), Columbia (53), Coos (58), Crook (26), Curry (22), Deschutes (410), Douglas (201), Gilliam (5), Grant (11), Harney (13), Hood River (11), Jackson (305), Jefferson (28), Josephine (170), Klamath (41), Lake (22), Lane (433), Lincoln (56), Linn (284), Malheur (32), Marion (457), Morrow (12), Multnomah (629), Polk (58), Tillamook (51), Umatilla (85), Union (70), Wallowa (3), Wasco (21), Washington (493) and Yamhill (142).

Oregon reported 2,142 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 10, 1,513 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 11, and 1,045 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on September 12.

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

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Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/13/21 11:41 AM
Devin M. S. Harris
Devin M. S. Harris
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/1070/148415/thumb_Harris_D.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Devin Michael Stephen Harris, died September 6, 2021. Harris was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away at a local hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the State Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Harris entered DOC custody on June 22, 2021, from Marion County with an earliest release date of September 27, 2023. Harris was 28 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 13 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses approximately 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

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Attached Media Files: Devin M. S. Harris

Fatal Crash on Hwy 6-Washington County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/21 11:26 AM

On Sunday, September 12, 2021 at approximately 5:15 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 6 near milepost 33.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F150, operated by Gene Carlson (66) of Oregon City, was towing a 17-foot boat eastbound on Hwy 6. For unknown reason the Ford drifted off the highway and lost control, striking a guardrail and rolling. 

Carlson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 6 was closed for approximately 2 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Banks Fire Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Interstate 5-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/21 10:43 AM

On Friday, September 10, 2021 at approximately 12:18 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on southbound Interstate 5 near milepost 264.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Prius, operated by Julie Lafayette (57) of Gervais, was northbound in the southbound lanes and struck an Infiniti, operated by Mohamed Mustafa (24) of Wilsonville. 

Lafayette sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Mustafa was transported to a local hospital with critical injuries. 

Interstate 5 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours.

OSP was assisted by Marion County Fire and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 18-Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/21 10:22 AM

On Sunday, September 12, 2021 at approximately 11:00 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 18 near milepost 49, east of McMinnville. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Camry, operated by Jared Nissen (21) of Dayton, pulled out of a private driveway to head westbound and was struck in the driver side door by an eastbound Yamaha motorcycle, operated by Michael Abeyta (22) of Hillsboro. 

Abeyta sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Nissen sustained minor injuries. A passenger in the Toyota Camry, Samantha Maddox (21) of Amity was uninjured. 

Hwy 18 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours. The investigation into the crash is ongoing. 

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office, McMinnville and Dayton Fire and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 207-Morrow County
Oregon State Police - 09/13/21 9:46 AM

On Sunday, September 12, 2021 at approximately 12:16 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a motorcycle crash on Hwy 207 near milepost 20C, south of Heppner. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Suzuki motorcycle, operated by Edmund LaPlante (70) of Oregon City, was southbound when it failed to negotiate a curve and left the roadway. 

LaPlante sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The Oregon State Police were assisted at the scene by the Morrow County Sheriff’s Office, Morrow County Ambulance and ODOT.