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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Fri. Sep. 4 - 1:56 pm
09/04/15
Downtown Pasco Gets a Facelift: Incorporates New Tri-Cities Brighter, Louder, Bolder, Better Brand (Photo)
Downtown Pasco Development Authority - 09/04/15
DPDA logo
DPDA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/4906/87590/thumb_DPDA_Logo.jpg
Pasco, WA--Downtown Pasco has plans underway for some big changes. Now the vibrant Downtown has immersed itself in the new Tri-Cities brand, becoming Brighter, Louder, Bolder and Better in its banners.

The Downtown Pasco Development Authority (DPDA) and the City of Pasco's Public Works department took to the streets this week and hung new banners Downtown that support their brand values of Vibrant, Innovative, Cultural, Local, and Fun combined with the Tri-Cities brand of Brighter, Better, and Bolder.

"This is an important step in our revitalization efforts as it unifies Downtown Pasco as an integral part of the Tri Cities," said DPDA executive director Michael Goins. "We've worked hard to brand Downtown Pasco as a destination and banners build on those efforts with just the right amount of visual appeal."

20 banners were hung this week blanketing Downtown Pasco including the 4th and Lewis Street. Plans are to extend the banners throughout the Downtown corridor in a larger plan of wayfinding and place making being coordinated between the DPDA and the City of Pasco.

"We're pretty excited. Visual tools like banners help create a sense of community and each improvement no matter how small is a step in the right direction," commented Dave Zabell, city manager, City of Pasco.

The banners were hung ahead of the Pasco Specialty Kitchen's popular weekly Food Truck Friday program and just one week before the Northwest's signature spicy food event, the Fiery Food Festival held in Downtown Pasco on September 12th and hosted by the Downtown Pasco Development Authority.



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About Downtown Pasco
The Downtown Pasco Development Authority (DPDA) is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit organization based in Pasco, Washington. The DPDA was formed by a Pasco City Council ordinance in 2010 and oversees two projects: Pasco Farmer's Market and Pasco Specialty Kitchen. Its mission is to strengthen and develop Downtown Pasco as a center of Vibrant, Innovative, Cultural, Local, and Fun. Follow Downtown Pasco on Facebook www.facebook.com/DowntownPasco
Twitter @pascorocks and online www.downtownpasco.com.


Attached Media Files: DPDA logo
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Friday, September 4, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/04/15
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officer: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
Note: No fire updates will be issued on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday unless the situation necessitates doing so. Have a great and wildfire-safe holiday week-end.


This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.


FIRE FACTS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lighting-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started on August 12 and located one mile south of John Day and Canyon City, is at 109,876 acres (17,040 ODF-protected acres) and 66 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed 44 primary residences, has 951 personnel assigned and is under Unified Command of the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (IC Lund) and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker).
More Information: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit: The lightning-caused Grizzly Bear Complex, started on August 13, 20 miles southeast of Dayton, WA and near Troy, OR, is 74,709 acres (10,107 of ODF-protected acreage, including 3,299 acres of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife lands) and 27 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed five primary residences (33 total structures), has 1,116 personnel assigned and is being managed by Washington Incident Management Team 4 (IC Gales).
More Information: 541-437-0138 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | www.facebook.com/pages/Grizzly-Bear-Complex-Fire/1152633018086248 | www.twitter.com/2015grizzlyfire | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com | #grizzlybearcomplex

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The human-caused Stouts Fire, started on July 30, 11 miles east of Canyonville, remains at 26,452 acres (11,239 ODF-protected acres) and today is 98 percent contained. The fire has 247 personnel assigned and is being managed by a smaller fire management organization (Florida Forest Service Type 3 - IC Mike Work).
More information: 541-825-3724 or 206-402-7175 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos | #stoutsfire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

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Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov
State park fire ban lifted for west side of Oregon
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/04/15
Thanks to lower temperatures, moisture, and a gradual relaxation of fire bans by other jurisdictions, the statewide Oregon state park fire ban has been cancelled. Fires are allowed in designated metal fire pits in the Columbia Gorge, Willamette Valley, Portland-area, and on the coast from Fort Stevens near Astoria to and including Honeyman Memorial State Park near Florence.

The state park campfire ban continues unchanged on the beach, in all coastal state park campgrounds south of Reedsport, and in Central, Eastern, and Southern Oregon. The ban includes open flames and, in some areas, charcoal briquettes. Park-by-park information on these restrictions is online at http://oregonstateparks.org.

Visitors should remember to be extremely careful with any fire in areas where the ban has been relaxed. Conditions and restrictions could change with very little notice. Information on safely extinguishing a campfire is online at http://smokeybear.com/put-out-campfire.asp.
Fatal Crash Takes Lives Of Oregon Man and Washington Toddler - Morrow County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 09/04/15
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1002/87573/thumb_P1270093.JPG
On September 3, 2015 at about 9:30PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision on Interstate 84 near milepost 165 (near Boardman).

Preliminary information indicates a 2005 Subaru Impreza was traveling westbound on I-84, when it crossed the median for an unknown reason. The Subaru struck an eastbound 2015 Chrysler 200 head-on.

The driver of the Subaru, Fernando Javier CASTANEDA, age 23, of Boardman, was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. The driver of the Chrysler, Tami R GRAVES, age 44, of Burbank, WA, was taken by ground ambulance to Good Shepard Hospital in Pendleton for non-life threatening injuries. GRAVES' passenger and her neice, Emmalee KITCHEN, age 3, was pronounced deceased on scene.

The eastbound lanes of I-84 were closed for approximately 5 hours while the investigation was conducted and the wreckage was removed. OSP was assisted by the Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Boardman Police Department, Boardman Fire Department, Irrigon Fire Department, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The cause of the crash is still under investigation. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-09/1002/87573/P1270093.JPG , 2015-09/1002/87573/P1270106.JPG
09/03/15
Single Vehicle Rollover Crash Injures Several - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 09/03/15
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1002/87570/thumb_20150903_164428.jpg
On September 3rd, 2015 at approximately 2:28pm members of the Oregon State Police Pendleton Area Command responded to the report of an injury rollover crash on Interstate 84 eastbound near exit 209 (in Pendleton).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1995 Ford Explorer was traveling eastbound when the vehicle had a tire blow out which contributed to the vehicle leaving the roadway. The vehicle entered the center median where it struck a dirt embankment and rolled an unknown number of times.

Witness statements indicate at least two male adult passengers were ejected from the vehicle of which one came to rest in the westbound lanes of I-84. Passenger and witness statements also revealed the vehicle was occupied by seven people at the time of the crash. A total of four patients were transported to area hospitals by ground and air ambulance for treatment of injuries suffered during the crash and three of the occupants are believed to have fled the area on foot.

The male adult driver was transferred by air ambulance from St. Anthony's Hospital to Kadlec Medical Center in Richland, WA, for treatment of critical injuries. One of the ejected male adult passengers was transferred by air ambulance from St. Anthony's Hospital to Oregon Health Sciences University for treatment of critical injuries.

One of the female adult passengers who left the crash scene was contacted at St. Anthony's Hospital where she was receiving treatment and was subsequently arrested on an outstanding warrant after she was treated and released.

The Pendleton Police Department, Pendleton Fire and Rescue and the Oregon Department of Transportation assisted at the scene.

More information and the identities of the involved parties will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2015-09/1002/87570/20150903_164428.jpg
PHOTOS: Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen assist with wildfire cleanup operations (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/03/15
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SALEM, Oregon - Members of the Oregon National Guard are currently conducting wildfire cleanup operations in support of ongoing firefighting efforts throughout Oregon.

Following the activation of the Oregon National Guard by Oregon Governor Kate Brown in August, approximately 375 Soldiers and Airmen completed training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon, and deployed to fire camps throughout the state.

The first group of 125 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers deployed on August 26 to the Canyon Creek Complex near John Day, Oregon.

An additional 250 Soldiers and Airmen from Oregon National Guard units throughout the state deployed August 30 to firebases in eastern and central Oregon.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in firefighting efforts. This agreement is reviewed by both agencies annually to remain up-to-date for each fire season.

Photo Captions:
150902-Z-WB774-005: Brig. Gen. Michael E. Stencel (right), Interim Adjutant General, Oregon, speaks with Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Kerry Wood (left) and Pfc. Nathan Cochran, both members of the 41st Brigade Special Troops Battalion, about their work during wildfire cleanup operations in support of firefighting efforts at the Grizzly Bear Complex near Elgin, Oregon, Sept. 2, 2105. The Oregon National Guard was activated in August by Oregon Governor Kate Brown and deployed to fire camps throughout the state to assist firefighters. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150902-Z-WB774-004: Brig. Gen. Michael E. Stencel (left), Interim Adjutant General, Oregon, greets Oregon Army National Guard Spc. Danny Trump (right), with A Company, 41st Brigade Special Troops Battalion, as he visits Soldiers performing wildfire cleanup operations in support of firefighting efforts at the Grizzly Bear Complex near Elgin, Oregon, Sept. 2, 2105. The Oregon National Guard was activated in August by Oregon Governor Kate Brown and deployed to fire camps throughout the state to assist firefighters. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150902-Z-WB774-015: Brig. Gen. Michael E. Stencel (second from left), Interim Adjutant General, Oregon, and Oregon State Command Sgt. Maj. Shane Lake (right) speak with Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers about their work during wildfire cleanup operations in support of firefighting efforts at the Grizzly Bear Complex near Elgin, Oregon, Sept. 2, 2105. The Oregon National Guard was activated in August by Oregon Governor Kate Brown and deployed to fire camps throughout the state to assist firefighters. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150902-Z-WB774-018: Brig. Gen. Michael E. Stencel (center), Interim Adjutant General, Oregon, and Dave Stuckey (left of Stencel), Oregon Military Department Interagency Director, watch Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers demonstrate their work during wildfire cleanup operations in support of firefighting efforts at the Grizzly Bear Complex near Elgin, Oregon, Sept. 2, 2105. The Oregon National Guard was activated in August by Oregon Governor Kate Brown and deployed to fire camps throughout the state to assist firefighters. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150902-Z-WB774-010: Oregon State Command Sgt. Maj. Shane Lake (center) receives instruction from Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers as he learns how to perform their work during wildfire cleanup operations in support of firefighting efforts at the Grizzly Bear Complex near Elgin, Oregon, Sept. 2, 2105. The Oregon National Guard was activated in August by Oregon Governor Kate Brown and deployed to fire camps throughout the state to assist firefighters. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2015-09/962/87569/150902-Z-WB774-018.JPG , 2015-09/962/87569/150902-Z-WB774-004.JPG , 2015-09/962/87569/150902-Z-WB774-005.JPG , 2015-09/962/87569/150902-Z-WB774-015.JPG , 2015-09/962/87569/150902-Z-WB774-010.JPG
Fire season update, forest health report on Forestry Board Sept. 9 agenda
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/03/15
The Oregon Board of Forestry will receive an update on the 2015 wildfire season, the third severe season in a row, when it meets Sept. 9 in Salem. Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) staff will also present an annual report highlighting the general health of Oregon forests.

The meeting is open to the public.

AGENDA HIGHLIGHTS

2015 FIRE SEASON UPDATE
Fire Protection Division staff will provide the Board a status report on the 2015 wildfire season, including a briefing on ongoing coordination with forest landowners, and ODF's federal, state and local agency partners in Oregon's fire protection system. Agency leaders will also highlight workload and financial impacts to ODF's non-fire programs as a result of this third consecutive severe season.

ANNUAL FOREST HEALTH REPORT, 2014
Department staff will present an overview of the major insects, diseases and harmful agents (including invasive species) that affected Oregon's forests last year. The report will also include an update on a program to slow the spread of Sudden Oak Death disease in Curry County.

OFRI FOREST VALUES AND BELIEFS REPORT, 2014
Highlights from recent poll highlighting public perception related to forestry will be presented. The research was sponsored by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute (OFRI).

FOREST RECREATION RULES REVISION
Oregon's state-owned forests are managed for a range of purposes including public recreation opportunities, for which demands have increased over time. Proposed revisions to administrative rules address this, as well as changes in use and other recreation-related issues.

EXECUTIVE SESSION
The board will meet in executive session for the purpose of consultation with legal counsel. The session is closed to the public, but members of the news media may attend, under provisions of ORS 192.660. The Board holds such sessions from time to time to discuss various ongoing legal cases as well as to confer on attorney-client privileged communication. By law, no decisions are to be made in an executive session.

MEETING DETAILS:
The meeting will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building (C), at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, 2600 State St., in Salem.

A general public comment period on items not listed on the agenda is scheduled near the start of the meeting. Public comment on specific agenda items will be received as the board deliberates.

Agenda materials will be available prior to the meeting at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx, under the 2015 meeting link.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance, at (503) 945-7200.

ABOUT THE BOARD:
The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base. More information on the board is available at www.oregon.gov/odf. ODF is on Facebook and other social media sites, accessible at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx
Oregon Health Authority announces dates for Behavioral Health System town halls
Oregon Health Authority - 09/03/15
September 3, 2015

Program contact: Sarah Lochner, 503-945-6358

Beginning this month, Sen. Sara Gelser, D-Corvallis, and OHA Director Lynne Saxton are traveling the state to hear from adolescents, adults and families who have had difficulties accessing mental health and substance use disorder treatment in Oregon.

On September 23, OHA will host the first of six statewide town hall meetings for individuals and families to talk about their experiences.

Please save the dates below and watch your email and the OHA website at
www.oregon.gov/oha/amh/Pages/strategic.aspx for additional information, including confirmed meeting locations in the following cities:

Klamath Falls, Wednesday, September 23, 5-8 p.m.
La Grande, Friday, October 2, 5-8 p.m.
Bend, Wednesday, October 7, 5-8 p.m.
Astoria, Wednesday, November 4, 5-8 p.m.
Albany, Monday, November 9, 5-8 p.m.
Portland, Friday, November 20, 5-8 p.m.

Please RSVP to BH.TownHalls@dhsoha.state.or.us and specify which meeting you will attend. Also use this email address if you require real-time transcription, interpretive services or other accommodations.

# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Thursday, September 3, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/03/15
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2015-09/1072/87552/Grizzly_Bear_Complex_Job_Corps.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1072/87552/thumb_Grizzly_Bear_Complex_Job_Corps.jpg
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officer: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3


This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

OVERALL FIRE SITUATION AND FIRE PREVENTION MESSAGE
Today's Periscope video of the overall fire situation and update, as well as a fire prevention message from ODF Fire Division Chief Doug Grafe at https://www.periscope.tv/w/aLiI5TQ3MzI5ODZ8MXlvS012RXFFQmVHUQmAzNjp_Cym1vLcyxwxBe4Pt15vsJH5l4vLHtGFdzlF

FIRE FACTS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lighting-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started on August 12 and located one mile south of John Day and Canyon City, is at 105,684 acres (16,981 ODF-protected acres) and 57 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed 44 primary residences, has 1,016 personnel assigned and is under Unified Command of the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (IC Lund) and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker).
More Information: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit:

The Falls Creek Fire, started on August 22, five miles southwest of Joseph, is 353 acres (79 acres ODF-protected) and 63 percent contained. The fire has been turned over to the local unit and impacts no additional ODF-protected acreage, so, unless the situation changes, this will be the final report on this fire.
More Information: 541-426-5633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4561/ | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ |

The lightning-caused Grizzly Bear Complex, started on August 13, 20 miles southeast of Dayton, WA and near Troy, OR, is 74,634 acres (10,107 of ODF-protected acreage, including 3,299 acres of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife lands) and 27 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed five primary residences (33 total structures), has 1,015 personnel assigned and is being managed by Washington Incident Management Team 4 (IC Gales).
More Information: 541-437-0138 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | www.facebook.com/pages/Grizzly-Bear-Complex-Fire/1152633018086248 | www.twitter.com/2015grizzlyfire | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com | #grizzlybearcomplex

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

The lightning-caused Eagle Complex, started on August 10, 16 miles northeast of Baker City, is at 12,702 acres (364 ODF-protected acres) and 60 percent contained. The fire has been turned over to a local smaller fire management organization (East Blues Local Type 3 - IC Crippen), and 188 personnel are currently assigned. The fire is not impacting any additional ODF-protected lands so, unless the situation changes, this will be the final report on this fire.
More information: 541-406-0201 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/EagleComplex2015

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The human-caused Stouts Fire, started on July 30, 11 miles east of Canyonville, remains at 26,452 acres (11,239 ODF-protected acres) and today is 96 percent contained. The fire has 272 personnel assigned and is being managed by a smaller fire management organization (Florida Forest Service Type 3 - IC Mike Work).
More information: 541-825-3724 or 206-402-7175 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos | #stoutsfire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

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Attached Media Files: 2015-09/1072/87552/Grizzly_Bear_Complex_Job_Corps.jpg
Calendar Correction for September Board Meetings for Kiona-Benton City School District
Kiona-Benton City Sch. Dist. - 09/03/15
The Board meetings for September have been corrected to the second and fourth Monday of the month. September 14, 2015 and September 28, 2015 are the correct dates.
Oregon DHS Notice of Public Meeting: Children's Residential Care Advisory Committee
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/03/15
The first meeting of the HB2233 Advisory Committee will take place on Tuesday, September 8th at 2pm in conference room 410 of the Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations, 201 High Street SE, Suite 500, Salem.

The advisory committee has been assigned to review current policies and make recommendations to the legislature about facilities that provide residential care for children, youth or youth offenders.

The committee will meet three times and provide a report to the legislature by December 15, 2015. Specifically the group will examine:
The need to adopt new or amend existing administrative rules;
The status of existing processes to investigate residential care and the need to improve or streamline processes;
The current processes for making findings of abuse or neglect in residential care; and
Strategies for ensuring the safety of children, youth or youth offenders in residential care.

The agenda for the meeting is at the link below.

For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at (503) 689-5034.


Attached Media Files: Agenda for September 8 Meeting
Oregon Wing CAP Joins USAF Total Force (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/03/15
Oregon CAP members refuel a Cessna 182 search aircraft after a recent training mission at the Aurora State Airport. CAP Members are now classified as "Airmen" under new USAF Total Force guidelines during USAF assigned operations. Airmen applies to all r
Oregon CAP members refuel a Cessna 182 search aircraft after a recent training mission at the Aurora State Airport. CAP Members are now classified as "Airmen" under new USAF Total Force guidelines during USAF assigned operations. Airmen applies to all r
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1184/87533/thumb_DSC_0806.JPG
Civil Air Patrol joins Total Force 'Airmen'
Staff Sgt. Whitney Stanfield
Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs Command Information

WASHINGTON - Following 74 years of support to emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs, the Civil Air Patrol, when conducting missions for the Air Force as the official Air Force Auxiliary is now included in the Air Force's definition of the Total Force.
The Air Force updated Doctrine Volume 2, Leadership, in August 2015 expanding the Air Force's descriptions of Total Force and Airmen to now consist of regular, Guard, Reserve, and Auxiliary members.

Historically, the broader term Airmen referred to uniformed and civilian members of the US Air Force (officer or enlisted; regular, Reserve, or Guard) regardless of rank, component, or specialty.
With this newest change, Air Force leaders should consider each part of the Total Force, including the Auxiliary, when determining the most effective and efficient ways to complete the mission. CAP has approximately 57,000 volunteers and 550 aircraft assigned to more than 1,500 units stateside available or currently supporting non-combat missions on behalf of the Air Force.

"As a strategic partner, these unpaid professionals have boldly served our nation saving the Air Force almost 40 times the cost of using military assets for each hour served," said Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James. "Inclusion in the Total Force reflects the continuing key contributions of this highly trained and equipped organization."

The Auxiliary members who fly the nearly 100,000 hours per year performing disaster relief, counterdrug, search and rescue, fighter interceptor training, aerial observation and cadet orientation flights will now be included in the Total Force and referred to as Airmen during the performance of official duties in recognition of their contributions to the Air Force.

"Civil Air Patrol enjoys a proud legacy of selfless sacrifice and service to country and community that spans decades," said Maj. Gen. Joseph Vazquez, CAP National Commander. "Our ability to augment the Air Force is second to none. We provide 85 percent of inland search and rescue missions and disaster-relief support to local, state and national agencies as well as aerial reconnaissance for homeland security, and remain continually postured to offer more."

Beyond CAP's support to achieve its homeland responsibilities for non-combat operations, the organization has been recognized for their efforts to inspire hundreds of thousands of cadets and K-12 students to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics education and training.

"Civil Air Patrol's increased exposure has a direct impact on attracting youth interest in STEM-based activities which are skills necessary to develop the innovative Airmen our Air Force needs," said Chief of Staff General Mark A. Welsh III. "We proudly welcome the Air Force Auxiliary by extending our badge of honor as Airmen."

attached photos provided by Oregon Wing Civil Air Patrol


Attached Media Files: Oregon CAP members refuel a Cessna 182 search aircraft after a recent training mission at the Aurora State Airport. CAP Members are now classified as "Airmen" under new USAF Total Force guidelines during USAF assigned operations. Airmen applies to all r , Oregon CAP Cessna 182 search aircraft await mission assignments during a recent statewide exercise at Aurora State Airport. CAP is now part of the USAF Total Force on Air Force assigned operations. , Oregon Wing Cessna 182 search aircraft departs Aurora Airport on a recent Search and Rescue Exercise. CAP is now included in the United States Air Force Total Force when operating on USAF assigned missions
09/02/15
Fire danger remains despite cooler temperatures
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/02/15
While this week's weather has moderated to cooler than normal temperatures and the feeling of fall is in the air, fire danger is still very real throughout central Oregon. The limited precipitation in the area did little to improve the fuel conditions that have been extreme throughout the summer. The approach of Labor Day and the last camping trips of summer has fire managers concerned the cool weather will give a false sense of security.

The Central Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) remains in a regulated closure, which restricts activities with the potential to ignite fires. Campfires continue to be prohibited on lands protected by ODF, including Oregon State Parks. This campfire ban includes warming fires and cooking fires. Hunters are encouraged to be prepared for theses cooler temperatures as they go to the field so they will not be tempted to build a fire to stay warm.

Open burning such as burn barrels and debris burns within the Central Oregon District require a permit from ODF during fire season. Currently no permits are being issued. Burning without a permit can result in citations or fines.

Additional restrictions are included in the regulated closure which regulate activities such as chainsaw use, cutting of dried grass, and welding. The full closure can be found at this link: oregon.gov/odf/centraloregon/Documents/Fire%20Season/2015_RegulatedUse_Closure.pdf In addition to these restrictions exploding targets, tracer ammunition, and sky lanterns are all prohibited during fire season. Check with other agencies such as Bureau of Land Management, National Forests, county emergency management, or local fire districts to determine their current restrictions when engaging in activities in their jurisdiction.

Requirements for industrial operations, including fire watch and tools, also remain in effect. Fuel conditions are monitored by fire managers to evaluate fire growth potential and to determine restrictions needed to reduce the risk of ignition. Information regarding fire season rules and regulated closure restrictions can be found at the Central Oregon District webpage oregon.gov/ODF/centraloregon. Please contact a local ODF Office if you have questions regarding the regulated use closure or other activities on lands protected by ODF. Human-caused fires are well above the 10-year average this year. Please use caution so your Labor Day activities do not add to this number.
Fire season still in effect
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/02/15
RECENT PRECIPITATION MISNOMER TO FIRE DANGER

The recent rainfall that fell across Oregon in variable amounts has fire officials concerned.

"Now is not the time for folks to let their guard down," says Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. "We're still in the midst of three consecutive fire seasons that have wreaked havoc in all four corners of the state. And while the small amount of rain was a welcome relief, we are far from putting this fire season to bed."

For the most part, the significant rainfall since August 24 landed along the Oregon coast and Willamette Valley. The north Cascades also received in excess of an inch of rain while the rest of the state remained fairly dry. Fuels receptive to sparks and embers remain abnormally dry and are still prone to ignite and carry fire with ease. Add to the mix the region's early fall east winds that blow over the Cascades like California's Santa Anna winds, and the threat doubles. The Scoggins Creek, Yellow Point and Lost Hubcap fires from 2014 are prime examples of September fires that grew out of control, threatened communities, and cost millions of dollars to put out. Broken down, the Scoggins Creek Fire burned 211 acres and cost $1.9 million; Yellow Point burned 789 acres and cost $5.6 million; and Lost Hubcap burned 2,712 acres and cost $3.1 million.

"The bottom line," according to Fields, "is that we still need to exercise caution and follow fire restrictions in effect when working or recreating in wildland areas."

Campfires remain prohibited on private and public lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry as well as all state parks. The exception is developed and approved campgrounds in some areas.

"Your best bet is to know before you go. Check with the local authority before heading out." Fields says another tool is ODF's fire restrictions interactive map on the web at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelMap.aspx.

While many corporate private lands remain closed due to the continued fire danger, hunting season is still open. Hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts must have landowner permission before entering and follow all public fire use restrictions, such as no smoking or off-road driving.

Outdoor debris burning also remains prohibited. Other fire-starting activities currently restricted include the use of power equipment such as chainsaws and lawn mowers cutting dry grass. Those activities can only be done early in the day when fire danger is at its lowest.
DOC Director's statement on administrative segregation
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/02/15
Oregon Department of Corrections Director Colette S. Peters released the following statement regarding a report published today on the nationwide use of administrative segregation by the Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA) and the Arthur Liman Public Interest Program at Yale Law School.

"I commend ASCA and the Yale Law School for their efforts in compiling the latest statistics on states' use of administrative segregation and for bringing national light to this important issue. This is a strong first step in understanding the complex landscape of special housing use, conditions, and staffing.

"In Oregon, we are already taking steps to analyze our use of special housing and safely reduce our reliance on it as a prison management tool. We have made this one of our top agency initiatives. As part of this initiative, in March, Oregon was one of five states selected to participate in the Vera Institute of Justice's Safe Alternatives to Segregation initiative. We will receive up to two years of technical assistance, focused on analyzing our use of segregated housing and developing recommendations for its safe reduction, as well as initial assistance with implementation of those recommendations.

"We look forward to our continued work with Vera, and to more robust dialogue with our counterparts in other states - and our key stakeholders and partners at home - about how we can collectively work to reduce the use of special housing across the nation."

View ASCA's press release: http://www.asca.net/system/assets/attachments/8895/ASCA%20LIMAN%20Press%20Release%208-28-15.pdf?1441222595
Full report: http://www.law.yale.edu/documents/pdf/Liman/ASCA-Liman_Administrative_Segregation_Report_Sep__2_2015.pdf


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Attached Media Files: ASCA-Liman Full Report , ASCA Press Release
Oregon offers assistance to first-time homebuyers
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 09/02/15
Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is pleased to announce that it's Oregon Bond program currently has resources available to help first-time homebuyers get a mortgage loan at below market interest rates.

"For many members of our community, homeownership remains a key part of the American dream," said Margaret Van Vliet, Director. "My agency, Oregon Housing and Community Services, is pleased to be able to help qualified first-time homebuyers access loan products that will help ensure their home remains affordable for years to come."

The Oregon Bond Loan has two programs: the first offers a below market interest rate of 3.25%; the second program offers a 3.75% interest rate and gives buyers the ability to use up to 3% of the loan to pay closing costs. Eligible homeowners can buy a new or existing home anywhere in Oregon, including site built homes, qualified condominiums, and manufactured housing.

"Buying a home is a life-long dream for many families and provides them with an opportunity to secure a better future for themselves and their kids," said Aubre Dickson, Chair of the State Housing Council. "Purchasing a home at an affordable interest rate is one of the best ways to ensure they will be able to continue to remain stable in their homes for years to come."

The Oregon Bond Loan program uses the proceeds from tax exempt revenue bonds to finance below market rate mortgage loans for qualified first-time home buyers. OHCS works in partnership with participating mortgage lenders, local governments, and non-profit organizations to assist homebuyers. OHCS works with participating mortgage lenders to offer this product to first-time home buyers. A list of participating mortgage lenders is available here: http://o.hcs.state.or.us/lenders/lenderlocator.jsp.

OHCS also helps to support a network of homeownership centers across Oregon, which provide education to help first-time homebuyers as well as one-on-one counseling. If you're interested in owning your own home but aren't sure where to start, homeownership centers can help. Find one near you: http://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/HD/SFF/brochures/oregon-housing-centers.pdf.

To learn more and see if you qualify, visit: http://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/HD/SFF/forms/oregon_bond_program_income_limits.pdf.

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Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Wednesday, September 2, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/02/15
Defensible Space Works. Here's a photo of a house that survived the recent Cove Fire because of defensible space actions the homeowners had taken to help protect it from wildfire.
Defensible Space Works. Here's a photo of a house that survived the recent Cove Fire because of defensible space actions the homeowners had taken to help protect it from wildfire.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1072/87514/thumb_Cove_Fire_Defensible_Space_Home.jpg
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officer: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2015


This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

Defensible space works. Here is a photo of a home that survived being in the direct path of the recent Cove Fire in central Oregon. The homeowners had diligently worked on defensible space actions over an extended period of time - actions that included installing a metal roof, keeping gutters free of debris, surrounding the grounds of the home outward from the house for several feet with gravel surface material, adding cinder blocks between the deck surface and the ground (to prevent embers from getting under the deck area) and, just within the past month, re-surfacing that wooden deck with brick. As the fire swept up the downhill side of where the home was situated - through extremely dry and flammable fuels, and pushed by winds including 40 mph gusts - items destroyed near and on the home's deck within the fire's path indicate a sustained period of 200+ degrees of heat. However, the home, itself, stood, with minimal damage.

ODF encourages all Oregonians living in the wildland urban interface to find out more about living with wildfire and defensible space actions they can take to help protect their homes. Learn more at Keep Oregon Green, and other organizations, such as Firewise.

FIRE FACTS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lighting-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started on August 12 and located one mile south of John Day and Canyon City, is at 105,684 acres (16,981 ODF-protected acres) and 52 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed 44 primary residences, has 1,014 personnel assigned and is under Unified Command of the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (IC Lund) and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker).
More Information: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit:

The Falls Creek Fire, started on August 22, five miles southwest of Joseph, is 353 acres (79 acres ODF-protected) and 63 percent contained. The fire has 181 personnel assigned and is being managed by a local team (East Blues Local Type 3 - IC Tyler). The cause of the fire remains under investigation.
More Information: 541-426-5633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4561/ | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ |

The lightning-caused Grizzly Bear Complex, started on August 13, 20 miles southeast of Dayton, WA and near Troy, OR, is 74,496 acres (10,107 of ODF-protected acreage, including 3,299 acres of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife lands) and 23 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed five primary residences (33 total structures), has 1,056 personnel assigned and is being managed by Washington Incident Management Team 4 (IC Gales).
More Information: 541-437-0138 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | www.facebook.com/pages/Grizzly-Bear-Complex-Fire/1152633018086248 | www.twitter.com/2015grizzlyfire | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com | #grizzlybearcomplex

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

The lightning-caused Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex, started on August 10, 10 miles east of Unity, remains at 102,089 acres (42,883 ODF-protected acres) and is 85 percent contained. The fire destroyed 8 primary residences (17 total structures). The fire has been returned to the local units and 32 personnel are assigned to the fire working towards total containment. Unless the situation changes, this will be the final report on this fire.
More Information: 541-446-3521 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | #CornetFire, #WindyRidgeFire

The lightning caused Eagle Complex, started on August 10, 16 miles northeast of Baker City, is at 12,702 acres (364 ODF-protected acres) and 60 percent contained. The fire has been turned over to a local smaller fire management organization (East Blues Local Type 3 - IC Crippen), and 188 personnel are currently assigned.
More information: 541-406-0201 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/EagleComplex2015

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The human-caused Stouts Fire, started on July 30, 11 miles east of Canyonville, remains at 26,452 acres (11,239 ODF-protected acres) and today is 94 percent contained. The fire has 331 personnel assigned and is being managed by a smaller fire management organization (Florida Forest Service Type 3 - IC Mike Work).
More information: 541-825-3724 or 206-402-7175 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos | #stoutsfire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

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Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov


Attached Media Files: Defensible Space Works. Here's a photo of a house that survived the recent Cove Fire because of defensible space actions the homeowners had taken to help protect it from wildfire.
Oregon State Penitentiary reports inmate death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/02/15
At approximately 6:20 a.m. on September 2, Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) inmate Ronald Anthony Drennen, 69, died unexpectedly in the infirmary. Oregon State Police confirmed the death was due to natural causes.

Drennen entered Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody on January 16, 2013, on one count of assault in the third degree out of Clackamas County. His earliest release date was September 22, 2016.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy applauds growing prominence of addiction issues in presidential campaigns
Woloshin Communications - 09/02/15
With a third of U.S. households affected by addiction and thousands dying every year from overdose, the presidential candidates' increasing focus on this issue may be just the catalyst needed to bring solutions to a public health crisis that has long been overlooked.

So says Nick Motu, Vice President of the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy.

"Over the last several months, we've seen addiction issues claim an increasingly prominent space in the 2016 presidential campaign," said Motu. "Today's announcement by the Clinton campaign is the latest in a series of ideas from various candidates of both parties, and this increased focus is welcome news to recovery advocates and a spark of hope for families everywhere."

While Hillary Clinton's plan to invest $10 billion over 10 years in addiction prevention, treatment and recovery is arguably the first formal proposal among the current field of 20 Republican and Democratic candidates, it is not likely to be the last. Several candidates have been talking about the nation's deadly addiction crisis.

"There's a grassroots movement in this country that is bringing this issue out of the shadows and into the light, and I assume the candidates' polls are starting to show it," Motu added. "We know people can recover from the disease of addiction, so it's good to see politicians paying attention to how we can make that a reality for more people."

People affected by addiction are becoming a constituency of consequence. Never will that be more evident than on Oct. 4, when tens of thousands will gather on the National Mall in Washington, DC to call for action on what organizers call the "most pressing public health issue of our time."

"In New Hampshire, this issue is front and center," said Motu. "Just as New Hampshire is a bellwether for the political race, let's hope this issues' prominence there serves as a catalyst for continued focus among all of our candidates." 

It was just a month ago, on Aug. 6, in the first Republican primary debate, that John Kasich talked about his record of shifting funds from prisons to treatment programs for those with substance use and mental health disorders. Carly Fiorina, Jeb Bush and Chris Christie have sounded similar themes. Bernie Sanders and others have called for expanded use of Naloxone, a medication that can reverse heroin and prescription opioid overdoses before they become fatal. And Rand Paul, whose state of Kentucky has been ground zero in the nation's opioid crisis, has helped introduce legislation to expand specialized treatment for prescription drug and heroin addiction.

"It's clear this is a bipartisan issue, and we are pleased this important conversation is getting bigger," he added. "We think America would benefit from an entire televised debate devoted to this issue."

"The Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy has made addressing the heroin and prescription opioid crisis a focus of the advocacy efforts at our organization this year," Motu said. "Congress is considering a number of bills aimed at addressing the opioid epidemic, and we are hopeful the bipartisan presidential campaign spotlight on these issues will spur action soon."

About the Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy
Our mission is to provide a leading national voice on all issues related to addiction prevention, treatment and recovery and to facilitate conversation among those in recovery, those still suffering and society at large. We are committed to smashing stigma, shaping public policy and educating people everywhere about the problems of addiction and the promise of recovery.

The Hazelden Betty Ford Institute for Recovery Advocacy is part of the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider.  With a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation has 16 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas. Learn more at www.HBFinstitute.org.
Video Conferencing Breaks Down State Barriers to Networking (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 09/02/15
Credit Union professionals attending the Northwest Credit Union Association's Networking Council meeting in Tigard, OR, were linked via video conference technology to their counterparts in six other cities in Oregon, Washington and Idaho.
Credit Union professionals attending the Northwest Credit Union Association's Networking Council meeting in Tigard, OR, were linked via video conference technology to their counterparts in six other cities in Oregon, Washington and Idaho.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/4992/87504/thumb_Video_conference_council_1.jpg
SeaTac, WA, Boise, ID. -- Who needs a long drive and a big travel budget? Thanks to video conferencing technology and collaboration between the Northwest Credit Union Association and the Idaho Credit Union League, credit union professionals in three states are connecting for networking and training.

Through video conferencing hosted in seven cities throughout Washington, Oregon and Idaho, 65 marketing, business development and community outreach specialists inaugurated the expansion of the NWCUA Networking Council program on August 25. The Compliance Council's Sept. 1 event then drew 85 participants from credit unions in all three states. Video conferencing locations included NWCUA and ICUL offices, and credit union facilities in Eugene, Oregon, Spokane, Washington and Lewiston and Pocatello, Idaho.

"The opportunity to network 'face-to-face' with other credit union staff members in our region is invaluable and would not be possible without the use of this video technology," said Kris Watkins, Compliance/Security Officer at CapEd Credit Union in Meridian, Idaho. In addition to attending the councils, she served as an onsite host for Boise council attendees.

"This successful collaboration with the NWCUA is allowing Idaho credit union professionals to connect with more of their colleagues, share experiences and create added value forums for change and talent development," said Kathy Thomson, President/CEO of the Idaho Credit Union League.

Added Denise Gabel, NWCUA COO, "It is empowering and enlightening to see credit union colleagues sharing ideas directly with each other. It is much more connective than an email or phone call. This innovation will result in a higher level of cooperation among cooperatives--one of our guiding principles in the credit union movement."

About the Idaho Credit Union League and Northwest Credit Union Association
The Idaho Credit Union League is the trade association representing over 30 Idaho affiliated credit unions across the state. The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing more than 160 credit unions in Washington and Oregon. Both organizations provide legislative and regulatory advocacy, compliance support, professional development opportunities, and public relations resources to help credit unions thrive and better serve the millions of Northwest consumers who are credit union members.


Attached Media Files: Credit Union professionals attending the Northwest Credit Union Association's Networking Council meeting in Tigard, OR, were linked via video conference technology to their counterparts in six other cities in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. , Credit union professionals in seven cities in Washington, Oregon and Idaho were linked via video conferencing.
Upcoming Educational Forum in Pendleton to Discuss Changes for Home and Community-Based Services and Supports: September 10, 2015
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/02/15
Beginning Monday, August 31 and ending October 1, the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority are hosting a series of educational forums throughout the state. On Thursday, September 10, the Pendleton forum will take place at the Vert Club Room.

Providers and consumers are invited to discuss upcoming changes to federal and state requirements for people who receive services in their home and in community-based settings. These changes will ensure more rights, as well as an increased ability for people receiving services to be part of their local community.

Who: Forums are open to all and no registration is required. Family members and people receiving supports in in-home or community-based settings as well as providers for Aging and People with Disabilities (APD), Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) and Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) services are encouraged to attend.

Also invited are advocates and community partners.

These forums are targeted to people over age 18 and the service providers supporting individuals over the age of 18. Forums will be offered to children's providers and guardians later in 2015.

What: There will be a presentation about Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), regulatory changes and upcoming surveys directly followed by a group discussion. Agency staff will be available to answer questions and offer guidance.

Where: Vert Club Room, 345 SW 4th Street, Pendleton, Oregon

When: There will be both an afternoon and evening session, each covering the same material:
Afternoon session is from 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Evening session is from 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm

For information about upcoming Educational Forums:
http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/seniors-disabilities/HCBS/Pages/Index.aspx
After the fire: Technical advice and guidance from Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/02/15
It has been nearly three weeks since the Mason Springs and Berry Creek fires came roaring down canyon, consuming everything in their path. These fires merged, known as the Canyon Creek Complex, they continue to burn in the surrounding hillsides. While the smoke still lingers and the shock starts to wear off, residents begin the planning stages of the difficult rebuilding process. Thoughts of how to rebuild and reclaim a community from the fire aftermath are forming. The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) wants to be a part of this process of restoring communities in Grant County.

The John Day Unit of ODF employs a staff that can help by providing technical assistance to landowners in the rebuilding of their forested landscapes. This staff is vital in helping the community return the forests and wildland back to pre-fire conditions over time while meeting the requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act.

Scorched and burned out silhouettes remain where grass, shrubs and trees were once part of the landscape. As we move toward fall and the rainy season, fragile soil that was held in place by this vegetation becomes a threat to water quality. Rules in the Oregon Forest Practices Act are intended to limit damage to soils and streamside vegetation which can filter ash and sediment from run-off on these blackened slopes. While you may want to get started right away clearing burned vegetation, that vegetation may be critical for soil stabilization until new plants become established. ODF Stewardship Foresters can help landowners navigate through the rules and processes which are in place to maintain healthy forests.

ODF wants to assist landowners through the process for removing hazard trees near homes and infrastructure as well as planning for and implementing salvage logging operations and post fire recovery efforts on private forestlands. ODF John Day Unit Stewardship Forester Ryan Miller explains, "We don't want to stop someone from removing a tree that poses a safety hazard, we just want to ensure that we protect streams and soil. We can provide landowners options and technical advice for removing hazards while protecting the environment." Stewardship Foresters can also provide advice on how to restore vegetation back to a site. Contact the local ODF Office in John Day (541-575-1139) for more information.

Additional information and guidance for forest activities is available online at www.oregon.gov/odf/privateforests/pages/fpakeys.aspx
Fun, Sun and Safe Boating this Labor Day Weekend (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 09/02/15
Waterskier enjoing flatwater.
Waterskier enjoing flatwater.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/4139/87156/thumb_mattchatterton.jpg
Labor Day Weekend is one of the top three boating weekends of the year on many Oregon lakes and rivers, attracting thousands to the alluring banks and warmest water of the season. To keep things fun and safe, the Oregon State Marine Board suggests using your thinking cap as you plan your water getaway:


-Don't drink and boat. The Marine Board encourages boaters and persons floating on the waterways, to leave the alcohol on shore. It's safer for everyone. If arrested for Boating Under the Influence of Intoxicants (BUII), violators have been fined up to $7,500, can lose boating privileges for up to three years and even serve jail time. Consumption of intoxicants on many Oregon waterways are up, and so are accidents and fatalities involving alcohol. So far this year, 12 people have lost their lives in recreational boating incidents, half of which involve drugs and alcohol, and all of the victims have been male.

-Know your waterway. "Be familiar with your surroundings and always keep a sharp lookout throughout your trip," says Ashley Massey, Public Information Officer for the Marine Board. "Stumps, deadheads and sand and gravel bars can appear out of nowhere with water depth changes. Start out slow and get your bearings. Water levels around the state are very low."

-Know what rules apply. "There are all types of watercraft on the market; some are considered boats and others are pool toys. Boats are designed differently, and by state law, have specific equipment requirements such as having enough properly fitted life jackets and a sound producing device, like a whistle. Attach the whistle to your life jacket and you're set." Massey adds. "If you plan to float the river, keep in mind that pool toys are designed for use in a swimming pool - have no directional control, and puncture easily in rivers.
If you are planning a relaxing float, do so in a watercraft designed for the river; one which won't easily puncture and comes properly equipped with a paddle so you can maneuver away from obstructions."

-Wear your life jacket. Each boat (including kayaks, inflatable boats and canoes) must have a properly fitting life jacket for each person on board and at least one sound producing device, like a whistle. Life jackets need to be in good shape and readily accessible - not under a hatch or in its packaging. All youth younger than 13 must wear a life jacket when in a boat that's underway. U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that over half of all boating fatalities occur with small boats on calm waterways, in sunny conditions. Ninety percent of boating fatality victims this year were not wearing a life jacket, on par with Oregon's average of 85-90% over the last 30 years.

-Sit on the seat. The growth of wake surfing is luring many people to ride on the swim platform, stern, sides and the bow of unenclosed boats. The stern can be a dangerous place for exposure to carbon monoxide and a prop-strike safety hazard. It is illegal to ride on the bow, decks, gunwales or transoms of a motor boat when the boat is underway. Sitting on designated seat cushions is the safest place to be -especially when the boat is towing someone.

-Slow down and keep a sharp lookout. Know the boating regulations for your area of operation. Always obey the "slow no-wake" buoys or signs. Boaters are responsible for their wake. Remember to slow down within 200 feet of a dock, launch ramp, marina, moorage, floating home or boathouse, pier or swim float. Be courteous with paddlers who are also sharing the waterway. Wakes can easily swamp low-freeboard paddle craft. Don't allow your wakes to generate negative attention from other boaters, property owners, and possibly, result in a citation.

-Carry your boater education card. All boaters operating boats over 10 hp need to have a boater education card. Youth 12-15 who operate a powerboat 0-10 hp alone must carry a boater education card. When operating a powerboat greater than 10 hp, youth must be supervised by a card-holding adult age 16 or older. When operating a personal watercraft, the supervising adult must be 18 or older. Educated boaters are much less likely to be involved in boating accidents because they know the "rules of the road."

-Carry your aquatic invasive species prevention permit. For registered motorized craft, your boat registration and current decals act as proof of payment into the program. For non-motorized watercraft 10 feet long and longer, such as canoes, kayaks, sailboats, paddleboards and inflatable rafts, the operator needs to physically carry a permit when out on the water.

The cost is $7 for non-motorized craft and can be purchased through any ODFW field office or licensing agent. Permits are valid until December 31 of the year issued. Tyvek tags (waterproof permits) are sold through the Marine Board's online storefront and various Marine Board permit dealers. Tyvek tags are $5 for the annual permit and $10 for a two-year permit. This program is self-funded and permit fees support aquatic invasive species detection, decontamination, signage, and education materials for boaters.

Marine officers will be on the water to assist boaters and help keep the waterways safe. The top violations so far this summer involve not having life jackets, failure to carry a boater education card or aquatic invasive species permit, and not having current boat registration decals. Other violations involve reckless operation and drugs and alcohol impairment. "Boating is the best escape, and a long weekend before heading back to school and other responsibilities makes it even better," Massey adds. "Just remember to prepare, and plan so you can have the best time out on the water, playing."

For more information on boating safety, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/Pages/safety/safety.aspx
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Attached Media Files: Waterskier enjoing flatwater.
09/01/15
State park fire restrictions continue one more week, tighter in Eastern and Central Oregon
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/01/15
The statewide state park ban on open flames will continue for another week. While temperatures have moderated in some areas and a little rain has fallen, especially on the Willamette Valley and coast, conditions have not improved enough to warrant relaxing the restriction. Fire crews are still heavily engaged in combating blazes in Central and Eastern Oregon, and resources in many local communities are stretched thin.

Propane stoves for cooking and charcoal briquettes for cooking are not covered by the statewide ban, but some parks have more restrictive bans in place that do cover briquettes. Before traveling, visitors should verify what's allowed at their destination by calling the park, calling the state park toll-free information line at 800-551-6949 (Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.), or looking up the park online at http://oregonstateparks.org/

The restriction will be reviewed again next week.
Nurse of the Year Awards Nominations Close September 11th
March of Dimes - 09/01/15
The call for nominations for the Fifth Annual Nurse of the Year Awards ends on September 11th. With just over a week until the deadline, 200 nurses from across the Oregon and SW Washington have been nominated. Awards honoring outstanding nurses for their constant care and compassion toward patients will be given in 16 categories.

Nominations may be submitted online at marchofdimes.org/oregon through September 11th. There is no fee to submit a nomination and you may submit multiple nominations. Award recipients will be determined by a selection committee comprised of healthcare professionals. Winners will be announced at the Nurse of the Year Awards breakfast on November 13, 2015, at the Sentinel Hotel in downtown Portland.

"Through the Nurse of the Year Awards, March of Dimes brings the health care community together to pay tribute to the profession of nursing and the often unsung heroes and heroines who save the lives and improve the health of others," said Elizabeth Joscelyn, State Director for March of Dimes, Greater Oregon Chapter.

Nurse of the Year Awards is sponsored by Adventist Health, Legacy Health, Moda Health and PeaceHealth.

The nominating categories are as follows:

Adult Acute Care
Advance Practice
Ambulatory/Clinic Care
Case Management, Occupational Health & Utilization Review
Community Health
Critical Care (Adult/Pediatric/Neonatal)
Emergency
Hospice, Home Health, Long Term Care, Rehab and Palliative Care
Nurse Educator
Nurse Leader
Nurse Specialty
Pediatric Acute Care
Rising Star
Small Hospital
Surgical Services
Women's Health

For more information visit marchofdimes.org/oregon.

March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org. Find out how you can help raise funds to prevent premature birth and birth defects by walking in March for Babies at marchforbabies.org. Find out what's going on in the Greater Oregon Chapter by visiting OregonMOD.com.
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Tuesday, September 1, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/01/15
Hand crews working with an excavator to accomplish the mop-up standard on the Stouts Creek Fire.
Hand crews working with an excavator to accomplish the mop-up standard on the Stouts Creek Fire.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/1072/87477/thumb_Stouts_Creek_Fire_Hand_Crews_Excavator.jpg
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officer: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell).

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2015


This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.


With the recent weather changes - various amounts of precipitation received across the state (with more precipitation possible during the week), cooler temperatures, and higher humidities, many restrictions on both public and industrial use are changing. ODF cautions all Oregonians to continue to be mindful of wildfire-safety and not assume that fire season has come to a close. As just one example, a high number of human-caused fires are still being caused by various types of engines and equipment - whether those are vehicle engines, mowing and maintenance equipment, chain-saws, and other types. Restrictions may still remain in effect on the times of day that many types of engines and equipment may be used, but using common sense, and being fire-safe and prepared, is still the best action that people can take to prevent human-caused wildfires in Oregon.

FIRE FACTS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lighting-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started on August 12 and located one mile south of John Day and Canyon City, is at 105,687 acres (16,981 ODF-protected acres) and 49 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed 44 primary residences, has 966 personnel assigned and is under Unified Command of the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (IC Lund) and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker).
More Information: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Central Oregon District: The 280-acre human-caused Cove Fire, started on August 29, three miles northwest of Culver, is in mop-up and patrol of the fire perimeter; it is expected to be fully contained later today. Unless otherwise needed, this will be the final report on this fire.
More Information: www.twitter.com/ODF_COD | www.twitter.com/CentralORFire |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit:

The Falls Creek Fire, started on August 22, five miles southwest of Joseph, is 353 acres (79 acres ODF-protected) and 35 percent contained. The fire has 181 personnel assigned and is being managed by a local team (East Blues Local Type 3 - IC Tyler). The cause of the fire remains under investigation.
More Information: 541-426-5633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4561/ | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ |

The lightning-caused Grizzly Bear Complex, started on August 13, 20 miles southeast of Dayton, WA and near Troy, OR, is 74,471 acres (10,107 of ODF-protected acreage, including 3,299 acres of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife lands) and 20 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed five primary residences (33 total structures), has 1,056 personnel assigned and is being managed by Washington Incident Management Team 4 (IC Gales).
More Information: 541-437-0138 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | www.facebook.com/pages/Grizzly-Bear-Complex-Fire/1152633018086248 | www.twitter.com/2015grizzlyfire | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com | #grizzlybearcomplex

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

The lightning-caused Eldorado Fire, started on August 14, 5 miles southeast of Unity, remains at 20,611 acres (5,448 ODF-protected acres) and is 100 percent contained. The fire destroyed one primary residence (three total structures). The fire has been returned to the local unit and, unless needed, this will be the final report on this fire. http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 #EldoradoFire |

The lightning-caused Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex, started on August 10, 10 miles east of Unity, remains at 102,089 acres (42,883 ODF-protected acres) and is 85 percent contained. The fire destroyed 8 primary residences (17 total structures). The fire has been returned to the local units and 32 personnel are assigned to the fire working towards total containment.
More Information: 541-446-3521 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | #CornetFire, #WindyRidgeFire

The lightning caused Eagle Complex, started on August 10, 16 miles northeast of Baker City, is at 12,702 acres (198 ODF-protected acres) and 60 percent contained. The fire has been turned over to a local smaller fire management organization (East Blues Local Type 3 - IC Crippen), and 327 personnel are currently assigned.
More information: 541-406-0201 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/EagleComplex2015

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The human-caused Stouts Fire, started on July 30, 11 miles east of Canyonville, is at 26,452 acres (11,239 ODF-protected acres) and 92 percent contained. The fire has 324 personnel assigned and is being managed by a smaller fire management organization (Florida Forest Service Type 3 - IC Mike Work). Crews continue repair work and expanding mop-up operations. "We are working with our agency administrators for a smooth transition back to the local authorities," said Rickey Britt, Planning Chief with the Florida Forest Service Team. "We believe we have a solid plan to seamlessly changeover the operations once we reach 100% containment [of the Stouts Creek Fire]."
More information: 541-825-3724 or 206-402-7175 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos | #stoutsfire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

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Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street, Salem, OR 97310
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov


Attached Media Files: Hand crews working with an excavator to accomplish the mop-up standard on the Stouts Creek Fire. , “A second contingent of 155 National Guard Members arrived in Elgin yesterday [to assist with Grizzly Bear Complex Fire operations] . . . , [and,] with a formidable show of efficiency, the Guards swapped uniforms for green pants and yellow shirts, packed
2015 Fiery Foods Festival All About Local: Food, Flavors & Entertainment (Photo)
Pasco Specialty Kitchen - 09/01/15
DPDA logo
DPDA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/5145/87476/thumb_DPDA_Logo.jpg
Pasco, WA--Eight food trucks and counting, eight local bands and a community festival that starts at 8:00 a.m., breaks until 4:00 pm and wraps up at 10:00 p.m., happens Saturday, September 12, 2015 in Downtown Pasco.

Deeply rooted in the Tri-Cities community and hosted by the Downtown Pasco Development Authority the Fiery Foods Festival will feature burning sensations across food and entertainment categories. The event format this year differs from years prior with the day split into two features: family activities and fun for grown-ups. "We really wanted to up the local factor in support of small food businesses as well as musical talent at this year's event," noted Michael Goins, executive director, Downtown Pasco Development Authority. "There is a thriving music scene here just a bit under wraps and we wanted to highlight that talent to add some cool exposure."

The free event will be abuzz with family fun from 8:00 a.m. to noon. Families will enjoy an array of activities including the Fiery Farmer's Market, live pepper roasting by Big Daddy's, acoustic entertainment, cultural performances and even a Hot Pepper Eating Contest.

The City of Pasco Parks and Recreation department's popular Tons of Trucks will include interactive exercises in the Edith House. The Edith House is a fire safety demonstration structure that allows area firefighters to teach kids fire safety. Mock fire drills complete with fake smoke will take place and kids can climb out a window to 'safety' with the assistance of fire fighters.
Complementary plastic fire, construction and sheriff hats will be provided by Pasco Recreation and sponsored by RDO while supplies last. The Pasco Police Department will partner with the Benton Franklin Health District and teach child Passenger Safety.
The second feature of this year's festival, After Dark, happens from 4:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. and primarily targets teens and adults. The Fiery Food Truck Faceoff Budweiser Beer and Wine Garden and Pasco Rocks YouTube local band contest kick off the food and mingling portion of the day.

-Fiery Food Truck Faceoff
Participating food trucks will feature a spicy or 'hot' food item and vie for two awards: A People's Choice Award and $500 cash prize and a Judge's Award and $250 cash prize. Anyone attending the festival is encouraged to vote on their favorite food truck from 4:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m. Media representatives, food aficionados and sponsors make up the Judge's team. They will sample a spicy dish from each vendor and vote on their favorite. The most votes determines the winner in both award categories and will be announced at 9:00 p.m.

-Pasco ROCKS YouTube
The second annual, popular contest presents local Tri-Cities' talent from all genres of music performing at festival. Today, a viral, local band contest is playing out on YouTube prior to the actual live performances whereby fans and groupies cast votes for their favs. To date over 1200 votes have been tallied. The local bands include: Badland Nomad, Evan Egerer, Riley Carter, The Lamps, Tino Cruze, Traveler of Home, VHS, and Volcanoes on the Sun. The lineup order and ultimate headliner for the evening are solely determined by the highest vote getter on YouTube. Voting ends September 7th at midnight with an announcement to follow on September 8. While the event is free to the general public, attendees are encouraged to arrive early as event organizers expect a big crowd. The winner will receive $500 cash award and all subsequent bragging rights.

-Day of event timeline
See attached.

For all the latest information on 2014 Fiery Foods Festival visit:
www.Fieryfoodfestival.com.
To stay connected follow us on Facebook/Downtown Pasco and
Twitter #bolder, #hotter, #louder.
For Pasco ROCKS YouTube band contest:
http://fieryfoodsfestival.com/entertainment/pascorocksyoutube/


Hosted by the Downtown Pasco Development Authority (DPDA), the 2015 Fiery Foods Festival is a signature event in Downtown Pasco that celebrates the cultural intersection of local food, flavors, and entertainment. For more information, contact Michael Goins, 509-546-1304 or mgoins@downtownpasco.com.



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2015 Fiery Foods Festival Timeline

Fiery Farmer's Market 8:00 am -12 pm
8:00 am Pasco Farmer's Market opens
8:00 am City of Pasco Parks and Recreation's Tons of Trucks; interactive fire safety fun
9:00 am Entertainment begins--acoustic guitar, hot pepper roasting and bounce house at Fiery Farmer's Market
10:30 am Cultural performances near Tons of Trucks
11:00 am Hot Pepper Eating contest

Fiery Foods "After Dark" 4:00 pm - 12 pm
4:00 pm Budweiser Beer and Wine Garden open; Food trucks open
Fiery Food Truck Faceoff People's Choice voting opens
4:00 pm Welcome remarks
4:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: First music band
5:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: Second music band
6:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: Third music band
7:00 pm Judge's group begins sampling dishes for Fiery Food Truck Faceoff Judge's Award
7:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: Fourth music band
8:00 pm Fiery Food Truck Faceoff People's Choice Award ballots collected and closed;
8:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: Fifth music band
9:00 pm Fiery Food Truck Faceoff winners announced by sponsor
9:15 pm Pasco Rocks YouTube: Closing music band; Winner of the Pasco Rocks YouTube performs
10:00 pm Event concludes


Attached Media Files: DPDA logo
Moda Health joins roster of plans that cover addiction treatment at Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation in Oregon
Woloshin Communications - 09/01/15
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation continues to expand insurance coverage choices for its comprehensive day and residential treatment facilities in Oregon. "This is in alignment with our nonprofit organization's mission to make our unique Springbrook in Newberg residential and Beaverton outpatient treatment programs as accessible as possible," said Jan Vondrachek, vice president of the Pacific Northwest Region for the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation.
The professionals at Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation's Springbrook and Beaverton facilities combine clinical experience with innovative programs and evidence-based practices. A spectrum of specialized services at the residential and outpatient centers offer personalized treatment to address the specific needs of:

Health care and other licensed professionals

Individuals needing pain management

Medication assisted therapy

Trauma therapies

LGBTQ programming

Residential detox, outpatient detox, assessment services, family programs, mental health, recovery management and support.

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is the largest nonprofit addiction treatment provider in the nation with 16 sites across the country. Staff, counselors and physicians are dedicated to continuous research and innovative treatment models that lead to recovery and support for other complex life issues beyond addiction.

The outpatient treatment facility at Beaverton now accepts Moda Health, Aetna, Avera, Beacon Health Options - Formerly Value Options, Cigna, Com Psych, Gunderson Health Plan, Health Net/MHN, International Longshoreman, Magellan, Pomco, Security Health Plan, UBH and Value Options health insurance.

The Springbrook residential facility in Newberg also accepts Moda Health, Aetna, Avera, Beacon Health Options - Formerly Value Options, Cigna, Com Psych, Gunderson Health Plan, International Longshoreman, Magellan, Pomco, Preferred One, Security Health Plan and Value Options health insurance.
Please check with your insurance provider about Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation services in Oregon, as different plans may have specific coverage requirements for residential and outpatient treatment.
Nationally, the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation has always used flexible systems for those who are insured but are out-of-network; since individual plans vary widely, people are encouraged to call 866-866-4662 and speak to a financial case manager. The case managers are dedicated to facilitating in- and out-of-network insurance coverage for patients. They are also able to help answer questions about residential and outpatient insurance coverage and, if appropriate, financial aid programs. For more information, please visit www.hazeldenbettyford.org.
About the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. It is the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider, with a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center. With 16 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas, the Foundation offers prevention and recovery solutions nationwide and across the entire continuum of care to help youth and adults reclaim their lives from the disease of addiction. It includes the largest recovery publishing house in the country, a fully accredited graduate school of addiction studies, an addiction research center, an education arm for medical professionals and a unique children's program, and is the nation's leader in advocacy and policy for treatment and recovery.  Learn more at www.hazeldenbettyford.org.
Community Forums in La Grande to discuss the vision for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities set for September 16 and 17
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/01/15
The Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) is hosting a Community Forum in La Grande to discuss the vision for the future of services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Ensuring the principles of self-determination is the core of our vision.

Who: People with intellectual and developmental disabilities who receive services and their families, as well as providers, Community Developmental Disability Programs (CDDPs) and Support Service Brokerages are encouraged to attend. (Brokerages provide services to eligible adults living in their own or their family's home to help them remain in their homes and be engaged in their communities.)

When: Wednesday, September 16 and Thursday September 17
For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who receive services and their families: Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015 from 6 to 8 p.m.
For CDDPs, Brokerages and Providers: Thursday, Sept. 17, from 9 a.m. to noon

Where: The Center for Human Development, 2301 Cove Avenue, La Grande

What: There will be a short presentation followed by a group discussion. This is one in a series of Community Forums throughout the state.

For information about upcoming Community Forums: www.oregon.gov/dhs/DD/Documents/ODDS%20Statewide%20Community%20Forums%20Schedule.pdf.
For more information about the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services: www.oregon.gov/DHS/dd/Pages/index.aspx.

If you have a disability and need this document in another format, please send an email to DHS.Forms@state.or.us or contact the Office of Document Management at (503) 378-3523;
TTY at 503-378-3523.

To find the closest DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs or contact 211Info for help. You can contact 211Info by dialing 2-1-1, visiting 211info.org online, texting your zip code to 898211, or e-mailing to help@211info.org.
Wapato First Day of School Reminder
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 09/01/15
Good morning all,

Attached is a release regarding Wapato Public Schools first day of the new school year. We start a week from today, on Sept. 8th. Anything you can do to spread this reminder would be appreciated. The release also contains info about some open houses at our schools over the next few days. We'd also like to get this info out.

Thanks for whatever you can do to help!


Thanks and remember "EVERY School Day Counts"


Attached Media Files: Wapato First Day of School
Governor Brown proclaims September National Preparedness Month (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/01/15
2015-09/3986/87463/2015_National_Preparedness_Month.jpg
2015-09/3986/87463/2015_National_Preparedness_Month.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-09/3986/87463/thumb_2015_National_Preparedness_Month.jpg
Oregon Governor Kate Brown has issued a Governor's Proclamation announcing September to be National Preparedness Month in Oregon. The proclamation encourages all Oregonians to join in observance and learn about ways to prepare for all types of emergencies.

The proclamation also states that the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) has made it a top priority to conduct outreach and educate the citizens of Oregon on the importance of preparing for emergencies.

With September being the 12th Annual National Preparedness Month, public safety agencies are busy working on a number of events to ensure that their communities are educated, informed and ready to face any type of crisis.

OEM is endorsing an online social media game called the 30 Days, 30 Ways Preparedness Challenge at www.30days30ways.com, as well as the 2nd Annual Race the Wave 5/10k run, walk and roll in Cannon Beach, Ore., Sept. 13. Participants will follow a tsunami route to a preparedness fair with giveaways. You can register at: https://endurancecui.active.com/event-reg/select-race?e=19612053. Oregonians are also encouraged to register for Oregon's largest earthquake drill, the Great Oregon ShakeOut at http://shakeout.org/oregon/.

"Preparedness Month is a great opportunity to highlight how important it is for Oregonians to be prepared for emergencies," said OEM Direction Andrew Phelps. "Individual and family preparedness is going to help save lives and property on our worst day."

Visit http://www.oregon.gov/OMD/OEM for information about emergency management programs in Oregon or www.Ready.gov to learn more about the risks facing communities, and learn more about how you can prepare.


PHOTO CAPTIONS:
131017-FS713-6
Linda Flood, a 2nd grade teacher at Candaleria Elementary School in Salem, Ore., holds a sign showing all of her students are accounted for during a past Great Oregon Shakeout earthquake drill. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory E. Grogan)

Preparedness Month Proclamation
The 2015 Preparedness Month Proclamation signed by Oregon Governor Kate Brown urges Oregonians to join in observance of September as National Preparedness Month in Oregon.
(Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory E. Grogan)


Attached Media Files: 2015-09/3986/87463/2015_National_Preparedness_Month.jpg , 2015-09/3986/87463/131017-FS713-6.jpg
08/31/15
District to break ground on new Walla Walla High School track
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/31/15
WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools is planning a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Sept. 8 at 10 a.m. to kick-off construction of a new all-weather track at Walla Walla High School. The $875,000 project will take approximately 90 to 110 days to complete, weather permitting. Walla Walla High School is currently the only 4A school in the state to have a cinder track for physical education classes and track and field competitions. Two-thirds of the funding for this project was raised privately by the Big Blue Boosters under the leadership of Scott Krivoshein.

Event Details
Event: Walla Walla High School track groundbreaking ceremony
Date: Tuesday, Sept. 8
Time: 10 a.m. (approximately a 20 minute event)
Location: Walla Walla High School Track and Field area
Photo Opportunities: Gold shovel activity, students in attendance, demolition of existing storage shed

Event Agenda
1. Welcome from Principal Pete Peterson
2. Comments from School Board President Sam Wells
3. Comments from PE teacher and track coach Eric Hisaw
4. Gold shovel activity
5. Demolition of existing storage shed

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125 Additional Soldiers from the Oregon National Guard Depart DPSST for Fire Lines (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/31/15
Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure
Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1187/87453/thumb_IMG_1008.JPG
This morning just after 8:00 am, 125 additional members of the Oregon National Guard departed from the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem after completing a week of wildland firefighter training. This third group of 125, from the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team based at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, is in route to the Grizzly Bear Fire.

This deployment was ordered by Governor Kate Brown under "Op Plan Smokey" to support the efforts of the Oregon Department of Forestry. "Op Plan Smokey" is an agreement that has been in place for many years that allows the Oregon National Guard to support wildland firefighting efforts when all other public and private resources are depleted. When "Op Plan Smokey" is activated the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) provides wildfire training for the Oregon National Guard in partnership with the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Their week of basic fire training included two courses needed for qualification as a wildland firefighter by the National Wildfire Coordinating Group, S-130 Firefighter Training and S-190 Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior. The training cadre included seasoned fire instructors from the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Military Department.

This group, along with 250 other Airmen and Soldiers from the Oregon National Guard deployed under Op Plan Smokey completed the basic wildland fire training course required of all (public and private) firefighters in the United States before they can work on the fire lines. The training included a variety of topics including fire behavior, incident command, watch outs, fire orders, fire shelters, hazards, terminology, use of water, mop up/securing line, communications, suppression, and others. Today's ten-hour, hands-on, field day conclusion included pumps, hose lays, hand line construction, mop-up(wet), mop-up (dry), and engines.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.


Attached Media Files: Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure , Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure , Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure , Oregon National Guard OPSA Departure
Public Health Advisory Board meets September 11 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/31/15
August 31, 2015

Program contact: Brittany Sande, 971-673-1291; brittany.a.sande@state.or.us

What: The Public Health Advisory Board's quarterly public meeting

Agenda: Announcements; approval of December 2014, March and June 2015 minutes; Public Health Division update; State Health Improvement Plan; Public Health Modernization.

When: Friday, Sept. 11, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is at noon; all comments are limited to three minutes. The final 15 minutes will be for preparation for the December PHAB meeting, including discussing the December agenda.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on policy matters related to public health programs, reviews statewide public health issues and participates in public health policy development.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodation by contacting Brittany Sande at 971-673-1291 or brittany.a.sande@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - 08-31-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/31/15
This is an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Monday, Aug. 31, 2015.

[This is a summary update. More detailed updates on the individual fires as well as other fire-related information are posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.]

Light to heavy precipitation occurred on the west side of the Cascades over the weekend, with scattered light precipitation on the east side. The cooler temperatures and higher humidity moderated fire behavior in some areas, but fire danger persists. The public is asked to continue to exercise extreme caution in the forest with any activity that could potentially start a wildfire. Firefighting resources are scarce due to the large fires burning in Oregon and Washington, and any new fires would strain the fire protection system.

FIRE FACTS

The 12,504-acre Eagle Complex 20 miles NW of Richland, Oregon, is 60 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 327 total personnel. Resources include: nine hand crews, 12 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 105,048-acre Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day is 49 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 1,026 total personnel. Resources include: 23 hand crews, 69 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 20,635-acre Eldorado Fire five miles SE of Unity is 99 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 102,089-acre Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex 16 miles south of Baker City is 85 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 74,471-acre Grizzly Bear Complex 20 miles SE of Dayton, Wash., and near Troy, Ore., in the Northeast Oregon District is 17 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 915 total personnel. Resources include: 17 hand crews, 34 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 26,452-acre Stouts Creek Fire 16 miles east of Canyonville is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 343 total personnel. Resources include: five hand crews, 11 fire engines, and one helicopter.

The 353-acre Falls Creek Fire five miles south of Joseph is 50 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 116 total personnel. Resources include: three hand crews, four fire engines and one helicopter.

The 280-acre Cove Fire in the Central Oregon District three miles NW of Culver, Ore., is expected to be fully contained later today.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed
www.oregon.gov/pages/wildfire.aspx for fire prevention, response and recovery links

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT TripCheck, http://tripcheck.com/Pages/RCMap.asp#
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.
08/30/15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - 08-30-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/30/15
This is an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015.

[This is a summary update. More detailed updates on the individual fires as well as other fire-related information are posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.]

FIRE FACTS

The 12,504-acre Eagle Complex 20 miles NW of Richland, Oregon, is 25 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 315 total personnel. Resources include: nine hand crews, 12 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 101,465-acre Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day is 49 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with759 total personnel. Resources include: 10 hand crews, 67 fire engines and nine helicopters.

The 20,635-acre Eldorado Fire five miles SE of Unity is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 102,089-acre Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex 16 miles south of Baker City is 85 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 33 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 73,658-acre Grizzly Bear Complex 20 miles SE of Dayton, Wash., and near Troy, Ore., in the Northeast Oregon District is 10 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 749 total personnel. Resources include: 12 hand crews, 34 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 26,452-acre Stouts Creek Fire 16 miles east of Canyonville is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 365 total personnel. Resources include: six hand crews, 11 fire engines, and two helicopters.

The 396-acre Falls Creek Fire five miles south of Joseph is 35 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 186 total personnel. Resources include: seven hand crews and nine fire engines.

The 200-acre Cove Fire in the Central Oregon District three miles NW of Culver, Ore., is 30 percent contained. Firefighters are performing mop-up today and securing fire lines. The fire was human-caused. ODF, Jefferson County RFD, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are partnering in the suppression effort. Two vacant residences and several outbuildings were destroyed. The fire was reported Aug. 29.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed
www.oregon.gov/pages/wildfire.aspx for fire prevention, response and recovery links

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT TripCheck, http://tripcheck.com/Pages/RCMap.asp#
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.
08/29/15
Second team of Oregon National Guard members complete training, prepared to assist with firefighting (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/29/15
2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-004.JPG
2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-004.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87424/thumb_150829-Z-YJ247-004.JPG
SALEM, Oregon--Members of the Oregon Air National Guard conducted their final day of fire training at the Department of Public Safety, Standards, and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 29. The Citizen-Airmen are a part of a second group of Oregon National Guard members to complete the training at the facility, and are scheduled to deploy to firebases in central and eastern Oregon on Sunday, Aug. 30.

A third team of 125 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers from the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, who have completed their training at DPSST along with the Airmen are scheduled to deploy to firebases shortly.


Photo Captions:

150829-Z-YJ247-001
Oregon Air National Guard Senior Airman Robert Holster, of the 173rd Fighter Wing, in Klamath Falls, Oregon, demonstrates how to wrap a fire hose at the Department of Public Safety, Standards, and Training in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 29. Holster is an F-15 aircraft mechanic with previous firefighting experience. Photo by Lt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.

150829-Z-YJ247-002
Oregon Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Ashley Vela, of the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon, listens as instructors at the Department of Public Safety, Standards, and Training in Salem instruct the group on fire fighting techniques, Aug. 29. Vela work as an aircraft armament member at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls. Photo by Lt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.

150829-Z-YJ247-003
Oregon Air National Guard Capt. Chris Webb, of the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, receives hands-on training at the Department of Public Safety, Standards, and Training in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 29. Webb, a Citizen-Airman with the CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP), is also a General Surgery Physician's Assistant in his civilian occupation. Photo by Lt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.

150829-Z-YJ247-004
Oregon Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Chris Campbell, of the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, practices using a fire hose at the Department of Public Safety, Standards, and Training in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 29. Campbell is a Non-Destructive Inspector in the Oregon Air National Guard, is scheduled to deploy to the field on Sunday to fight fires. Photo by Lt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-004.JPG , 2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-003.JPG , 2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-002.JPG , 2015-08/962/87424/150829-Z-YJ247-001.JPG
08/28/15
(Photo and Video) Oregon Army National Guard units complete battle simulations at U.S. Army National Training Center
Oregon Military Department - 08/28/15
More than 500 Soldiers of the Oregon Army National Guard's 3rd Battalion, 116th Calvary Regiment (3-116th Combined Arms), and the 1186th Military Police Company (1186th MP), spent 12 days conducting live-fire exercises and large-scale simulated battle scenarios at the National Training Center (NTC), in the Mojave Desert at Fort Irwin, Calif., August 14-25, 2015.

The Oregon units augmented the Idaho Army National Guard's 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) during the first Decisive Action operation, known as "force-on-force," integrated combat and maneuver training cycle the Army National Guard has completed since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. More than 5,200 Service Members from 10 states' National Guard units, as well as U.S. Army Reserve and active duty U.S. Army components, participated in the training.

"The purpose of this NTC rotation is to allow the brigade to advance its collective training skillsets and our proficiencies as a brigade combat team," said Idaho Army National Guard Col. Russell Johnson, commander of the 116th CBCT. "We rarely, if ever, get the opportunity to take all 4,000-plus Soldiers out and train together at one time. The National Training Center is one of those rare resources in today's Army that allows us the opportunity to do that."

The training was designed to simulate an expeditionary deployment experience and increase war-fighting capabilities. The 116th CBCT used Abrams tanks, Bradley Fighting Vehicles, and Apache helicopters provided by the Idaho Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 183rd Attack Reconnaissance (1-183rd ARB), to conduct simulated battles against the U.S. Army's 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR).

The Director of the Army National Guard, Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy, said that NTC training ensures combat units in the National Guard achieve the readiness levels required by the Army in order to meet the nation's demands.

"The National Guard is part of the total Army force and we have combat formations within our team ... so it's important that we give these organizations the opportunity to come out and go against world-class OPFOR [opposing forces] to grow and train," said Kadavy.

Oregon's 3-116th Battalion successfully conducted three running battles and retained the ability to continue projecting effective combat power during the training. The battalion defeated more than double its weight in opposing force combat troops, armor and equipment.

"It was an extremely challenging environment and a very difficult standard and the Soldiers did exceptionally well," said Oregon Army National Guard Lt. Col. Brian Dean, commander of the 3-116th Battalion.

The 3-116th Battalion consists of Citizen-Soldiers from seven Eastern Oregon cities and was the first National Guard battalion in the nation certified on the new M2A3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) and the Abrams M1A2 SEPv2 main battle tank. The battalion spent four years training on the new equipment and preparing for NTC.

"This marks the end of a lot of sacrifice for Soldiers, families and employers," said Dean. "I want to thank the families. I understand that it is sacrifice for them. And to the employers, without them being willing to give up their hard working Soldiers, we wouldn't be able to do this."

The 1186th MP Company is based in Salem, Oregon, with a detachment in Milton-Freewater. The military police Soldiers contributed to the training as a combat service and support unit.

"The troops have been great. It's been absolutely fantastic. High morale under very austere conditions and they've risen to every challenge and I'm fantastically proud of each and every one of them," said Oregon Army National Guard Master Sgt. James Webb, with the 1186 MP Company, 821st Troop Command Battalion.


PHOTOS from the training are available for download at the following link:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/albums/72157657476490650

VIDEOS are available for download at the following links:
BROLL: 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team NTC Rotation:
https://www.dvidshub.net/video/420592/3rd-battalion-116th-cavalry-brigade-combat-team-ntc-rotation-broll#.VeDUIksyGDU

PKG and SOT: Oregon Army National Guard Cavalry Trains at NTC:
https://www.dvidshub.net/video/420964/oregon-army-national-guard-cavalry-trains-ntc#.VeDTyUsyGDU

SOT: Director of the Army National Guard Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy comments on the importance of the National Guard training at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif.: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/420224/arng-dir-visits-ntc#.VeEMjUsyGDU

SOT: Gen. Frank Grass, Chief of the National Guard Bureau, visits the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif.: https://www.dvidshub.net/video/419876/chief-nat-guard-bureau-visits-ntc-fort-irwin-california#.VeENkksyGDU
Donations to Red Cross Help Families in Need (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/28/15
Red Cross supplies are pre-positioned for quick, organized response in times of need.
Red Cross supplies are pre-positioned for quick, organized response in times of need.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1190/87408/thumb_ERV_in_central_OR.jpg
Five Red Cross Cascades Region volunteers, from Roseburg to southwest Washington, today have been deployed to Spokane and Wenatchee, Wash., to assist with relief efforts for families affected by rampant wildfires.

Last week in central and eastern Oregon, wildfires consumed over 248,000 acres, destroying homes and other buildings, and forcing residents to evacuate. Nearly 90 Oregon and southwest Washington-based Red Cross volunteers provided support to affected families, offering meals, a place to stay, basic essentials and clean up kits - plus guidance on how to take the next steps toward recovery.

Fires here have temporarily abated and Red Cross shelters in Warm Springs, Baker City and Mt. Vernon have been closed. Still, response teams keep a watchful eye on fire activity and remain on standby to help on a moment's notice.

Quick, organized response is a hallmark of the Red Cross. From wildfires to home fires, tornadoes and floods, you can do something right now to make sure that families facing devastation can get help right away. Help people affected by disasters big and small. Make a donation today to the American Red Cross. Call 1-800-RED-CROSS or visit www.redcross.org. Thank you for your support as we help families when they need it most.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.


Attached Media Files: Red Cross supplies are pre-positioned for quick, organized response in times of need. , Red Cross workers remain at-the-ready in case Oregon wildfires flare up. , Red Cross volunteers transport supplies to a shelter site in eastern Oregon.
Oregon National Guard Soldiers, Airmen scheduled to complete fire training, deploy to fire bases (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/28/15
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice smothering fires during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group spent four days training to assist the Oregon Department of Fores
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice smothering fires during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group spent four days training to assist the Oregon Department of Fores
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87369/thumb_20150826-V-RE919-75.jpg
SALEM, Oregon (Aug. 28, 2015)--The additional 250 Oregon National Guard members activated to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts throughout the state are scheduled to complete their firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon on Saturday, Aug. 29.

The group, comprised of Citizen-Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, and the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon, and Citizen-Soldiers from the Oregon Army National Guard's 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, are scheduled to deploy to firebases in eastern and central Oregon on Sunday, Aug. 30.

The media is invited to view their field training on Aug. 29, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway, Salem, Oregon 97317.

The first group of 125 Oregon Soldiers who were activated, completed their firefighting training at DPSST on Aug. 25, and are currently assisting first responders, initial attack contract crews and fire managers at a firebase near John Day. This initial group comes from Oregon Army National Guard units across the state, including; 224 Engineering Company, 1-186 Infantry Battalion, 1-82 Cavalry, 141 Brigade Support Battalion and 1249 Engineer Company. They join Soldiers from Charlie 7-158 Aviation, and Army and Air National Guard Joint Staff who have been participating in the effort since Aug. 3.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting. This agreement is reviewed annually by both agencies' leadership.

Photo Caption:
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice smothering fires during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group spent four days training to assist the Oregon Department of Forestry during the 2015 firefighting season, and have since deployed to the fire lines early on Aug. 26. They will be joined by 250 more Oregon Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers who began their training at DPSST on Aug. 26, and are expected to deploy to the fire lines Aug. 30. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.


Attached Media Files: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice smothering fires during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group spent four days training to assist the Oregon Department of Fores
08/27/15
Veterans Advisory Committee Meeting in Hermiston
Oregon Dept. of Veterans' Affairs - 08/27/15
SALEM - The public is invited to attend and participate in the next quarterly meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs. The meeting is being held at the Hermiston Conference Center, 415 S. Highway 395, on September 2, from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

The nine-member committee is comprised of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel to the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.

Registration is not required, but is encouraged. RSVP at: www.surveymonkey.com/r/CWNK5SB.

If you have questions for the committee, email them to vaac@odva.state.or.us.

For more information about the committee and its members go to: www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx.

The advisory committee's meetings are held throughout the state on the first Wednesday in March, June, September and December.
###
UPDATE: Inmate walks away from Santiam Correctional Institution work crew (Photo) - Inmate Back in custody
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/27/15
Inmate William A. Beebe
Inmate William A. Beebe
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1070/87285/thumb_Beebe.jpg


UPDATE: William Beebe is back in custody. Salem Police Department and Oregon State Police arrested him today at approximately 12:33 p.m. in Salem. No other details are available at this time.



Today at approximately 9:30 a.m., inmate William Arch Beebe walked away from an Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) work crew in the area of Richmond Elementary School in southeast Salem. Local law enforcement is assisting.

Beebe is an inmate at Santiam Correctional Institution (SCI) in Salem. He was working on a ten-man crew when staff discovered he was missing.

Beebe is a 38-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet 2 inches tall, 180 pounds, clean shaven, and has hazel eyes. He was last seen wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange, and a blue t-shirt similarly stenciled in orange.

Beebe entered DOC custody on June, 23, 2015, on two counts of unauthorized use of a vehicle out of Marion County. His earliest release date is April 6, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding Beebe's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at
1-800-452-7888.

SCI is a minimum-security prison in Salem that houses approximately 440 male inmates who are within four years of release. The facility concentrates on work opportunities, most of which are in the form of work crews contracting with state agencies, local organizations, and private industries within a 60-mile radius of Salem. SCI provides a range of other correctional programs and services including education, transition programs, and religious services. The building that is now SCI was constructed in 1946 and originally was used as an annex to the Oregon State Hospital for mental health patients. Over the years it was used for a variety of correctional purposes until, in 1990, it opened as SCI.

####


Attached Media Files: Inmate William A. Beebe
Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation to sponsor Free Workshop on "Trauma, Substance Use Disorders and Sexuality"
Woloshin Communications - 08/27/15
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, the nation's largest nonprofit addiction treatment provider, is coming to Seattle to sponsor a free workshop on "Trauma, Substance Use Disorders, and Sexuality" from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 3 at McCormick and Schmicks, 1200 Westlake Ave. N.

The workshop features Buster Ross, a national expert on substance abuse disorders, sexuality and mental health and the national director of LGBTQ-Integrative Programming at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation.

"Human sexuality and trauma are complicated," states Ross. "All of our experiences influence our sexuality. For many, substance use has become a way of managing sexual shame, confusion and unresolved abuse. Counselors excel at establishing a safe and trusting environment for patients to disclose nonconsensual and exploitive experiences," Ross says. "But what is healthy? The workshop will help providers increase their skills in helping clients in recovery answer that question."

Designed to help counselors and other helping professionals feel more confident when working with patients with substance use disorders and histories of sexual abuse, the two-hour workshop carries two free continuing education credits from the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists.

RSVP online at www.HazeldenBettyFord.org/Samantha or call Kirsten Cannavino, 503-554-4324.

About Buster Ross
Buster Ross, M.A., CADCII, L.P.C., C.S.C, is the National Director of LGBTQ-Integrative Treatment Programming at Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, and is based in Springbrook, Ore. He works at the intersections of substance use disorders, sexuality and mental health; teaches at the Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies; and trains helping professionals throughout the U.S. Ross is an AASECT Certified Sexuality Counselor, Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor II and Licensed Professional Counselor.

About LGBTQ-Integrative Treatment Programming
LGBTQ-Integrative Treatment Programming is based on the philosophy that providing sexual health training to staff and sexual health education to clients in drug and alcohol treatment creates a supportive and healing environment for LGBTQ people and non-LGBTQ people.

About The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation
The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. It is the nation's largest nonprofit treatment provider with a legacy that began in 1949 and includes the 1982 founding of the Betty Ford Center. With 16 sites in California, Minnesota, Oregon, Illinois, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, Colorado and Texas, the Foundation offers prevention and recovery solutions nationwide and across the entire continuum of care for youth and adults. Learn more at www.hazeldenbettyford.org.
Educational Forums planned throughout Oregon to discuss changes for home and community-based services and supports
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/27/15
Beginning Monday and ending October 1, the Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) are hosting educational forums throughout the state. Next week, forums will take place in Bend, Keizer and Hillsboro. Providers and consumers are invited to discuss upcoming changes to federal and state requirements impacting those receiving services in their home and in community-based settings. These changes will ensure more rights as well as an increased ability for people receiving services to be part of their local community.
Who: Family members and people receiving supports in an in-home or community based setting. Providers for Aging and People with Disabilities (APD), Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) and Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) services are also invited. Advocates and community partners are also encouraged to attend.
What: There will be a presentation followed by a group discussion. Agency staff will be available to answer questions and offer guidance for upcoming regulatory changes and surveys.

City DATE Location
Bend 8/31/2015 Central Oregon Community College
Keizer 9/2/2015 Keizer City Hall
Hillsboro 9/3/2015 Hillsboro Public Library
Pendleton 9/10/2015 Vert Club House
Ontario 9/14/2015 Four Rivers Cultural Center
Medford 9/22/2015 Smullin Health & Education Center
South Coast Coos 9/23/2015 Confederate Tribe Community Center
Eugene 9/28/2015 Lane County Community College
Astoria 9/30/2015 Judge Guy Boyington Building
Portland 10/1/2015 Ambridge Event Center

For information about upcoming Educational Forums:
http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/seniors-disabilities/HCBS/Pages/Index.aspx

To find the closest DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs or contact 211Info for help. You can contact 211Info by dialing 2-1-1, visiting 211info.org online, texting your zip code to 898211, or e-mailing to help@211info.org.
###


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/973/87353/HCBS_Forums_agenda_and_locations.pdf
Recreational fire ban continues at Oregon State Parks
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/27/15
The statewide campfire and open flame ban in Oregon State Parks remains in place for at least one more week. Conditions have not improved since the ban began Aug. 19.

Fires are not allowed on properties owned and managed by Oregon State Parks, including the ocean shores. The ban includes but is not limited to fire pits, tiki torches and candles.

Although the state park ban doesn't apply to propane cooking stoves and/or charcoal briquettes for cooking, there may be fire restrictions local to a specific area that do limit propane cooking stove and briquette use. Visitors planning a trip should check with park staff for the most current information, or call the state park information line at (800) 551-6949 or visit www.oregonstateparks.org.

The ban will be re-evaluated next week based on current wildfire status, weather and guidance from state and local fire officials.
08/26/15
Photo Release: Oregon Soldiers depart for fire base in John Day, Acting Adjutant General visits second group of volunteers (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/26/15
2015-08/962/87344/150826-Z-YJ247-027.JPG
2015-08/962/87344/150826-Z-YJ247-027.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87344/thumb_150826-Z-YJ247-027.JPG
Photo Release

150826-Z-TK422-160
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers board buses headed out to a fire base in John Day, Oregon, following completion of their firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety, Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 26. The first group of 125 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers began their training at DPSST on Aug. 22. Another group of 250 Soldiers and Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, and the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team based at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, arrived at DPSST Aug. 25. The second group should complete their training there by Aug. 29. The call up of Oregon Guardsmen came as Oregon Governor Kate Brown activated the Oregon National Guard to assist with the ongoing firefighting efforts around the state. Photo by Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs Office.

150826-Z-TK422-172
Acting Oregon Adjutant General, Brig. Gen. Michael Stencel, and Oregon Army National Guard Command Sergeant Major Shane Lake, address a group of Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers during their firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety, Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 26. The group is part of an additional 250 Oregon Air and Army National Guard members placed on state active duty orders to assist with the ongoing firefighting efforts around the state. Another group of 125 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers completed their training at DPSST on Aug. 25, and headed to a fire base near John Day. Photo by Nick Choy, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs Office.

150826-Z-YJ247-027
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers from the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team depart from the Department of Public Safety, Standards and Training (DPSST) in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 26, after completing firefighting training at the facility. This first group of 125 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers began their training at DPSST on Aug. 22. Another group of 250 Soldiers and Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, and the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team based at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, arrived at the facility Aug. 25. The second group should complete their training there by Aug. 29. The call up of Oregon Guardsmen came as Oregon Governor Kate Brown activated the Oregon National Guard to assist with the ongoing firefighting efforts around the state. Photo by Lt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs Office.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/87344/150826-Z-YJ247-027.JPG , 2015-08/962/87344/150826-Z-TK422-172.JPG , 2015-08/962/87344/150826-Z-TK422-160.JPG
Health advisory for water contact at Seal Rock State Park Beach lifted August 26
Oregon Health Authority - 08/26/15
August 26, 2015

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Seal Rock State Park Beach in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory August 11 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from subsequent samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
BPA selects new vice president of Transmission Engineering and Technical Services (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/26/15
2015-08/1236/87326/20150726_Mike_Miller_hi.jpg
2015-08/1236/87326/20150726_Mike_Miller_hi.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1236/87326/thumb_20150726_Mike_Miller_hi.jpg
PR 18 15
BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015
CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140/503-230-5131

BPA selects new vice president of Transmission Engineering and Technical Services

Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration has selected Mike Miller to be its vice president of Engineering and Technical Services. He will begin his new position Sept. 6.

"Mike possesses a unique blend of great technical and leadership skills along with on-the-ground experience in several Engineering and Technical Services arenas that make him an outstanding selection for this role," said Richard Shaheen, senior vice president for Transmission Services. "I look forward to Mike positioning this vital part of Transmission for even greater success and delivery of excellence to our customers in the months to come."

As leader of BPA's Engineering and Technical Services organization, Miller will have responsibility for implementing Transmission Services' $500 million capital program, providing technical support for the transmission maintenance program and providing real property services to BPA.

Miller also will serve as BPA's principal engineer and key policy formulator in leading the design, material specification, coordination, project management and construction of major transmission infrastructure projects necessary to sustain and improve the reliability of the existing system and incorporate new energy generation facilities.

"I am honored to be selected for this position and excited to lead Engineering and Technical Services," Miller said. "I love this organization and its people and am eager to provide the long-term stability and leadership we need."

Miller came to BPA as a student in 1992 in the substation outdoor design group, assisting in purchasing outdoor design equipment as well as drafting for capital projects. He graduated from Central Washington University, earning a bachelor's degree in electronic engineering technology. In July of 1994, he became a permanent BPA employee, working in the Protection Engineering Design group as an electrical engineer until 2002. At that time, he became the supervisor of the group, a position he held until 2010. Miller was then selected as the manager of System Control Engineering, a group comprised of eight sub-groups, including Protection Engineering Design. In August of 2014, he accepted a nine-month role as the acting vice president of Engineering and Technical Services.

About BPA
The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 259 substations to 490 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region's high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov
###


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1236/87326/20150726_Mike_Miller_hi.jpg
Special Board Meeting scheduled for 8/27/15 at 6:00 pm in the Board room
Kiona-Benton City Sch. Dist. - 08/26/15
A meeting to adopt budget extension and approve accounts payable.
08/25/15
Photo Release: First group of Oregon National Guard Soldiers complete fire training at DPSST, head to fire bases (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/25/15
2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-89.jpg
2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-89.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87315/thumb_20150826-V-RE919-89.jpg
Photo Release


Photo Captions


20150826-V-RE919-89
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice using fire hoses during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group is undergoing the training to assist the Oregon Department of Forestry during the 2015 firefighting season. The first group of 125 Soldiers are scheduled to deploy to the fire lines early on Aug. 26, and will be joined by 250 more Oregon Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers who began their training at DPSST today, and are expected to deploy to the fire lines Aug. 30. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150826-V-RE919-67
An Oregon Army National Guard Soldier practices using fire hoses during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group is undergoing the training to assist the Oregon Department of Forestry during the 2015 firefighting season. The first group of 125 Soldiers are scheduled to deploy to the fire lines early on Aug. 26, and will be joined by 250 more Oregon Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers who began their training at DPSST today, and are expected to deploy to the fire lines Aug. 30. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150826-V-RE919-79
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice cutting fire lines during wild land fires' training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group is undergoing the training to assist the Oregon Department of Forestry during the 2015 firefighting season. The first group of 125 Soldiers are scheduled to deploy to the fire lines early on Aug. 26, and will be joined by 250 more Oregon Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers who began their training at DPSST today, and are expected to deploy to the fire lines Aug. 30. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150826-V-RE919-75
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers practice smothering fires during wild land fires training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, in Salem, Oregon, Aug. 25. The group is undergoing the training to assist the Oregon Department of Forestry during the 2015 firefighting season. The first group of 125 Soldiers are scheduled to deploy to the fire lines early on Aug. 26, and will be joined by 250 more Oregon Citizen-Airmen and Citizen-Soldiers who began their training at DPSST today, and are expected to deploy to the fire lines Aug. 30. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-89.jpg , 2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-79.jpeg , 2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-75.jpg , 2015-08/962/87315/20150826-V-RE919-67.jpg
Eastern Oregon State Highways remain open, expect smoke and delays due to fires on some routes
ODOT: East. Ore. - 08/25/15
All state highways in eastern Oregon remain open at this time. Travelers are advised to expect delays up to twenty minutes on OR 245 (Dooley Mnt. Hwy) in Baker County and U.S. 395 between John Day and Seneca in Grant County as ODOT crews work to remove hundreds of hazard trees damaged by wildfires. Work is expected to continue over the next several weeks along these routes. Fire crews also continue to travel on US 395 and other highways near active fires. Please plan extra travel time, slow down near work zones or when fire/emergency crews are in the area, expect smoke/limited visibility, and tune to local radio stations for update fire information. Highway conditions and fire activity can change quickly. Check TripCheck.com for update road conditions or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941. For fire information http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/. Know before you Go!
County advisory group for forestry to meet Sept. 1 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/25/15
The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee (FTLAC), representing Oregon counties that in the past deeded forestland to the state for management, will meet on Tuesday, September 1, in Salem. Highlighted items on the agenda include:

An update on the State Forest Management Plan revision and outcomes from the August 12 Board of Forestry Forest Management Plan Subcommittee meeting.

Information about the US Fish and Wildlife Service Barred Owl removal research project.

Beginning conversations about revisions to the Oregon Administrative Rules, which would better enable the department to enforce recreation rules, and drafting of rule revisions resulting from the passage of HB 2453.

An update on the Department of State Land's process for transferring ownership of the Elliott State Forest.

MEETING DETAILS
When: 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Where: Tillamook Room, Building D, Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Headquarters Office, 2600 State St., Salem.

FTLAC meetings are open to the public. An opportunity for public comment will be provided around 1:45 p.m. More information, including a detailed agenda and meeting materials, can be found at:
http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/board/forest_trust_land_advisory_committee.aspx

SPECIAL NEEDS
Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours before the meeting, at (503) 945-7200.

ABOUT THE FTLAC
The FTLAC is a legally mandated committee of county commissioners representing counties that deeded lands to the state. The committee advises the Board of Forestry on matters where counties may have a responsibility related to forestland managed by ODF. Planning and policy decisions made by the board and department can affect revenues received by the counties with forest trust lands managed by ODF, which are located in the Tillamook State Forest and elsewhere.

The FTLAC is made up of seven members that represent the 15 counties that have state forest land within their county boundaries: Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Douglas, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook, and Washington.
Oregon Health Policy Board to meet September 1 at OHSU in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 08/25/15
August 25, 2015

Contact: Stephanie Jarem, 971-273-6844 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting September 1 in Portland. The meeting will be held at the Oregon Health & Science University Center for Health and Healing. The board will hear updates on health system transformation and will receive a report on the Oregon Health Authority's six-year financial sustainability plan. Public testimony will be heard during the meeting, beginning at 11:45 a.m.

When: Tuesday, Sept 1, 8:30 a.m. to noon

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3033 SW Bond Ave., third floor, Room 4. The meeting will also be available via live Web stream. A link to the live stream and a recording of the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2015-OHPB-Meetings.aspx. Members of the public can also call in to listen by dialing 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda:

-- Director's report;
-- OHPB committee updates;
-- Health system transformation updates;
-- OHA six-year financial sustainability;
-- Public testimony.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2015-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - Aug. 25, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/25/15
This is an Oregon Department of Forestry fire update for Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015.

[This is a summary update. More detailed updates on the individual fires as well as other fire-related information are posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.]

FIRE FACTS

ODF West Oregon District - Dallas Unit
Willamina Creek Fire | 08-19-15 | 9 miles north of Willamina | 230 acres | 75% contained | Under investigation | ODF local mgmt. team |
More Information: 503-934-8153 | http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry |


ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit
Canyon Creek Complex | 08-12-15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 74,744 acres | 37% contained | 707 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit
Falls Creek Fire | 08-22-15 |4 miles southwest of Joseph, OR | 249 acres | 0% contained | Local IMT (IC Tyler) |
More Information: 541-523-1246 or 541-523-1208 | www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman | www.twitter.com/WallowaWhitman

Rock Creek Fire | 08-23-15 | 7 miles SE of Pendleton | 230 acres | 100% contained |
More information: 541-276-3491 |

Grizzly Bear Complex | 08-13-15 | 20 miles SE of Dayton WA - Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness, south and east | 60,000 acres | 5% contained | 676 personnel | Lightning | WA IMT 4 (IC Gales) / OSFM Green Team (IC Kunze)
More Information: 541-612-0059 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit
Eldorado Fire | 08-14-15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,611 acres |75% contained |256 personnel | Lightning Hold-over |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 08-10-15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,887 acres | 80% contained | 37 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Eagle Complex | 08-10-15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 9,582 acres |7% contained | 307 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)
Stouts Fire |07-30-15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 36,367 acres | 86% contained | 610 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

Why does ODF fight fire at night?
Oregon Dept. of Forestry and partner crews jump on opportunities to make sure fires are out. When you see ODF firefighting operations online, you might notice images of night firefighting. Doing anything in the dark can be difficult, and considering safety above all else, we minimize risk so that crews can take full advantage of working at night, providing some very special situational advantages, including slowing the fire down quickly.

Less heat from the sun, and often higher humidity provide ideal conditions for getting a leg up on suppression. John Flannigan, Coos Forest Protective Association and Night Operations Chief with ODF's Incident Management Team 1 from last year's Haystack Complex, said that in his experience of working at night, he has seen "many times when the fire lies down, allowing crews to make great progress." This includes spraying those areas with water and digging fire line to contain it quickly and efficiently.

Fighting fires at night is just one of the many strategies that ODF and our partners employ to protect Oregon's forests and communities.
08/24/15
Willamina Creek Fire Evening Update - Monday, August 24, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/24/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153


August 24, 2015
8:00 pm

Current Situation:
Crews working on the Willamina Creek Fire spent the day fully-engaged in mop-up activities. This is arduous work during which firefighters locate and fully extinguish every hot spot. This process requires digging out roots and stumps or breaking apart piles of burned fuel which still has burning material deep inside. Crews often use water to extinguish the burning material completely until they can't feel any heat. Mop up can be a long process--especially in the heavy fuels that characterize the northwest Oregon Coast Range forests. Firefighters on the Willamina Creek Fire will be mopping up the entire 230 acre fire area to ensure no hidden ember has a chance to escape and reignite the fire. Tree fallers were working in the fire area again today taking down snags and hazard trees to protect the crews who will be working below. Handheld infrared cameras will be used again tonight to help identify as many hidden hot spots as possible. A few crews will also be working on mop up this evening.

This will be the last evening update for this fire. Daily updates will continue to be provided in the morning once per day unless conditions change.

Weather and Fire Behavior:
The weather forecast is expected to become partly cloudy overnight with temperatures between 50 and 53 degrees and 84-88% humidity.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR
Percent contained: 75%
Size: 230 acres
Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15, approximately 5:00 pm

Wildland resources assigned to the fire include (day and night shifts): 13 hand crews, 6 engines, 1 dozer, 6 water tenders, and overhead personnel.

Total personnel: 197

Cost estimate to date: $1,086,000

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road are under a Level 1 (Ready, in the Ready, Set, Go! system) evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.

Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

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Media invited to DPSST-led Oregon National Guard training to support state's wildland fires
Oregon Military Department - 08/24/15
SALEM, Oregon (Aug. 24, 2015)--Governor Kate Brown has authorized the activation of an additional 250 Oregon National Guard members to assist with ongoing firefighting efforts throughout the state.

The additional personnel are scheduled to report to the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon to undergo firefighting training starting Wednesday, Aug. 26. DPSST officials say the additional group should complete their training by Aug. 30.

Members of the media are invited to view the field training of the first group of 125 Oregon Soldiers during a media tour on Tuesday, Aug. 25 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., at the DPSST, the Oregon Public Safety Academy, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway, Salem, Oregon 97317.

The additional 250 volunteers are comprised of Oregon Guard units from around the state. Half of the additional Guard members are Citizen-Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, and the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The other half of the additional Guard members are from the Oregon Army National Guard's 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team.

The first group of Oregon Soldiers activated are currently undergoing training at DPSST, and are scheduled to complete their training by Aug. 25. As of Monday, Aug. 24, this first group is scheduled to head to the Canyon Creek Complex Firebase where they will assist first responders, initial attack contract crews and fire managers.

The Soldiers in the first group come from units across the state, including; 224 Engineering Company, 1-186 Infantry Battalion, 1-82 Cavalry, 141 Brigade Support Battalion and 1249 Engineer Company. They join Soldiers from Charlie 7-158 Aviation, and Army and Air National Guard Joint Staff who have been participating in the effort since Aug. 3.

The Oregon National Guard has an ongoing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting. This agreement is reviewed annually by both agencies' leadership.
Stouts Creek Fire update - O8-24-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/24/15
Stouts Creek Fire
Daily Update August 24, 2015
http://tinyurl.com/StoutsFire8-24-Update

Fire operations managers have secured the fire and are confident the firelines will hold. The threat to structures has decreased to the point that as of 7 a.m. today, all evacuation levels have been reduced to a Level 1 (Ready). Local residents should be aware of the danger that still exists in their area, monitor emergency services, websites and local media outlets for information.

The Stouts Creek Fire has blackened 26,367 acres and is 86 percent contained. Crews continue to secure and strengthen the fire line by extinguishing hot spots and falling danger trees.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13. In an-coming Type 3 Team from Florida Forest Service (Work) will arrive today at ICP for an in-brief and shadow. The new team will assume command tomorrow at 6 p.m.

There are 610 personnel assigned to the fire with 10 crews, 12 engines, 11 water tenders, 5 bulldozers and five helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $34.7 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46 percent on state-protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 54 percent on the Umpqua National Forest.

FIRE AT A GLANCE
26,367 acres
?--? 86% contained
?--? 158 residences threatened
?--? Personnel: 610
?--? Helicopters: 5
?--? Hand crews: 10
?--? Engines: 12
?--? Dozers: 5
?--? Water Tenders: 11
Archaeologists return to Fort Rock Cave
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/24/15
Joint Release: University of Oregon/Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

Fort Rock OR -- Archaeologists from the University of Oregon (UO) will be returning to the site of the 1938 discovery of the oldest known footwear in the world.

Fort Rock Cave in northern Lake County is famous for dozens of approximately 10,000-year-old sagebrush bark woven sandals that were found there by the "Father of Oregon Archaeology" Luther S. Cressman, who was on the UO faculty from 1929 until his retirement in 1963.

Scheduled for Aug. 31-Sept. 4, archaeologists will follow up on Cressman's investigations.

Cressman discovered the sandals beneath a layer of volcanic ash produced by the 7600-year-old eruption of Mt. Mazama - the same eruption that created Crater Lake. The age of the sandals was confirmed in the 1950s through radiocarbon dating. In 1966, Cressman returned to the site with graduate student Stephen Bedwell who uncovered a hearth in Pleistocene (Ice Age) gravels. Charcoal from the fire pit was radiocarbon dated to roughly 15,800 years before present, the oldest reputed hearth in Oregon.

"As important as the site is to the human story of North America, the archaeological work there was done more than half a century ago. We still have important questions about the site that might be answered with recovery methods and analytical techniques that were not available to Cressman and his students," said Tom Connolly, project leader and director of archaeological research for the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History. "Our excavation will not be extensive, but will focus on the chronology and dating of the site deposits, and drawing critical samples for later analysis."

Limited public access to the site will be provided by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) in partnership with UO. If interested in visiting Fort Rock Cave during the archaeological excavation, please contact OPRD staff at 541-923-7551 x21 to make arrangements. Fort Rock Cave became part of the OPRD system in 2000 and is accessible only by guided tour.
08/23/15
Willamina Creek Fire Evening Update - Sunday, August 23, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153


August 23, 2015
9:00 pm

Current Situation:
Excellent progress on containing the Willamina Creek Fire was made today. The fire has not grown since Friday night. Increases in acreage shown in these updates over the last few days reflect the GPS data collection work that has been completed which has resulted in more accurate mapping. The final acreage is not expected to increase from today's total.

Today, firefighters continued the grueling work of mopping up the fire. Crews made great progress on this work on the majority of the fire perimeter. Some heat remains along the east side of the fire, which crews will focus on tonight to make sure the entire edge of the fire is secure. This is the last planned full night shift. Quite a bit of mop-up work remains in the interior--some in very tough ground--the remaining work will be completed during the course of the next few days.

A significant change in the evacuation level will be effective at 9:00 pm tonight. The evacuation level for the cabins on East Creek Road will be reduced from Level 3 (Go!) to Level 1 (Ready). Landowners will be allowed to access their property. Level 1 evacuation means that homeowners should be prepared to evacuate, long before the threat arises. Assemble emergency supplies and have a plan for how you would escape if you had to. For more information about the Ready, Set, Go! Program, visit www.wildlandfirersg.org.

Firefighters have felt the community support and appreciate the signs and words of gratitude from local residents. On their way off the fireline tonight, Bravo Division stopped at a neighboring home where the homeowners had set up a sweet thank you of delicious baked goods. The crews were so grateful for this kind gesture. Yamhill County has also been a big supporter and today activated their ARES (ham radio) unit to assist their CERT members with communications while they manage the road blocks. For anyone who wants to support the fire effort, please consider making a donation to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation (www.wffoundation.org) or the American Red Cross (www.redcross.org).

Weather and Fire Behavior:
The weather forecast for tonight calls for gusty winds coming back around from the west which should ease after dark. Relative humidity is expected to rise tonight with a marine layer coming in over the fire area. The temperature is forecast to be 50-53 degrees with 84-88% humidity.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR Percent contained: 50%
Size: 230 acres Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15, approximately 5:00 pm

Wildland resources assigned to the fire include (day and night shifts): 16 hand crews, 11 engines, 4 dozers, 12 water tenders, and overhead personnel.

Air resources: 1 Type 2 helicopter

Total personnel: 266

Cost estimate to date: $860,000

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road are under a Level 1 evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.

Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

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Red Cross responds to a victim of a single-family fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/23/15
A single-family fire occurred in 1400 block of W. Orchard Ave in Hermiston.
A Red Cross Disaster Team responded
The fire affected one adult
Red Cross provided food, lodging, clothing, and shoes

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness: Get informed, make a plan, build a kit and review your family's plan if there is a fire in your home. Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. This information and more is available at www.redcross.org or in a Prepare! Resource guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://redcross.org/1zq8XVV6.
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Sunday, August 23, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/15
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officers: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), and Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 (office) or 503-508-0574 (Cell)

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - SUNDAY, AUGUST 23, 2015

This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

Wildfire smoke from the large fires in the intermountain west reached the Willamette Valley and the coast yesterday, serving as a vivid reminder of the intensity of this fire season. While the smoke is a nuisance and a health risk to those residents, it pales in comparison to the homes, livelihoods, and lives lost to those immense wildfires. We remain aware of the harsh reality of this extreme fire season. Our thoughts are with those affected by fire, here at home and across the west.

It also serves as a bold reminder to all Oregonians of the importance of preventing any new human-caused fires, and as an opportunity to learn about the brave men and women who are doing the work to help prevent future loss - loss of property, homes, and natural resources. You can see, hear, and learn more about these firefighters, and those supporting them, on ODF's various social media channels, and the other online sites that are listed below for each fire in the "Fire Facts" section of this update. Take a moment today and reflect on how you and your own actions can help prevent the next human-caused wildfire. Know the local restrictions where you will be working and playing - they may change suddenly. And thank those who are here and who have come from across the nation and other countries to help with the current large fires burning across Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.

FIRE FACTS

ODF Forest Grove District
August Fire | 8/22/15 | 10 miles west of Banks, near MP 42-43 on Highway 26 | 12-14 acres | 10% contained | Human-caused | 60 personnel; Local ODF Forest Grove District and local fire agencies assisted |
More Information: http://www.fgdfire.com | http:// http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/ | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry |

ODF North Cascade District - Santiam Unit
Kinney Creek Fire | 8/20/15 | 1.6 miles west of Detroit (across Detroit Dam) |12 acres | 95% contained |Under investigation | Local ODF unit assisting USFS - Willamette NF due to threat to ODF-protected lands |
More Information: 503-569-2200 | www.fs.usda.gov/willamette | www.twitter.com/willametteNF |

ODF West Oregon District - Dallas Unit
Willamina Creek Fire | 8/19/15 | 9 miles north of Willamina | 230 acres | 20% contained | 266 personnel | Under investigation | ODF Local IMT |
More Information: 503-934-8153 | http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry |

ODF Central Oregon District - The Dalles Unit
Wamic Grade Fire | 8/20/15 | 7 miles northwest of Maupin | 100 acres | Mop-up | Human-caused | Local ODF Unit; USFS assisting |
More Information: 541-296-4626 | www.twitter.com/odf_cod |

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit
Canyon Creek Complex | 8/12/15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 68,545 acres | 23% contained | 832 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund) / Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit
Falls Creek Fire | 8/22/15 |4 miles southwest of Joseph, OR | 200+ acres | 0% contained | Local IMT (IC Tyler) |
More Information: 541-523-1246 or 541-523-1208 | www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman | www.twitter.com/WallowaWhitman

Grizzly Bear Complex | 8/13/15 | 20 miles SE of Dayton WA - Wenaha-Tucannon Wildernes, south and east | 61,150 acres | 0% contained | 395 personnel | Lightning | WA IMT 4 (IC Gales) / OSFM Green Team (IC Kunze)
More Information: 541-612-0059 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

Eldorado Fire | 8/14/15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,611 acres |65% contained |358 personnel | Lightning Hold-over |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 8/10/15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,887 acres | 80% contained | 351 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Eagle Complex | 8/10/15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 6,540 acres |5% contained | 326 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)

Stouts Fire |7/30/15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 26,368 acres | 84% contained | 694 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire |

Cable Crossing Fire | 7/28/15 | 6 miles east of Glide | 1,857 acres | 90% contained | 50 personnel | Under investigation | DFPA
More information: Phone: 541-817-7186 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/ | www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation ||www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###

Jeri Chase | Public Information Officer/
Office: 503-945-7201
Cell: 503-931-2721
Jeri.Chase@oregon.gov
Canyon Creek Complex update - 08-23-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/15
Updated Fire Information phone numbers: 541-820-3643, 541-820-3633
Community Meeting at Grant Union High School, 5 p.m. today, August 23

Cause: Lightning

Date of Origin: August 12, 2015

Location: One mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon.

Types of Fuel: Timber with brush/grass understory and areas of medium density logging slash. Structures Threatened: 150+

Structures Damaged: 50+

Residences Destroyed: 39 (according to the Grant County Sheriff's Office)

Current Size: 69,606 acres

Percent Containment:23%

Number of Personnel: 832

Types of resources: 2 Type 1 Crews, 18 Type 2 Crews, 4 Helicopter, 56 Engines, 19 Dozers, 8 Skidgines, 26 Water tenders

ODOT: will have a pilot car for Hwy 395 travel today from 9AM- 5PM leaving from Canyon City. Expect delays on Hwy 395. After 5:00 pm the road will be closed to all traffic.

Weather: temperatures will begin to increase creating warmer and drier conditions with light winds from the southwest increasing by Sunday afternoon.

Air Quality Index: Smoky conditions should improve today, except Prairie City where the southwest winds will continue to push the smoke.

Red Flag Warning for Sunday and Monday.

Jerry's Draw Fire:
Jerry's Draw Fire occurred August 20 at 4:45 p.m. in the Ricco Road area north of Prairie City, holding at 161 acres. Dozer line has been completed around the fire and crews will continue to mop up and extinguish interior hotspots. Structure protection was provided and no structures were lost.

Canyon Creek Complex Recent Activities:

Fire perimeter to southeast has had improvement in containment and currently is in mop-up status. Southeast corner of the fire had successful burn-out operations which helps tie the fire into the wilderness.

North and northwest fire perimeter continues to become more contained. Crews have secured handlines to Mud Springs. Low fire behavior has contributed to crews' successful operations.

Night operations continued despite smoky conditions.



Planned actions include:

· Crews are working to tie up the northeast fire perimeter where highest public and community infrastructures are threatened. Crews will continue to improve and mop up completed line on the north, west, and south sides of the fire perimeter.

Continue strategic planning to assess suppression action into the wilderness.

Priority is containment of Jerry's Draw Fire to prevent spread into roadless area;

Air resources are on standby for visibility conditions to improve.

Oregon Trails Electric Coop is continuing its efforts to restore power to residences along Hwy 395.

Evacuation Update on Canyon Creek Complex


Joint Information Center Hotlines: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633


Level 3 Evacuations: Jerry's Draw Fire
There are no level 3 evacuations in place at this time for the Jerry's Draw fire. All areas have been reduced to a level 1


Level 3 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
· The area west of County Road 62, south of the forest boundary (MP 12) and north of the 16 to the junction of FR 15/16 is in a level 3 evacuation. CR 62 and the 16 are open for through travel, at this time.

· Forest Closures remain in effect. Current Forest Orders are available at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/malheur/home/?cid=stelprd3845529.


Decreased to Level 2: Canyon Creek Complex

· South on Dog Creek Road to Little Dog Creek

· Upper end of Pine Creek Road from Berry Ranch Lane

· From J - L south to the end of County Road 65.


Level 1 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex

· Adams Road and Adams Drive Marysville

· Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch

· Pineview Buckhorn

· Edgewood Little Pine

· Rebel Hill Lower Pine Creek from Berry Ranch Lane


Lifted Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex

· Canyon Creek along Hwy. 395, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City to the J-L Ranch

· Izee-Paulina Road from Hwy 395

· Seneca

· Nan's Rock Road, Laycock Creek Road, Luce Creek, West Bench Road


Roads Reopened:

· Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26


Road Closures:

· Hwy. 395 remains closed to through traffic

· Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.

· The 15 road remains closed.

· South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek is closed


Evacuation level definitions:


LEVEL 1: A Level 1 Evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation.


LEVEL 2: A Level 2 Evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate.


LEVEL 3: A Level 3 Evacuation means "GO" Evacuate now, leave immediately.


Email Address: canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/canyoncreekfireoregon
Malheur NF www.facebook.com/malheurnationalforest
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/


Twitter: @CanyonCreekFire #CanyonCreekComplex
Stouts Creek Fire update - Aug. 23, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/15
A red sun glows above the fire line today as firefighters expect to spend another day battling the fire in extreme working conditions. An inversion is sitting over the fire area, holding the smoke down at ground level. Operations Section Chief John Pellissier told crew bosses " to rotate your crews in and out of the super smokey areas in your division today." Crews will continue work on securing the line by extinguishing hot spots and felling dangerous snags.

The dense smoke will ground helicopters here today but they'll be available to nearby fires if needed. Late yesterday afternoon, helicopters flew using the Plastic Sphere Device Machine (aka, ping pong machine) to lay a line of fire in the middle of an unburnt area of fuel. The goal is to have the fire consume all the fuels and complete the burnout. This is the final stretch of a long and slow burnout operation needed to complete the team's objective of containing the fire and minimizing the impacts to the Elk Creek Restoration Project.

A Level 2 Evacuation notice (Get Set) remains in place for residents on Upper Cow Creek Road east of Devils Flat to the end of the road. This precautionary measure is because of high temperatures and low humidities that might cause increased fire behavior.

The Stouts Creek Fire has blackened 26,367 acres and is 84 percent contained and still has the potential for rapid growth. A contingency plan to protect structures on Upper Cow Creek is in place and will be activated if needed. Evacuation levels for all other areas remain at Level 1 (Get Ready).

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

There are 694 personnel assigned to the fire with 11 crews, 15 engines, 18 water tenders, 6 bulldozers and five helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $34.4 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46 percent on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 54% on the Umpqua National Forest.
#StoutsFire

FIRE AT A GLANCE
?--? 26,3678 acres
?--? 84% contained
?--? 158 residences threatened
?--? Personnel: 694
?--? Helos: 5
?--? Handcrews: 11
?--? Engines: 15
?--? Dozers: 6
?--? Water Tenders: 18
?--? Evacuations: Level 2 (Get Set) for the area of Upper Cow Creek Road east from Devil's Flat to the end of the road. All other areas remain in Level 1.

FIRE INFORMATION
Phone: 541-825-3724
Cell: 206-402-7175
stoutsfire@gmail.com
Eldorado Fire update - 08-23-15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/23/15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, incident commander

Fire Information: (541) 446-3521

Current Fire Information
Crews continued to mop up the Eldorado Fire yesterday and last night, focusing on those areas that still contained some heat within 300 feet of the line. That work continues today including gridding and cold trailing, or carefully inspecting and feeling with the hand for heat to detect any fire.

Rehabilitation work will also take place, with the objective of minimizing erosion resulting from hand and dozer line construction by blocking access, removing berms, water barring, repairing ditches, and pulling removed vegetation back into control lines near streams and dry creek beds. Hose will be removed from sections of the line where there is no longer any potential for the fire to escape.

The weather forecast calls for warmer temperatures in the 80's, relative humidities of 15-20 percent and gusty winds from the south of up to 15 miles per hour on the ridges. Those conditions, along with unstable air, have warranted a Red Flag warning from noon today until late Monday evening.

Interagency investigators concluded the El Dorado fire was caused by lightning hold over.

The fire remains at 20,611 acres and is 65 percent contained.

As of 8 p.m. on Aug. 22 there were 358 personnel assigned to the Eldorado Fire. Resources on the fire line include 10 crews, 12 dozers, 23 engines, 7 water-tenders and 2 helicopters.

The Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3 (IMT) will also assume command of the Cornet-Windy Ridge fire from the Southwest IMT on Monday morning, Aug. 24, 2015 at 6 a.m. The Cornet-Windy Ridge fire is also in the mop-up and rehabilitation stage with very little fire activity.
08/22/15
Willamina Creek Fire Evening Update - Saturday, August 22, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153


August 22, 2015
9:00 pm

Special message:
Wildfire smoke from the large fires in the intermountain west filled the Willamette Valley today serving as a vivid reminder of the intensity of this fire season. While the smoke is a nuisance and a health risk to residents here, it pales in comparison to the homes, livelihoods and lives lost to those immense wildfires. We remain aware of the harsh reality of this incredible fire season. Our thoughts are with those affected by fire, here at home and across the west.

Current Situation:
The heavy smoke over the fire area helped to keep the temperatures lower than expected which allowed crews to make good progress on reinforcing containment lines. In the absence of the gusty winds experienced the last couple days, the fire did not grow at all today. Tree falling crews worked in the fire area today dropping hazard trees and snags which posed a threat to firefighters working below. Fire crews are still facing risks from rolling debris, snags and bees which require them to be ever vigilant about safety. Tonight, crews will be continuing to work on mopping up the fire, working from the perimeter into the interior. The ultimate goal is to have the entire fire area mopped up 100%. A hand-held infrared camera will be used overnight to identify hot spots which could lead to embers escaping the fireline if not extinguished.

A special thank you needs to be extended to volunteers from Yamhill County's CERT program who are volunteering their time to staff the road block on Willamina Creek Road. The road block is in place to keep fire crews and the public safe and the CERT volunteers efforts will help ensure this.

Burning on land protected by ODF's West Oregon District Dallas Unit, the Willamina Creek Fire is currently estimated to be about 212 acres. The fire is burning in heavy fuels on high-value private and BLM timberland. Additional GPS data will be collected over the coming days to continue to improve accuracy of the acreage measurement.

Weather and Fire Behavior:
The forecast for Sunday calls for more hot and dry conditions with gusty winds. Temperatures will be 85-90 degrees with humidity between 29 and 34%.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR
Percent contained: 20%
Size: 212 acres (estimated)
Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15, approximately 5:00 pm

Wildland resources assigned to the fire include (day and night shifts): 16 hand crews, 11 engines, 4 dozers, 12 water tenders, and overhead personnel.

Air resources: 1 Type 2 helicopter

Total personnel: 266

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road remain under a Level 3 evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.

Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

###
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Saturday, August 22, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/15
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officers: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), and Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 (office) or 503-508-0574 (Cell)

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2015

This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

In the massive, multi-agency effort to corral dozens of wildfires burning across the state, the work of Oregon's private forest owners and operators often gets overlooked. When large fires do occur, forest landowners figure as a major player in the suppression actions.

ODF's Astoria District Forester, Dan Goody, notes that forest owners in his area put a lot of thought into planning and preparing for fires prior to fire season, and now are dropping what they are doing and rushing to the scene to help when fires break out.

Forest landowners bring a lot of know-how and hardware to the job, being intimately familiar with the terrain, road systems, and other information crucial to a firefighting operation. And when the West Oregon District called on them for help, they even brought heavy equipment to fill in for ODF fire engines and other gear that had been dispatched to fight existing fires. For example, when the recent Willamina Creek Fire started on August 19, Starker Forests placed their engines at the offices in Dallas and Philomath to back up ODF.

Starker and other forestry companies have been fully engaged in assisting ODF throughout the state during this severe fire season. While the industry has routinely responded to firefighting needs "for more than a century," the 2015 response has been remarkable. When the Oregon Forest Industries Council put a call out for assistance on August 15 to landowners and operators, citing the extreme fire conditions and the shortage of resources, including an appeal for "trained personnel and equipment, capable of assisting in suppression actions, to make their availability known" to their local ODF or fire protective association office, Oregon's forest industry quickly stepped up to fill specialized fire team positions, along with supplying an array of equipment.

Goody says the system has worked really well - a fully coordinated statewide system on steroids. He adds that given the scarcity of resources across the state, he does not think the overall response could have been so strong without this assistance from Oregon's forest landowners and operators.

FIRE FACTS

ODF North Cascade District - Santiam Unit
Kinney Creek Fire | 8/20/15 | 1.6 miles west of Detroit (across Detroit Dam) |12 acres | 85% contained |Under investigation | Local ODF unit assisting USFS - Willamette NF due to threat to ODF-protected lands |
More Information: 503-569-2200 | www.fs.usda.gov/willamette | www.twitter.com/willametteNF |

ODF West Oregon District - Dallas Unit
Willamina Creek Fire | 8/19/15 | 9 miles north of Willamina | 212 acres | 10% contained | 226 personnel | Under investigation | ODF Local IMT |
More Information: 503-934-8153 | http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry |

ODF Central Oregon District - The Dalles Unit
Wamic Grade Fire | 8/20/15 | 7 miles northwest of Maupin | 100+ acres | Mop-up | Human-caused | Local ODF Unit; USFS assisting |
More Information: 541-296-4626 | www.twitter.com/odf_cod |

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit

Jerry's Draw Fire | 5 miles north of Prairie City | 248 acres | 0% contained | In mop-up | Under investigation | Added as a branch to Canyon Creek Complex; this is the FINAL SEPARATE REPORT |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | www.twitter.com/odf_cod |

Canyon Creek Complex | 8/12/15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 61,792 acres | 17% contained | 902 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund) / Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit
Grizzly Bear Complex | 8/13/15 | 20 miles SE of Dayton WA - Wenaha-Tucannon Wildernes, south and east | 59,364 acres | 0% contained | 262 personnel | Lightning | WA IMT 4 (IC Gales) / OSFM Green Team (IC Kunze)
More Information: 541-612-0059 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

Eldorado Fire | 8/14/15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,611 acres |55% contained |450 personnel | Under investigation |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 8/10/15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,887 acres | 75% contained | 375 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Eagle Complex | 8/10/15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 5,539 acres |0% contained | 307 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)

Stouts Fire |7/30/15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 26,208 acres | 82% contained | 764 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire |

Cable Crossing Fire | 7/28/15 | 6 miles east of Glide | 1,857 acres | 90% contained | 50 personnel | Under investigation | DFPA
More information: Phone: 541-817-7186 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/ | www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation ||www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

###
Canyon Creek Complex Update 22 Aug 2 p.m.
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/22/15
Canyon Creek Complex
Fact Sheet

Type of Incident: Wildfire
Cause: Lightning
Date of Origin: August 12, 2015
Location: One mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon.
Types of Fuel: Timber with brush/grass understory and areas of medium density logging slash.
Structures Threatened: 300+
Structures Damaged: 50+
Residences Destroyed: 36 (according to the Grant County Sheriff's Office)
Current Size: 67,456 acres
Percent Containment: 17%
Number of Personnel: 902
Types of resources: 3 Type 1 Crews, 14 Type 2 Crews, 4 Helicopter, 64 Engines, 19 Dozers, 8
Skidgines, 25 Water tenders

ODOT: will begin a pilot car for Hwy 395 travel south today from 9AM- 5PM everyday leaving from John Day at the top of the hour. Expect delays on Hwy 395.

Weather: temperatures will begin to increase creating warmer and dryer conditions with light winds from the southeast increasing to southwest by Sunday afternoon.

Air Quality Index: Today is moderate to good.

Jerry's Draw Fire:
Jerry's Draw Fire occurred August 20 at 4:45 PM in the Ricco Road area north of Prairie City. Using aggressive initial attack by both ground and air resources it has been held at 240 acres. Firefighters made great progress completing a fireline around the fire and will continue to reinforce with dozer and handline today. Structure protection was provided and no structure was lost.

Canyon Creek Complex Recent Activities:
Air operations held the line when the wind kicked up yesterday, and burnout operations along road 15 into the Parrish Cabin Fire was successful in securing a fireline into the wilderness.
Crews were able to reinforce line to the north and are continuing to secure the fireline on the west side of the fire.
Night operations continue to assist with the suppression efforts.
Planned actions include:
Continue to secure priority divisions where highest public and community infrastructure are threatened. Hold completed line on the north, west, and south sides of the fire perimeter to continue to improve and extend fireline to increase total containment.
Continue strategic planning to assess suppression action into the wilderness.
Utilize air resources on the southern flank to assist crews in building fireline and securing the perimeter.
Oregon Trails Electric Coop is continuing their efforts to restore power to residences along Hwy 395.

Evacuation Update on Canyon Creek Complex

Level 3 Evacuations: Jerry's Draw Fire
There are no level 3 evacuations in place at this time for the Jerry's Draw fire. All areas have been reduced to a level 1

Level 3 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
· The area west of County Road 62, south of the forest boundary (MP 12) and north of the 16 to the junction of FR 15/16 is in a level 3 evacuation. CR 62 and the 16 are open for through travel, at this time.
· Forest Closures remain in effect. Current Forest Orders are available at:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/malheur/home/?cid=stelprd3845529.

Level 2 Evacuations: Jerry's Draw Fire
· Dixie View

Decreased to Level 2: Canyon Creek Complex
· South on Dog Creek Road to Little Dog Creek
· Upper end of Pine Creek Road from Berry Ranch Lane
· From J - L south to the end of County Road 65.

Level 1 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
· Adams Road and Adams Drive Marysville
· Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch
· Pineview Buckhorn
· Edgewood Little Pine
· Rebel Hill Lower Pine Creek from Berry Ranch Lane

Lifted Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
· Canyon Creek along Hwy. 395, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City to the J-L Ranch
· Izee-Paulina Road from Hwy 395
· Seneca
· Nan's Rock Road, Laycock Creek Road, Luce Creek, West Bench Road

Roads Reopened:
· Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26

Road Closures:
· Hwy. 395 remains closed
· Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.
· The 15 road remains closed.
· South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek is closed

Evacuation level definitions:
LEVEL 1: A Level 1 Evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation.
LEVEL 2: A Level 2 Evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate.
LEVEL 3: A Level 3 Evacuation means "GO" Evacuate now, leave immediately.
Potlucks and Sparkplugs: FireWise Success Catches on in Upper Cow Creek (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/15
Kathy Staley, community sparkplug
Kathy Staley, community sparkplug
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1072/87219/thumb_Stouts_Creek_Fire_Firewise_Story_Kathy_Staley_Community_Sparkplug.jpg
The Oregon Department of Forestry and Douglas Forest Protective Association released the following news release today



News Release
August 22, 2015

Major Media
For immediate distribution

Contacts:
Marcus Kauffman, ODF, Stouts Creek Fire Information: 541-825-3724; Cell: 206-402-7175
Kyle Reed, DFPA, 541-672-6507 X 136 CELL: 541-817-7186


Potlucks and Sparkplugs: FireWise Success Catches on in Upper Cow Creek


Southern Oregon is wildfire country. In the last five years about one-third of the 325,000-acre Tiller Ranger District has been blackened by wildfire. This year, the Stouts Creek Fire has already burned over 25,000 and was 82 percent contained on August 22, 2015. Locals here know about living with wildfire. They have learned that adapting to wildfire means getting to know your neighbors and that potlucks are the perfect place talk about being a fire-adapted community.

When the Stouts Creek Fire was threatening homes east of the community of Azalea, fire managers were pleased to learn that Milo, Tiller, and Upper Cow Creek Road were designated FireWise Communities. Being Firewise means homeowners have taken significant steps to make their homes defensible from a wildfire. After several years of hard work, 14 homes and several roads including Upper Cow Creek Rd have defensible space and have joined the dozen other recognized FireWise communities in Douglas County.

The maxim of many hands makes light work applies. Grant resources, program support and technical assistance came from the Douglas Forest Protective Association, the Umpqua National Forest, Douglas County Public Works, the Phoenix Charter School and others. At the grassroots level, neighbors did not just come together on their own. There was a spark, a catalyst, someone who overcame the inertia and fostered change. That person was Kathy Staley of Upper Cow Creek Rd.

"The Umpqua National Forest is part of our community," said Kathy Staley. "Donna Owens, Tiller District Ranger, made it easy for us. We hold regular potlucks and Donna and her staff began attending. As we got to know one another we naturally broadened our circle of care to include those who work for the Forest Service," she explained.

"Prior to these gatherings, the relationship with the Umpqua NF was often adversarial. It helped that Ranger Owens was willing to say the tough but honest things," Staley said. "That built trust in the eyes of the community members."

Clearly motivated, Kathy explained that her career as an engineering inspector gave her a sharp and critical eye.

"I saw a need," she explained. "I'm relatively new to the community. We learned that there were grants available to help pay for removing the brush and small trees to make our homes safer from wildfire," she said. The grant funds and other monies helped pay for road crews removing roadside brush.

"Red Apple Road used to be tight with brush," explained Kathy Pack of Upper Cow Creek Road. "It made me nervous thinking about driving it during a wildfire. Getting the roads and houses cleared of brush out really gave me piece of mind," she said.

Once the neighbors learned that they could meet their commitment by contributing their time, the idea spread like creamy peanut butter. Using the county's road crew and students from the Phoenix Charter School, they were able conduct defensible space activities at more than a dozen homes--removing brush and small trees and pruning up the branches on larger trees to make the homes safer from wildfire.

"We've owned this piece of land for 30 years," said Jim Pack. "I planted all the trees myself and each one has a name. This place is a dream come true for me. Making it safer from wildfire was just something we had to do. We have too much at stake to live with the risk of it burning."

Just as local residents gave their time, staff from the Tiller Ranger District understood they had to do the same. "The relationship building just took time," said Terry Brown, Fire Management Officer, Tiller Ranger District. "The relationships we have with the community are the most valuable results from this process."

The Douglas Forest Protective Association formed the third leg of the FireWise triangle. FireWise Coordinator Dennis Sifford advises communities on becoming FireWise.
"The program helps make homeowners aware of the risks and teaches them about the little things they can do to help their homes survive a wildfire," said Dennis.

Wildfire is a frequent visitor to southern Oregon. Building resilience and adapting to wildfire depends on knowing your neighbors, widening the circle of care and finding the catalysts in the community who can make things happen. In these Firewise communities, these grass roots efforts have clearly paid off.

"When I learned that the residents of Upper Cow Creek Road were designated FireWise, I was more confident that we could protect the homes and that our firefighters would come home safely," explained Steve Bowen, Structural Liason for the Stouts Creek Fire.


Helpful Links:
http://www.dfpa.net
http://www.firewise.org
http://www.fs.usda.gov/umpqua
http://www.swofire.com

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Attached Media Files: Kathy Staley, community sparkplug , Defensible space around the home of Jim and Kathy Pack , Residents of Upper Cow Creek Rd with IMT 2 Steve Bowen
Red Cross Services Shift to Grizzly Fire n Oregon/Washington Border
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/22/15
John Day, Ore. - As wildfire-affected residents in and around John Day continue to receive help from devoted community members, Red Cross recovery services volunteers are winding down their work here. Caseworkers will be on site at the LDS church at 26 John Day Hwy until 4 p.m. Saturday. Residents needing assistance after this time may call (541) 620-8454 to access Red Cross help.

"John Day is a tremendously resilient community," says Cara Sloman, regional disaster program manager and director of the central/eastern Oregon Red Cross wildfire response operation. "This supportive environment allows us to maximize our work with partner agencies and provide recovery services quickly and efficiently, while minimizing emotional upheaval after such a terrible disaster."

Sloman and another member of the Red Cross team, both of whom have been overseeing the Red Cross wildfire response in this area, will head to Baker City this evening to help volunteers stationed at the high school in Enterprise. The school has been turned into a shelter to temporarily house residents from the unincorporated towns of Troy and Flora who have been evacuated from their homes due to the Grizzy Fire in remote northeast Oregon.

Donations to the Red Cross enable trained volunteers to respond whenever, wherever there is a need to provide shelter, meals, recovery planning and emotional support. Contributions can be made by calling 1-800-RED-CROSS or by visiting www.redcross.org or at any US Bank branch.
Grizzly Bear Complex fires update - Aug. 22, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/22/15
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAMS ASSUME COMMAND OF FIRE

Washington Interagency Incident Management Team 4 and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Green Team assumed a unified command of the Grizzly Bear Complex fire on Friday. Firefighting resources including crews, equipment, and structural apparatus are now deployed to the complex, which is burning in both Oregon and Washington. The complex now includes 5 lightning caused fires after some of the original 17 burned together. The fire is currently burning on the Umatilla National Forest and private land protected by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Three structure protection task forces mobilized through the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office worked in the areas around the Troy and Flora communities during the daytime operational period yesterday and one task force worked during the night. Crews were optimistic that fire conditions were less severe than yesterday and that fire was still a couple of miles away from Flora. Those task forces will be in the area again today, continuing with structure triage and have coordinated plans in place with wildland crews given the forecasted weather and fire behavior conditions.

An estimated 300-400 structures are scattered throughout the area threatened by the fire. The fire is currently active on all sides. The fire is generally still west of the Grand Ronde River, but moving northeast and down-canyon from Troy. Weather conditions today appear more favorable than in recent days, with lighter winds, though conditions remain dry.

Current evacuation notices include:
Level 3: Troy, Eden Bench, Grouse Flat, and Bartlett. The area North of the Grande Ronde river at Eden Bench and Troy to the state line. East along the state line to Hwy 129, north through Boggan's Oasis to Big Butte.

Level 2: An area east of Hwy 129 from the State line north through Boggan's Oasis to Big Butte. An area within the boundary from the Clearwater Guard Station to Lick Creek Road; from Lick Creek Rd. to Asotin city limits; around Asotin to the Snake River; from the Snake River south to the state line; from the state line west to Highway 129. Flora, Lost Prairie, Redmond Grade northeast to Highway 3

Level 1: City of Asotin, WA


QUICK FACTS:

Fire Complex Size: 59,150 acres

Fire Start Date: August 13, 2015

Location: 20 miles SE of Dayton, WA, burning on Umatilla National Forest and private lands protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry and Washington Dept. of Natural Resources.

Hazards: Rapid fire growth with crowning, spotting and wind-driven runs, unauthorized drone flights.

Values at Risk: Public safety, Communities of Troy, Grouse Flats, Eden Bench; Long Meadows Guard Station; Historic Hoodoo lookout, communications facilities.

Cause: Lightning

Containment: 0%

Personnel: 262

Resources: 5 Crews, 14 Engines, 1 Helicopter (Type 3)

Structures Lost: 22

Evacuation Levels:
Level 1: Be alert to situation.
Level 2: Be ready to evacuate.
Level 3: Leave immediately.

A Red Cross Shelter is located at Enterprise High School, 201 SE 4th St in Enterprise, phone 541-519-2360
08/21/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update - Friday, August 21, 2015 @ 9 p.m. PDT
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry Team
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153

August 21, 2015
9:00 pm

Current Situation:
Yesterday's winds pushed the fire beyond the containment line in the southeast corner of the fire. Today, crews put concerted effort into strengthening lines around that area. Winds increased again this afternoon which resulted in new spot fires outside of the completed line on the north side of the fire. Fire managers ordered an additional Type 2 helicopter and three SEATs (Single Engine Air Tankers) for the afternoon to provide assistance in extinguishing the new spot fires. Tonight's focus will be on reinforcing the line around the spots.

Expected weather for tomorrow is going to test the completed lines with higher temperatures, low humidity and a return of an off-shore wind. Tomorrow's focus will be on holding the completed lines through this period of challenging weather conditions. Fire managers continue to be hopeful about seeing containment numbers

The Willamina Creek fire started at approximately 5:00 pm on August 19 on land protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is currently estimated to be about 212 acres and is burning in heavy fuels on BLM and private timberland. A majority of the current fireline was more accurately mapped today using GPS technology which is helping to provide more accurate acreage estimates. This work will continue as conditions change which may lead to higher acreage numbers in the coming days.

Weather and Fire Behavior:
Tonight's weather is forecasted to be cool with higher humidity. Temperatures are expected to be between 52 and 55 degrees with 88-92% humidity. Tomorrow, hot and dry conditions with northeast winds are expected.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR
Percent contained: 15%
Size: 212 acres (estimated)
Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15

Wildland resources assigned to the fire include (day and night shifts): 12 hand crews, 11 engines, 4 dozers, 12 water tenders, and overhead personnel.

Air resources: 1 Type 2 helicopter

Total personnel: 226

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road remain under a Level 3 evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.

Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

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Extreme fire danger not letting up; ODF's West Oregon District urges caution in Oregon's forests
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Distribution: Major Media
August 21, 2015
Contact: Shirl Fredenburg, (541) 336-2273


Northwest Oregon is currently experiencing fire danger not seen in recent memory and weather forecasts don't provide any relief. Forest fuels are at record dry levels and forecasts for this weekend indicate it will continue to be hot and dry. Everyone should be concerned.

The Oregon Department of Forestry's (ODF) West Oregon District is currently engaged in fighting the Willamina Creek Fire approximately 9 miles north of the community of Willamina. Four cabins were evacuated as a result of the fire and forest resources have been lost. Estimated to be about 140 acres, this fire is under investigation, but it is believed to have been human-caused, possibly by recreational activities. In addition to the Willamina Creek Fire, the District's firefighters continue their daily work of responding to reports of smoke and fire throughout the District. All of these fire activities stretch available resources very thin.

This fire season gives managers pause and calls attention to the need for everyone to exercise extreme caution in the forest and elsewhere. Land managers have tightened fire restrictions over the last week over much of the state.

On lands protected by ODF in the West Oregon District, public use restrictions, which limit campfires, chainsaw use, and mowing of dry grass and require forest travelers to carry fire tools, have been in place since mid-June, weeks earlier than in recent years.

Before you head out to the forest, parks or beaches for your weekend plans, take a moment to learn the fire restrictions for that area. You can find out more about fire rules by contacting the local ODF office.

In Benton County contact the ODF - Philomath office (541) 929-3266
In Lincoln County contact the ODF - Toledo office (541) 336-2273
In Polk and southwest Yamhill County contact the ODF - Dallas Office (503) 934-8146

Or by using ODF's interactive map of forest restriction here: http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx

Every person has a role in preventing wildfires.


###
Oregon forest owners, operators making big difference in the fire fight
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
In the massive, multi-agency effort to corral dozens of wildfires burning across the state, the work of Oregon's private forest owners and operators often gets overlooked. To borrow from firefighting lingo, these landowners are the true "first responders" when it comes to battling fires. If a timber harvest operation sparks a small fire, for example, in most instances the loggers on scene put it out immediately. But only a fraction of the blazes are started by their activities.

"It is worth noting that the large majority of human-caused fires are not industrial related," said Rex Storm with Associated Oregon Loggers. "Most result from carelessness and not from industrial activities such as logging."

When large fires do occur, whether from lightning or people, forest landowners figure as a major player in the suppression actions. The Oregon Department of Forestry's Astoria District Forester, Dan Goody, recalls the way forest owners in his area responded when he advised them earlier this summer about predicted extreme weather conditions.

"They put a lot of thought into planning and preparing for fires," he said. "And when the fires broke out, they dropped what they were doing and rushed to the scene to help."

They bring a lot of know-how and hardware to the job. Forest landowners are intimately familiar with the terrain, road systems, and other information crucial to a firefighting operation. And when the West Oregon District called on them for help, they even brought heavy equipment to fill in for ODF fire engines and other gear that had been dispatched to fight existing fires.

"When the Willamina Creek Fire took off, local landowners organized task forces of their company fire engines and also water tenders to back up department firefighters," said Mike Dykzeul with the Oregon Forest Industries Council (OFIC). "For example Starker Forests, Inc. placed engines at the offices in Dallas and Philomath to back up ODF."

Starker and other forestry companies have been fully engaged in assisting agency suppression operations throughout the state during this severe fire season. While the industry has routinely responded to firefighting needs "for more than a century," he said the 2015 response has been remarkable. OFIC put out a call for assistance to landowners and forest operation Aug. 15, citing the extreme fire conditions and the shortage of resources. The notice included an appeal for "trained personnel and equipment, capable of assisting in suppression actions, to make their availability known" to their local ODF or fire protective association office.

Oregon's forest industry quickly stepped up to fill specialized fire team positions such as Falling Boss and Dozer Boss, along with supplying an array of equipment from bulldozers for constructing fire line, to mechanized logging gear to create fire breaks.

There could be a lot if fire season still ahead. But Goody is optimistic based on the response he has seen so far from landowners and operators.

"It has worked really well - a fully coordinated statewide system on steroids," he said. "Given the scarcity of resources across the state, I don't think we could have made such a strong response without their efforts."
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Friday, August 21, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
CONTACT
Fire Information Duty Officers: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), and Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 (office) or 503-508-0574 (Cell)

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY (ODF) FIRE UPDATE - THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 2015

This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

Formal community meetings connect fire teams, the media, and state leadership with local community members, providing information about the fire situation in their community, and a forum for answering questions and responding to concerns.

Then, there are the not-so-formal meetings with the community. Sisters is just one of many communities where, when a large fire threatens, it's common for fire agency staff to set up shop on the main street or in a local park with fire maps taped to a large piece of plywood, sharing the latest fire-related information and listening.

And, there are times when it's not all about the fire. At an already-scheduled meeting of the Oregon Cattlemen's Association in the Baker City Park, near the Cornet/Windy Ridge Fire, representatives from fire protection agencies and others spoke with ranchers about after-the-fire assistance - land rehabilitation, livestock, livestock forage, and crop disaster assistance - and how to work jointly to support those landowners and permittees suffering losses.

At the Eldorado Fire, there have also been "Meetings on the Hood," starting from the early days of the fire when nearly 25 Ironside community members gathered the fire team with maps and cookies, around the hood of an ODF truck to share the latest. On the Stouts Creek Fire in Douglas County, numerous community meetings have been held since the fire started on July 30, in Azalea, Milo, and Tiller, and ODF IMT 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline took shared his famous barbequed ribs to a grange potluck in a local park.

When a wildfire threatens everything you've built, own, and hold dear, nothing tops getting the latest information. Getting to know the men and women working hard to protect your homes and forests, and having a safe place to discuss concerns and the future is what community and working together is all about.

FIRE FACTS

ODF North Cascade District - Santiam Unit
Kinney Creek Fire | 8/20/15 | 1.6 miles west of Detroit (across Detroit Dam) |12 acres | 75% contained |Under investigation | Local ODF unit assisting USFS - Willamette NF due to threat to ODF-protected lands |
More Information: 503-569-2200 | www.fs.usda.gov/willamette | www.twitter.com/willametteNF |

ODF West Oregon District - Dallas Unit
Willamina Creek Fire | 8/19/15 | 9 miles north of Willamina | 140 acres | 10% contained | 226 personnel | Under investigation | ODF Local IMT |
More Information: 503-934-8153 | http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry |

ODF Central Oregon District - The Dalles Unit
Wamic Grade Fire | 8/20/15 | 7 miles northwest of Maupin | 95 acres | Mop-up | Human-caused | Local ODF Unit; USFS assisting |
More Information: 541-296-4626 | www.twitter.com/odf_cod |

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit

Jerry's Draw Fire | 5 miles north of Prairie City | 248 acres | 0% contained | Initial Attack crews from Canyon Creek Complex responded | Under investigation |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | www.twitter.com/odf_cod |

Canyon Creek Complex | 8/12/15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 61,631 acres | 13% contained | 939 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund) / Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit
Grizzly Bear Fire | 8/13/15 | 20 miles SE of Dayton WA - Wenaha-Tucannon Wildernes, south and east | 60,300 acres | 0% contained | 106 personnel | Lightning | WA IMT 4 (IC Gales) / OSFM Green Team (IC Kunze)
More Information: 541-612-0059 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit

Eldorado Fire | 8/14/15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,611 acres |50% contained |492 personnel | Under investigation |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 8/10/15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,887 acres | 75% contained | 482 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Eagle Complex | 8/10/15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 5,525 acres |0% contained | 208 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com |

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)

Stouts Fire |7/30/15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 26,188 acres | 80% contained | 764 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire |

Cable Crossing Fire | 7/28/15 | 6 miles east of Glide | 1,857 acres | 90% contained | 50 personnel | Under investigation | DFPA
More information: Phone: 541-817-7186 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/ | www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation ||www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.
Evacuation Update on Canyon Creek Complex and Jerry's Draw Fire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/21/15
Friday, August 21, 2015, 2 p.m. update


Level 3 Evacuations: Jerry's Draw Fire
New: For Jerry's Draw Fire, residences on Ricco Ranch Road, Standard Creek, Dean Creek Road and Dixie Creek from the end of the pavement north past the fire boundary.

Level 3 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
The area west of County Road 62, south of the forest boundary (MP 12) and north of Forest Road 16 to the junction of FR 15/16 is in a level 3 evacuation. CR 62 and the 16 are open for through travel, at this time.
Forest Closures remain in effect. Current Forest Orders are available at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/malheur/home/?cid=stelprd3845529.

Level 2 Evacuations: Jerry's Draw Fire
Dixie View

Decreased to Level 2: Canyon Creek Complex
South on Dog Creek Road to Little Dog Creek
Upper end of Pine Creek Road from Berry Ranch Lane
From J - L south to the end of County Road 65.

Level 1 Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
Adams Road and Adams Drive Marysville
Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch
Pineview Buckhorn
Edgewood Little Pine
Rebel Hill Lower Pine Creek from Berry Ranch Lane

Lifted Evacuations: Canyon Creek Complex
Canyon Creek along Hwy. 395, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City to the J-L Ranch
Izee-Paulina Road from Hwy 395
Seneca
Nan's Rock Road, Laycock Creek Road, Luce Creek, West Bench Road
Roads Reopened:
Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26

Road Closures:
Hwy. 395 remains closed
Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.
The 15 road remains closed.
South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek is closed

Evacuation level definitions:
LEVEL 1: A Level 1 Evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation.

LEVEL 2: A Level 2 Evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate.

LEVEL 3: A Level 3 Evacuation means "GO" Evacuate now, leave immediately.


Email Address: canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
Lake Billy Chinook Saturation Patrol Yields BUII, Other Offenses (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 08/21/15
Boater drinking while operating a boat with a youth not wearing a life jacket.
Boater drinking while operating a boat with a youth not wearing a life jacket.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/4139/87198/thumb_BUI-006.jpg
Staff from the Marine Board and marine patrols from Jackson, Jefferson, Klamath, Marion, Lane and Multnomah County combined their on-water patrol efforts on Lake Billy Chinook during the weekend of August 7-8, which resulted in improved safety and "education through enforcement."

Lake Billy Chinook is a popular destination for Oregon natives and out-of-state boaters as well. The nearly-guaranteed perfect weather and boating conditions attract boaters, and with the added bonus of having a plethora of open operating space, many boaters forget the basic rules and responsibilities when operating with other recreationists.

The coordinated effort sought compliance for safety equipment, safe operation, and sober boating. The efforts paid off, and for many, the lesson was costly.
During the weekend, the following citations were issued:

Boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII) - potential A misdemeanor violation
Unsafe operation (excessive speed, coming too close to other craft or floating objects)
Not having proper equipment for the length/type of boat (life jackets, sound producing devices, fire extinguishers
Non-compliance with personal watercraft operating rules (speed and proximity)
Lack of proper nighttime navigation lighting. Many boaters were at anchor with no lighting, and towing skiers/tubers after dusk.
Riding on bows, decks or gunwhales
Not having skier down flags or other waterskiing, surfboarding or similar activity's safety rules
Not having a boater education card or aquatic invasive species permit
Improper display of numbers or not carrying a certificate of number (similar to a car registration).

Complying with existing laws is for everyone's safety. Anyone operating a motorboat over 10 horse power is required to take a boating safety course and carry their boater education card when operating their boat. When renting, customers are required to complete a dockside safety checklist and all of the same operating rules apply. Rental facilities need to ensure that all customers understand what to do to be safe by going through the checklist carefully.

At the end of the weekend, 52 citations were issued, with the majority involving unsafe operation and improper lighting. It's important that all boaters play by the rules, for safety's sake. Fortunately, there were no reported accidents during this targeted operation.

To learn about boating regulations, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/BoatLaws/Pages/Regulations.aspx.

The Marine Board's website also contains a flip book called, "Experience Oregon Boating -Safety, Regulations and How-To's for Fun Boating," explaining each regulation and why it's important. The flip-book is also mobile friendly to easily access information at your fingertips. Other requirements, such as the boater education card and aquatic invasive species, both aim to educate boaters about safe boating behavior, which begins the minute a boat hits a parking lot in the boating facility to the time it leaves.

To view a list of fines for particular offenses, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/BoatLaws/docs/BailSchedule.pdf.
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Attached Media Files: Boater drinking while operating a boat with a youth not wearing a life jacket.
Head Start/ECEAP preschool applications now accepted
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/21/15
WALLA WALLA - The WWPS Head Start/ECEAP preschool program is now taking applications for the 2015-2016 school year! The program provides free preschool classes for qualifying children in Walla Walla County. Families are encouraged to apply for children who will be three or four by August 31, 2015. Applications are available at Blue Ridge Elementary and on the Walla Walla Public Schools website.
Oregon Guard Soldiers scheduled to train for firefighting support following state activation by Governor Brown
Oregon Military Department - 08/21/15
SALEM, Oregon--Following the activation of the Oregon National Guard by Oregon Governor Kate Brown to help fight fires, 125 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers are scheduled to begin firefighting training at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in Salem, Oregon.

The Soldiers are scheduled to assist with cleanup operations near Canyonville, Oregon, which will free up firefighters for rest and recuperation, and to continue battling larger fires throughout the state. Ultimately, local fire managers and incident commanders will determine the best utilization of Oregon's Citizen-Soldiers.

The Soldiers are scheduled to report to DPSST sometime Friday evening, and will begin their training on Saturday, Aug. 22. Following fire training, they are scheduled to deploy to the Stouts Creek Fire Base on Wednesday, Aug. 26.

Members of the media are invited to view their field training during a media tour on Tuesday, Aug. 25 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., at the DPSST, the Oregon Public Safety Academy, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway, Salem, Oregon 97317.

The Soldiers come from units across the state, including; 224 Engineering Company, 1-186 Infantry Battalion, 1-82 Cavalry, 141 Brigade Support Battalion and 1249 Engineer Company. They join Soldiers from Charlie 7-158 Aviation, and Army and Air National Guard Joint Staff who have been participating in the effort since Aug. 3.

The Oregon National Guard is comprised of more than 8,000 Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen.
Eldorado Fire Daily Update - Friday, August 21, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 3
LINK SMITH, INCIDENT COMMANDER


Baker County Joint Information Center: (541) 523-2905

ELDORADO FIRE DAILY UPDATE
August 21, 2015 -

NOTE: Updates are now occurring once daily before 10:00 a.m. unless significant changes or events take place during an operation period.

Unity, Ore. -

Current Fire Information
Firefighters continue to prepare for the looming weather event that is expected to bring up to 30 mile per hour northwest wind gusts to the Eldorado fire as early as 9:00 a.m. today. The incident meteorologist and fire behavior analyst cautioned firefighters to "keep their guard up", with a red flag warning issued until late this evening. Efforts on the fire line will continue to focus on strengthening containment lines and extinguishing hot spots that could allow the fire to escape. The Day Operations Chief asked resources to be nimble. If any section of the line gets challenged he vowed to "bring a gun to a knife fight" by shifting resources in response to catch the fire. Two Type Two helicopters, capable of dumping 360 gallon bucket drops, are available in support and two additional ships can be requested. The fire remains at 20,611 acres and is 50 percent contained.

As of 2030 on 8/20/2015 there were 492 personnel assigned to the Eldorado Fire. Resources on the fireline include 15 crews, 15 dozers, 27 engines, 7 water-tenders and 4 helicopters.

###
Stouts Creek Fire Update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
Stouts Creek Fire
Daily Update August 21, 2015
http://tinyurl.com/StoutsFire8-21-Update


After three weeks of hard dangerous work, crews now have the Stouts Creek Fire fully encircled with a blackline--when the fire's edge has burnt to a road or other fireline and is secure. Last night, fire crews completed burn out operations on the last piece of the 51-mile fire perimeter. Reaching this milestone has been the fire crews' focus for the past week.

"I feel really good about where we are at," said John Pellisier Operations Section Chief. "I was able to sleep easy last night knowing that we have this thing cinched up."

While mood at morning briefing was upbeat, fire managers reminded crews to be vigilant and stay focused on the work ahead. "Yes, we have a blackline around this fire. That's great. And we still have lots of work to do," said Incident Commander Chris Cline. "We need to stay focused and make sure our lines hold as the weather heats back up in coming days."

The day shift will focus on burning interior patches of unburnt fuels near the southern tip of the fire. These operations will produce smoke for at least a couple more days. Once the burnout is secured, the evacuation level on Upper Cow Creek Road will be reduced. Until then, the evacuation levels remain unchanged.

A Level 2 Evacuation notice (Get Set) remains in place for residents on Upper Cow Creek Road east of Devils Flat to the end of the road. This precautionary measure is because of high temperatures and low humidities that might cause increased fire behavior. The Stouts Creek Fire has blackened 26,188 acres and is 80% contained and still has the potential for rapid growth. A contingency plan to protect structures on Upper Cow Creek is in place and will be activated if needed. Evacuation levels for all other areas remain at Level 1 (Get Ready).

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

There are 764 personnel assigned to the fire with 11 crews, 19 engines, 25 water tenders, 13 bulldozers and six helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $33.3 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 54% on the Umpqua National Forest.

Hand painted signs of gratitude along Upper Cow Creek Rd.
?--? 26,188 acres
?--? 80% contained
?--? 158 residences threatened
?--? Personnel: 764
?--? Helos: 6
?--? Handcrews: 11
?--? Engines: 19
?--? Dozers: 13
?--? Water Tenders: 25
?--? Evacuations: Level 2 (Get Set) for the area of Upper Cow Creek Road east from Devil's Flat to the end of the road. All other areas remain in Level 1.

--------------------------
FIRE INFORMATION
Phone: 541-825-3724
Cell: 206-402-7175
stoutsfire@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/stoutsfire
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos/
@stoutsfire #stoutsfire
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/


#StoutsFire





Our mailing address is:

Oregon Dept. of Forestry
11286 Tiller Trail Highway
Days Creek, OR 97429


####
Willamina Creek Update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/21/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry Team
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153


August 21, 2015
9:00 am

Special Message:
Expected weather for Saturday shows a return to hot and dry conditions, extending critical fire danger. The Oregon Department of Forestry urges all Oregonians to exercise extreme caution. Before you head out to play in the wildlands, check out fire restrictions. Bring the required fire tools (a shovel plus one gallon of water or a 2 ?1/2 pound fire extinguisher) with you and refrain from engaging in any activity which could create a new fire start. Nationwide, fire resources are stretched thin; preventing one more fire will help.

Current Situation:
An increase in onshore winds late yesterday afternoon pushed the fire towards the southeast, outside of the containment line that had been constructed. Overnight, crews worked to reestablish and strengthen containment lines around that portion of the fire. Winds calmed, temperatures dropped and humidity increased overnight, which helped crews in their efforts. Today's goal is to have line built around the entire fire and mop-up well under way by the end of the day. Fire managers want to have strong containment lines complete before the weather change, which is expected on Saturday.

The Willamina Creek fire started at approximately 5:00 pm on August 19 on land protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is currently estimated to be about 140 acres and is burning in heavy fuels on BLM and private timberland. The requested infrared flight from last night was not available, so acreage totals are still estimates at this time.

Weather and Fire Behavior:
Forecasted weather for today is similar to yesterday - onshore breezes with cooler temperatures and higher humidity. Temperatures today are predicted to be between 69 and 72 degrees with humidity between 50 and 55%. Looking out to Saturday, hot and dry conditions with northeast winds will return.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR Percent contained: 10%
Size: 140 acres (estimated) Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15

Wildland resources assigned to the fire include (day and night shifts): 12 hand crews, 11 engines, 4 dozers, 12 water tenders, and overhead personnel.

Air resources: 1 Type 2 helicopter

Total personnel: 226

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road remain under a Level 3 evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.

Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

###
Canyon Creek Complex Update 21 August 2015 9 a.m.
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/21/15
Updated Fire Information phone numbers: 541-820-3643, 541-820-3633
Joint Information Center Hotlines: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633

Type of Incident: Wildfire
Cause: Lightning
Date of Origin: August 12, 2015
Location: One mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon.
Types of Fuel: Timber with brush/grass understory and areas of medium density logging slash.
Structures Threatened: 700+
Structures Damaged: 50+
Residences Destroyed: 36 (according to the Grant County Sheriff's Office)
Current Size: 61,631 acres
Percent Containment: 13%
Number of Personnel: 939
Types of resources: 5 Type 1 Crews, 21 Type 2 Crews, 4 Helicopter, 66 Engines, 19 Dozers, 7
Skidgines, 27 Water tenders

Weather: The Red Flag Warning Continues through today with winds 20-25 mph gusting to 35 mph.

Recent Activities:
Protected threatened homes on the fires southern edge.
Worked to limit spread to the SE where fire activity was highest.
Several aviation and initial attack resources responded to a new fire north of Prairie City at 4:45 pm yesterday. The ODF's designated initial attack units were utilized extensively to combat this fire.
The newest fire that started yesterday called "Jerry's Draw". It will be added into the Canyon Creek Complex.

Planned actions include:
Continue to work the fires southern flank to limit spread.
A Fire Information Officer will be available outside the store in Seneca from 12 pm-4 pm
Crews will closely monitor weather to determine the best distribution of firefighting resources during the Red Flag warning and expected high winds.
Continue to improve and extend fireline to increase total containment.
Work to quickly control the newest start and to protect the structures in that area.
Use air resources aggressively (as weather allows)

Evacuation Update on Canyon Creek Complex
(This does not include new fire north of Prairie City)

Level 3 Evacuations:
The area west of County Road 62, south of the forest boundary (MP 12) and north of Forest Road 16 to the junction of FR 15/16 is in a level 3 evacuation. The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness remains in a closure. CR 62 and the 16 are open for through travel, at this time.
South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek will stay closed and under a Level 3 evacuations
Upper end of Pine Creek from the road closure near the rock pit will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.
Canyon Creek, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City, south to the 15/16 junction will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.

Level 2 Evacuations:
Adam Marysville
Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch
Pineview Buckhorn
Edgewood Little Pine
Rebel Hill Both sides of Izee Road from Hwy 395 to the Mike Moore Ranch
Lower Pine Creek from the rock pit to Highway 26
Nan's Rock Road, Laycock Creek Road, Luce Creek, West Bench (still level 2 but inadvertently left off list)

Road Closures:
Hwy. 395 remains closed
Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26 is CLOSED TO THROUGH TRAFFIC. Only homeowners will be able to access that portion of the road. Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.
The 15 road remains closed.

Evacuation level definitions:
LEVEL 1: A Level 1 Evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation.
LEVEL 2: A Level 2 Evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate.
LEVEL 3: A Level 3 Evacuation means "GO" Evacuate now, leave immediately.
Email Address: canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/canyoncreekfireoregon
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
Twitter: @CanyonCreekFire #CanyonCreekComplex
Northwest Credit Union Foundation Mobilizes Relief Fund to Assist Wildfire Victims
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 08/21/15
Tigard, Or., SeaTac, Wa. -- Many Northwest families have suffered significant loss as a result of the devastating wildfires sweeping across Oregon and Washington. In an effort to help the community, The Northwest Credit Union Foundation (NWCUF) is teaming with the National Credit Union Foundation and local Red Cross organizations to raise relief funds in support of the victims.

The NWCUF has seeded an emergency fund and call for donations to assist victims of the Chelan Wildfire burning in Central Washington, and the Canyon Creek Complex Fire that has destroyed more than 48,000 acres near John Day, Oregon. Donors will have the option of directing their donation to those specific areas if they choose; in addition, there is a general fund established to support all wildfire victims in Oregon and Washington.

"The fires burning in Oregon and Washington have affected thousands of lives. Countless families have lost their homes," said Northwest Credit Union Foundation Executive Director Denise Gabel. "Whether the victims are credit union members or not, we feel it's our duty to help these families rebuild. By pulling together we can truly make a difference for those hurting in our community."

The National Credit Union Foundation typically manages disaster relief fundraising for the credit union system, and in this case, is working with the Northwest Credit Union Foundation to assist in fundraising.

"We encourage the credit union community to donate, to help people affected by these devastating wildfires," said Christopher Morris, Director of Communications at the National Credit Union Foundation. "There is a critical need for funds in the area and contributing to help our brothers and sisters through this difficult time is a great example of the credit union movement's 'people helping people' philosophy."

A web page to receive donations has been established. Those who wish to donate are asked to visit http://nwcuf.org/oregon-washington-wildfire-relief/.



The Northwest Credit Union Foundation (NWCUF) is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to identifying and nurturing partnerships that bring together Northwest credit unions, community organizations and nonprofits to improve and grow the regional economy. We provide credit unions and community partners with support that promotes asset-building, economic empowerment and cooperative development. Learn more at http://www.nwcuf.org.
08/20/15
Willamina Creek Fire Evening Update - Thursday, August 20, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/20/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update
Oregon Department of Forestry Team
West Oregon District - Dallas Unit

Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153

August 20, 2015
10:00 pm


Current Situation:
Fire managers are feeling optimistic about progress made on the Willamina Creek Fire today. The work the night shift completed last night set the day shift up for a productive day. Crews working by hand, aided by bulldozers and a helicopter, continued to build and strengthen fireline around the fire. Cooler marine air lowered temperatures which helped moderate the fire behavior. A period of higher winds in the early evening challenged containment lines leading to a few hot spots. The night shift crews will be working to contain those hot spots tonight. Mop-up work has begun on portions of the fireline.

The Willamina Creek fire started at approximately 5:00 pm on August 19 on land protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is currently estimated to be about 120 acres and is burning in heavy fuels on BLM and private timberland. An infrared flight has been requested for tonight which will provide a better assessment of total acreage.

Weather and Fire Behavior:
Tonight's forecasted weather should help to moderate fire activity. Temperatures are forecasted to be 52-55 degrees with 94-98% humidity.

Fire Statistics
Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR
Percent contained: 10%
Size: 120 acres (estimated)
Cause: under investigation
Start Date: 8/19/15
Wildland resources assigned to the fire for tonight's night shift include: 2 hand crews, 4 engines, 2 dozers, 2 water tenders, and overhead personnel.
Total personnel assigned to the fire (approximately): 191

Evacuations and closures:
Four cabins along East Creek Road remain under a Level 3 evacuation.
Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road.
Places to get information:
ODF Fire Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com
Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Twitter - www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry


###
Red Cross Opens Shelter in Enterprise
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/20/15
The American Red Cross is opening a shelter for evacuated residents affected by the Grizzly Bear Fire in eastern Oregon. The shelter is at Enterprise High School, 201 SE 4th St.,
Enterprise, OR 97828
Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee meets August 27
Oregon Health Authority - 08/20/15
August 20, 2015

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee.

Agenda: Review purpose and agenda; review and approve July 23 minutes; review messages developed by communications workgroup on pregnancy and breastfeeding; review white paper on marijuana labeling, packaging and marketing; wrap-up and future topics; public comment.

When: Thursday, Aug. 27, 3-5 p.m. The public comment period begins at 4:45 p.m. All comments are limited to two minutes, or can be submitted to marijuana.science@state.or.us.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1-B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Why: The Oregon Health Authority's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee, based at the Public Health Division, provides scientific input to inform public health recommendations related to retail marijuana in Oregon. The committee is examining adverse health effects of recreational marijuana use; and impacts of time, place, and manner of retail sale of potentially addictive substances.

For more information about the committee, visit the committee's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/Retail-Marijuana-Scientific-Advisory-Committee.aspx.

# # #
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - Aug. 20, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/20/15
This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

Today is a difficult day as we reflect on the tragic line-of-duty fatalities and injuries suffered by wildland firefighters in Washington. It is also a time to pause for a moment of silence for these individuals, their families and coworkers, and all who have served in Washington and across the West. Yesterday's tragedy is a grim reminder of the sacrifice and risk experienced by the brave men and women who staff our firelines each year, and now during this severe fire season. Safety first is a principle guiding all of our operations, and ODF and partners will continue to apply this mantra to every detail of our work.

In the coming days, weather conditions are forecast to be similar to last week, and a number of new fires were reported last night. High temperatures and low humidity continues. The latest fire updates follow:

FIRE FACTS

ODF West Oregon District - Dallas Unit
Willamina Creek Fire | 8/19/15 | 9 miles north of Willamina | 100 acres | 5% contained | 191 personnel | Under investigation | ODF Local IMT |
More Information: 503-934-8153 | http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com | www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry | www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit
Canyon Creek Complex | 8/12/15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 53,876 acres | 10% contained | 915 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund/Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit
Eldorado Fire | 8/14/15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,611 acres |40% contained |435 personnel | Under investigation |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 8/10/15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,540 acres | 45% contained | 675 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com

Eagle Complex | 8/10/15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 3,055 acres |0% contained | 204 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)
Stouts Fire |7/30/15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 25,806 acres | 76% contained | 920 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire

Cable Crossing Fire | 7/28/15 | 6 miles east of Glide | 1,857 acres | 90% contained | 50 personnel | Under investigation | DFPA
More information: Phone: 541-817-7186 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/ | www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation |www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook
The Washington Department of Early Learning Restructures Leadership
Wash. State Dept. of Early Learning - 08/20/15
OLYMPIA, WA --The Washington State Department of Early Learning (DEL) has implemented a department-wide organization plan to maximize partnerships and accelerate their work.

"We have many new and important assignments as part of the Early Start Act as well as the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) reauthorization," said DEL Director, Dr. Bette Hyde. "In order to get this considerable workload moving forward, we are setting up an organizational structure that encourages work across all programs and individuals. By pulling together, we can achieve our goals for early learning in Washington."

Dr. Hyde has assigned three directors to lead early learning programs moving forward:
The Assistant Director for the Early Start Act, Luba Bezborodnikova, is now also the Assistant Director for Licensing. Luba will work closely with Mary Kay Quinlan, the current Statewide Licensing Administrator.

"By combining Early Start Act initiatives and licensing, we mean to emphasize that licensing is paramount in all this exciting and important work. The regional administrators and licensing supervisors will continue to report to the Statewide Licensing Administrator," said Dr. Hyde.

Nicole Rose (former PreK-3/ ECEAP Administrator) is now acting Assistant Director for Quality Practice & Professional Growth (QPPG), and will lead the Early Start Act work on preschool initiatives. This will include closer partnerships with ECEAP (state-funded preschool) and Head Start (federally funded preschool) as well as working to develop pathways with child care providers to become ECEAP providers or Early Head Start providers. This position will work closely with the Seattle Schools and their preschool implementation and will be our primary contact with OSPI for WAKIDS and other P-3 initiatives.
The Assistant Director for Partnerships & Collaboration, Greg Williamson, will continue his leadership in emphasizing the importance of the very crucial infant and toddler years. He will continue to serve as our lead for the Healthiest Next Generation, Essentials for Childhood, ACE's Public Private Initiative (APPI), Developmental Screenings, and Frontiers of Innovation.

"We want to emphasize providing quality professional development for our DEL staff," said Dr. Hyde. "This is something that we need to do better. All of our work is done under the umbrella or 'roof' of the Early Start Act and CCDF reauthorization. The peak of this roof and the peak of all that we are looking for is the highest quality for children and families."

Dr. Hyde is set to retire on August 31, 2015. DEL's new director will be named and announced in the coming weeks.


About DEL: The Department of Early Learning was created in 2006 to help all Washington children reach their full potential. DEL oversees the state-funded preschool program, child care licensing and subsidies, early intervention services, and other initiatives and programs to support parents as children's first and most important teachers. For more information, go to www.del.wa.gov.


Attached Media Files: Word document attachment with hyperlinks.
Change to - Canyon Creek Complex Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/20/15
Noted changes in this update include Fire Information Phone Numbers, Number of structures threatened, types of resources, a safety warning, and new Level 3 Evacuations and Level 1 Evacuations.

Canyon Creek Complex
Fact Sheet
August 20, 2015

Type of Incident: Wildfire
Cause: Lightning
Date of Origin: August 12, 2015
Location: One mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon.
Types of Fuel: Timber with brush/grass understory and areas of medium density logging slash.
Structures Threatened: 700+
Structures Damaged: 50+
Residences Destroyed: 36 (according to the Grant County Sheriff's Office)
Current Size: 53,876 acres
Percent Containment: 10%
Number of Personnel: 915
Types of resources: 5 Type 1 Crews, 15 Type 2 Crews, 4 Helicopter, 83 Engines, 15 Dozers, 6
Skidgines, 17 Water tenders

Safety: There will be increased fire traffic east of Seneca along the 16 to Logan Valley
Weather: A Red Flag Warning has been issued and will last through Friday. 36 hours of increased winds, Lower RH, Warmer temperatures.

Recent Activities:
Protected threatened homes on the fires southern edge.
Worked to limit spread to the SE where fire activity was highest.
After several days with lines on the NW perimeter holding fire managers have declared this fire 10% contained.
Hosted Governor Brown, USDA Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, State Forester Doug Decker and
Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker
An ODF Contingency initial attack group has been added to the Canyon Creek Complex firefighting efforts. This group will assist the team's current divisions with suppression on private lands. This group will also be available for initial attack assignments for the ODF John Day Unit. A total of 6 ODF engines, 3 ODF five-person crews, 3 contract dozers, 1 contract skidgine, and 4 ODF overhead. A total of 37 people are tied these resources.
Received additional resources, including 3 additional interagency Hotshot Crews. Currently 915 total personnel are working on this incident .

Planned actions include:
Send additional resources to the fires southern flank.
A Fire Public Information Officer will be available at the post office in Seneca from 1pm-5pm
Closely monitor weather to determine the best distribution of firefighting resources.
A public meeting will be held tonight at 5:30 pm in the Grant Union high school Old Gym.
Continue to monitor and work the fire perimeter, especially near structures to limit fire spread.

Evacuation Update on Canyon Creek Complex
Thursday, August 20, 2015, 8 a.m. update

Level 3 Evacuations:
NEW: The area west of County Road 62, south of the forest boundary (MP 12) and north of Forest Road 16 to the junction of FR 15/16 is in a level 3 evacuation. The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness remains in a closure. CR 62 and the 16 are open for through travel, at this time.
South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek will stay closed and under a Level 3 evacuations
Upper end of Pine Creek from the road closure near the rock pit will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.
Canyon Creek, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City, south to the 15, 16 junction will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.

Level 2 Evacuations:
Adam Marysville
Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch
Pineview Buckhorn
Edgewood Little Pine
Rebel Hill Both sides of Izee Road from Hwy 395 to the Mike Moore Ranch
Lower Pine Creek from the rock pit to Highway 26.

NEW Level 1 Evacuation: Seneca

Road Closures:
Hwy. 395 remains closed
Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26 is CLOSED TO THROUGH TRAFFIC. Only homeowners will be able to access that portion of the road. Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.
The 15 road remains closed.

Evacuation level definitions:
LEVEL 1: A Level 1 Evacuation means "BE READY" for potential evacuation.
LEVEL 2: A Level 2 Evacuation means "BE SET" to evacuate.
LEVEL 3: A Level 3 Evacuation means "GO" Evacuate now, leave immediately

Email Address: canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
Facebook: www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon
Twitter: @CanyonCreekFire #CanyonCreekComplex
Willamina Creek Fire Update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/20/15
Willamina Creek Fire Update

Oregon Department of Forestry Team

West Oregon District - Dallas Unit



Fire Information number: (503) 934-8153





August 20, 2015

10:00 am



Special Message:

The Oregon Department of Forestry would like to urge everyone to be extremely careful with fire during this period of critical fire danger. Know the fire restrictions where you live and where you recreate and exercise extreme caution when you're in the forest. Everyone has a role in preventing the next fire.



Current Situation:

The Willamina Creek fire started at approximately 5:00 pm on August 19 on land protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is currently estimated to be about 100 acres and is burning in heavy fuels on private and BLM timberland. Resources from the Oregon Department of Forestry's West Oregon District were assisted last night by resources from Sheridan, Amity, West Valley, Dundee, Dayton and McMinnville. Two helicopters and 3 SEATs (Single Engine Air Tankers) also assisted ground operations. Today crews will work to continue building line with bulldozers and by hand working towards building line around the fire's perimeter.



Weather and Fire Behavior:

Today's weather is predicted to be cooler with higher humidity than yesterday which fire managers hope will assist crews with making progress on the fire. The forecast calls for temperatures to be 74-81 degrees and 36-50% humidity today.



Fire Statistics



Location: approx. 9 miles north of Willamina, OR

Percent contained: 5%

Size: 100 acres (estimated)

Cause: under investigation

Start Date: 8/19/15



Wildland resources assigned to the fire include: 7 hand crews, 5 engines, 4 dozers, 16 water tenders, and overhead personnel.



Air resources: 1 Type 2 helicopter



Total personnel: 191



Evacuations and closures:

Four cabins along East Creek Road are under a Level 3 evacuation. Willamina Creek Road and East Creek Road are closed north of the junction with Coast Creek Road



Places to get information:



ODF Fire Blog - wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

Facebook - www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry

Twitter - twitter.com/ORDeptForestry







###
Red Cross Recovery Services in Central Oregon (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/20/15
2015-08/1190/87140/ERV_in_central_OR.jpg
2015-08/1190/87140/ERV_in_central_OR.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1190/87140/thumb_ERV_in_central_OR.jpg
JOHN DAY, Ore. - American Red Cross volunteers are shifting their disaster response efforts to focus on recovery services today for individuals and families affected by the devastating wildfires.

With evacuations in Warm Springs moved to Level 1, Red Cross will close the shelter there, at about 2 p.m., after lunch has been served. The shelter in Baker City is closed. Red Cross volunteers continue to provide disaster recovery services with affected residents.

The shelter in Mt. Vernon has also closed and Red Cross services have moved to the Church of Latter Day Saints (26 John Day Hwy). Information and resources are available there until 7 p.m. today. Client recovery meetings will take place from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.

In addition, Red Cross representatives on site at the multi-agency resource center from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at John Day H.S.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1190/87140/ERV_in_central_OR.jpg , One-on-one conversations with wildfire-affected families begiin the disaster recovery process.
08/19/15
Smarter Balanced assessment test results provide new baseline to measure academic achievement
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/19/15
WALLA WALLA - Monday school districts across the state of Washington received results from the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) assessments taken electronically this spring by students in grades 3-8, 10 and 11. The exams were in English Language Arts (reading, writing and listening) and mathematics.

This was the first year of full implementation of the new tests which are designed to measure the Washington State Learning standards (Common Core State Standards). The SBAC exams will gradually replace the High School Proficiency and End of Course exams by the Class of 2019. Student results from this year's assessment establish a new baseline for data that will be able to show progress toward college and career readiness, according to Curriculum Director Dr. Tracy Williams.

"Student results from this year's assessment will be a new starting point from which we will be able to show growth in student learning in the future," said Dr. Williams. "The 2015 results are not an "apples to apples" comparison from previous results and will not be featured in a side-by-side glance with Spring 2014 results."

Annual assessments provide an academic check-up and give teachers, students, and families a snapshot view about how students are doing in school and whether they are on the path to success after high school. Nearly 4,000 Walla Walla Public Schools students participated in the state exam this spring at all grade levels. District students generally are on par with students across the state in English Language Arts. A highlight includes 73 percent of 10th grade students scored at or above the career and college readiness benchmark in English Language Arts.

"This is a new way of assessing and the first year we have administered the new Washington State Learning Standards," said Superintendent Dr. Bill Jordan. "These results will provide useful feedback for our administration, teachers and students as we continue to refine our school improvement plans especially as it pertains to math."

States are required to reach 95 percent participation on state tests as one way to help ensure schools are meeting the needs of all students in all groups. Walla Walla Public Schools total participation rate for all grade levels in both content areas exceeded 97 percent. High school students who earn a 3 or 4 on the tests can use their scores for college course placement at nearly 200 colleges and universities in six states, once they are admitted, instead of taking costly additional placement tests or additional courses that do not accrue college level credits.

Career and college readiness goals are key: A March 2013 Washington Roundtable report states 50,000 jobs will remain unfilled in Washington state for highly skilled workers by 2017. The report also cites 80 percent of the new jobs created in Washington will be in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) and healthcare by 2017 and 70 percent of jobs in the state will require a college degree or certificate by 2018.

"We are committed to strengthening college and career ready learning environments," Dr. Williams said. "Curriculum and instruction alignment will continue this fall and throughout the school year to assure that Walla Walla Public Schools students receive a quality education and are making academic progress."

Results: http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/summary.aspx?schoolId=266&reportLevel=District&orgLinkId=3004&year=2014-15&yrs=2014-15
PHOTO RELEASE: Oregon Army National Guard supports fire suppression efforts (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/19/15
2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-78.jpg
2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-78.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87124/thumb_20150818-V-RE919-78.jpg
20150818-V-RE919-71
HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter pilot, Warrant Officer One, Matthew Munson with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, conducts pre-flight checks before take off in support of fire suppression efforts in Baker County, August 5. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water and can be dumped on specific locations at the request of fire fighting ground crews. Three Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Baker City Helibase since Monday to support ground firefighting crews on four separate fires in the area. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150818-V-RE919-78
HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter crew chief Sgt. Jerod Clevenger with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, keeps an eye on the sky, watching for other aircraft working in their area of the El Dorado Fire, August 18. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Three Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Baker City Helibase since Monday to support ground firefighting crews on four separate fires in the area. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150818-V-RE919-53
HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter crew chief Sgt. Jerod Clevenger with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, Oregon Army National Guard, drops 500 gallons of water on a target at the request of firefighting ground crews, August 18. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Three Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Baker City Helibase since Monday to support ground firefighting crews on four separate fires in the area. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.

20150818-V-RE919-13
HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter crew chief Sgt. Jerod Clevenger with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, Oregon Army National Gaurd, conducts pre-flight checks before take off in support of fire suppression efforts in Baker County, August 18. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water and can be dumped on specific locations at the request of fire fighting ground crews. Three Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Baker City Helibase since Monday to support ground firefighting crews on four separate fires in the area. Photo by Sgt. Tianna Waite, 41 Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-78.jpg , 2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-71.jpg , 2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-53.jpg , 2015-08/962/87124/20150818-V-RE919-13.jpg
Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - Aug. 19, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/19/15
This is a summary update; actual fire updates and other fire-related information is posted to the ODF Wildfire Blog. You can also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

"Your help is critical in preventing the next wildfire." Oregon's State Forester Doug Decker calls on Oregonians to keep the next fire from starting. See the video at https://youtu.be/evoV67OztLU. Read the State Forester's statement.

As Oregonians and others throughout the Pacific Northwest continue to experience some of the most severe fire conditions in memory, ODF and its partners are managing the fires affecting ODF-protected lands. Two of the agency's three Incident Management Teams are deployed - one to the 25,324-acre Stouts Creek Fire in Douglas County, a human-caused fire that started on July 31, and one that was deployed last Friday to the 20,600-acre Eldorado Fire in Baker and Malheur counties; while one remains available for extended attack on ODF-protected lands, as needed. Across Oregon, 12 incident management teams are deployed to nine large fires, including structural firefighters from across the state, and teams from throughout and outside of the Pacific Northwest.

Fire agencies were alerted to the possibility of dry lightning and wind at the end of last week, and planned and prepared for it. The result, though, due to a combination of factors that are not surprising to anyone - a drought that stretches across most of the state, low fuel moistures, dry weather - is the 315,000-plus acres burning today across Oregon. "Friday was a very unusual day for ODF," remarked ODF Incident Commander John Buckman. "Over 50,000 acres of ODF-protected lands burned in one day, a figure not seen in recent history."

ODF and partner organizations and agencies continue to take the measures necessary to protect Oregon's forests - from no longer allowing campfires even in designated locations as well as prohibiting all off-highway vehicles not on maintained roads in both the Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests, to today's ban implemented by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department on all campfires in Oregon's state parks - including beaches, and the Governor's announcement this afternoon of activating the Oregon National Guard for training of 125 National Guard ground forces to assist with large fires in Oregon.

ODF and its partner private protection associations are also being aggressive with initial attack - a strategy that has resulted over the past several years in suppressing 97 percent of all fire starts to 10 acres or less. From a 1/10th-acre fire in Douglas County on Tuesday due to a downed power line where the Douglas Forest Protective Association and other local fire agencies responded, to a recent fire start in Lake County where ODF provided mutual aid to the local rural fire district and stopped a fire, that threatened ODF-protected lands, from burning structures, as well as advancing further. Day-in and day-out - even during and despite this extreme fire situation - at ODF offices throughout Oregon, personnel and resources continue to respond and do the work that is needed to protect Oregon's forests.

Protecting Oregon's forestlands remains ODF's primary mission - and one in which every employee is somehow engaged. Decker asks all Oregonians to engage, as well. "We should recognize that this is not business as usual. Our current situation necessitates a different type of approach, and involves setting difficult priorities. Fire escalation on the east side is unlike anything we've seen before, and the magnitude is significant. At the moment we have limited extended attack resources," added Decker. "Oregonians need to be even more vigilant about preventing wildfires because the state can't afford any more human-caused fires."

FIRE FACTS
ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit
Canyon Creek Complex | 8/12/15 | one mile south of John Day and Canyon City | 48,201 acres | 0% contained | 649 personnel | Lightning | Great Basin IMT 1 (IC Lund/Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker) |
More Information: Joint Information Center: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.fs.usda.gov/malheur | www.facebook.com/MalheurNationalForest | www.facebook.com/pages/Great-Basin-National-Incident-Management-Team-1/1395232140691247 | www.twitter.com/MalheurNF | canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit
Eldorado Fire | 8/14/15 | 5 miles southeast of Unity | 20,601 acres |35% contained |348 personnel | Under investigation |ODF IMT 3 (IC Smith) |
More information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/ | www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015 | eldoradofire2015@gmail.com |#EldoradoFire |

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex | 8/10/15 | 10 miles east of Unity | 103,540 acres | 45% contained | 675 personnel | Lightning | Southwest IMT (IC Ruggiero)
More Information: Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905 | http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ | www.facebook.com/CornetFire | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com

Eagle Complex | 8/10/15 | 16 miles northeast of Baker City | 3,055 acres |0% contained | 204 personnel | Lightning | Rocky Mountain Black IMT (IC Greer).
More information: Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/ | www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545 | bakerjointinfo@gmail.com

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA)
Stouts Fire |7/30/15 | 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo | 25,324 acres | 74% contained | 1,010 personnel | Human | ODF IMT 2 (IC Cline) / U.S. Forest Service (IC Mike Wilde) |
More information: Phone: 541-825-3724 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | #StoutsFire

Cable Crossing Fire | 7/28/15 | 6 miles east of Glide | 1,857 acres | 90% contained | 50 personnel | Under investigation | DFPA
More information: Phone: 541-817-7186 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/ | www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation |www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
department's web site
department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
ODOT Tripcheck
Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook
FBI Media On-Call
FBI - Oregon - 08/19/15
Until Monday, August 31st, media should utilize the FBI on-call pager for assistance. That number is (503) 208-6241.

Thank you!
Fire Bans widen for Tillamook County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/19/15
he Oregon Department of Forestry issued this news release today.

Fire Bans widens for Tillamook County

August 19, 2015

Contact:
Ed Wallmark
503-842-2545
Edward.H.Wallmark@oregon.gov

Due to extreme fire conditions statewide and elsewhere around the region, local officials are banning campfires throughout Tillamook County effective immediately.

Campfire permits that have been issued by the Oregon Department of Forestry and rural fire departments are rescinded until further notice. This ban applies to the entire Tillamook State Forest, Tillamook County Parks, Bureau of Land Management lands, all properties owned and managed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department including ocean shores, and ODF protected public and private lands.

This means NO
Campfires (prohibited even in established fire rings/pits
Cooking fires (including charcoal and briquettes)
Tiki torches
Candles
Sky Lanterns

Campers may continue to use portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels where permitted, with extreme caution.
In addition, the public is reminded that a campfire ban is already in place for Siuslaw National Forest lands east of Highway 101.


Your cooperation and efforts are greatly appreciated during this period of extreme fire danger. As many fire managers have reemphasized across the region, "we don't need any more fires on the landscape." This closure will be monitored closely and when conditions warrant, the campfire ban will be lifted.
Board clears final hurdle for new Walla Walla High School track
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/19/15
WALLA WALLA - Construction on a new all-weather track at Walla Walla High School could begin next month after the Walla Walla Public Schools Board of Directors last night unanimously voted to increase the district's contribution for the project. The school board voted to authorize the use of the $100,000 track project contingency fund and add another $50,000 to ensure the $875,000 project was adequately funded. The district previously committed $150,000 for the project, bringing the total district contribution to $300,000. The remaining funds, about two-thirds of the revenue needed for the track project, were raised privately by the Big Blue Boosters under the leadership of Scott Krivoshein.

In July, the school board unanimously rejected all bids for a new track after they came in higher than anticipated. After the bids were rejected, Facilities Support Director Dan Johnson reached out to the King County Directors Association, a buying co-op that provides member school districts with predetermined preferential pricing by approved vendors whose product has already been bid at a national level, to get a bid on a track. FieldTurf in conjunction with Beynon Sports Surfaces presented a bid of $875,000 for a 9-lane, blue track. This price, which includes tax, but does remove fencing and concrete work temporarily that was associated with the original bids, is approximately $50,000 less than the lowest bid in July for a similar track. These cost savings efforts and the additional district funds allowed the project to move ahead using the KCDA bid. The school district had considered waiting until winter to put the track project up for public bid, prior to agreeing to contract with KCDA.

"We have learned from the bid process and KCDA that this is what it cost to do this project so it doesn't make sense to wait when we can get started now and have it ready for next spring's track season," said School Board President Sam Wells. "This is a great deal for the district to get a quality facility like this for only about one-third of the cost thanks to the generous community support for the project."

Walla Walla High School is currently the only 4A school in the state to have a cinder track for physical education classes and track and field competitions. The current 50-year-old cinder Wa-Hi track is no longer suitable for physical education classes or the school's successful Track & Field program. Currently, Track & Field practice and events are held at the aging Martin Field facility at the Borleske Stadium site. The new track will also eliminate $8000 in transportation costs annually to bus track athletes to Martin Field. It will also improve safety as students will not be driving across town daily for practice. The facility will also be available for community events and public use for walking and fitness.

"We have waited a long time for this moment and I'm excited for our kids and community," said Track coach and Physical Education Teacher Eric Hisaw. "I look forward to seeing the renewed energy in our students as they use this wonderful facility."
Construction is expected to begin in mid-September pending final approval from Walla Walla County for all permits.

###
Campfires and open flames prohibited in all Oregon State Parks
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/19/15
(Updated with new contact telephone information for news media. Chris Havel, 503 986-0722)

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is prohibiting all campfires in Oregon State Parks and other properties owned and managed by the department beginning Aug. 19 at 10 a.m. The ban includes but is not limited to designated fire pits, tiki torches and candles. The ban also extends to fires on ocean beaches.

"Our goal is to avoid any accidental fires on OPRD property that would further tax limited firefighting resources," said MG Devereux, OPRD Deputy Director. "Most communities have sent local firefighters and equipment to help with wildfires throughout the state. An unintentional fire in a state park would add an unnecessary burden to firefighting efforts."

The state park ban doesn't apply to propane stoves and/or charcoal briquettes for cooking, but there may be local fire restrictions that do limit propane stoves and briquettes. Visitors planning a trip should check with park staff for the most current information, or by calling the state park information line at (800) 551-6949 or visiting www.oregonstateparks.org.

This ban will remain in effect for at least one week and will be re-evaluated based on fire status, weather, and guidance from state and local fire officials.
Red Cross Assists Families in Wildfire Recovery (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/19/15
2015-08/1190/87105/image.jpg
2015-08/1190/87105/image.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1190/87105/thumb_image.jpg
John Day, Ore. - Red Cross relief efforts continue, turning to the recovery phase in impacted communities across Oregon where wildfires have destroyed more than 300,000 acres and dozens of homes and structures. Additional homes are without water or power as wildfires damaged local infrastructure.

This week, affected individuals and families are meeting with trained Red Cross volunteers in John Day, Warm Springs and Baker City and Jon Day to identify needs and begin their recovery process. The Red Cross is providing financial assistance to address immediate needs like clothing, food, and other basic necessities and where appropriate, relief supplies to support clean-up efforts, including shovels, rakes, work gloves, lanterns, coolers, etc. We are also working together with local and state community and faith-based organizations to provide ongoing support for the community impacted by the Canyon Creek Complex fire and the Cornet/Windy Ridge fire.

Red Cross service delivery by the numbers:
· More than 3,000 meals and snacks served at shelters and community meetings in impacted communities
· Reached more than 2,000 people with wildfire preparedness and safety information
· More than 70 Red Cross volunteers supporting Red Cross relief and recovery operations

Donations to the Red Cross enable trained volunteers to respond whenever, wherever there is a need to provide shelter, meals, recovery planning and emotional support. Contributions can be made by calling 1-800-RED-CROSS or by visiting www.redcross.org.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1190/87105/image.jpg , Red Cross is stationed near devastated areas to distribute recovery items to affected families. , 2015-08/1190/87105/image.jpg , 2015-08/1190/87105/image.jpg
Canyon Creek Complex Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/19/15
Next community meeting: 5:30 pm Thursday at Grant Union High School's old gym

JOHN DAY, Ore. -The Canyon Creek Complex is currently estimated at 48,201 acres. It is the number one priority nationally for resources with approximately 649 personnel currently assigned to this incident.

Yesterday, firefighters set hose lines in the northeast corner of the fire as a contingency should winds shift and again push the fire towards homes located there. The fire burned very actively in the Vance Creek area during the morning, advancing toward a main powerline that is a priority resource to protect. Late in the afternoon, the fire advanced to the south and west of the Dry Soda Lookout area. The fire also backed into the Canyon Creek area, where firefighters successfully defended homes.

Today, firefighters will again concentrate work in these two areas in order to limit the fire's expansion and protect houses and private lands. Some priority areas today are around the Wickiup Campground and Road 3925 areas on the south side of the fire and the Fall Mountain area to the west.

Recent weather patterns are expected to continue. Afternoon northwest winds may generate increased fire activity and visible smoke throughout the area.

Oregon Department of Transportation crews will continue to work along the Highway 395 corridor removing hazardous trees and material on or near the roadway.

Due to successful work on the north end of the fire, the Grant County Sheriff's Office decreased evacuation levels from Level 3 to Level 2 in some areas on the north end of the Canyon Creek Complex fire yesterday. These changes are for residents of the affected areas only. The areas reduced to Level 2 are as follows:
Adam Marysville
Eagle Peak Gardner Ranch
Pineview Buckhorn
Edgewood Little Pine

Marysville from Hwy. 395 to Dog Creek and the junction of Hwy. 26 is CLOSED TO THROUGH TRAFFIC. Only homeowners will be able to access that portion of the road. Homeowners on the lower Little Canyon Mountain Trail area can also access their homes.

Areas remaining at Level 3:
South from Dog Creek to Little Dog Creek will stay closed and under a Level 3 evacuations
Upper end of Pine Creek from the road closure near the rock pit will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.
Canyon Creek, from the fire perimeter north at Canyon City, south to the 15, 16 junction will remain under a Level 3 evacuation.

Both sides of Izee Road from 395 to the Mike Moore Ranch remain at Level 2.

An American Red Cross shelter has been established at the Mt. Vernon Community Center at 640 Ingle Street.

The Red Cross is providing financial and relief services for displaced residents. Those wishing to make monetary donations can contact the American Red Cross Mountain River Chapter at redcross.org/cascades or in person at the shelter located on Ingle Street in Mt. Vernon. The Red Cross is opening a service center at the LDS Church in John Day from 1-4 p.m.

Closures
An emergency fire closure is in effect in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness area. A copy of the closure order and map is available at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ Forest Service personnel have assisted with escorting campers and other recreationalists out high-use areas, coordinating with Grant County Sheriff's Office and other local agencies to facilitate the closure.

Fire activity will likely have some affect on hunting, for more information contact-
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/hunting/

Additional information on the Canyon Creek Complex can be found on Inciweb at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/.

Please be advised of increased fire traffic and smoky conditions throughout the area. Forest officials ask that the public stay clear of all fire activities.

Additional fire information can be found at JDIDC - BICC sites online at: http://bicc-jdidc.org/index.shtml.

For more information on the Malheur National Forest, please visit us at www.fs.usda.gov/malheur, follow U.S. Forest Service- Malheur National Forest on Facebook, and follow @MalheurNF on Twitter for all the latest forest news.

To report a fire, contact the John Day Interagency Dispatch Center at 541-575-1321 or the Burns Interagency Communication Center at 541-573-1000.

Email Address: canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com
Facebook: Great Basin National Incident Management Team 1
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
08/18/15
Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update - Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/18/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Tuesday, August 18, 2015.

We've changed the look, length and frequency of ODF Daily Fire Updates. Starting today, the Daily Fire Update will provide a high-level snapshot of Oregon fire activity, pointing to additional resources and contact information. The ODF Fire Blog will become home for all updates from individual fires and other-fire related information. Please bookmark the blog page for quick reference. Please also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

URGENT FIRE PREVENTION MESSAGE
"Your help is critical in preventing the next wildfire." With resources stretched thin and more than 300,000 acres burning in Oregon alone, State Forester Doug Decker calls on Oregonians to keep the next fire from starting. See the video at
https://youtu.be/evoV67OztLU. Read the State Forester's statement.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lightning-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started August 12, is burning one mile south of John Day and Canyon City. The complex is approximately 43,738 acres and 0 percent contained. Evacuation notices have been issued for this fire at all levels, which has destroyed and continues to threaten primary residences in the fire's area, and an area closure is in effect. A community meeting will be held tonight at 5:00 p.m. [note the updated time] at the Grant Union High School's old gym. This is the top priority fire in the nation for resources, with additional firefighting resources continuing to arrive from around the state and country, and approximately 561 firefighters currently assigned. The fire is being managed under Unified Command by the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (Incident Commander Lund) and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Red Team (Incident Commander Walker).
More Information:
Joint Information Center: 541-575-3040
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
www.fs.usda.gov/malheur
https://www.facebook.com/MalheurNationalForest
https://twitter.com/MalheurNF
#canyoncreekcomplex
canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com
Facebook: Great Basin National Incident Management Team 1 https://www.facebook.com/pages/Great-Basin-National-Incident-Management-Team-1/1395232140691247

Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit: The Eldorado Fire, burning approximately 8 miles southeast of Unity on ODF-protected private lands, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands, is estimated at 20,500 acres and 30 percent contained. ODF Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) assumed command of the fire on August 15. This morning, all evacuation notices for the fire area have been updated to Level 1 [Get Ready]. Today, 285 personnel are assigned to this fire. The cause remains under investigation.
More information:
Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC): 541-523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015
eldoradofire2015@gmail.com
#EldoradoFire
Ready Set Go: www.wildlandfirersg.org

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit: The lightning-caused Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex, which started on August 10, is burning 10 miles east of Unity, and approximately 99,270 acres and 35 percent contained. The fire is burning on ODF-protected lands, and U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands. Area and road closures remain in effect on this fire, and evacuation notices at all levels have been issued for this fire which threatens and has destroyed structures. Approximately 628 personnel are assigned to this fire which is being managed under Unified Command by the Southwest Incident Management Team (Incident Commander Ruggiero) and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Green Team (Incident Commander Kunze).
More Information:
Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905
bakerjointinfo@gmail.com
http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/
https://www.facebook.com/CornetFire

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit: The lightning-caused Eagle Complex, which comprises three fires burning approximately 20 miles northwest of Richland (16 miles northeast of Baker city), is approximately 2,518 acres and 0 percent contained. This complex, burning on ODF-protected lands and the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, is being managed by the Rocky Mountain Interagency Team Black (Incident Commander Greer).
More information:
Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905
bakerjointinfo@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Stouts Fire, reported July 30, burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo, is 25,076 acres and 72 percent contained. Today the fire released resources - personnel and equipment - to assist with other fires burning in Oregon; currently 1,030 personnel remain on this fire. Approximately 48 percent of the fire has burned on ODF-protected forestlands (private lands and BLM), and about 52 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. The fire is under joint command of ODF Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Chris Cline) and the U.S. Forest Service (Incident Commander Mike Wilde). The fire has been determined to be human-caused.
More information:
Phone: 541-825-3724
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
https://twitter.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Cable Crossing Fire remains at 1,857 acres and 90 percent contained. Today, about 50 firefighters remain assigned to the fire, which is in mop-up status.
More information:
Phone: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

WILDFIRES AND ROAD AND HIGHWAY SAFETY, DELAYS, AND CLOSURES
Wildfires can affect the status of Oregon's roads, including State Highways. Firefighting equipment may be in the area - either on the roadways or in the air above. Smoke may appear suddenly, making travel hazardous. Use caution when driving in the area of any wildfire, traveling at a safe and appropriate speed for the conditions, but do not slow down or stop to watch firefighting operations. And, always, for the latest information on state roads and highways relating to delays and closures, visit www.tripcheck.com.

EVACUATIONS - READY, SET, GO!
Be aware that evacuation levels can change rapidly based on unexpected growth from fire behavior.
LEVEL ONE - GET READY! Be Prepared. Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area and monitor websites, social media, and local media outlets for information.
LEVEL TWO - GET SET! Be Set. This indicates that there is significant danger to your area, and residents should be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice.
LEVEL THREE - GO! Leave Immediately. Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately.
If, at any time, no matter what the level, you feel threatened by fire, do not wait for someone to tell you that it is time to evacuate, just go. For more information on the READY, SET, GO! Evacuation Levels system, visit www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 249 fires burned 2710 acres
Human-caused fires: 543 fires burned 27,048 acres
Total: 792 fires burned 29,758 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 237 fires burned 21,523 acres
Human-caused fires: 429 fires burned 3,308 acres
Total: 666 fires burned 24,831 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officers, who are currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), and Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 (office) or 503-508-0574 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


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Marine Board's Guide Advisory Committee to Meet August 24
Oregon Marine Board - 08/18/15
The Oregon State Marine Board's Guide Advisory Committee will be meeting on August 24, beginning at 7 pm at the Guy Boyington Building, 857 Commercial Street, in Astoria.

The committee will review old business and will also discuss new business relating to the Outfitter & Guide Program administered within the Oregon State Marine Board.

The meeting is accessible for persons with disabilities. For a communication aid request or agenda questions, please contact Mervin Hee, Boating Safety Waterway Coordinator at
503-378-2610 by Friday, August 21. The committee will accept public comment during the designated period at the end of the meeting.

To view the agenda items, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/admin/docs/GAC_082415_MeetingAgenda.docx.
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Employment in Oregon July 2015 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 08/18/15
Oregon Adds 4,600 Jobs in July and the Unemployment Rate Increases to 5.9 Percent

Payroll employment in Oregon rose at a brisk pace in July, adding 4,600 jobs, following a revised gain of 2,600 in June. In July, five major industries added 1,000 jobs or more, with construction (+2,300 jobs) and professional and business services (+1,700) adding the most. Only two major industries--government ( 3,200 jobs) and leisure and hospitality (-1,900)--declined substantially.

Over the past 12 months, Oregon's economy expanded rapidly, with payrolls growing by 55,900 jobs, or 3.2 percent. Gains were widespread as five major industries expanded in the 4-percent range, four industries grew in the 3-percent range, and none declined significantly. Recent revisions to the job counts reflect an even stronger winter economy than originally estimated. This refresh to the data elevated the March through June 2015 payrolls by 4,300 jobs.

Oregon's unemployment rate rose to 5.9 percent in July from 5.5 percent in June. The rate, which is based primarily on data from the Current Population Survey, can be volatile at times. Oregon's unemployment rate dropped dramatically in the early months of 2015 and has bumped back up a little in more recent months. Despite the increase, Oregon's unemployment rate was significantly below its year-ago figure of 7.0 percent in July 2014. Oregon's rate remained close to the U.S. rate of 5.3 percent in July.

"Oregon's job growth continued at a rapid pace in July," said Nick Beleiciks, Oregon's state employment economist. "We're also seeing a large number of people entering the labor market or who are leaving their jobs voluntarily. They account for about half the increase in unemployment. Oregon's economy is adding jobs so fast right now that many of them will find work quickly."

These preliminary estimates of jobs and other labor force data are produced in cooperation with the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, are based largely on a survey of businesses and a survey of households, and are subject to later revision.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the July county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, August 25th, and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for August on Tuesday, September 15th.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/930/87072/employment_in_Oregon_--_July_2015_--_press_release.pdf
08/17/15
Eldorado Fire Evening Update - Monday, August 17, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/17/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Incident Commander Link Smith

Eldorado Fire Evening Update - August 17, 2015


Unity, OR - Tonight over 25 Ironside community members and some of the Oregon Department of Forestry wildfire team's leadership reviewed the Eldorado fire's potential activity and strategy to contain it as quickly as possible. With maps and cookies on the truck's hood, the group shared information and had their questions answered.

The arrival of hand crews to the Eldorado Fire paid dividends today as they were able to tie dozer and hand lines together on the west side of the fire. The night shift will work to complete the task by widening lines and burning out small pockets of vegetation from established containment lines to strengthen them. The fire is 20,500 acres and 20 percent contained.

The southern portion of the fire is burning in light fuels along rocky cliffs and has not advanced in the last two days. While crews shore up the fire's west and southwest corner under moderate conditions, they will also take advantage of even cooler weather to build containment lines along the fire's south end in the next couple of days.

The portion of the fire north of Highway 26 is nearly mopped up. Crews on the north end will soon begin transitioning to assist the operation on the southern end of the fire.

There are 275 people working on this fire. Resources on the fire include seven 20-person crews, seven dozers, 14 engines, five water-tenders and four helicopters. The National Guard also delivered air power to help fight the fire today.

The following evacuation level notifications remain in effect.

Level 1 (Ready): Shirts Creek; Job Creek and south of Job Creek Road; East of Bull Run Road; and south of Campbell Lane.

Level 2 (Set): Dry Gulch area and Ripley Gulch area.

Level 3 (Go): Beam Creek area; Eldorado Ditch area; Long Creek area (Baker County); Long Creek Reservoir; and Camp Creek south of Highway 26.

More information about evacuations available at: http://tinyurl.com/Evacuation-Level-Meaning

FIRE AT A GLANCE

FIRE NAME: ELDORADO
LOCATION: 8 MILES SE OF UNITY
FIRE SIZE: 20,500 acres
CONTAINMENT: 20%
CREWS: 7
ENGINES: 14
WATER TENDERS: 5
DOZERS: 7
HELICOPTERS: 4
AIR TANKERS: 0
TOTAL PERSONNEL: 285
ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $973,000

MORE INFORMATION:
BAKER CITY
JOINT INFORMATION CENTER
(541) 523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015
eldoradofire2015@gmail.com
#EldoradoFire
Ready Set Go Evacuation Information: www.wildlandfirersg.org


Our mailing address is:

Eldorado Fire
S 1st Ave
Unity, OR 97884

###
Walla Walla School District Public Work Session, Board Meeting & Executive Session: August 18, 2015
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/17/15
Walla Walla School District Public Work Session, Board Meeting & Executive Session: August 18, 2015

Supporting documents are available via the following link:
http://www.wwps.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2705&Itemid=1028&jsmallfib=1&dir=JSROOT/2015/2015-08-18+BOARD+MEETING
Red Cross Wildfire Response Continues (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/17/15
Red Cross shelter team volunteers put plans in place to assist evacuees.
Red Cross shelter team volunteers put plans in place to assist evacuees.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1190/87052/thumb_shelter_mtg_WS2_081515.jpg
Red Cross volunteers from around the region mobilize to deliver resources to those in need.

MADRAS, Ore - Five days into recent Oregon wildfires response, Red Cross disaster relief activities continue. The Red Cross has activated three shelters, distributed more than 2,000 snacks and meals, supported five community meetings, and provided disaster mental health and health support services in the communities of Warm Springs, Baker City and Mt. Vernon to help people affected by the fires.

Local sheltering teams reacted swiftly last Wednesday when blazes engulfed more than 10,000 acres near Warm Springs. Just hours later, Red Cross crews called in additional volunteers to stand up another shelter to offer safe place for wildfire evacuees near Baker City. A day later, canyon fires closed in on the John Day community and Red Cross volunteers from Medford, Ore., to Vancouver, Wash., opened a shelter in Mt. Vernon.

As wildfire relief operations continue, Red Cross volunteers are convening with community partners and local officials to create disaster recovery strategies.

"Taking care of basic immediate physical and emotional needs is at the core of Red Cross services when disasters strike," says Amy Shlossman, chief executive officer for the American Red Cross Cascades Region. "Our disaster teams, led by an amazing volunteer corps, have been hard at work supporting affected communities as devastating wildfires covered nearly a quarter million acres in central and eastern Oregon. In the days ahead, we will continue to serve these local communities, working with partner agencies to begin the recovery process."

As of Monday afternoon, shelters are open at the Warm Springs Community Hall and Mt. Vernon Community Center. The Baker City shelter has been moved into stand-by status. Shelter workers remain in place to reopen the site if requested or as needed in response to changes in fire activity and/or evacuation notices. All shelters continue to serve as community hubs for information dissemination and disaster recovery planning.

You can help people affected by disasters like the Oregon wildfires, and countless other crises by making a gift to American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasterss big and small. Visit www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED-CROSS.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org/cascades. Or, read about Red Cross volunteers at http://redcrosscascade.blogspot.com/.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Red Cross shelter team volunteers put plans in place to assist evacuees. , Red Cross provided recovery information, as well as snacks and water, at local community meetings in fire-affected communities in central and eastern Oregon. , Updated fire information and other resources are available at Red Cross shelter locations in Warm Springs, Mt. Vernon and Baker City
Oregon Dept of Forestry Fire Update for Monday, August 17, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/17/15
A firefighter checks information at the Stouts Fire in southwest Oregon
A firefighter checks information at the Stouts Fire in southwest Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1072/87053/thumb_StoutsFire.JPG
FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The Eldorado Fire located approximately 8 miles southeast of Unity, Oregon is burning on Oregon Department of Forestry private lands, Vale BLM and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands. The fire lies on the north and south side of Highway 26 between Unity and Ironside, two small communities south of Baker City in eastern Oregon.

The fire size is now estimated at 20,237 acres and 10 percent contained.

20-person hand crews have started trickling in to support the bulldozers and engines that have been working on the Eldorado Fire the past three days. Yesterday bulldozers continued developing containment lines in moderate terrain.

Because of the many fires burning across Oregon and Washington, the people and equipment available for containing these fires is spread thin. "The weather and the number of large fires burning in the Pacific Northwest have made this fire difficult," said Incident Commander Link Smith, "however, we've put a plan together that we feel will help us meet our objectives, which is to minimize acres burned while keeping safety for the public and firefighters a top priority."

Overnight crews removed fuel around a few structures and strengthened containment lines along the southern and western portions of the fire. "Normally, on a fire this size over 300 firefighters would be constructing containment lines," said Marvin Vetter, Operations Section Chief. "However, because of the many wildfires burning throughout the West the Eldorado Fire team is doing all it can with its limited resources."

Today's plan includes using hand crews to connect containment lines started by bull dozers on the northwest side of the fire. On the southwest corner of the fire crews anticipate building containment lines to help keep the fire on the east side of Ironside Mountain. Stronger winds are forecasted over the next few days that will challenge established containment lines and increase fire behavior.

Yesterday the wind stoked the fire front on the fire's west and south sides. Weather reports from the Boise Weather Center predict a dry cold front coming through the area early today with 10-15 mile per hour winds. Fire incident meteorologists are calling for more difficult weather toward the end of the week.

Last night, engine crews worked through the night to extinguish hot spots along the fire's edge and strengthen containment lines.

Resources: Resources currently assigned to this fire include four 20-person crews, seven bulldozers, 12 engines and one helicopter.

Highway 26 is now open to motorists. The Cause of the fire is under investigation.

ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $487,000

MORE INFORMATION:
BAKER CITY JOINT INFORMATION CENTER (JIC) (541) 523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015
eldoradofire2015@gmail.com
#EldoradoFire
Ready Set Go: www.wildlandfirersg.org


> The Canyon Creek Complex located one mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon, was sparked by lightning on August 12, 2015 and is burning on federal, state and private jurisdiction lands. It is currently estimated at 40,100 acres and is 0 percent contained.

It is being managed under a unified command structure with federal and state representation. A Type 1 Great Basin Incident Management Team (IMT), IC Lund, and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team, IC Walker, are currently managing firefighting efforts.

This fire continues to challenge firefighters due to the extremely dry conditions, rugged terrain and afternoon winds. Additional firefighting resources continue to arrive from around the state and country with more than 300 firefighters currently assigned and more are anticipated to arrive to assist.

Yesterday air tankers and helicopters supported hand crews as they worked digging fire line in terrain too rugged for bulldozers. Late in the afternoon air tankers were diverted to a new fire that was burning nearby, however helicopters continued fight the fire.

Structural firefighters worked to protect homes and to determine the number of houses lost to the fire during the extreme wind event that occurred on Aug. 14th. Fire activity increased on the southern portion of the fire, near Dry Soda Lookout. Firefighters worked through the night to protect houses and to reinforce fire line.

Sunday afternoon two community meetings were held at the high school. Community members who have lost homes and property to this fire attended the first meeting and the second meeting provided fire information to the general public. More than 50 people attended the first meeting and more than 220 people attended the second. Speakers included local officials and firefighting personnel.

Today, the fire managers expect weather similar to yesterday, however the possibility of unpredictable winds exists. Firefighters continue working to improve total fire containment and line strengthening in the North. Today we will have a special focus with new resources on the South flank where activity is increasing. Firefighting aircraft will be used aggressively to keep this fire in check, however those resources can be diverted to new fires at a moment's notice.

Communities under Level 3 and Level 2 evacuations:

Level 3: Dog Creek-south of Marysville
Marysville South
Pine Creek - Gravel Pit, South
Canyon Creek
Edgewood Drive Level 2: Laycock Creek Adams Drive
Nans Rock Rd West Bench Rd
Luce Creek Marysville North
Pine Creek - Gravel Pit, North
Dog Creek-north of Marysville

An American Red Cross shelter has been established at the Mt. Vernon Community Center at 640 Ingle Street. Donations can be brought to the fairgrounds pavilion between 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM.

The Red Cross is transitioning to providing financial and relief services for displaced residents. Those wishing to make monetary donations on behalf of displaced residents can contact the American Red Cross Mountain River Chapter at redcross.org/cascades or in person at the shelter located on Ingle Street in Mt. Vernon. Other donations are being accepted at the pavilion at the fairgrounds in John Day.

Closures
An emergency fire closure is in effect in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness area. A copy of the closure order and map is available at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ Forest Service personnel have assisted with escorting campers and other recreationalists out high-use areas, coordinating with Grant County Sheriff's Office and other local agencies to facilitate the closure.

Additional information on the Canyon Creek Complex can be found on Inciweb at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/.

Please be advised of increased fire traffic and smoky conditions throughout the area. Forest officials ask that the public stay clear of all fire activities. Power lines have been damaged by fire and some residents may be using generators. Without an automatic cutoff switch, generators can pose an extreme hazard to power company employees due to back-feeding, please don't plug generators into the electrical system without an approved cutoff device.

Firefighting resources remain scarce due to the high number of fires burning regionally, however this fire is a very high priority both within the state and nationally. As other incidents wind down fire crews and equipment become available and if requested by commanders they are assigned to the Canyon Creek Complex. Firefighters will continue to work hard until this situation is brought to an end.

Additional fire information can be found at JDIDC - BICC sites online at: http://bicc-jdidc.org/index.shtml.

For more information on the Malheur National Forest, please visit us at www.fs.usda.gov/malheur, follow U.S. Forest Service- Malheur National Forest on Facebook, and follow @MalheurNF on Twitter for all the latest forest news.

To report a fire, contact the John Day Interagency Dispatch Center at 541-575-1321 or the Burns Interagency Communication Center at 541-573-1000.

Canyon Creek Complex Fire Info
canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
Facebook: Great Basin National Incident Management Team 1
http://bicc-jdidc.org/index.shtml
Phone: 541-575-3040 / 541-575-3480


> Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex
The Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex is comprised of the lightning-caused Windy Ridge Fire (ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit) located 4 miles west of Durkee first reported August 11 and the lightning-caused Cornet Fire (ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-unit). The fire has been burning on ODF-protected lands, U.S.F.S. and B.L.M. in brush, grass and timber and is now estimated at 96,762 acres and 30 percent containment.

The terrain on the fire is rugged and steep and ground crews have trouble accessing certain areas. This has necessitated aggressive air suppression including single engine air tankers (SEATs), helicopters and heavy air tankers, though increasingly scarce resources are straining air support.Favorable night weather conditions allowed fire fighters to conduct burn out operations that were successful in the north portions of the fire. Crews continue to patrol and hold lines while mopping up around structures. Today's weather conditions will allow for a favorable day for fire fighting efforts.

Burnout operations today will occur on Woods Gulch Road and Burnt Canyon Road to prevent fire from spreading to the east. Smoke will be visible from I-84.

Resources: A partial list of resources includes 19 crews, 4 helicopters, 34 fire engines and 12 bulldozers, as well as Southwest Incident Management Team-Mark Ruggiero and Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office-Ted Kunze.

Area Fire Closures:
A forest closure order is in place for the area around the Cornet / Windy Ridge Fire. Please see the link to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Website
http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/wallowa-whitman/home OR-245 remains closed. As of this morning, Highways- 7 and Interstate-84 are open

Highway 245 is still closed 11 miles north of Hereford. Drivers are urged to check highway conditions on tripcheck.com

Regulated closures are in effect on State and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in northeast and central Oregon. Please check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry office for public use restrictions on lands protected by ODF. Visit the Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch webpage at www.bmidc.org or contact a local ODF office for more complete information.

Public shelters: As of 10 a.m. today, the American Red Cross has placed its shelter at the Baker City Nazarene Church, 1250 Hughes Lane, into standby status. Workers remain in place to reopen the shelter if requested by individuals affected by area wildfires or as needed in response to changes in fire activity / evacuation notices. Red cross nurses are available for evacuees that need medical attention. For more information: 541-519-2360.

Public Safety: the public should be cautious when driving; crews and equipment are working near and along the roads, and smoke may hinder visibility.

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex Fire Info
Joint Info Center: 541-523-2905 (MEDIA requested to use this number)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/


> The Eagle Complex (Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit) reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon, is now approximately 2,217 acres. The fire is burning on U.S.F.S. lands and lands protected by O.D.F. Three fires comprise the complex and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

Rocky Mountain Team Black assumed command of the Eagle Complex at 6:00 a.m. yesterday morning.Yesterday firefighters continued to protect structures and assess opportunities to construct containment lines.

Most of the fire growth yesterday took place in the southeast section of the fire in the Bradley Creek area. Today, firefighters will continue structure protection efforts. Crews will also improve and hold the west and southwest sides of the fire and continue efforts to prevent the fire from turning north into East Eagle Creek. Aviation resources plan to resume assisting firefighters' efforts as conditions allow.

Weather today is expected to be warm and dry with increased warming and drying expected later this week.

Public meeting: Representatives from Rocky Mountain Team Black, Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service will meet with residents of the Eagle community at 3:00 pm today at Baker City Nazarene Church Gymnasium.

Closures: There is an area closure in effect for the Eagle Complex near Main Eagle, East Eagle, Tamarack Campground and Two Color Campground. Please see the link to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest website http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/wallowa-whitman/home .

Evacuations: There is a Level 2 (Set) for FS 77 Rd. Bennett Peak Area, main Eagle Area, Tamarack Campground.
Rocky Mountain Team Black (Greer), a Type 2 Incident Management Team, assumed command of the Eagle Complex at 6 am today.

Eagle Complex Fire Information
Fire and Evacuation Information: 541-523-2905
Email: BakerCoJointInfo@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/

> The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) approximately16 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 24,756 acres and now estimated at 70 percent containment.

Sunday's preparation for the burnout operations allowed the night crews to continue what was started late in the afternoon. Overnight crews working on the southwest side of the fire, from DP 69 to Newman's Gap, were able to make significant progress. Using established fireline, crews were able to use low-intensity burn methods to widen the line as much as 50-75 yards. The day shift will continue these efforts to build and strengthen this line.

With warming temperatures and lowering humidity, fire activity has the potential to increase. Because of these conditions, crews will continue monitoring firelines on the west, north and east sides and address any flare ups that are encountered.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

Resources: There are 1,144 personnel assigned to the fire with 22 crews, 24 engines, 26 water tenders, 19 bulldozers and 6 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to assist with many of the other fires in the state and geographic area.

The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest.
Cost: To date the Stout Creek Fire has cost $29.5 million.

Stouts Fire Information
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire


> The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 1,857 acres and 90 percent containment. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire



FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

Residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, orview and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 250 fires burned 2710 acres
Human-caused fires: 540 fires burned 27,046 acres
Total: 790 fires burned 29,756 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 228 fires burned 21,511 acres
Human-caused fires: 423 fires burned 3,246 acres
Total: 651 fires burned 24,757 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-510-7972 (Cell) & 503-945-7421 (office) or any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.


Attached Media Files: A firefighter checks information at the Stouts Fire in southwest Oregon
BPA selects Thompson as new power marketing vice president (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/17/15
Garry Thompson is BPA's new vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing.
Garry Thompson is BPA's new vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1236/87049/thumb_Garry-Thompson-VP-NW-Requirements-Marketing.jpg
Portland, Ore. - Administrator Elliot Mainzer has selected Garry Thompson as the Bonneville Power Administration's vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing. Thompson is scheduled to begin his new position this fall.

"I am thrilled to have Garry join the Power Services leadership team, where he brings with him years of diverse managerial and leadership experience in power products and services, energy efficiency and strong customer service," said Senior Vice President of Power Services Mark Gendron. "I have known and worked with Garry for over 20 years and know that BPA and the region will be well served with him in this important role of service to our customers."

As vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing, Thompson will be responsible for marketing power, primarily from 31 federal dams, to more than 140 Bonneville utility customers in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and Northern California.

"I am excited to work in my new role as vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing," Thompson said. "The position will allow me to continue excellent delivery of the value our carbon-free assets provide to our customers. I look forward to leading a dedicated group of individuals working on diverse issues and helping them navigate the changing electricity industry."

Previously, Thompson was BPA's power customer service manager overseeing account executives serving BPA's power customers. These customers represent approximately $2.5 billion dollars in annual energy sales.

Thompson also has served as a senior account executive in BPA's Spokane office, and over the course of several years worked as a power account executive for over 30 customers. After earning a bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Eastern Washington University, he worked for the City of Coeur d'Alene, City of Lewiston, Spokane County and Kootenai Electric Co-op. He joined BPA in 1986.


Attached Media Files: Garry Thompson is BPA's new vice president of Northwest Requirements Marketing.
El Dorado Fire Morning Update - Monday, August 17
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/17/15
Unity, OR - Firefighters are making good progress on the Eldorado Fire despite working with half the personnel and equipment for a fire this size. The fire is currently 20.237 acres and 10 percent contained. Overnight crews removed fuel around a few structures and strengthened containment lines along the southern and western portions of the fire.

"Normally, on a fire this size over 300 firefighters would be constructing containment lines," said Marvin Vetter, Operations Section Chief. "However, because of the many wildfires burning throughout the West the Eldorado Fire team is doing all it can with its limited resources."

Today's plan includes using hand crews to connect containment lines started by bull dozers on the northwest side of the fire. On the southwest corner of the fire crews anticipate building containment lines to help keep the fire on the east side of Ironside Mountain. Stronger winds are forecasted over the next few days that will challenge established containment lines and increase fire behavior.

Resources on the fire include seven 20-person crews, seven dozers, 12 engines and one helicopter.

The following evacuation level notifications remain in effect.

Level 1 (Ready): Shirts Creek; Job Creek and south of Job Creek Road; East of Bull Run Road; and south of Campbell Lane.

Level 2 (Set): Dry Gulch area and Ripley Gulch area.

Level 3 (Go): Beam Creek area; Eldorado Ditch area; Long Creek area (Baker County); Long Creek Reservoir; and Camp Creek south of Highway 26.

More information about evacuations available at: http://tinyurl.com/Evacuation-Level-Meaning


FIRE AT A GLANCE

FIRE NAME: ELDORADO
LOCATION: 8 MILES SE OF UNITY
FIRE SIZE: 20,237 acres
CONTAINMENT: 10%
CREWS: 4
ENGINES: 12
DOZERS: 7
HELICOPTERS: 1
AIR TANKERS: 0
TOTAL PERSONNEL: 201
ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $487,000

MORE INFORMATION:
BAKER CITY JOINT INFORMATION CENTER: (541) 523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015
eldoradofire2015@gmail.com
#EldoradoFire
Ready Set Go Evacuation Information: www.wildlandfirersg.org


Our mailing address is:

Eldorado Fire
S 1st Ave
Unity, OR 97884



###
08/16/15
Eldorado Fire Evening Update - Sunday, August 16, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/16/15
Eldorado Fire Evening Update - Aug. 16



Unity, Ore. - 20-person hand crews have started trickling in to support the bulldozers and engines that have been working on the Eldorado Fire the past three days. The fire is now 20,070 acres and 10 percent contained. Today bulldozers continued developing containment lines in moderate terrain. Hand crews will scrape fire trails in many areas that bulldozers can't go. Because of the many fires burning across Oregon and Washington, the people and equipment available for containing these fires is spread thin.

"The weather and the number of large fires burning in the Pacific Northwest have made this fire difficult," said Incident Commander Link Smith. "However, we've put a plan together that we feel will help us meet our objectives, which is to minimize acres burned while keeping safety for the public and firefighters a top priority."

This afternoon the wind stoked the fire front on the fire's west and south sides. Weather reports from the Boise Weather Center predict a dry cold front coming through the area early Monday with 10-15 mile per hour winds. Fire incident meteorologists are calling for more difficult weather toward the end of the week.

Tonight, engine crews will work through the night to extinguish hot spots along the fire's edge and strengthen containment lines.

Resources on the fire include four 20-person crews, seven dozers, 12 engines and one helicopter.

The following evacuation level notifications remain in effect.

Level 1 (Ready): Shirts Creek; Job Creek and south of Job Creek Road; East of Bull Run Road; and south of Campbell Lane.

Level 2 (Set): Dry Gulch area and Ripley Gulch area.

Level 3 (Go): Beam Creek area; Eldorado Ditch area; Long Creek area (Baker County); Long Creek Reservoir; and Camp Creek south of Highway 26.

More information about evacuations available at: http://tinyurl.com/Evacuation-Level-Meaning


FIRE AT A GLANCE

FIRE NAME: ELDORADO

LOCATION: 8 MILES SE OF UNITY

FIRE SIZE: 20,070 acres

CONTAINMENT: 10%

CREWS: 4

ENGINES: 12

DOZERS: 7

HELICOPTERS: 1

AIR TANKERS: 0

TOTAL PERSONNEL: 201

ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $134,000

MORE INFORMATION:
BAKER CITY JOINT INFORMATION CENTER:
(541) 523-2905

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/

www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015

eldoradofire2015@gmail.com

#EldoradoFire

Ready Set Go Evacuation Information:
www.wildlandfirersg.org



Our mailing address is:

Eldorado Fire
S 1st Ave
Unity, OR 97884
Oregon Dept of Forestry Fire Update for Sunday, August 16, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/16/15
FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The Eldorado Fire reported Friday morning 8 miles southeast of Unity, Oregon is burning on Oregon Department of Forestry private lands, Vale BLM and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands.

With an abundance of fire activity taking place in the northwest, firefighting resources are hard to come by. Firefighters are attacking the fire with what night Operations Section Chief Eric Perkins has coined as an "Engine Brigade."

The night shift on this fire was composed of three division supervisors and six engine crews. Fire officials are hopeful in obtaining additional personnel and equipment in the next couple of days.
The fire currently stands at 18,600 acres with zero percent containment.

Firefighters on the Eldorado Fire hope to take advantage of moderate weather conditions forecasted over the next few days.
The fire started Friday morning and, pushed by high winds through the Eldorado Pass, grew to more than 10,000 acres in less than 24 hours. Lighter winds and cooler temperatures have allowed crews to gain a foothold in several areas.

The fire lies on the north and south side of Highway 26 between Unity and Ironside, two small communities south of Baker City in eastern Oregon. While fire activity is greatest south of Highway 26 near Ironside Mountain, firefighters are securing containment lines and mopping up on the north side of the highway. Today's plan is to continue to work the fire to the south into areas with lighter fuels, like grass and sage brush, where containment objectives can be better achieved.

Resources: 161 personnel including 2 crews, 12 engines, 7 bulldozers, 3 helicopters, 0 air tankers
Smith's Type 1 ODF IMT assumed command of the incident at 10:00 yesterday.

Highway 26, which is now open to motorists, splits the fire with much of the activity burning toward the south in the Ironside Mountain area. While the fire to the north and northeast of the highway is looking good, firefighters plan to work the south and southeast edges near Rose Creek Road, where suppression efforts will be more effective in lighter fuels such as grass and sage brush.

The following evacuation level notifications remain in effect.

Level 1 (Ready): Shirts Creek; Job Creek and south of Job Creek Road; East of Bull Run Road; and south of Campbell Lane.
Level 2 (Set): Dry Gulch area and Ripley Gulch area.
Level 3 (Go): Beam Creek area; Eldorado Ditch area; Long Creek area (Baker County); Long Creek Reservoir; and Camp Creek south of Highway 26.

Cooperating agencies on the fire include the Oregon Department of Forestry, Ironside Rangeland Protection Association, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. Cause is under investigation.

ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $134,000

MORE INFORMATION:
BAKER CITY JOINT INFORMATION CENTER (JIC) (541) 523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
www.facebook.com/ElDoradoFire2015
Ready Set Go: www.wildlandfirersg.org



> The Canyon Creek Complex started on August 12, 2015 due to lightning. The Canyon Creek Complex is comprised of the Berry Creek and Mason Springs Fires.

Yesterday, the fire grew rapidly, fueled by wind, terrain and drought conditions. Extreme fire behavior was observed, with spotting two to four miles in front of the main fire. The fire grew quickly from 500 acres to an estimated 37,119 acres, burning a number of structures in the process. "We are saddened by this huge loss to the community; our hearts go out to all the families and friends," said Malheur National Forest Supervisor Steve Beverlin.

Firefighters are challenged to make a full assessment of the number of structures burned due to wooden bridges that have likely been compromised by the fire activity. In the meantime, firefighting efforts are focused on utilizing burnout operations when possible. On the north flank of the fire, dozer and retardant line is in place behind houses. "We are working through the night and staying engaged," said Roy Walker, Malheur Forest Fire Management Officer. Planned helicopter burnout operations were put on hold today due to the smoke inversion. A temporary flight restriction is in place over the fire area.

Public meeting
A community meeting is scheduled for today, August 16 at 4:00 p.m. at Grant Union High School old gym.

Local, state and federal firefighters continue to actively fight the fire, reinforced by structural fire engines to provide community and structure protection. Firefighting resources were provided an early morning briefing by the incoming state and federal firefighting teams in the sale barn at the Grant County Fairgrounds.

"As we work in this incredibly resilient community we recognize local responders and the public who worked to help friends and neighbors through this very difficult event with limited resources. We will be here for as long as it takes to ensure that you have the support you need moving forward," said Oregon State Fire Marshal and Red Team Incident Commander Jim Walker.

Both of the Incident Commanders stressed the importance of working together with the local resources. Two incident management teams: a federal wildland firefighting team, and an Oregon State Fire Marshal's team, are managing the Canyon Creek Complex under unified command as of 6 a.m. this morning.

"We are working with local leaders to support the community and responders. Today's priority is for a safe and organized transition. We are assessing the fire situation and building on the long standing relationships in this community," added Great Basin Team 1 Incident Commander Beth Lund.

Approximately 300 firefighters are currently assigned and more are anticipated to arrive to assist with the Canyon Creek Complex. Air tankers provided good support to the fire operations yesterday, and the lack of a smoke inversion this morning allowed helicopter operations to get an early start today providing support to ground operations.

Today, the fire is most active in the southeast corner in the Strawberry Wilderness. Fire managers cautioned firefighters that potential rapid growth of spot fires may occur with exposure to predicted gusty winds. Equipment operators have been requested to fill up tanks prior to leaving town to minimize impacts to water sources, and to notify local land managers of stray livestock in an effort to assist permittees.

A number of communities remain under Level 3 and Level 2 evacuations:

Level 3: Dog Creek-south of Marysville
Marysville South
Pine Creek - Gravel Pit, South
Canyon Creek
Edgewood Drive
Level 2: Laycock Creek Adams Drive
Nans Rock Rd West Bench Rd
Luce Creek Marysville North
Pine Creek - Gravel Pit, North
Dog Creek-north of Marysville

American Red Cross shelter has been staged at the Mt. Vernon Community Center at 640 Ingle Street.

The Red Cross is transitioning to providing financial and relief services for displaced residents. Those wishing to make monetary donations on behalf of displaced residents can contact the American Red Cross Mountain River Chapter at redcross.org/cascades or in person at the shelter located on Ingle Street in Mt. Vernon.

Closures
An emergency fire closure is in effect in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness area. A copy of the closure order and map is available at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ Forest Service personnel have assisted with escorting campers and other recreationalists out high-use areas, coordinating with Grant County Sheriff's Office and other local agencies to facilitate the closure.

Additional information on the Canyon Creek Complex can be found on Inciweb at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/.

Please be advised of increased fire traffic and smoky conditions throughout the area. Forest Officials ask that the public stay clear of all fire activities.

The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group (NMAC) is increased the National Fire Preparedness Level (PL) to its highest point, PL-5, effective at 5:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time on Thursday, August 13. The last time that the National Preparedness Level was raised to 5 was on August 20, 2013. The National Preparedness Level remained at 5 for 7 days until it was dropped to 4 on August 26, 2013. This is the fifth time that PL-5 has been reached in the last ten years.

> The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group (NMAC) has increased the National Fire Preparedness Level (PL) to its highest point, PL-5, effective at 5:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time on Thursday, August 13.

> The last time that the National Preparedness Level was raised to 5 was on August 20, 2013. The National Preparedness Level remained at 5 for 7 days until it was dropped to 4 on August 26, 2013. This is the fifth time that PL-5 has been reached in the last ten years.

Canyon Creek Complex Fire Info
Inciweb at: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/
http://bicc-jdidc.org/index.shtml
(541) 263-0661


> Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex
The lightning-caused Windy Ridge Fire (ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit) located 4 miles west of Durkee first reported August 11 has merged with the lightning-caused Cornet Fire (ODF Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-unit) to form the Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex. The fire has been burning on ODF-protected lands, U.S.F.S. and B.L.M. in brush, grass and timber. The terrain on the fire is rugged and steep and ground crews have trouble accessing certain areas. This has necessitated aggressive air suppression including single engine air tankers (SEATs), helicopters and heavy air tankers, though increasingly scarce resources are straining air support.

Favorable night weather conditions allowed fire fighters to conduct burn out operations that were successful in the north portions of the fire. Crews continue to patrol and hold lines while mopping up around structures. Today's weather conditions are mostly sunny with west to northwest winds up to 7 mph and afternoon gusts of 15 mph. These weather conditions will allow for another favorable day for fire fighting efforts.
Resources: A partial list of resources includes 14 crews, 4 helicopters, 19 fire engines as well as Southwest Incident Management Team-Mark Ruggiero and
Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office-Ted Kunze.

Area Fire Closures:
OR-245 remains closed. As of this morning, Highways- 7 and Interstate-84 are open

A forest closure order is in place for the area around the Cornet/Windy Ridge Fire.
Please see the link to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Website http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/wallowa-whitman/home

Public Safety: the public should be cautious when driving; crews and equipment are working near and along the roads, and smoke may hinder visibility.

Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex Fire Info
Joint Info Center: 541-523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/


> The Eagle Creek Complex (Northeast Oregon District - Baker Sub-Unit) reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon, is now approximately 1,700 acres. The fire is burning on U.S.F.S. lands and lands protected by O.D.F. Three fires comprise the complex and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

A level 2 evacuation notice has been sent to residents along Forest Service Road 77 near Tamarack Campground, Bennett Peak and Main Eagle areas associated with the Eagle Complex. A Level 2 evacuation notice means residents should be SET (Ready, Set, Go) to evacuate and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information. Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be directed to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

An area closure has been implemented for public and firefighter safety. Firefighter and public safety remains the highest priorities.
Structure protection and continued safe fireline operations are planned for Friday. No structures have been burned.

A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will transition over the next couple of days with the current Type 3 team currently working on the Complex.


The fire danger rating has increased to EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect. For more information about the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest's Public Use Restrictions, please contact any forest office, or visit our website at www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman/ or on the Blue Mountain Fire Information BlogSpot at http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/.


Eagle Complex Fire Information
(541) 523-1267
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/


> The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) approximately16 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 24,471 acres and now estimated at 69 percent containment.

About 35 residents from Azalea and surrounding communities spent part of their Saturday night listening to fire officials and hearing about ongoing burn out operations. Operations Section Chief John Pellisier explained the ongoing burnout operations on the southern end of the fire.

"We have been working for the better part of a week preparing this area for fire. We plan to take a cautious approach, burning out small chunks at a time." This incremental approach will keep the fire close to the ground and avoid putting large amounts of smoke and ash in the air.

Today's fire tactics call for continuing the burn out operations on the fire's southern perimeter and deepening mop up lines on the northern reaches of the fire lines. The next few days should bring higher temperatures and lower humidities which could provide favorable conditions for the burn out operations.

Residents near the communities of Drew and Tiller might see increased smoke over the next few days. Motorists are urged to use caution when driving through smoke, treat it like they would fog and turn on their low-beam headlights. Those with smoke sensitivities should avoid extended exposure to smoky air.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

Resources:There are 1,441 personnel assigned to the fire with 28 crews, 23 engines, 21 water tenders, 17 bulldozers and 10 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to assist with many of the other fires in the state and geographic area.

To date the Stout Creek Fire has cost $29 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest.

Stouts Fire Information
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire


> The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 1,857 acres and 85 percent containment. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire


> The Phillips Creek Fire (Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit) located 7 miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest, has burned 2,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands. It is now approximately 94 percent contained and crews continue to do mop up. Unless things change, this will be the last report on this fire.


Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-437-1159
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

> The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group (NMAC) has increased the National Fire Preparedness Level (PL) to its highest point, PL-5, effective at 5:30 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time on Thursday, August 13. The last time that the National Preparedness Level was raised to 5 was on August 20, 2013. The National Preparedness Level remained at 5 for 7 days until it was dropped to 4 on August 26, 2013. This is the fifth time that PL-5 has been reached in the last ten years.

Residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, orview and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-510-7972 (Cell) & 503-945-7421 (office) or any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Eldorado Fire Morning Update - Sunday, August 16, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/16/15
OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 3
LINK SMITH, INCIDENT COMMANDER


ELDORADO FIRE UPDATE
August 16, 2015 10:00 a.m.

Unity, OR - Firefighters on the Eldorado Fire hope to take advantage of moderate weather conditions forecasted over the next few days. The fire is currently 18,600 acres with zero percent containment.

The fire started Friday morning and, pushed by high winds through the Eldorado Pass, grew to more than 10,000 acres in less than 24 hours. Lighter winds and cooler temperatures have allowed crews to gain a foothold in several areas.

The fire lies on both the north and south side of Highway 26 between Unity and Ironside, two small communities south of Baker City in eastern Oregon. While fire activity is greatest south of 26 near Ironside Mountain, firefighters are securing containment lines and mopping up on the north side of the highway. Today's plan is to continue to work the fire to the south into areas with lighter fuels, like grass and sage brush, where containment objectives can be better achieved.

Resources on the fire include 12 engines, 7 dozers and one helicopter. Several hand crews are expected to arrive from other fires in the next couple of days.

###
08/15/15
FIRE UPDATE: Eldorado Fire finds firefighting resources hard to come by (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/15
Situation Map of this evening's Eldorado Fire
Situation Map of this evening's Eldorado Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1072/87018/thumb_REDUCED_JPG_sit_ArcE_port_20150815_1700_Eldorado_OR972S000942_0815night_150dpi.jpg
Unity, OR - Firefighters on the Eldorado Fire eight miles southeast of Unity are attacking the fire with what night Operations Section Chief Eric Perkins has coined an "Engine Brigade."

With an abundance of fire activity taking place in the northwest, firefighting resources are hard to come by.

The night shift on this fire will be composed of three division supervisors and six engine crews. Fire officials are hopeful in obtaining additional personnel and equipment in the next couple of days. Three helicopters are also assigned to the fire.

The fire currently stands at 18,600 acres with zero percent containment.

Highway 26, which is now open to motorists, splits the fire with much of the activity burning toward the south in the Ironside Mountain area. While the fire to the north and northeast of the highway is looking good, firefighters plan to work the south and southeast edges near Rose Creek Road, where suppression efforts will be more effective in lighter fuels such as grass and sage brush.

The following evacuation level notifications remain in effect.

Level 1 (Ready): Shirts Creek; Job Creek and south of Job Creek Road; East of Bull Run Road; and south of Campbell Lane.

Level 2 (Set): Dry Gulch area and Ripley Gulch area.

Level 3 (Go): Beam Creek area; Eldorado Ditch area; Long Creek area (Baker County); Long Creek Reservoir; and Camp Creek south of Highway 26.

Cooperating agencies on the fire include the Oregon Department of Forestry, Ironside Rangeland Protection Association, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

FIRE AT A GLANCE

LOCATION: 8 MILES SE OF UNITY
FIRE SIZE: 18,600 acres
CONTAINMENT: 0%
CREWS: 2
ENGINES: 12
BULLDOZERS: 7
HELICOPTERS: 1
AIR TANKERS: 0

TOTAL PERSONNEL: 161

ESTIMATED COST TO DATE: $134,000


Attached Media Files: Situation Map of this evening's Eldorado Fire
Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, The Adjutant General, Oregon promoted to the rank of Lt. Gen. (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/15/15
2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-AH721-072.jpg
2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-AH721-072.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/87016/thumb_150815-Z-AH721-072.jpg
SALEM, Oregon - Oregon National Guard Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general in ceremony, today, at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon.

The ceremony was presided over by Gen. Frank J. Grass, Chief of the National Guard Bureau, with Hokanson's friends and family in attendance.

Hokanson has served as the Adjutant General for Oregon for more than two years and will now assume the role of Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.

Photo captions:
150815-Z-AH721-072: Gen. Frank J. Grass (left), Chief of the National Guard Bureau, presents a medal to Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, during his promotion ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon, August 15. Hokanson has been assigned as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

150815-Z-AH721-105: Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, stands between his wife, Kelly (left), and mother, Dianne Hokanson (right), as they pin on his new rank as lieutenant general during his promotion ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon, August 15. Hokanson has served as the Adjutant General for Oregon for more than two years and will now assume the role of Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

150815-Z-SJ786-039: Gen. Frank J. Grass (front), Chief of the National Guard Bureau, and Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, salute the U.S. Flag during Hokanson's promotion ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon, August 15. Hokanson has been assigned as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. (Photo by Capt. John Farmer, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150815-Z-SJ786-062: Gen. Frank J. Grass (right), Chief of the National Guard Bureau, congratulates Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, during his promotion ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon, August 15. Hokanson has been assigned as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. (Photo by Capt. John Farmer, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

150815-Z-SJ786-053: Gen. Frank J. Grass (left), Chief of the National Guard Bureau, gives a speech during a promotion ceremony for Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Reserve Center in Clackamas, Oregon, August 15. Hokanson has been assigned as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. (Photo by Capt. John Farmer, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-AH721-072.jpg , 2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-AH721-105.jpg , 2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-SJ786-062.jpg , 2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-SJ786-053.jpg , 2015-08/962/87016/150815-Z-SJ786-039.jpg
State Forester calls on Oregonians to prevent all human-caused fires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
August 15, 2015
Media Contact: Paul Ries, 503-508-0990

"Wildfire activity in Oregon has escalated significantly since Friday, particularly in eastern Oregon," said Doug Decker, Oregon State Forester. "If you couple these major fires with increasing shortages of firefighting resources and add in the extreme fire danger and conditions statewide, you can see just how critical it is to prevent the next fire."
"I'm asking every Oregonian and visitor to help us eliminate the risk of any new human-caused fire through the rest of fire season," said Decker. "Now is the time for vigilance and fire awareness."

Fire regulations are in effect across Oregon's wildlands, pertaining directly to anyone living, recreating or working there. The Department of Forestry uses its citation authority to enforce fire restrictions on lands in its jurisdiction, and investigates every fire. Liability for fire costs goes to responsible parties.

Multiple fast-moving fires have ignited in eastern Oregon in the past 48 hours. The 13,742-acre El Dorado [http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/] Fire, the 34,000 acre Canyon Creek Complex [http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/], the 23,000-acre Windy Ridge [http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4497/] and the 26,000-acre Cornet [http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/] fires are burning forest resources, threatening homes and transportation corridors, and prompting evacuations and closures. On Friday, Governor Brown invoked the Conflagration Act to mobilize structural firefighting resources for the Canyon Creek Complex of fires near John Day. Additional structural task forces have been mobilized elsewhere in the state.
30 second video of State Forester Doug Decker's call to Oregonians at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evoV67OztLU&feature=youtu.be

Important wildfire prevention resources:
ODF social media for the latest #ORfire information at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx.
Fire prevention message from Oregon Governor Kate Brown at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfcNXVJLx1k
Interactive fire restrictions map at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx
ODF prevention resources at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/fire/fire.aspx#Fire_Prevention
Keep Oregon Green Association at http://www.keeporegongreen.org/
ODF's Wildfire Blog at http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/


###
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Saturday, August 15, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/15
FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The El Dorado Fire reported Friday morning 5 miles southeast of Unity, Oregon is burning on Oregon Department of Forestry private lands, Vale BLM and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands. The fire burning primarily in grass, brush and timber is exhibiting extreme fire behavior including wind-driven runs and is approximately 12,000 acres at this time. Significant spread to the east and northeast is expected. Fire officials are recommending that people avoid driving near the fire due to increased firefighting traffic.

Resources assigned: Smith's Type 1 ODF IMT assumed command of the incident at 10:00 this morning.
Cause is under investigation.
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4502/
Joint Incident Comment (JIC): 541-523-2905


> Canyon Creek Complex
This lightning-caused complex of fires located south of John Day Oregon and reported Wednesday afternoon is now estimated at 34,143 acres.
The fire has exhibited extreme behaviors including crowning, wind-driven runs and long-range spotting up to two miles. Strong winds pushed the Berry Creek and Mason Springs Fires to the north toward Canyon City and John Day on Friday.

The fires merged together creating a fast moving fire forcing residents to evacuate and fire fighters to retreat from the fire line. Air resources were grounded in the late afternoon because of the heavy winds. Today the fire is being managed by a local Type 3 Team, including ODF resources, with support from the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Red Team.

Structural task forces are in place, working to protect homes in the path of the fire. Crews working to assess structures are challenged by access due to damage to road infrastructure such as burned wooden bridges and fallen trees.

There are currently 26 primary residences confirmed destroyed. This number may rise as crews make assessments.

The fire is estimated to be approximately 34,000 acres based on an IR flight from Friday night. Fire fighters will face calmer winds and increased humidity today.

Resources
Throughout the night dozers worked to put in line south of Canyon City. Available resources continue to be limited; approximately 225 people are currently assigned to this fire including 5 crews and 1 helicopter.

Today at 4pm the Great Basin Team (Type 1) will be in-briefed, with plans to take command of the fire on Sunday.
Firefighting resources are depleted at a national level in the west.

Multiple evacuations have been issued by the Grant County Sheriff's Department across the area. Due to the severity of the situation of the Canyon Creek Complex, the Conflagration Act has been enacted.

Evacuations
Level 2 evacuation notices have been issued for:
Laycock Creek Road, Nance Rock Road, West Bench Road, Dog Creek

Level 3 evacuation notices have been issued for: South of Canyon City to the J-Bar-L Ranch, Marysville Road, Adams Drive, South side of Marysville Road, Pine Creek

Those under a Level 1 evacuation notice need to be aware of the situation
Level 2 - prepare to leave on short notice
Level 3 - evacuate immediately

Please continue to monitor KJDY at 1400 am for more evacuation information

Closures and shelters
Highway 395 south is expected to remain closed for potential three more days at least due to active fire, hazard trees and heavy fire fighter traffic. A Red Cross shelter has been set up at the Mount Vernon Community Hall. Multiple churches are also providing assistance.
Multiple landowners are offering space for livestock as well as the Grant County Fairgrounds.

Canyon Creek Complex Fire information
(541) 263-0661
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/



> Cornet Fire The lightning-caused Cornet Fire (EOA) near Hereford, Oregon on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Vale BLM District and on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry is approximately 26,000 acres. It is 5 percent contained and now threatens approximately 146 residences.

On Thursday Governor Kate Brown invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act in response to the Cornet Fire. This declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The fire is exhibiting extreme behavior with crowning, wind-driven runs and spotting.

Resources: Approximately 457 people are assigned to this fire including 14 crews, 4 helicopters and 19 fire engines.
Ruggreio's Type 1 Southwest IMTeam 2 assumed command of the Incident at 1800 hours yesterday.

Evacuations:
Level 1 (READY) - Elk Creek Lane to Griffin Gulch Lane
Level 2 (GET SET) -Bridgeport
Level 3 (GO) -Beaver Creek -Black Mountain -Denny Creek -French Gulch -Greater Gowen Valley Rural Fire to French Gulch -Old Auburn Ln

Closures: Baker County Sheriff' Office has issued a Level 3 Evacuation Order for Stices Gulch and a level 2 Evacuation Order for Rancheria Creek, Black Mountain and Denny Creek.

Cornet Fire Joint Information Center
541-523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/



> The lightning-caused Windy Ridge Fire (BLM) located 4 miles west of Durkee first reported August 11 has moved to the northeast toward Interstate-84. 41 residences are threatened.

The fire is burning in brush, grass and timber and size is estimated to be 22,862 acres.

The terrain on the fire is rugged and steep and ground crews have trouble accessing certain areas. This has necessitated aggressive air suppression including single engine air tankers (SEATs), helicopters and heavy air tankers, though increasingly scarce resources are straining air support.

The Team is transitioning to Ruggiero's Type 1 Team (Cornet and Windy Ridge Fires expected to merge).

Windy Ridge Fire Information
541-523-2904



> The Eagle Complex (USFS) reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon, is now approximately 1,700 acres. Three fires comprise the complex and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

Strong winds and continued hot, dry conditions caused additional growth of the Eagle Fire Complex on Friday. The fire spotted over Forest Service Road 77 road in the southwest corner of the fire. Firefighters were able to successfully catch all of the spot fires and no structures were burned.

Today's operations include continued structure protection and fire suppression.

Resources: A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will transition over the next couple of days with the current Type 3 team currently working on the Complex.

Evacuations
Level 2 evacuation notices remain in effect. A Level 2 evacuation notice means residents should be SET (Ready, Set, Go) to evacuate, and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information. Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be directed to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

An area closure has been implemented for public and firefighter safety and can be viewed at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/

The fire danger rating has increased to EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect. For more information about the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest's Public Use Restrictions, please contact any forest office, or visit our website at www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman/ or on the Blue Mountain Fire Information BlogSpot at http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/.

Eagle Complex Fire Information
(541) 523-1267
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/


> The Chambers Mill fire located approximately 2 miles south of Lorane is now 100 percent lined with a combination of dozer and hand lines.
Initial attack was strongly supported by air attack; three residences were threatened.

Friday's resources: 4 Hand Crews, 2 helicopters, 4 engines, 4 bulldozers, 6 water tenders.

Crews have been mopping up and Territorial Highway is now open both ways.
Cooperators on the incident include Weyerhaeuser Co. and the Bureau of Land Management. The fire size was 180 acres.

> The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) approximately16 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 24,181 acres and 65 percent containment.

Night crews on the Stouts Creek Fire continued to be vigilant, holding and widening control lines while working toward securing the south end of the fire. Overnight fire activity was low as firefighters patrolled the northern portions of the 24,181-acre fire looking for hot spots and flare ups.

There are 1,645 personnel assigned to the fire with 49 crews, 46 engines, 27 water tenders, 20 bulldozers and 11 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to fires with greater needs. The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $25.5 million. The Incident Management Team leading the effort under unified command is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands, and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest. Twenty-three states and three Canadian provinces have provided staff for this effort.

Stouts Fire Information
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire


> The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 85 percent containment.
The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire



> The Phillips Creek Fire (Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit) located 7 miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest, has burned 2,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands. It is now approximately 89 percent contained and crews continue to do mop up.

Planned actions include holding and mopping up along the fire perimeter, and continuing repair work on contingency lines.The tentative plan is to transition management of the fire back to the local district in the next three to six days.

Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-437-1159
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, orview and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office) or 503-510-7972 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
PNWU welcomes Class of 2019
Pacific NW Univ. of Health Sciences - 08/15/15
Contact: Ryan Rodruck
Tel: 509.249.7861
Email: rrodruck@pnwu.edu

August 15, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences welcomes Class of 2019

YAKIMA, WA - Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences' (PNWU) College of Osteopathic Medicine welcomed 140 new student doctors in a special ceremony held Saturday. The students comprise the college's eighth class since the university's founding in 2005.

The White Coat Ceremony is a traditional celebration held by medical schools throughout the country. During the ceremony, students receive their white lab coats signifying their role as student medical professionals.

"This is a very special and ceremonial day for students and their families," said Dr. Thomas A. Scandalis, Dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine. "The White Coat Ceremony begins an important step in a student's medical career and is an important recognition of the hard work it took to arrive at this point in their education," Dr. Scandalis continued.

More than 4,200 candidates applied for admission to the College of Osteopathic Medicine for the 2015 application cycle.

"Of all the schools I applied to, PNWU felt the most like home. I'm excited to be here and begin my medical education" said Student Doctor Teresa Straub, an incoming first year medical student from Ridgefield, Washington.

During their first year, student learning focuses on the scientific foundations of medicine, clinical skills, community-based medicine and application of osteopathic principals. The ceremony begins four years of intense medical education in the university's osteopathic medical program.

###

About PNWU: In 2004, physicians and community leaders raised the awareness and resources to build a health sciences university where the next generation of health care professionals would train. Located in Yakima, Washington, Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences welcomed its first class of 70 medical school students into the College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2008 and graduated them in 2012. Today the University houses 300 medical students who are training under the careful instruction of highly-qualified faculty. In addition to the Yakima campus, PNWU has established 18 core rotation sites in communities around the Pacific Northwest. Hospitals and clinics around the region have welcomed PNWU students, training them in the clinical settings where they will eventually practice.
FIRES UPDATE: Cornet, Windy Ridge, Eagle Complex & El Dorado Fires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/15
Firefighters welcomed the cooler weather and lighter winds last night but wind gusts and fire conditions remain unpredictable.

During the day, fire was driven by wind and there was extreme crowning of fire in trees with several spot fires.

Local fire resources from Baker County are being assisted by nearly 700 firefighters and personnel from around the state.

> > Evacuations
Level 3=Go! Level 2=Be Ready Level 1=Get Set

For more details about evacuation instructions, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/Documents/Ready,%20Set,%20Go!%20Evacuation%20Levels. pdf

> CORNET
Level 1 (READY) - Elk Creek Lane to Griffin Gulch Lane
Level 2 (GET SET) -Bridgeport
Level 3 (GO) -Beaver Creek -Black Mountain -Denny Creek -French Gulch -Greater Gowen Valley Rural Fire to French Gulch -Old Auburn Ln

> WINDY RIDGE
Level 1 (READY) - Durkee
Level 2 (GET SET) - Sutton Creek
Level 3 (GO) -Alder Creek -Burnt River Canyon -Dry Creek -Cry Creek Cutoff -Ebell Creek -Hill Creek Rd.

> ELDORADO
Level 1 (READY) - East of Bull Run Rd. -Job Creek & South of Job Creek -South of Campbell Ln
Level 2 (GET SET) -Dry Gulch Area -Ripley Gulch Area
Level 3 (GO) -Beam Creek Area (Malheur County) -Camp Creek South of Hwy 26 -Eldorado Ditch Area -Long Creek Area (Baker County) -Long Creek Reservoir/Campground -Ironside (Malheur County)

> EAGLE COMPLEX
Level 1 (READY)
Level 2 (GET SET) -FS 77 Rd. -Bennett Peak Area -Main Eagle Area -Tamarack Campground
Level 3 (GO)

Road Closures
Highway 245 still closed 11 miles north of Hereford
Highway 7 has reopened
Highway 26 closed from milepost 213-231
Interstate 84 has reopened, but may need to close again depending on fire conditions

Structure Loss
Several structures have been destroyed by the fires. Field crews are still working to determine exact numbers and locations. In some cases, assessments are hampered by dangerous trees that still need to be felled before crews or residents can safely access the area. Some homes were saved due to work done in advance by homeowners and firefighters to create a defensible space and keep areas wet and clear. For more information about improving your home's odds of withstanding a wildfire, visit http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/homewildfiresafety.asp

Areas Affected Cornet Fire - 26,000 acres, five percent contained
Windy Ridge Fire - 22,862 acres
Eagle Fire Complex - 900 acres
El Dorado Fire -12,000 acres

Shelters
The American Red Cross has opened a shelter at the Baker City Middle School with 100 beds currently available. The shelter is open 24-hours and has food, bedding and toiletries for evacuees. For more shelter information, contact David Morman at 503-569-1380.

Incident Priorities

Night fire crews are working on triaging and preparing structures near fire areas.

Weather Forecast & Smoke Conditions
Temperatures are expected to be mostly sunny with a high near 82. Less wind is expected for the weekend. Shifting winds will impact fire operations and pose safety concerns for fire commanders.

Smoke
Numerous fires in Baker County and the surrounding area may make smoke an issue. To monitor the air quality index, the public can access the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's website at www.deq.state.or.us/aqi.

Recreation Areas Regulated closures are in effect on State and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in northeast and central Oregon. Please check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry office for public use restrictions on lands protected by ODF. Visit the Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch webpage at: www.bmidc.org or contact a local Oregon Department of Forestry office for more complete information.

Similar restrictions may be in effect on State and private lands protected by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (WA-DNR).
More information can be found on the WA-DNR website at: http://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/firedanger/BurnRisk.aspx.
Winds Challenge Firefighters on Eagle Complex
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/15
Strong winds and continued hot, dry conditions caused additional growth of the Eagle Complex, located approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City, on Friday. An estimate of the increased acreage burned was not available at the time of this release. A more detailed news release will be sent out later today.

Key information available at 9 pm last night includes::

· No structures were burned.
· Level 2 Evacuation Notices remain in effect.
· A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will transition over the next couple of days with the current Type 3 team currently working on the Complex.

FIRE DANGER
The fire danger rating has increased to EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect.

For more information about the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest's Public Use Restrictions, please contact any forest office, or visit our website at www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman/ or on the Blue Mountain Fire Information BlogSpot at http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/.

MORE INFORMATION
For continued information on the Eagle Complex, go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/
08/14/15
Inmate escapes from Columbia River Correctional Institution - inmate back in custody (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/14/15
Inmate Danny Spillers
Inmate Danny Spillers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1070/86654/thumb_spillers.jpg
UPDATE: Danny Spillers is back in custody. U.S. Marshals arrested him today at approximately 5:30 p.m. in Fairview. No other details are available at this time.



CRCI staff discovered inmate Danny Spillers missing at approximately 5:30 a.m., Sunday, August 2, after discovering a broken window in the kitchen area.

Spillers is a 35-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet tall, 185 pounds, with red hair and hazel eyes. He is most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange (or red shorts), and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Spillers entered DOC custody on June 9, 2015, on four counts of burglary in the second degree and one count of unauthorized use of a vehicle out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date is April 13, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding Spillers whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

CRCI is a minimum-security facility that houses approximately 595 male inmates who are within four years of release. Located in the largest metropolitan area of the state, this facility is focused on cognitive programming, work programs, and preparing inmates for return to the community. CRCI is home to a 50-bed cognitive restructuring Alternative Incarceration Program (AIP). Individuals who successfully complete this 180-day in-prison program are released to the community for a 90-day transitional leave period. Individuals who successfully complete the transitional leave period are granted a reduction in their sentence and move to post-prison supervision. CRCI is located on a 26-acre site in northeast Portland and officially in opened in September 1990.

####


Attached Media Files: Inmate Danny Spillers
Health advisory for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach lifted August 14
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/15
August 14, 2015

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Sunset Bay State Park Beach in Coos County. The health authority issued the advisory August 12 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program's website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Update: Health advisory for Klamath River below JC Boyle Reservoir to California border lifted
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/15
August 14, 2015

Reduced blue-green algae toxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority is modifying a health advisory issued July 28, and extended July 29 and August 4, for several water bodies in the Klamath Basin in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that levels of blue-green algae toxins in the Klamath River below JC Boyle Reservoir are below levels that could be harmful to human health. However, the advisory extending from Upper Klamath and Agency lakes to the JC Boyle Reservoir is still in effect. The area where the advisory is still in effect includes the Link River downstream to Lake Ewauna and the Keno area.

The Oregon Health Authority recommends that people continue to be cautious with their pets in the Klamath River downstream from JC Boyle Reservoir, because toxins are still above the very low exposure levels established for dogs.

Continuous cold water conditions in Pelican Bay have prevented blue-green algae from growing in this location, so Pelican Bay is not included in the advisory that is still in place.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid contact if the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, or if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. Also contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories," for information about advisories issued or lifted for the season.

# # #
Meetings on proposed gold mine to be held in Ontario, Bend
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 08/14/15
MALHEUR COUNTY, Ore.-Upcoming informational meetings in Ontario and Bend will offer the public an opportunity to comment on a proposed gold mine in Malheur County.

Calico Resources USA is proposing development of an underground gold mine and ore processing facility in Malheur County, about 25 miles south/southwest of Vale. In July, the company filed a second amended notice of intent, which changed the location of ore processing, tailings management area, and administration building to be sited on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and eliminated an associated haul road. In August, the company filed supplemental environmental baseline data.

The revised documents are available online: bit.ly/calicomeetings. Copies are also available for review at DOGAMI's offices in Portland and Albany, as well as at the Vale City Library and the Ontario Community Library.

Informational meetings will be held:
August 26, 2015
Department of Environmental Quality
475 NE Bellevue Dr., Suite 110, Bend
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. PST
5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. PST

September 1, 2015
Four Rivers Cultural Center
676 SW 5th Avenue, Ontario
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. MST
5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. MST

The informational meetings and public comment period will identify issues raised by the proposed mining operation and offer the public a chance to provide input, including input related to collection of baseline data, regarding the pre-mine environment and evaluation of the consolidated application for the proposed mine by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and other state agencies.

Written public comment on the proposal will be accepted until 5 p.m. on September 15, 2015. Comments must be received by this date and time. Comments may be submitted by email to calicoinformation@mlrr.oregongeology.com (note "Grassy Mt comment" in the subject line) or by mail to DOGAMI, 229 Broadalbin St. SW, Albany, OR 97321.
Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet September 1
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/15
August 14, 2015

What: A public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee (TRAC), which provides recommendations and guidance on program and budget matters to the state Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP). Agenda items include TRAC overview, TPEP status update, budget and program proposals, and TRAC recommendations.

When: Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2-3:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A
800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the governor. Its members represent private organizations and state agencies dedicated to reducing of the harmful impact of tobacco use on Oregonians.

Details: Please note space is limited.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodation by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-1699, TTY 711, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Baker County Fire Update Cornet, Windy Ridge, Eagle Fire Complex, and Eldorado Fires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/14/15
This news release is being sent by the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal on behalf of Baker County

Friday, August 14, 2015, 1pm
Fire and Evacuation Information: (541)-523-2905
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com
https://www.facebook.com/CornetFire

Several fires in Baker County are keeping fire crews busy this afternoon. An incident management team from the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office is coordinating with local fire departments, Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service and a federal incident management team to manage resources and operations in the area. Local fire resources from Baker County are being assisted by 644 firefighters from around the state to contain the wildfire and protect structures and property.

Evacuations
Level 3=Go!
Level 2=Be Ready
Level 1=Get Set
For more details about evacuation instructions, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/Documents/Ready,%20Set,%20Go!%20Evacuation%20Levels.pdf

Level 3 Evacuations: 125 homes at Denny Creek Road, Rancheria Creek, Black Mountain, Powder River, Stices Gulch Road, Beaver Creek, Ebell Creek Lane, Dry Creek Road, Old Hwy 30, Alder Creek Road, Hill Creek Road, Pleasant Valley

Level 2 Evacuations: 36 homes at Sutton Creek Road, Old Auburn Road, Tamarack Campground, Bennett Peak area, Main Eagle area

Level 1 Evacuations: 7 homes at Bridgeport Road

Road Closures
Highway 245 still closed 11 miles north of Hereford
Highway 7 closed at Salisbury Junction
Highway 26 closed from milepost 213-231
Interstate 84 has reopened, but may need to close again depending on fire conditions
Forest Service Road 11 at junction of the 1140 road the 1140-025 at the junction of the 1140.
Forest service Road 1117 at the junction of the 1140
Forest Service Road 1118 at the Forest Boundary
Forest Service Road 1135 at the Forest Boundary
Coronet Creek road at the Forest Boundary

Structure Loss
Several structures have been destroyed by the fires, but field crews are still working to determine exact numbers and locations. In some cases, assessments are hampered by dangerous trees that need to be felled before crews or residents can safely access the area.

Some homes were saved due to work done in advance by homeowners and firefighters to create a defensible space and keep areas wet and clear. For more information about improving your home's odds of withstanding a wildfire, visit http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/homewildfiresafety.aspx

Areas Affected
Cornet Fire - 15,000 acres
Windy Ridge Fire - 30,000 acres
Eagle Fire Complex - 1500 acres
Eldorado Fire (8 miles SE of Unity near Eldorado Campground) -1000 acres

Shelters
The American Red Cross has opened a shelter at the Baker City Middle School with 100 beds currently available. The shelter is open 24-hours and has food, bedding and toiletries for evacuees. For more shelter information, contact Kirsten Barnes at 503.999.7590.

Incident Priorities
Several teams are organized to prioritize,life safety, structural protection and establish flanks to surround actively burning areas. Due to extreme fire behavior, large fire runs, spot fires, shifting winds, as well as snags and green trees, division supervisors are concerned about firefighter safety.

Weather Forecast & Smoke Conditions
Temperatures are expected to be mostly sunny with a high near 90 degrees on Friday.
An upper low that has been off the coast the last few days will finally push into Oregon today. The associated cold front is expected to push through the region in the early to mid afternoon. Winds will shift from a southerly direction to a west to northwest. Less wind is expected for the weekend. Shifting winds will impact fire operations and pose safety concerns for fire commanders. Numerous fires in Baker County and the surrounding area may make smoke an issue. To monitor the air quality index, the public can access the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's website at www.deq.state.or.us/aqi.

Recreation Areas
Regulated closures are in effect on State and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in northeast and central Oregon. Please check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry office for public use restrictions on lands protected by ODF. Visit the Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch webpage at: www.bmidc.org or contact a local Oregon Department of Forestry office for more complete information. Similar restrictions may be in effect on State and private lands protected by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (WA-DNR). More information can be found on the WA-DNR website at: http://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/firedanger/BurnRisk.aspx.


# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Friday, August 14, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/14/15
FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY (ODF)-PROTECTED LANDS

Chambers Mill Fire
Located approximately two miles south of Lorane, it is now 100 percent lined with a combination of dozer and hand lines. Three residences were threatened. Initial attack was strongly supported by air attack.

Resources: 4 Hand Crews, 2 helicopters, 4 fire engines, 4 bulldozers, 6 water tenders.

Crews are busy mopping up today and Territorial Highway is now open both ways. Cooperators on the incident include Weyerhaeuser Co. and the Bureau of Land Management. The fire size was 180 acres.

Canyon Creek Complex
The Berry Creek Fire burning seven miles south of John Day saw strong winds and increased fire activity yesterday. It was reported August 12 following a series of early morning thunderstorms in the area. Currently the fire is estimated at 50 acres, burning primarily in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness, with a small number of ODF-protected acres burned.

A local Type 3 organization was mobilized August 13 to increase suppression efforts. Active fire activity in the region has limited available resources to respond to the fire. The fire is burning in heavy fuels and slash with wind- and terrain-driven fire behavior. Today the winds are expected to increase in the fire area. ODF's John Day Unit is actively engaged in the suppression efforts for the fire.

Mason Springs Fire
The fire is estimated at 600 acres burning on U.S. Forest Service lands seven miles north of Seneca. The fire is approximately one mile from private lands protected by ODF. A Level 2 evacuation has been issued for the private lands near the fire. Oregon Highway 395 near Seneca is closed because of fire activity along the highway. Due to the complexity of these two fires the Rocky Mountain Blue (Type 2) Team will take command of the Berry Creek and the Mason Springs Fires on Monday. The two fires are now the Canyon Creek Complex.

Canyon Creek Complex Fire information
(541) 263-0661
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/

Eagle Complex
The Eagle Complex reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon, is currently estimated at 1,500 acres. Three fires comprise the complex and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by ODF. Difficult terrain combined with hot weather and wind contributed to fire growth. Firefighter and public safety remains the highest priority. Structure protection and continued safe fire line operations are planned for Friday. No structures have burned.

A level 2 evacuation notice has been sent to residents along Forest Service Road 77 near Tamarack Camp Ground, Bennett Peak and Main Eagle areas associated with the Eagle Complex. A Level 2 evacuation notice means residents should be SET (Ready, Set, Go) to evacuate, and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information.

Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be directed to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

An area closure has been implemented for public and firefighter safety and can be viewed at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/

The fire danger rating has increased to EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect.

For more information about the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest's Public Use Restrictions, please contact any forest office, or visit our website at www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman/ or on the Blue Mountain Fire Information BlogSpot at http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/

Eagle Complex Fire Information
(541) 523-1267
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/

Cornet Fire
The lightning-caused Cornet Fire (Eastern Oregon Area) near Hereford, Oregon burning approximately 7 miles east of Hereford, Oregon on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Vale BLM District and on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry is approximately 12,791 acres. It threatens approximately 112 residences.

Gov. Kate Brown invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act in response to the Cornet Fire. This declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire. Yesterday the priority was protecting structures in Stices Gulch. Firefighters continued working the south and west flanks of the fire and will continue to build lines to the northeast as resources are available. More fire growth is expected due to fuels and weather.

Closures: Baker County Sheriff' Office has issued a Level 3 Evacuation Order for Stices Gulch and a level 2 Evacuation Order for Rancheria Creek, Black Mountain and Denny Creek.

Cornet Fire Joint Information Center
541-523-2905
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/

Stouts Creek Fire
The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association [DFPA]) 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 24,181 acres and 65 percent containment. Night crews continue to be vigilant, holding and widening control lines while working toward securing the south end of the fire. Overnight fire activity was low as firefighters patrolled the northern portions of the fire looking for hot spots and flare ups.

Using heavy equipment, crews have completed the majority of the containment line on the south end in preparation for the large burnout, north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek. Firefighters will install hoses, pumps and tanks as managers wait for favorable conditions to complete the next phase. Based on current progress and weather forecasts, the burnout could begin in the next few days.

"We should have the line completed today," says John Pellissier, Operations Chief for the fire. "We're about two-thirds done with the mechanical work and then we'll run hose and water sources throughout. Operationally, we'll be ready. Then it's up to Mother Nature."

Fire managers are looking for weather conditions that allow for a safe, slow burn that will minimize impact on timber and other natural resources. With many factors involved in the burn operations, any number of things out of parameters could delay the burnout.

"All of the weather conditions and other factors have to be right," Pellissier said. "We are looking to start with a smaller, slow trial process and this could take several days. It will be a slow, steady process."

The public will be given as much notice before the burnout begins as possible.

Resources: There are 1,645 personnel assigned to the fire with 49 hand crews, 46 fire engines, 27 water tenders, 20 bulldozers and 11 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to fires with greater needs.

Costs: The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $25.5 million. The Incident Management Team leading the effort under unified command is protecting lands that are about 48 percent on state protection, which includes BLM and private lands, and 52 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. Twenty-three states and three Canadian provinces have provided staff for this effort.

Stouts Fire Information
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Cable Crossing Fire
The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association [DFPA]) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 85 percent containment. Crews continue to make good progress, with firefighters now focusing efforts on mopping up hot spots, extinguishing all visible smokes and smoldering material within 300-500 feet of the fire trail. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire

Phillips Creek Fire
The Phillips Creek Fire (ODF Northeast Oregon District, LaGrande Unit) located seven miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon is burning in brush, grass, slash and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest. It has burned 2,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands.

Following transition to the local Type 3 interagency Incident Management Team led by Incident Commander (IC) Joel McCraw and Deputy IC Renee Kuehner yesterday, crews continued to make steady progress in mop-up operations on all flanks of the fire. As containment objectives were successfully achieved, resources were released to help suppress and support other area fires.
The tentative plan is to transition management of the fire back to the local district in the next three to six days.

Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-437-1159
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, orview and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office) or 503-521-5868 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather

Wildfire smoke forecasts

Wildfire smoke and air quality

Keep Oregon Green


Follow us on Twitter & Facebook

Cynthia Orlando | Public Information Officer & Certified arborist
http://www.oregon.gov/odf/urbanforests/Pages/index.aspx
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310
Desk 503.945.7421
cynthia.a.orlando@oregon.gov

Connect with us:
www.oregon.gov/ODF | social media | State Forests Online Community
Arts Commission announces Small Operating Grant program (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 08/14/15
A summer art camp at The Dalles Art Center, where young people created self portraits using a stencil process. The Dalles Art Center is eligible to apply for an Arts Commission Small Operating Grant
A summer art camp at The Dalles Art Center, where young people created self portraits using a stencil process. The Dalles Art Center is eligible to apply for an Arts Commission Small Operating Grant
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1418/86983/thumb_The_Dalles_Art_Center_summer_art_camp_group.jpg
Salem, OR - A two-year pilot grant program designed to provide operating support to arts organizations with budgets under $150,000 is now open at the Oregon Arts Commission.
Applications for the first round of funding will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 16, at http://oregon.culturegrants.org/. Eligibility is limited to organizations that have operated as an IRS recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit for two years or more.

The new program replaces the Arts Recognition Grant program and provides on-going operating support to Oregon's small arts providers, said David Huff, the Arts Commission's assistant director. "We are hoping to serve a broader field of small arts organizations that provide access to meaningful arts programming for Oregonians throughout the state," said Huff.

Grant awards will fund operating expenses such as administration, facility costs and productions expenses and are restricted to nonprofit organizations operating with a mission that describes the arts as their primary purpose and that provide ongoing arts programming to their community. Grant award amounts will generally range between $1,000 and $3,000.
Application materials and narrative questions are dramatically reduced in comparison to operating support applications for medium and large organizations.

"Oregon has hundreds of small arts groups doing great work with very limited resources," said Huff. "This program ensures those groups have an opportunity to access funding."

"This new grant program is in direct response to feedback we received during our statewide town meetings last year," said Julie Vigeland, Arts Commission chair. "As part of our new strategic plan, we are working hard to streamline and simplify our grants programs while providing meaningful support to all levels of Oregon's arts organizations."

For more information visit http://www.oregonartscommission.org/grants/small-operating-grants or contact Community Arts Coordinator Brian Wagner at (503) 986-0083 or brian.wagner@orgon.gov.
- ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Oregon Business Development Department in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon
The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.
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Attached Media Files: A summer art camp at The Dalles Art Center, where young people created self portraits using a stencil process. The Dalles Art Center is eligible to apply for an Arts Commission Small Operating Grant
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet August 21
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 08/14/15
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, August 21 at DOGAMI's Portland offices, 800 NE Oregon St., Ste. 965.

The meeting agenda is available at www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly at sites around the state. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Chambers Mill Fire Daily Update - Aug. 14, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/14/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Steve Kendall, Incident Commander

Containment Reaches 70 percent

Night fire crews continued mop-up and plumbing operations on the 180-acre Chambers Mill Fire near the community of Lorane. Fire crews completed hose lays to all areas of the fire and have water tenders and pumping stations in place. With strong containment lines in place and water to the fire, mop-up operations are proceeding swiftly. Fire managers expect the fire to be fully contained later this evening.

Today's cooler weather and higher humidities offer favorable conditions for mop-up operations. The completed dozer and hand lines will be strengthened as crews complete mop-up activities deeper into the fire's perimeter.

The Western Lane District has approximately 130 people currently assigned to the fire and is providing Spartan accommodations to about half of those at the ODF office in Veneta.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has re-opened both lanes of Territorial Highway. Motorists are urged use caution when passing through the area.

The Chambers Mill Fire is burning on private and public lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. Cooperators on the incident include Weyerhaeuser Co. and the Bureau of Land Management. The cause remains under investigation.

FIRE AT A GLANCE
Size: 180 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 70 percent
Expected Date of Containment: Evening of 8/14/15
Crews and Equipment:
Hand Crews: 4
Helicopters: 2
Fire engines: 4
Bulldozers: 4
Water Tenders: 6
Personnel: 130

For More Information:
541-935-2283
https://www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry
Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, The Adjutant General, Oregon will be promoted to the rank of Lt. Gen. (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/14/15
2015-08/962/86970/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
2015-08/962/86970/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/86970/thumb_Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
SALEM, Oregon--Oregon National Guard Major General Daniel R. Hokanson will officially promote to the rank of Lieutenant General in a ceremony on August 15 at 10 a.m. at Camp Withycombe, Oregon.

The ceremony will be presided over by Gen. Frank J. Grass, Chief, National Guard Bureau.

Maj. Gen. Hokanson has been assigned as Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM), Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.

http://www.flashalert.net/news.html?id=962


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/86970/Hokanson_Official_Photo.jpg
08/13/15
2015 Oregon Dairy Princess, Emma Miller, Schedules Appearance at SAGE Center, Boardman - August 20, 11:00 am -12:30 pm
Oregon Dairy Farmers Assn. - 08/13/15
August 13, 2015 - Salem, Oregon - The Oregon Dairy Farmers Association is pleased to announce a special opportunity for community leaders, school age children and the general public to meet the 2015 Oregon Dairy Princess, Emma Miller, at the SAGE Center in Boardman, Oregon on Thursday, August 20th from 11:00 - 12:30 pm. Emma is including the appearance at the SAGE Center in conjunction with her participation in the Morrow County Fair later the same day.
The Oregon Dairy Princess, Emma Miller, and the First Alternate, Megan Sprute, have spoken to more than 11,000 school age children since the first of the year. These young ladies serve as industry representatives in the schools and to civic organizations throughout the year.
Oregon's Dairy industry is comprised of 230 producers accounting for more than 1 billion in economic impact resulting in a fourth place ranking amongst Oregon's Ag and Natural Resource industries. Morrow County now ranks among the top Dairy Producing Counties.
Join Emma at the SAGE Center, August 20th between 11:00 am - 12:30 pm, learn about the Dairy industry, learn where milk comes from and its importance in a healthy diet. You can even enjoy a Tillamook ice cream cone (served daily at the SAGE Center).
The Oregon Dairy Farmers Association is located in Salem. The Association has been proudly serving Oregon's Dairy farmers since 1892.


Attached Media Files: Emma Miller, 2015 Oregon Dairy Princess
State Land Board votes to support ownership transfer of the Elliott State Forest
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/13/15
Aug. 13 decision puts in place a detailed protocol for soliciting acquisition plans

Salem - In a unanimous vote, the State Land Board approved a resolution that directs Department of State Lands (DSL) staff to begin implementing a protocol to transfer ownership of the Elliott State Forest out of the Common School Fund.

The resolution also directs staff to stop work on finding a new manager for the Elliott and on securing a new habitat conservation plan, two other options that were explored over the past year and a half.

"This action today comes after years of hard work and thorough consideration of input from a wide spectrum of interested citizens," said DSL director Mary Abrams. "We believe the adopted protocol will allow the Land Board to meet their trustee responsibilities to the schoolchildren of Oregon through a transfer that balances economic and conservation values," she said.

Approximately 84,000 acres of the 92,000-acre forest are Common School Trust lands overseen by the Land Board to fund K-12 public schools in Oregon. Revenue from timber management of these lands is deposited in the Common School Fund. In recent years, policies adopted to assure compliance with the Endangered Species Act have resulted in the forest producing a net deficit to the fund of about $5 million since 2013.

The transfer protocol laid out in the resolution includes the following requirements that any plan for transfer must contain:

Compensating the Common School Fund for the fair market value of the forest
Ownership of the entire property
Retaining other values such as recreational access, older forest stands and watersheds for species habitat, and local economic benefits from the forest


The protocol also contains a schedule ending with submittal plans due by late 2016, said Abrams. A kick-off meeting for interested parties has been set for Sept. 17, 10:00 a.m. at the Veteran's Auditorium in Salem (700 Summer St NE).

"We realize the timeline is aggressive, but we are optimistic that interested and qualified parties will come to the table prepared to work together to preserve all the benefits the Elliott State Forest provides for Oregonians," she said.


The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon's Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state
Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Thursday, August 13, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/13/15
NEW FIRES
The lightning-caused Berry Creek Fire was reported this morning burning in grass, slash, and timber in NE Oregon approximately 5 miles south of Canyon City. 5 residences and 7 outbuildings are threatened.

Growth potential is high and extended attack is in progress with 2 crews, 1 engine, 2 air tankers and 2 helicopters at or enroute to the fire. A Local Type 3 Team has been assigned to this fire.

The Chambers Mill fire was reported in Lane County yesterday afternoon burning in timber, brush and slash on private and Bureau of Land Management lands about 2 miles south of Lorane. 3 residences were threatened.

South Lane Fire & Rescue responded along with ODF fire personnel. The fire size is currently estimated at 180 acres.

Resources assigned include 1 14-person crew, 3 fallers, 1 bulldozer, 1 water tender, 4 helicopters and 2 air tankers. Fire staff employed bulldozers to put a line around the fire last night; the fire is currently 80 percent lined and fire spread has been slowed.


FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

> The Eagle Complex reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon, is currently estimated at 700 acres. Three fires comprise the complex and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

Resources: 4 engines and two 10-person hand crews as well as several aviation resources, with additional resources on order.

A level 1 notice has been sent to residents along Forest Service Road 77 near Tamarack Campground, the Bennett Peak and Main Eagle areas associated with the Eagle Complex. A Level I notice means residents should be READY to evacuate and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information. Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be direction to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

An Interagency Type 3 Management team is assuming command of the fire today.

Eagle Complex Fire Information: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/


> The lightning-caused Cornet Fire (EOA) near Hereford, Oregon burning approximately 7 miles east of Hereford, Oregon on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and Vale BLM District as well as on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry has grown to approximately 12,600 acres. It is threatening approximately 170 structures, with more than 100 personnel on scene. Additional resources are on order.
Governor Kate Brown has invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act in response to the Cornet Fire. This declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

An Interagency Type 2 Incident Management Team with Incident Commander Brian Goff assumed command of the fire last night, however, a Type 1 Incident Command Team has been ordered for this fire and the Windy Ridge Fire, now estimated at 6,000 acres.

Evacuations:
Level 3 Evacuation Order (GO / Leave Immediately) has been issued by Baker County Sheriff's Office for:
Stices Gulch Rd. Area. (Cornet Fire)
Ebell Creek area (Windy Ridge Fire)
Alder Creek area (Windy Ridge Fire)

Level 2 Evacuation Order (SET) has been issued by Baker County Sheriff's Office for:
Black Mountain area (Cornet Fire)
Denny Creek area (Cornet Fire)
Rancheria Creek area (Cornet Fire)

Level 1 Evacuation Order (READY) has been issued by Baker County Sheriff's Office for:
Sutton Creek area (Windy Ridge Fire)
Beaver Creek area (Windy Ridge Fie)
Eagle Complex (Windy Ridge Fire)

Cornet Fire and Windy Ridge Fire Information: 541-523-1267
Evacuation Information: 541-523-2905



> The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 23,841 acres and 63 percent containment.

Hot temperatures and winds out of the west late Wednesday afternoon pushed the 23,841 acre Stouts Creek Fire, testing firelines. There were a few spots over the line along the southeast corner but all were contained and the remainder of the perimeter held. One of the last small areas to be burned out in the Upper Cow Creek area was successfully completed last night. Mop-up is underway in that area while much of the north end of the fire has almost completed mop-up. Mop-up means fire fighters walk the fireline, sometimes using handheld infrared devices, and ensure that no heat or smoke is visible for several hundred feet inside. Mop-up also continues along some sections of the southeast, south and southwest flanks. Operations staff report there are still areas with large, burning trees inside the line that, with a bit of wind, higher temperatures and dry receptive fuels could carry fire outside containment lines.

"This has been a tough, ugly fire," Incident Commander John Buckman said during Wednesday's night shift briefing. "It's only because you've persistently and safely fought this fire for 14 straight nights that we've made significant progress. Thank you for your dedication to the surrounding communities. Keep persevering."

"I think the message that we got with yesterday's unexpected critical fire weather," says Deputy Incident Commander Russ Lane, "is that, despite the success we've had, this is still a big fire with a lot of life and potential in it. We will continue to be vigilant, holding and widening the lines we have while we work to wrap up the south end."

The weather is expected to continue to be hot and dry again today which will increase fire behavior. There is still a large burnout needed on the south end of the fire, north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek. Prep work along roads in the area continues as firefighters wait for the right conditions to complete that operation.

Safety: The Stouts Creek Fire has had an unusually good safety record for a fire that has had more than 1900 people. The medical unit's primary complaints have been a significant number of firefighters dealing with poison oak and bee stings. Wednesday afternoon, a firefighter was taken off the line with a knee injury and taken to a local hospital.

Resources: There currently are 1,560 personnel assigned to the fire with 56 crews, 46 engines, 30 water tenders, 21 bulldozers and 10 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to fires with greater needs.

Cost: The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $22.4 million. The Incident Management Team leading the effort under unified command is protecting lands that are about 52 percent on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands, and 48 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. Twenty-three states and three Canadian provinces have provided staff for this effort. All evacuation levels are at Level I.

Smoke: With continued smoke in the area, those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. There they will find information on wildfires and health as well as access to Air Quality Index monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.
The cause of the fire was human-caused and appears to be related to an individual mowing grass.

Stouts Fire Information:
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
#StoutsFire



> The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 85 percent containment. Crews continue to make good progress with firefighters now focusing efforts on mopping up hot spots, extinguishing all visible smokes and smoldering material within 300 - 500 feet of the fire trail.

Crews are also beginning to move excess fire hose and miscellaneous supplies which are no longer needed on the fire line. These supplies are cleaned, checked, and made available for other fires as needed.

The Cable Crossing Fire currently has 214 personnel assigned to the fire. This number is expected to drop over the next couple days as the fire nears containment. Depending on the amount of time firefighters spent on the Cable Crossing Fire, they will either be released home for rest or reassigned to another fire in the region.

Safety for both the firefighters and the public remains the number one priority on the Cable Crossing Fire. The public is reminded that the temporary closure around the Cable Crossing Fire which was issued by the BLM remains in place as fire crews continue to work in the area.

The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire


> The Phillips Creek Fire (Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit) located 3-4 miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest, has burned 2,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands.

The fire has 206 personnel assigned and is now estimated at 85% contained.

A Type 3 Team has taken over the fire (IC Joel McCraw, USFS). The incident command post will remain at the Elgin Stampede Grounds in Elgin. Fire officials and firefighters wish to thank the communities of the Grande Ronde Valley for their tremendous support and cooperation.

Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-437-1159
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 239 fires burned 2510 acres
Human-caused fires: 529 fires burned 27,041 acres
Total: 768 fires burned 29,551 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 208 fires burned 19,958 acres
Human-caused fires: 404 fires burned 3161 acres
Total: 448 fires burned 23,119 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office) or 503-521-5868 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Wapato Teacher State's 2015 CTE Teacher of the Year
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 08/13/15
Hi all,

Some VERY exciting news for the Wapato School District and one of our teachers as we get ready for the 2015-2016 school year.

See the attached release for all the details.


Thanks and remember "EVERY School Day Counts"


Attached Media Files: CTE Teacher of the Year
Stouts Creek Fire cause update
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/13/15
Fire investigators working on the Stouts Creek Fire have determined that the fire was human caused and appears to be related to an individual mowing grass. Fire officials say that the responsible party was allegedly in violation of a Regulated Use Closure because they were mowing after the shutdown time when the fire occurred. Because of the violation, the individual may be liable for fire suppression costs and damages resulting from the fire.

Fire officials with DFPA want to remind everyone to know and follow the current fire restrictions which are in effect on the Douglas District.

To date, the Stouts Creek Fire has burned 23,841 acres and suppression costs have reached $22.4 million.

For more information about public or industrial restrictions currently in effect on the Douglas District, visit www.dfpa.net or call the 24-hour information line at 541-672-0379.
08/12/15
UPDATE: Warner Creek Correctional Facility inmate walks away from fire crew - inmate back in custody (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/12/15
Kenneth Polchowski
Kenneth Polchowski
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1070/86846/thumb_Polchowski.jpg
UPDATE: Kenneth Polchowski is back in custody. Medford Police arrested him today at approximately 8:30 p.m. No other details are available at this time.



UPDATE: A more recent photo of inmate Kenneth Polchowski is attached.



ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW

An inmate walked away this morning from a mobile camp at the Stouts Creek Fire near Canyonville. The Warner Creek Correctional Facility inmate was housed at the camp since July 31. Oregon State Police are investigating.

Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) staff discovered inmate Kenneth Curtis Polchowski missing today at approximately 6 a.m. after a routine count. Polchowski is a 26-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 10 inches tall, 180 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes. Polchowski was last seen wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange, and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Polchowski entered DOC custody on January 29, 2015, on four counts of identity theft, one count of theft in the first degree, and one count of burglary in the first degree out of Lane County. His earliest release date is October 6, 2017.

Anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

WCCF is a minimum-security prison in Lakeview that houses approximately 486 male inmates who are within four year of release. WCCF provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, transitional programs, religious services, and work opportunities crews. WCCF has a contact center on site through Oregon Corrections Enterprises. WCCF opened in September 2005 and is Oregon's newest operating prison. It received the State Energy Efficiency Design (SEED) award in May 2008 for its progress in design efficiency. The most energy-efficient element at WCCF is the use of geothermal energy, providing 100 percent of the hot water to the facility.

####


Attached Media Files: Kenneth Polchowski , Kenneth Polchowski - Updated
Red Cross Opens Two Shelters to Accommodate Resident Evacuations in Baker City and Warm Springs
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/12/15
The American Red Cross is responding to community needs during this busy wildfire season. The Cornet Fire in Baker County and a brush fire in Jefferson County have required area residents to be evacuated from their homes. Red Cross shelters have been opened in Baker City and in Warm Springs to ensure evacuees have a safe place to go.

The Red Cross shelter in Baker City is located at Baker City High School, 2500 E St., Baker City.

In Warm Springs, the Warm Springs Community Center is the shelter site. The center is located at 2200 Hollywood Blvd.

It has been a hot and dry summer, making for severe wildfire conditions in Oregon. The Red Cross Wildfire mobile app is a valuable resource. The free app provides information on what to do before, during and after a wildfire. Melinda Davis, preparedness and community partner manager for the Red Cross Cascades Region, points out that the app offers real-time wildfire safety tools.

"The app lists specific and simple steps such as meeting with family members to discuss what to do in case of a wildfire, what to pack and where to meet up if evacuated," says Melinda.
"It also provides steps on how to turn off gas, water and electric utilities." Additional information about the app is available at can www.redcross.org/prepare/mobile-apps.

The Red Cross remains at-the-ready to respond to disasters large and small, which is made possible due to the generosity of community members across the county. To support Red Cross Disaster Relief, visit www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED-CROSS today.
Oregon students honored with Workers' Memorial Scholarships
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/12/15
(Salem) - A workplace death or a life-altering injury can have a profound effect on a family, including their ability to finance higher education. Each year, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) Workers' Memorial Scholarship program provides awards to help surviving family members reach their educational goals.

Oregon OSHA, a division of DCBS, will honor 2015 recipients of the Workers' Memorial Scholarship during a public ceremony at 10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 14, 2015, in Room 260 of the Labor and Industries Building in Salem.

The recipients include:

- Nicole Beck, Gold Hill
Beck graduated in 2015 from Crater Academy of Health and Public Services. She plans to study nursing at Rogue Community College.

Beck lost her father to a logging accident and is receiving a $1,000 award.

- Daisy Maldonado Dominguez, Wilsonville
A 2014 graduate of Wilsonville High School, Maldonado Dominguez is studying English at Portland Community College and aspires to be a lawyer.

Maldonado Dominguez's father lost both arms in an agricultural machinery accident. She is receiving a $500 award.

- Kassandra McCabe, Springfield
McCabe is a 2014 graduate of Marist High School and is attending Oregon State University. She hopes to become a surgeon or physical therapist and is majoring in pre-medicine.

McCabe's father became paralyzed and later blind following a logging accident in 2002. He died in 2013. She is receiving a $1,000 award and is a past Workers' Memorial Scholarship winner.

- Amanda Shaffer, Medford
Shaffer is studying psychology at Rogue Community College and hopes to be a mental health counselor. She received her GED in 2003. Her mother was a road construction foreman and was struck and killed by a logging truck. Shaffer is receiving a $500 award.

One other award recipient wants to remain anonymous.

"While nothing can make up for the tragedies these families have endured, we hope the awards help these promising students achieve their goals," said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood.

Award recommendations are made by Oregon OSHA's Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee, an advisory group with members from business, organized labor, and government. Oregon OSHA presents the awards annually to help in the postsecondary education of spouses or children of permanently and totally disabled or fatally injured workers. The 1991 Legislature established the Workers' Memorial Scholarship at the request of the Oregon AFL-CIO, with support from Associated Oregon Industries.

The Workers' Memorial Scholarship is open to any high school graduate, graduating high school senior, GED recipient, or current college undergraduate or graduate student who is a dependent or spouse of an Oregon worker who has been fatally injured or permanently disabled while on the job.

Interest earned on a DCBS fund derived from Oregon OSHA civil fines and penalties funds the awards.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Oregon Cultural Trust awards record $2.6 million in grants, doubles Cultural Development Grants (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 08/12/15
Dancing People Company performance at a 2014 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Green Show.
Dancing People Company performance at a 2014 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Green Show.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1418/86917/thumb_Dancing_People_OSF_Green_Show_2014.jpg
Salem, Ore. - Statewide cultural organizations will receive a record $2.6 million in grants from the Oregon Cultural Trust in fiscal year 2015-16, up a full 30 percent over last year and surpassing $2 million for the first time. The dramatic increase in funding results from a record fundraising year and a new distribution formula approved by the Oregon legislature.

The awards include a total of $644,959 to the Cultural Trust's five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $644,959 to 45 county and tribal cultural coalitions (who re-grant the funds through local programs); and $1,260,945 to 84 cultural organizations through competitive Cultural Development Grants, more than double the amount awarded last fiscal year. The Cultural Development Grants include first-time awards to 25 organizations and the largest grants ever awarded - $35,000 - to six of the state's largest cultural nonprofits. The grants are awarded for projects that address access, capacity, creativity and preservation.

"We are extremely grateful to members of the legislature for giving us the flexibility to provide deeper support to the groups who ensure Oregon's cultural vitality," said Cultural Trust Executive Director Brian Rogers. "The increased funds will allow them to have an even greater impact on creating the quality of life we Oregonians expect and appreciate."

The new distribution formula, put in place through the passage of Senate Bill 441, allows the Trust to allocate a larger percentage of the funds it raises to grant making and administration. The Trust raised a record $4.4 million in fiscal year 2014-15, through donor participation in the cultural tax credit, allowing it to allocate $2.6 million to statewide grants.

Cultural Development Grants were awarded to:
(Note: Grants are organized alphabetically by region. denotes a first-time grant.)

Central Oregon
Arts Central, Bend (Capacity): $12,296
Central Oregon Creative Economy Development: To support the creation of an actionable plan to enhance the Central Oregon cultural economy.

Deschutes County Historical Society, Bend (Preservation): $14,164
Winter Comes: Oregon's Nordic Ski History: To support Deschutes Historical Museum's exhibit Winter Comes: Oregon's Nordic Ski History in 2016.

High Desert Museum, Bend (Access): $16,645
Arts for the People: To support an exhibit exploring the history and cultural legacy of the Works Progress Administration

Coast
Bay City Arts Center, Bay City (Preservation): $5,839
Hoquarton Historical Interpretive Center Roof Replacement: To support the replacement of the roof of the Hoquarton Historical Interpretive Center building.

Liberty Restoration, Inc., Astoria (Preservation): $8,445
Theater Preservation and Restoration: To support the preservation and restoration of the Historic Liberty Theater building.

North Tillamook Library Board, Manzanita (Capacity): $21,201
Creating Community Technology and Education Room: To support repurposing existing library facility to create community technology and education room.

Eastern Oregon
Arts Council of Pendleton, Pendleton (Access): $5,000
First Draft Writers and Readers: To support First Draft, a free monthly literary arts series at the Pendleton Center for the Arts.

Drexel H. Foundation, Vale (Preservation): $10,249
Vale Hotel Restoration: To support the Vale Hotel structural stabilization, architectural and engineering project.

Fishtrap, Inc., Enterprise (Access) $10,187
The Big Read 2016: To support Wallowa County's community-wide Big Read of Thornton Wilder's "Our Town & The Bridge of San Luis Rey" in January and February of 2016.

Four Rivers Cultural Center, Ontario (Access): $14,628
Four Rivers Community Theatre: To support the growth and increased participation of the Four Rivers Community Theatre program.

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph (Creativity): $16,367
Exhibitions at Josephy Center: To support the ongoing Josephy Center Exhibition calendar including art, lectures, music and films.

Playa, Summer Lake (Creativity): $24,961
Art/Science Thematic Residencies: To support the creation of exemplary artworks born from art+science residency interaction.

Wallowa Valley Arts Council, Joseph (Access): $11,800
Nez Perce Interpretive Center at Joseph: To support the purchase of the long-established Native American interpretive center at Joseph.

Gorge
Cascadia Center for Arts & Crafts, Government Camp (Preservation): $19,930
Roofs for Cascadia Center for Arts & Crafts: To support new roofs on an historic United States Forest Service ranger station where CCAC offers workshops to the public in the fall of 2015.

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles (Capacity): $5,000
Collections Equipment Improvement: To support the purchase and installation of computer/scanner equipment for the center's collections operations.

Southern Oregon
Dancing People Company, Ashland (Creativity): $5,993
Call Back the Sun, a Winter Solstice Community Dance and Celebration: To support the 10th year of DPC's Call Back the Sun, a community-inclusive Winter Solstice show.

Douglas County Museum, Roseburg (Preservation): $9,580
To support the ongoing restoration of O&C railcar #3001 at the Douglas County Museum.

Josephine Community Libraries, Inc., Grants Pass (Access): $12,972
Collection Development Project: To support the Collection Development Project and rebuild the library's books and other materials.

Klamath Art Association, Klamath Falls (Access): $18,319
Sugarman's Corner Pocket Park: To support sculpture in a pocket park honoring Klamath Basin's biological and historical diversity.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland (Creativity): $35,000
Creation and Production of "Vietgone" and "The Winter's Tale:" To support the 2016 pairing of "Vietgone" by Qui Nguyen and "The Winter's Tale" by William Shakespeare.

Rogue Valley Chorale, Rogue River (Capacity): $5,000
Marketing Project: To support a sustainable marketing plan including templates designed for in-house use.

Rogue Valley Symphony Association, Ashland (Capacity): $18,300
Marketing capacity: To support the increased marketing of Rogue Valley Symphony concerts and hiring a marketing assistant.

Willamette Valley
Delgani String Quartet, Eugene (Creativity): $5,270
A Celebration of Oregon Art: To support the production of Delgani's four-concert project titled "A Celebration of Oregon Art."

Eugene Concert Choir, Eugene (Creativity): $25,449
Remembrances Project: To support the Remembrances Creative Heights choral-orchestral masterwork commission project.

Eugene Opera, Eugene (Capacity): $15,684
Service Expansion Project: To support an expanded program of season productions and community engagement.

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene (Access): $13,890
ESYO String Academies: To support ESYO String Academies and teach music to elementary students of all backgrounds.

Grand Ronde Tribe Cultural Resources Department, Grand Ronde (Preservation): $33,543
Curatorial and Exhibit Renovation: To support the creation of curatorial space through renovation in the Museum and Cultural Center.

Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University, Salem (Creativity): $27,651
The Art of Ceremony: Conversations with Oregon Tribes. To support the writing and publication of The Art of Ceremony: Conversations with Oregon Tribes.

Joint Forces Dance Company, Inc., Eugene (Capacity): $7,878
Stabilizing DanceAbility International's Oregon Programs: To support more access to mixed-abilities dance with additional staff and an improved office.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene (Capacity): $21,408
Arts Asset Mapping: To support development of a county-wide Arts Asset Map and accompanying interactive web-based tools.

Linfield College, McMinnville (Preservation): $6,130
Oregon Wine History Archive: Janis Miglavs and Oregon Pinot Camp Collections. To support the digitization of and access to interviews of contributors to Oregon's wine industry.

Museum of Natural & Cultural History, Eugene (Preservation): $34,000
Redesign of MNCH anchor cultural exhibition hall: To support the redesign of the cultural exhibit hall, Oregon-Where Past is Present.

Oregon State Hospital Museum of Mental Health, Salem (Preservation): $6,865
Photo and Document Archive: To support cataloging, digitizing and archiving images and documents from Oregon State Hospital sites.

Oregon State University, Corvallis (Preservation): $5,000
Oregon Black Railroad Porters Oral History Preservation Project: To support the preservation of and access to Oregon black railroad porters' oral histories.

Portland Metro Area
All Classical Public Media, Inc., Portland (Capacity): $35,000
On-Air Programming Expansion Project: To support expansion of All Classical's program staff, on-air services and production facilities.

Bag&Baggage Productions, Hillsboro (Creativity): $5,000
Orson Welles' "Moby Dick, Rehearsed:" To support artists' wages for our production of Orson Welles' "Moby Dick, Rehearsed" in the spring of 2016.

BodyVox, Portland (Creativity): $20,045
The Spin: To support The Spin, a bold new dance show that blends live performance and audience participation in the fall of 2015.

c3:initiative, Portland (Creativity): $10,407
Demos Exhibition and Programs: To support the exhibition and Community Dialogues Series of Demos: Wapato Correctional Facility in the fall of 2015.

Caldera, Portland (Creativity): $12,645
Caldera's Artists in Residence Program: To support the development of artists from Oregon and around the world through one-month residencies at Caldera.

Cappella Romana, Portland (Creativity): $16,285
The Choral Works off Michael Adamis: Performances & Recording. To support concerts in Oregon and a recording of choral works by Greek composer Michael Adamis.

Circus Project, Portland (Access): $13,099
Increased Access to Hands-On Circus Arts Instruction and Performance for Youth: To support 2015-16 circus arts training in schools as well as social services and a new studio.

CoHo Productions, Portland (Capacity): $9,886
Theatre Consultation Program: To support a program providing resource and administrative management to professional artists.

Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, Portland (Creativity): $24,866
Portland2016: A Biennial of Contemporary Art. To support the production and exhibition of Portland2016: A Biennial of Contemporary Art.

Ethos, Portland (Access): $17,024
Music Across Oregon: To support music education opportunities for youth in rural Oregon communities.

Friends of the Cornelius Public Library, Cornelius (Capacity): $8,212
New Library and Community Convening Space: To support a new library to expand collections and provide space for more community involvement.

Friends of William Stafford, Lake Oswego (Capacity): $4,000
Website Update: To support a website upgrade that will allow the organization to advance its mission and build membership.

Imago Theatre, Portland (Creativity): $7,262
La Belle: The Lost Art of the Automaton. To support the creation of a new family show, "La Belle: The Art of the Automaton."

Independent Publishing Resource Center, Portland (Capacity): $22,827
IPRC Staffing and Retail Capacity-Building Project: To support capacity building and sustainability via staffing increases and retail space improvement.

Jewish Theatre Collaborative, Portland (Creativity): $4,445
"Davita's Harp:" To support JTC's adaptation and world premiere production of Chaim Potok's novel "Davita's Harp" in the spring of 2016.

Know Your City, Portland (Capacity): $9,363
Capacity building initiative: To support increasing Know Your City's programming capacity by hiring a full-time Program Coordinator.

Lan Su Chinese Garden, Portland (Access): $14,888
Lan Su Chinese Garden's 9th Annual Chinese New Year: To support expanded public access to Lan Su's 2016 Chinese New Year celebration.

Literary Arts, Portland (Access): $17,314
The Oregon Book Awards & Author Tour: To support literary excellence in writing by Oregonians and to facilitate a statewide author tour.

Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland (Access): $7,704
Outreach and Tuition Assistance: To create access to music via peer-to-peer education at underserved schools with tuition assistance.

Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland (Preservation): $11,787
Collections and Archives Accessibility Project: To support the creation of a publically searchable online database of the museum's permanent collection.

My Voice Music, Portland (Capacity): $12,123
Preparatory Assessment and Strategic Staff Increases for A Community Music Space: To support preparations for a capital campaign to move into a long-term community music space.

Northwest Dance Project, Portland (Creativity): $16,141
NEW NOW WOW: To support the commission, creation and presentation of three dance works by emerging choreographers in the fall of 2015.

Northwest Film Center, Portland (Access): $14,937
Northwest Film Center's Northwest Exhibition Program: To support the Northwest exhibition program, including year-round programs, festival and tour.

Oregon Bravo Youth Orchestras, Portland (Access): $8,666
BRAVO Community Performance: To support the creation and delivery of a concert series in underserved communities in Oregon.

Oregon College of Art and Craft, Portland (Access): $16,538
A. Susana Santos' Journeys in Creativity: To support the Journeys in Creativity program for Native communities in Oregon.

Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education, Portland (Capacity): $7,326
Capacity Building through Community Engagement: To support marketing to promote programming, membership development and outreach to new audiences.

Oregon Nikkei Endowment, Portland (Creativity): $8,021
"Nihonmachi: The Place to Be." To support two performances of the play "Nihonmachi: The Place to Be" in the fall of 2015.

Oregon Public Broadcasting, Portland (Access): $35,000
Oregon Experience: 2015-16 Season. To support the 2015-16 season of the award-winning history series Oregon Experience.

Oregon Repertory Singers, Portland (Creativity): $7,481
Dvo?(TM)ák's Stabat Mater: To support the Portland premiere of Dvo?(TM)ák's Stabat Mater, to be performed by ORS at the Newmark Theater in the fall of 2015.

Oregon Symphony, Portland (Access): $35,000
2015 Oregon Symphony Waterfront Festival of the Arts: To support access for all to experience excellence in orchestral music with a free live concert.

Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland (Capacity): $20,666
The Right Patron Services for Portland Baroque Orchestra: To support Portland Baroque Orchestra's new patron services manager & marketing assistant.

Portland Center Stage, Portland (Creativity): $35,000
2016 JAW: A Playwrights Festival. To support the creation of new theatrical works at the 2016 JAW: A Playwrights Festival.

Portland Children's Museum, Portland (Capacity): $29,176
Theater Renovation: To support PCM's theater renovation for enhanced play and cultural programming.


Portland Experimental Theatre Ensemble, Portland (Creativity): $8,413
The Journey Play is the Whole Thing: A Constellation of Art Events, Objects and Experience. To support the creation and production of a series of integrated works of art.

Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland (Access): $15,627
TBA:15: To support the planning and implementation of the 13th edition of the Time-Based Art (TBA) Festival in September of 2015.

Portland Opera Association, Inc., Portland (Access): $35,000
Opera ala Cart: To support the creation and pilot of Portland Opera's outreach project OPERA ALA CART in May of 2016.

Portland Playhouse, Portland (Creativity): $21,290
"How We Got On:" To support production of the west coast premiere of "How We Got On" by Idris Goodwin in the fall of 2015.

Portland Youth Philharmonic Association, Portland (Capacity): $6,244
Bridge to the Future: Year 2. To nurture PYP as a relevant, visible, accessible, stable and historic resource for young musicians.

RASIKA, Portland (Creativity): $8,208
Duality: Indian musical dance. To support the first major three-day music and dance Festival of India in three Oregon cities.

Regional Arts & Culture Council, Portland (Capacity): $12,369
Work for Art: Battle of the Bands. To support Battle of the Bands in May of 2016 to raise money for and celebrate employee engagement in the arts.

Scandinavian Heritage Foundation , Portland (Capacity): $24,034
Data Driven Decision and Outreach Improvement Project: To improve capacity for data-driven decision-making, optimizing human and financial resources.

Tavern Books, Portland (Creativity): $17,052
The Living Library Publishing Program 2015-2016: To support the growth of Tavern Books' Living Library publishing program.

The Library Foundation, Portland (Access): $6,128
Everybody Reads 2016: To support the purchase of 2,000 books and transportation for 750 teens for Everybody Reads.

The Northwest Photography Archive, Portland (Preservation): $16,369
Enduring Spirit: Photographs of Northwest Native Americans, 1855-1928. To support research and image restoration for "Enduring Spirit" a book of historical photographs.

The Shadow Project, Portland (Access): $12,786
Increasing Access to Literature for Children with Special Needs: To support the installation of SuperSensory Literacy Spaces in eight schools' special education classrooms.

Third Angle New Music Ensemble, Portland (Creativity): $6,140
Frozen Music: light and music in Aalto's library. To support a musical installation designed by architect Alvar Aalto at the Mt. Angel Abbey Library.

Third Rail Repertory Theatre, Portland (Capacity): $10,203
New Membership Model: To support an innovative membership model that will deepen participation and attract new audiences.

triangle productions!, Portland (Access): $8,273
The Jim Pepper Project Touring: To support touring a new Native American-themed work to underserved, tribal communities.

Write Around Portland, Portland (Access): $12,925
Creative Writing in Washington County: To support creative writing workshops for those with the least access in Washington County.

Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington, Portland (Creativity): $11,799
The Teaching Artist Studio: To serve 45 artists in three communities with training through The Teaching Artist Studio.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Dancing People Company performance at a 2014 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Green Show. , The historic chandelier in the Liberty Theater in Astoria. , An image by Kendrick Moholt for upcoming Barns in the Rural Landscape exhibit at the Josephy Center for Arts and Culture. Exhibit opens Oct. 2, 2015
Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, August 12, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/12/15
NEW FIRES
The Eagle Complex was reported Tuesday afternoon burning approximately 16 miles northeast of Baker City and 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon.
Three fires comprise the complex, approximately 120 acres, 40 and 10 acres in size and burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest as well as private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

Resources: 4 engines and two 10-person hand crews as well as several aviation resources, with additional resources on order.

A level 1 notice has been sent to residents in the Stices Gulch and Black Mountain area associated with the Cornet Fire, and along Forest Service Road 77 near Tamarack Campground, the Bennett Peak and Main Eagle areas associated with the Eagle Complex. A Level I notice means residents should be READY to evacuate and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information. Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be direction to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

An Interagency Type 3 Management team is assuming command of the fire today.

Fire officials want to remind everyone that the current fire danger rating remains at EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect. Regulated closures are in effect on State and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in northeast and central Oregon.

On the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands Public Use Restrictions are in effect, including campfire restrictions and use of chainsaws.
The Vale BLM Unit is also managing several large fires in the Burnt River area; additional information can be found at: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/fire/report-fire.php.

Cornet Fire and Eagle Complex Fire information:
Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center - www.bmidc.org
Blue Mountain Fire Information Blog - www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com
Cornet Fire on InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/
Wallowa Whitman National Forest -
- Website: www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman
- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WallowaWhitmanNF
- Twitter: @WallowaWhitman


FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The lightning-caused Cornet Fire (EOA) near Hereford, Oregon is currently burning approximately 7 miles east of Hereford, Oregon on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and Vale BLM District as well as on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry.

The fire has grown to approximately 5,000 acres and with just over 100 personnel on scene. Additional resources are on order.

Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 4 (ORIMT4), with Incident Commander Brian Goff, will assume command of the fire tonight. ORIMT4 brings a wealth knowledge and skill to the table with many of the team members coming from local, Northeast Oregon Interagency organizations.

> Cornet Fire Fire Information: Jamie Knight, (541) 786-0501



The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 23,589 acres and 56 percent containment.

While there still is a large active component to the Stouts Creek Fire, many portions of the fire are in mop-up mode. Firefighting crews are using handheld infrared devices to seek out small pockets of heat that could become problematic if left to smolder. There still is a long way to go before the effort is complete but progress is being made every day.

Firefighters along the southwestern edge of the fire - north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek - are gearing up for a burnout operation to help complete and strengthen fire line.

"This is a fairly substantial operation in difficult terrain and fuels," said Deputy Incident Commander Russ Lane. "Completing this task is key to closing the door on this fire."

Resources: There currently are 1,693 personnel assigned to the fire including 62 crews, 53 engines, 30 water tenders, 23 bulldozers and 16 helicopters. Relative humidity is forecast to be lower than yesterday with more fire activity but also allow for better burning operations.

All evacuation levels are at Level I.

Smoke: With continued smoke in the area, those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. There they will find information on wildfires and health as well as access to Air Quality Index monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.

Costs: The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $22.4 million.

The Incident Management Team leading the effort under unified command is protecting lands that are about 50 percent on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands, and 50 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. Twenty-three states and three Canadian provinces have provided staff for this effort. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. The Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1 develops and leads the wildland fire suppression strategy.

Please note that the current Incident Command Post located at Days Creek Charter School will move at 10 a.m. today to the main camp west of Days Creek. ­

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

> Stouts Fire Information:
Phone 541-825-3724
Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StoutsFire
E-mail: StoutsFire@gmail.com
#StoutsFire



The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 85 percent containment. Crews continue to make good progress with firefighters now focusing efforts on mopping up hot spots, extinguishing all visible smokes and smoldering material within 300 - 500 feet of the fire trail.

Crews are also beginning to move excess fire hose and miscellaneous supplies which are no longer needed on the fire line. These supplies are cleaned, checked, and made available for other fires as needed.

The Cable Crossing Fire currently has 214 personnel assigned to the fire. This number is expected to drop over the next couple days as the fire nears containment. Depending on the amount of time firefighters spent on the Cable Crossing Fire, they will either be released home for rest or reassigned to another fire in the region.

Safety for both the firefighters and the public remains the number one priority on the Cable Crossing Fire. The public is reminded that the temporary closure around the Cable Crossing Fire which was issued by the BLM remains in place as fire crews continue to work in the area.

The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

> Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire



The Phillips Creek Fire (Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit) located 3-4 miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest, has burned 2,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands.

The fire is now 82 percent contained, with 446 personnel assigned, however some staff are being released today.

Level 1 (Get Ready) evacuations were lifted on Sunday evening, however road closures in the area of the fire are in effect. There is also a lot of smoke in the area, much of it drifting in from other fires in the vicinity. A Type 3 Team has taken over today with (IC Joel McCraw, USFS). The incident command post will remain at the Elgin Stampede Grounds in Elgin. Fire officials and firefighters wish to thank the communities of the Grande Ronde Valley for their tremendous support and cooperation.

Due to the impact and continuing threats to ODF-protection, ODF is fully integrated with the team, with personnel assigned specifically to help protect ODF-protected private forestlands, as well as assigned elsewhere directly to the team or serving as liaisons.

> Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-975-4271
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
Fire danger and activity is high all over the state; for example, fire crews attacked a 7-acre wildfire from air and ground yesterday morning burning about 5 miles west of Alsea on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The public is reminded to continue to be vigilant.

FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office) or 503-521-5868 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Red Cross Now Recruiting Volunteers in northeast Oregon (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/12/15
Red Cross fire prevention team members are needed to install smoke alarms and create emergency home evacuation plans in eastern Oregon counties.
Red Cross fire prevention team members are needed to install smoke alarms and create emergency home evacuation plans in eastern Oregon counties.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1190/86904/thumb_Fred_C_-_installing_smoke_alarm.jpg
The American Red Cross is now recruiting volunteers in northeast Oregon. Positions are available on disaster response teams, as preparedness presenters, disaster mental health volunteers and sheltering team members. In addition, fire prevention team members are being sought to install smoke alarms and help area residents create a home-fire escape plan.

American Red Cross volunteer orientation and disaster response team training is held at various times throughout the year to provide an opportunity for community members to learn about the scope of services provided by the Red Cross and to recruit new volunteers.

WHEN: Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Two sessions are offered: 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.

WHERE: Oxford Suites Pendleton (Board Room), 2400 SW Court Place in Pendleton

RSVPs are encouraged but not required. Please let us know you plan to attend by sending an email to volunteer.cascades@redcross.org.

The American Red Cross is in every community, every day. Whether it's helping a family affected by a home fire or a wildfire, or installing smoke alarms and providing home-fire preparedness information to residents, the work of Red Cross volunteers makes a lasting impact on neighbors, students, local businesses and community members across the region.

# # #

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.


Attached Media Files: Red Cross fire prevention team members are needed to install smoke alarms and create emergency home evacuation plans in eastern Oregon counties. , Darin Furry is a Red Cross disaster workforce volunteer and preparedness presenter in central and eastern Oregon.
Health advisory issued August 12 for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 08/12/15
August 12, 2015

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for high levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach in Coos County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water - especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria - should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from shore and inland sources, such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk, even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
08/11/15
Red Cross Responds to Hermiston Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/11/15
Disaster action team volunteers with the American Red Cross this afternoon met with residents who experienced a single-family fire the 100 block of 7th St. in Hermiston, OR. The fire affected four adults and multiple pets. Red Cross provided food, clothing, shoes, lodging, health services and information about recovery services.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in communities across Oregon and southwest Washington. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 to schedule an appointment.

Know what to do before, during and after a home fire. Take a few moments to review your family's exit plan should there be a fire in your home. This information, and more, is available at www.redcross.org or in a free Prepare! Resource Guide published by the American Red Cross Cascades Region. The guide can be downloaded at http://rdcrss.org/1zq8XW6.
Oregon Dept of Forestry Fire Update for Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/15
NEW FIRES
The lightning-caused Cornet Fire (EOA) was reported yesterday burning in sagebrush and grass near Hereford, Oregon.

Access is difficult but the fire is 50% contained this morning. This fire has burnt approximately 243 acres. Tough terrain has made firefighting difficult.

Resources assigned: A North Powder Rural engine, a Sumpter engine and a Baker Rural tender.
Also three 10 person hand crews from Snake River Correctional Center, one 10 person hand crew from Powder River Correctional Center, two Type 2 contract hand crews with 20 people each, two contract skidgens (i.e. part skidder, part fire engine) and a contract bulldozer.

Suppression efforts are being led by ODF, although assistance has come from several of the Baker County Fire Departments.

"Things are very dry. It's important that folks that are out and about are paying attention to the restrictions that are in place. We need to prevent the human -caused fires that could add to our workload," says Wildland Fire Supervisor Steve Meyer, Baker ODF.

Much of Northeast Oregon is under Red Flag Warning today for thunderstorms with abundant lightning. The public is reminded that ODF is currently in Regulated Use Closure in Northeast Oregon.

Fire managers recommend that recreationists check the fire regulations before heading out to enjoy the forest. Contact a local Oregon Department of Forestry office for more complete information on ODF Restrictions.
La Grande Unit (541)963-3168
Baker City Sub-Unit (541)523-5831
Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881
Pendleton Unit (541)276-3491

> Comet Fire Fire Information: Jamie Knight, (541) 786-0501

FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The Stouts Creek Fire (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 23,388 acres and 50 percent containment.

The fire size continues to grow as managed burns, called burnouts, bring the fire to the constructed fire line. This is the first step in securing these lines. Growth of the fire's size and associated smoke is expected as this work continues. Almost 50% of the Stout's Creek Fire perimeter is now considered as a secured fire line. Work continues to fortify these lines and more than 45 miles of fire hose is in place to provide water for the work.

Evacuation level around the community of Drew between mileposts 28-39 were lowered to a Level I as of 6 p.m. on August 10th by the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

Today the weather will be moderate and good progress on the fire is expected from the 1,900 firefighters now assigned to the fire. On the sides of the fire bordering Milo, Tiller, and Drew mop-up operations will continue. North of Upper Cow Creek Road the possibility of burnout operations will be evaluated, otherwise firefighters will continue to prepare the fire lines for a future burnout.

Heavy equipment is in use along Forest Road 3201 and all non-essential traffic is requested to avoid this area. All county roads are open within the fire vicinity, but caution is advised as fire suppression traffic is heavy.

There are 1,900 personnel assigned to this fire, with twenty three states and two Canadian providences supplying fire staff. Many of these personnel bring expertise in burnout operations and tree falling, allowing local firefighters to return to their initial attack responsibilities and other people who have been helping to return to their regular jobs. As fire containment objectives are reached there will also be a steady release of firefighters assigned to this fire.

Smoke: With continued smoke in the area, those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health as well as access to AQI monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.

Fire costs: The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $19.4 million. The State and National teams leading the effort under unified command are protecting lands that are about 50 percent on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands, and 50 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. The Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1 develops and leads the wildland fire suppression strategy.

The cause of this fire remains under investigation.
> Stouts Fire Information:
PH: 541-825-3724
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StoutsFire
E-mail: StoutsFire@gmail.com
#StoutsFire


The Cable Crossing Fire, (Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 1,857 acres and is now 80 percent contained. A Type 3 Team is now assigned to the fire (Incident Commander Brian Reel). Crews are continuing to mop-up.

The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

> Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire


The Phillips Creek Fire (Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit) located 3-4 miles northwest of Elgin in northeast Oregon in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly on the Umatilla National Forest, has burned 3,601 acres including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands. The fire is now 70 percent contained, with 544 personnel assigned including 14 crews. Level 1 (Get Ready) evacuations were lifted on Sunday evening, however road closures in the area of the fire are in effect. Yesterday burnout operations were completed in the northwest area of the fire and crews are in mop up today.
Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Brett Fillis) assumed management of the Phillips Creek Fire on August 5 but the team will transition to a Type 3 Team tomorrow. A community meeting was held last night at Elgin Community Center, with representatives from the IMT, U.S. Forest Service, ODF, and Union County.

Due to the impact and continuing threats to ODF-protection, ODF is fully integrated with the team, with personnel assigned specifically to help protect ODF-protected private forestlands, as well as assigned elsewhere directly to the team or serving as liaisons.
> Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-975-4271
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire


FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 229 fires burned 2,499 acres
Human-caused fires: 520 fires burned 23,032 acres
Total: 749 fires burned 25,531 acres

10-year average (January 1 through August 4):
Lightning-caused fires: 200 fires burned 19,951 acres
Human-caused fires: 393 fires burned 3,147 acres
Total: 593 fires burned 23,098 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

Other Fire Information
Fire danger and activity is high all over the state; for example, ODF's Central Oregon District responded to 5 small (less than 10-acre) lightning and human-caused fires last night. The public is reminded to continue to be vigilant.

FIRE PREVENTION
Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires.

In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.


NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Cynthia Orlando, 503-945-7421 (office) or 503-521-5868 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

ODF Social Media sources for information on fires on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands:
the department's Wildfire blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics
the ODF's Southwest Oregon District blog with district-specific wildfire information and Twitter feed
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Facebook page and Twitter feed
the Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
the ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
the ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
PreSchool Openings Available for 2015-2016 School Year
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 08/11/15
Good morning all,

Things are starting to pick up here in the Wapato School District as we ready ourselves for the new school year. Just FYI, the first day of school for Wapato is Tuesday, September 8th.

Currently we are working to inform families in our District that we still have openings available in our PreSchool program for the 2015-2016 school year. Anything you could do to help us spread this word would be extremely appreciated.

I've attached a release with details about the application process.

Thanks for your help.

Let me know if you have any questions.


Thanks and remember "EVERY School Day Counts"


Attached Media Files: Wapato PreSchool Openings Available
Health advisory issued August 11 for water contact at Seal Rock State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/15
August 11, 2015

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for high levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Seal Rock State Park Beach in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water - especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria - should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from shore and inland sources, such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Seal Rock State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk, even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
Business partners needed for new school-to-work program (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 08/11/15
2015-08/1288/86882/Libby_Thompson.jpg
2015-08/1288/86882/Libby_Thompson.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1288/86882/thumb_Libby_Thompson.jpg
WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools Special Education Department is seeking business partners interested in providing work sites for students with special needs. Walla Walla high school students would work at area business sites with a district para-educator serving as a job coach. The students would be volunteers and work one or two days per week for a few hours, according to Special Education Director Libby Thompson.

"We would match students to their job interests," said Thompson. "Students would need to be juniors or seniors to work in the community."

Thompson is also developing an internal program for freshmen and sophomores to work at sites within Walla Walla Public Schools. This program will serve as training platform for underclassmen as they prepare for work in the community during their junior and senior years.

Businesses interested in partnering with the district on this school-to-work program should contact Libby Thompson at 526-6726 or lthompson@wwps.org.

PHOTO: Libby Thompson

###


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1288/86882/Libby_Thompson.jpg
Business Oregon creates loan program to help small manufacturers grow
Business Oregon - 08/11/15
Business Oregon, the state's economic development agency, is launching a $250,000 loan program to help small manufacturers increase their revenue and grow jobs in Oregon.

"Manufacturing is a cornerstone of Oregon's economy and delivers family wage jobs around the state," said Governor Kate Brown. "We must make sure our small manufacturers have the tools to compete globally so they continue to thrive and grow. This program will provide these tools to some who traditionally wouldn't have access."

Oregon has about 5,300 manufacturers and 75 percent of them have 20 or fewer employees. When they look to expand, these small companies often don't qualify for traditional commercial loan programs. The Small Manufacturing Business Expansion Program seeks to fill that gap for six to 12 companies.

"We're a state that still makes things and ships them around the world." said Sean Robbins, Business Oregon's director. "From semiconductors to wood products to ocean going ships, Oregon's middle class is fueled by manufacturing."

Learn more about the program details and qualifications on the Business Oregon website. Please contact your local business development officer for an application.

About the Small Manufacturing Business Expansion Program

It will target traded sector companies that export their products to other states and countries in the technology, outdoor gear or wood products industries. The loans are capped at $50,000 and may be forgiven for companies that meet specific performance goals. To be eligible, companies must have no more than 25 employees and provide at least 50 percent of the project cost from its own resources.

About Business Oregon: Our mission is to grow Oregon jobs, companies and communities. Learn more.
08/10/15
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update - Monday, August 10, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/10/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Monday, August 10, 2015.

FIRE PREVENTION
As the smoke is clearing over the Cable Crossing Fire, Oregonians are reminded to continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human caused fires. In addition, residents who live in the wildland urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock, and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon's air quality index. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

NEW FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported in the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Cable Crossing Fire, reported July 28 burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 1,857 acres and 80 percent contained. ODF IMT 3 (Incident Commander Link Smith), turned the fire over to a smaller fire management organization (Incident Commander Brian Reel) on Sunday, August 9. The team in place for the next few days is made up of about 221 personnel, with the fire camp having moved from French Creek Road to the Incident Command Post at the old Glide Jr. High School on Glide Loop Road. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.
Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
#cablecrossingfire

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Stouts Creek Fire, reported July 30, burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 22,501 acres and 40 percent contained, with over 1,770 personnel assigned. Crews made significant headway connecting the Stouts Creek Fire's control lines Sunday night and now will begin strengthening those lines. Crews from Oregon, Massachusetts, Ohio, and West Virginia, with expertise conducting burnout operations and falling large trees, arrived at the fire camp last night, and are headed out to the fireline today. Today's work will focus on strengthening lines along the southern part of the fire to prepare for a large burn. A Red Flag Warning is in effect in the area because of lightning potential which might be accompanied by rain, wind gusts, and hail during the next 24 hours. Motorists are asked to use extreme caution if they encounter smoke on roadways in the fire area, use headlights and slow their speed for safety, but not to slow or stop to view firefighting operations. All evacuation levels within the fire area remain at Level 1 (Get Ready) Level 2 (Get Set), with the number of homes under evacuation level notice remaining at 163. There are public land and road closures in place for the fire area by both the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, and Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands; 53 percent of the fire is on state-protected private and BLM lands, and 47 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. The fire being managed under joint command by the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1 (Incident Commander Buckman) and the U.S. Forest Service. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.
Stouts Fire Information:
PH: 541-825-3724
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StoutsFire
E-mail: StoutsFire@gmail.com
#StoutsFire

Northeast Oregon District - LaGrande Unit: The Phillips Creek Fire, reported August 1 burning seven miles northwest of Elgin in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly in the Phillips Creek Drainage on the Umatilla National Forest, is reported today having burned 2,447 acres, including approximately 435 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands (no change in ODF-protected acres). The fire is now 45 percent contained, with 582 personnel assigned. A Red Flag Warning for the area remains in effect through Tuesday due to the threat of thunderstorms with potential gusty winds up to 40 mph. Firefighting operations and smoky conditions will continue to impact travel in that area on Highway 204, necessitating pilot cars or temporary road closures - visit www.tripcheck.com for the latest information. Level 1 (Get Ready) evacuations were lifted on Sunday evening, however road closures in the area of the fire are in effect. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Brett Fillis), assumed management of the Phillips Creek Fire on August 5. Due to the impact and continuing threats to ODF-protection, ODF is fully integrated with the team, with personnel assigned specifically to help protect ODF-protected private forestlands, as well as assigned elsewhere directly to the team or serving as liaisons. A community meeting will be held this evening, August 10, at 6:30 p.m. in the Elgin Community Center, with representatives from the IMT, U.S. Forest Service, ODF, and Union County.
Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-975-4271
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires: 222 fires burned 2,498 acres
Human-caused fires: 513 fires burned 23,030 acres
Total: 735 fires burned 25,528 acres

10-year average (January 1 through August 4):
Lightning-caused fires: 174 fires burned 19,741 acres
Human-caused fires: 373 fires burned 3,110 acres
Total: 547 fires burned 22,851 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.
Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 10, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/10/15
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Stouts Creek Fire
Morning Update
August 10, 2015


Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
Twitter: @StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Making significant headway connecting the Stouts Creek Fire's control lines Sunday night, firefighters finished burning out an area along the fire's north and east sides along Hatchet Creek. Other crews along the Tiller-Trail Highway from milepost 30 to 35 crews walked the fire down to the control lines. They now will begin strengthening those lines. Heavy equipment operators maneuvered a half-dozen pieces of equipment along Forest Road 2301 to strengthen that contingency line overnight.

Type 2 Initial Attack (T2IA) crews from Oregon, Massachusetts, Ohio and West Virginia with expertise conducting burnout operations and falling large trees arrived last night. These crews are heading to the fire line today for operations the south and east sides of the fire. The Santa Fe Hot Shots will attempt a burnout operation about one mile north of Cow Creek Road near Beaver Creek.

The Incident Meteorologist reported a Red Flag Warning because of lightning potential which might be accompanied by rain, wind gusts and hail during the next 24 hours. He called for wind shifts from the south and southeast this morning to the west and northwest this afternoon. As crews continue conducting burns over the next few days and weeks to contain the fire residents, will see more smoke.

Today's work will focus on strengthening lines along the southern part of the fire to prepare for a large burn. Forest Roads 32, 3201 and 3230 would be used to hold a fairly large burnout planned for next week.

Those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health as well as access to AQI monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.

Evacuation levels remain unchanged. Drew is the only area on evacuation Level II from milepost 28 through milepost 39. The Douglas County Sheriff's office is monitoring that designation.

The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $17 million. The state and national teams leading the effort under unified command are protecting lands that are about 50 percent on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands, and 50 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. The Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1 develops and leads the wildland fire suppression strategy.


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08/09/15
Stouts Fire Evening Update - August 9, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/09/15
Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.) http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ www.facebook.com/StoutsFire

Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com Twitter: @StoutsFire #StoutsFire

Things Progress Well On The Stouts Creek Fire

It was another good day on the Stouts Creek Fire with a significant amount of work completed by firefighters, helicopters and heavy equipment. The work being done along the northern perimeter to bring the fire down to the bottom of Hatchet Creek where it intersects with the South Umpqua River is expected to be complete tonight. Most other burnout operations to the east and southeast are complete, or nearly so, and mop-up has begun in earnest.

The Oregon Fremont Winema Type 2 Initial Attack (T2IA) crew, along with T2IA crews from Massachusetts, Ohio and two from West Virginia all arrived tonight to assist. T2IA crews differ from regular type 2 hand crews in their ability to conduct burnouts, as well as their skills falling larger trees.

The Incident Meteorologist predicts winds from an approaching front will put smoke in the communities of Tiller and Drew tomorrow morning. Those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health, as well as access to AQI monitors. Motorists are urged be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles. A change in wind direction midday should help clear the smoke out around 1:00 pm.

Tonight's work will focus on finishing the small areas of burnout still left around the perimeter as well as prepping roads to the south with heavy equipment for a future large burn. The road prep is establishing a contingency line along Forest Roads 32, 3201 and 3230 which would be used to hold a fairly large burnout planned for next week should it begin to move south further than expected.

There are no changes to the current evacuation levels. Drew remains the only Level II from milepost 28 through milepost 39 and revising that designation is under consideration.

The Stouts Creek Fire has reached a cost of $16.9 million. Fifty two percent is on state protected, BLM and private lands, and 48% is on the Umpqua National Forest. It is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1.
Photos: 234th Army Band performs opening night of summer concert series observing 70th Anniversary of WWII (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/09/15
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SALEM, Oregon - The Oregon Army National Guard's 234th Army Band performed at the Elsinore Theater in Salem, Oregon, August 9, beginning a series of concerts scheduled throughout the region this summer to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of WWII.

The band is the featured musical headliner in the 70th Anniversary of WWII events, coinciding with the national Spirit of '45 Commemoration. The concerts are free and open to the public.

Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, and his wife, Kelly, were in attendance at the opening night concert event.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown proclaimed August 9-16, 2015, as WWII 70th Anniversary, Spirit of 45 Commemorative Week to honor and celebrate the achievements of the "Greatest Generation." The second Sunday of every August has been designated as Spirit of '45 Day to commemorate the service and sacrifice of all those who participated in WWII.

Oregon's Spirit of '45 Honorary Chairman, retired Brig. Gen. James B. Thayer, Sr., said he was proud to be a part of the 70th WWII commemoration celebration.

"I am pleased that Oregon has created a permanent day to honor the commitment of service, unity and spirit of 16 million American soldiers on the ground, sailors at sea, pilots in the air, and millions who supported the home front," Thayer said.

Oregon's 234th Army Band is scheduled to appear at the following locations on these designated dates and times:

Aug. 10, 7:00 p.m., Hult Center, Eugene, OR
Aug. 11, 7:00 p.m., North Medford High School, Medford, OR
Aug. 12, 7:00 p.m., Tower Theater, Bend, OR
Aug. 14, 7:00 p.m., The Vert Auditorium, Pendleton, OR
Aug. 15, 7:00 p.m., Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, OR

The event at Camp Withycombe on August 15 is preceded by a ceremony dedicating the Oregon Military Museum Park. The Oregon Military Museum is named in honor of Brig. Gen. Thayer, and is undergoing a $16 million renovation.

For more information on the Spirit of '45 commemoration events, visit https://www.Spiritof45.org.

Photo Captions:
150809-Z-WB774-005: Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Joseph Stanchfield, of the 234th Army Band, welcomes Mark Knecht, of Salem, Oregon, to the Elsinore Theatre, in Salem, for the 234th Army Band's first concert of the summer commemorating the 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII. The Oregon Army National Guard band is scheduled to participate in a series of concerts throughout the region this summer. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150809-Z-WB774-006: Members of the local community begin to arrive at the Elsinore Theatre in Salem, Oregon, for the 234th Army Band's first concert of the summer commemorating the 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII. The Oregon Army National Guard band is scheduled to participate in a series of concerts throughout the region this summer. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150809-Z-WB774-007: Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson (center), Adjutant General, Oregon, and his wife, Kelly (left), meet with Chief Warrant Officer-3 Ashley Alexander (right), commander of the Oregon Army National Guard's 234th Army Band, at the Elsinore Theatre in Salem, Oregon, prior to the opening night concert of the 234th Army Band's summer series. The Oregon Army National Guard band is scheduled to participate in a series of concerts throughout the region commemorating the 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150809-Z-WB774-008: Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson (right), Adjutant General, Oregon, meets with Chief Warrant Officer-3 Ashley Alexander (center), commander of the Oregon Army National Guard's 234th Army Band, at the Elsinore Theatre in Salem, Oregon, prior to the opening night concert of the 234th Army Band's summer series. The Oregon Army National Guard band is scheduled to participate in a series of concerts throughout the region commemorating the 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150809-Z-WB774-009: The Oregon Army National Guard's 234th Army Band performs during opening night at the Elsinore Theatre in Salem, Oregon, beginning their summer series of concerts throughout the region to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the end of WWII. (Photo by Master Sgt. Thomas Hovie, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


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Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 9, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/09/15
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Stouts Creek Fire
Morning Update
August 9, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
Twitter: @StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

TODAY'S PUBLIC MEETING: 7 pm at Milo Volunteer Fire Department

Aggressive firefighting continued Saturday on the Stouts Creek Fire as the number of structures threatened decreased from more than 300 previously to 163 today. Containment increased to 35% with acreage up to 22,501. The bulk of the activity occurred along the eastern perimeter of the fire, specifically along Hatchet Creek in the northeast and Forest Service Road 3201 to the south.

Today's plans call for more of the same tactics that have been successful in recent days: burnout operations along Hatchet Creek will continue, crews will work to strengthen lines along the fire's southern edge and much of the remaining perimeter is in various stages of mop up.

One big change for today is the alignment of upper- and lower-level winds in a west to southwest direction. This will push more smoke into the areas of Milo and Tiller while possibly alleviating smoke issues for residents along Upper Cow Creek Road.

People who are planning to drive the Tiller-Trail Highway today should plan for extra time as traffic can be congested and smoke could be an issue between Milo and Drew and points beyond. If motorists encounter smoke on the road, treat it as fog and use low beam headlights. Please do not stop along the road as traffic from fire operations will be heavy.

Those with health concerns should go to their doctor or www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health, as well as access to AQI monitors.

There are no changes to the evacuation levels.

There are 1,628 people - 62 crews, 47 engines, 28 water tenders and 27 bulldozers - now are working on the fire which has reached a cost of $16.8 million. 53% of the fire is on state protected, BLM and private lands, and 47% is on the Umpqua National Forest.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1.


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08/08/15
Stouts Fire Evening Update - August 8, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/15
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Stouts Creek Fire
Evening Update
August 8, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
Twitter: @StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

SUNDAY PUBLIC MEETING: August 9th, 7:00 pm Milo VFD

Significant progress was made by firefighters on the 21,858 acre Stouts Creek Fire again today, even though that progress generated smoke which created difficult driving conditions along the Tiller-Trail Hwy. Tonight, the community of Azalea hosted a public meeting and Sunday another meeting will be held in Milo, at 7 pm, at the Volunteer Fire Department.

Crews are focusing attention on the northeast corner where Hatchet Creek feeds into the South Umpqua River. Helicopters and tankers got airborne later on Saturday because of smoke but were very active into the late afternoon cooling the edge of the fire to keep it moving slowly as it approached to 2/10th of a mile from the bottom of the drainage. Fire managers hope crews can complete this line tonight. This portion of the fire where it is active and crews have done some burning, contributed much of the smoke in the area. Crews burnout along the eastern flank just west of Milepost 33 on the Tiller-Trail Hwy, straightening the jagged edge of the fire, removing fuel ahead of the main fire and prepping roads for further burnout possibly tonight. On the southeast corner, there were a few spots over the direct line, all of which were successfully lined by four crews who will continue mopping up that area tonight. Work continues on the southern perimeter, building contingency lines to check the fire should it push south past containment lines. The rest of the fire is in varying stages of mop up.

Smoke continues to be a health and driving concern for the public. People who are planning to drive the Tiller-Trail Hwy on Sunday should plan for extra time as traffic can be congested as people stop to watch the very visible aircraft working near the highway. Those who stop to watch are asked to pull well off the road and not impede fire equipment or other drivers. Those with health concerns should go to their doctor or www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health, as well as access to AQI monitors.

1800 people are now working on the fire, which includes four hotshot crews, 33 Type 2 crews and 18 helicopters. The fire is 30% contained and has reached a cost of $14.3 million. 53% of the fire is on state protected, BLM and private lands, and 47% is on the Umpqua National Forest.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1.


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Oregon Army National Guard welcomes home infantry unit from Afghanistan (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/08/15
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MEDFORD, Oregon - The Oregon Army National Guard honored nearly 300 Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, in a formal demobilization ceremony, August 8, at the Spiegelberg Stadium, in Medford, Oregon.

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden; Oregon State Senator Alan Bates, representing Oregon Governor Kate Brown; Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins; City of Medford Mayor Gary Wheeler; Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon; Brig. Gen. Todd A. Plimpton, Land Component Commander; Col. William J. Prendergast, IV, Commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, along with other dignitaries, attended the ceremony to officially welcome the Soldiers home.

The 1-186th Infantry Battalion conducted the Guard Force mission, providing security and force protection, for a joint task force operating throughout Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from September 2014 through December 2014, and Operation Freedom's Sentinel from January 2015 through June 2015. The battalion was headquartered at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan.

Due to the continual drawdown of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, Alpha Company, 1-186th Infantry Battalion, was re-missioned in December of 2014 and moved to support 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, in Kandahar until April 2015. Alpha Company provided force protection in static positions, on mounted patrols, and as part of the internal Quick Reaction Force for Kandahar Airfield.

During the deployment, Soldiers within the battalion were awarded two Bronze Star Medals, 112 Army Commendation Medals, 91 Army Achievement Medals, and four Combat Infantry Badges.

The 1-186th Infantry Battalion is headquartered in Ashland with companies based in Medford, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Coos Bay and St. Helens. The battalion is under the command of Lt. Col. Noel Hoback and Command Sgt. Maj. Brad Huppunen.

Photo Captions:
150808-Z-PL933-001: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, stand in formation, as they are welcomed home during a demobilization ceremony, August 8, in Medford, Oregon. The 1-186th Infantry Battalion spent approximately nine-months providing security and force protection in Afghanistan. (Photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150808-Z-PL933-003: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, stand in formation, as they are welcomed home during a demobilization ceremony, August 8, in Medford, Oregon. The 1-186th Infantry Battalion spent approximately nine-months providing security and force protection in Afghanistan. (Photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150808-Z-PL933-004: Oregon Army National Guard Lt. Col. Noel Hoback (center), commander of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, stands with his formation of nearly 300 Soldiers, as they are honored during a demobilization ceremony, August 8, in Medford, Oregon. The 1-186th Infantry Battalion spent approximately nine-months providing security and force protection in Afghanistan. (Photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150808-Z-PL933-006: Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson (center), Adjutant General, Oregon, welcomes home Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, following a demobilization ceremony, August 8, in Medford, Oregon. The 1-186th Infantry Battalion spent approximately nine-months providing security and force protection in Afghanistan. (Photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


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CORRECTED Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 8, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/15
This corrected version of the news release is being issued because of a change in the meeting time for the community meeting in Milo, OR on Sunday, August 9. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m., rather than 6:30 p.m., as previously stated.

---------------

Stouts Creek Fire
Morning Update
August 8, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
Twitter: @StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

TODAY'S PUBLIC MEETING: August 8th, 6:30 pm Azalea Glen Christian Center
SUNDAY PUBLIC MEETING: August 9th, 7 pm Milo VFD

Friday's night crews continued to make significant progress on the Stouts Creek Fire with several areas of the fire in the mop up stages and containment increasing to 30%. Now at 21,858 acres, the fire remains active on the northeast and southeast edges of the perimeter and residents can expect to see smoke and possibly flames on the ridge above Tiller-Trail Highway.

Helicopters will continue to be visible along the South Umpqua River as they work on hot spots and in support of fire fighting activities. Residents¬¬ also might see air tankers working in addition to the helicopters depending on the fire activity level. Motorists are encouraged to use extreme caution if they encounter smoke on roadways. Treat it as you would fog and turn on your headlights. We encourage those wanting to stop along the road to watch the firefighting efforts to continue moving in order to maintain traffic flow along the roadway.

The Upper Cow Creek Road and Milo area, as well as a small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County, are under a Level 1 (Ready) evacuation alert. Drew (milepost 28 to 39) remains at Level 2 (Set).

Structure protection resources and the OSFM Green Team personnel demobilized today after determining that protection benchmarks were met. Mitigation efforts included creating defensible space around threatened homes, fuel chipping, strategic placement of portable water tanks and pumps and placement of sprinkler kits where necessary. Fire managers also ensured that a structure protection plan is in place for both the assigned wildland resources and county fire agencies. Two structure task forces from Douglas County are available if needed.

More than 1,500 personnel are assigned to the fire suppression effort. The cost of suppression so far is $12.1 million.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands.

The Stouts Creek Fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1.


Attached Media Files: State Fire Marshal Incident Commander Ted Kunze discusses structure protection transition
Cable Crossing Fire Daily Update - Saturday, August 8, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update
8/08/2015


CREWS DEPARTING FOR OTHER FIRES
BLM TEMPORARILY CLOSES RIVER AND TRAIL ACCESS

Containment on the Cable Crossing Fire has climbed to 70 percent and fire managers continue releasing fire crews and equipment and sending them to other fires around the region. "Fire danger remains high all across Oregon and there is a great chance of new fires. We want make sure these are resources available when the fire bell rings again," said Dave Lorenz, Southern Oregon Area Manager for the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Some crews from the Cable Crossing Fire have been sent to the Stouts Creek Fire near Tiller, the Collier Butter Fire near Gold Beach, and to fires burning in Washington State.

To ensure public safety and resource integrity, The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has issued a temporary closure of some their lands in Douglas County. The closure area affects public lands inside the Cable Crossing Fire perimeter and beyond. Additionally, the North Umpqua River Corridor is closed to all activities from Baker Wayside downstream to Deadline Falls. The North Umpqua Trail is also closed from Tioga Bride downstream to the Swiftwater Trailhead. The trailhead, day use area, and bridge at Swiftwater Park are also closed.
For more information on the BLM temporary closure please visit: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/roseburg/newsroom/index.php or contact the Roseburg BLM District Office at 541-440-4930.
The current acreage for the fire is at 1,848. The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public. Both lanes of Highway 138 are now open.

# # #

Dozers: 6
Water Tenders: 11
Total Personnel: 736
Jurisdiction:
USDA-Forest Service
Umatilla NationalForest
Walla Walla R.D.
Oregon Department of Forestry
Social Media:
Facebook: Phillips Creek Fire | Facebook
Twitter: PhillipsCreek Fire (@PhillipsCK2015) | Twitter
Inciweb http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/

Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,848 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 70%
Expected Containment: 8/12/15
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 27
Helicopters: 4
Engines: 19
Dozers: 5
Water Tenders: 15
Total personnel: 732
Estimated Cost to Date: $7,900,000
For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire


###
Annual "Return from the Burn" | A Step Back in Time (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/15
Meet and greet Smokey Bear this week-end, August 15-17, at the Tillamook Forest Center's
Meet and greet Smokey Bear this week-end, August 15-17, at the Tillamook Forest Center's
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1072/86828/thumb_TFC_Return_From_the_Burn_Smokey_Kids.jpg
NOTE CORRECTION: Corrected the DATES in the previously-sent release (the DAYS were accurate)

----------

Annual "Return from the Burn" | A Step Back in Time
August 14-16 at Tillamook Forest Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
August 7, 2015 Contacts: Fran McReynolds, 503-815-6817
Denise Berkshire, 503-815-6803


Join us for three days of fun celebrating the unique Tillamook State Forest. Throughout the week-end of August 14 - 16, from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., the Tillamook Forest Center will host engaging activities and displays representing the history of the forest before, during, and after the fires.

This event - the 9th annual "Return from the Burn" celebration hosted by the center - commemorates the recovery of northwestern Oregon forests from a series of catastrophic wildfires that began in 1933. The largest reforestation effort ever undertaken restored these devastated forestlands to today's Tillamook State Forest that we know and enjoy.

All Three Days
Get a hug from Smokey Bear and receive a free goodie bag (Smokey visits at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. each day)!
Meet real forest firefighters and spray a fire hose at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. each day (if available due to fire season)
Create arts and crafts to take home
Check out a vintage 1930 Ford Model AA pumper truck
Win a prize by completing our Tillamook Forest Center Treasure Hunt or Wheel of Forest Game
Guest presenters (see below)

Saturday, August 15 @ 1 p.m. | Guest Presenter Bruce Rottink
Old-Time Loggers: Their Tools and Techniques
The old-time loggers had a tough job, but also a lot of special tools and techniques to help them do it. This interactive session will give you a glimpse into the work-life of an old time logger, before the days of the chainsaw. If you've ever wanted to see and learn about an old Tillamook logger's saw oil bottle, a falling wedge, a cat choker, or a "Tillamook Diving Board" (and much, much more), this is your chance. Impress your neighbors when you tell them you even volunteered to be an "undercut!"

Sunday, August 16 @ 1 pm | Historian and Guest Presenter Ed Kamholz
The Oregon Historical Railroads Project
Join railroad historian Ed Kamholz for a pictorial overview of railroad development in Oregon and the role it played to deliver and settle Anglo culture in the state. Kamholz will address railroad development in three broad categories representing main and branch line carriers, trolley and interurban lines, and private railroads, primarily those used for logging.

This presentation will also describe the ambitious Oregon Historical Railroads Project that will map all of Oregon's historical railroads dating from the state's first wooden tramway in 1846 to the present, and efforts to provide this information available online.

This year's Tillamook Forest Center "Return from the Burn" free event is offered in conjunction with Tillamook County's "A Step Back in Time" which offers visitors an opportunity to visit several other museums and take a scenic train ride for an all-inclusive $15.00 pass. For more information on "A Step Back in Time", please call the Garibaldi Maritime Museum at (503) 322-8411. We hope you'll join us for the "Return from the Burn" event this year for some free family fun!

Location, Days, and Hours
The Tillamook Forest Center is located on Highway 6 at milepost 22; approximately one hour from Portland and 20 minutes from the city of Tillamook. Summer hours (7 days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) continue through September 7. Fall hours (Wednesday - Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) begin on September 8, 2015. Admission is always free, as are most programs and events.

For more information, visit www.tillamookforestcenter.org or call toll-free (866) 930-4646.

###


Attached Media Files: Meet and greet Smokey Bear this week-end, August 15-17, at the Tillamook Forest Center's , Learn about logging in the past at the Tillamook Forest Center's
08/07/15
Shikar-Safari Club International Honors OSP Senior Trooper Martin Maher As Wildlife Officer Of The Year (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 08/07/15
2015-08/1002/86829/IMG_2923.jpg
2015-08/1002/86829/IMG_2923.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1002/86829/thumb_IMG_2923.jpg
Conservation-based organization, Shikar-Safari Club International, honored a Springfield area
Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division trooper today as the State's top wildlife enforcement officer for 2014. The award was presented in Salem during the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting.

On August 7, 2015, Shikar-Safari Club International representative Lynn Loacker presented
Senior Trooper Martin Maher with the Shikar-Safari Club International "Wildlife Officer of the
Year" award, placing him in a distinguished group of officers who have earned recognition for
their commitment to fish and wildlife enforcement and protection of natural resources. The
award has been given annually for more than 25 years to honor outstanding wildlife
enforcement officers whose efforts during the previous year reflected outstanding performance
and achievement among the state agency's sworn fish and wildlife law enforcement personnel.
In presenting the award, Lynn Loacker noted that wildlife enforcement officers rarely receive the recognition and encouragement they so greatly deserve for protecting our wildlife and natural resources.

"We congratulate Senior Trooper Maher on being selected for our Shikar-Safari Club
International's "Wildlife Officer of the Year" award. This award puts him in a very distinguished group who has earned this recognition for their outstanding performance and dedication to duty," said Loacker.

Senior Trooper Martin Maher has been a member of the OSP for almost 16 years, having spent 6 years in the Patrol Division and just shy of the last 10 years assigned to the Fish and Wildlife Division. He is well respected by his fellow teammates and is a go to person for expertise in all areas of fish and wildlife enforcement. Senior Trooper Martin Maher is responsible for southern Lane County and part of northern Douglas County, but routinely assists in other areas when needed. He diligently patrols his area and works closely with landowners, constituents and local Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists. He is often relied upon by members of the Patrol and Criminal Divisions when calls for service are requested in some of the remote locations within his area of responsibility.

Known for being a very well rounded trooper and passionate about Oregon's natural resources and marine safety, Senior Trooper Martin Maher shares his knowledge and mentors both younger and more experienced members. He has helped coached Fish and Wildlife Troopers on his team and also actively participates in training new recruits and college students about fish and wildlife enforcement.

The OSP also congratulates Senior Trooper Martin Maher on receiving this distinguished award and recently presented Sr. Tpr. Maher with the OSP Fish & Wildlife Division's 2014 "Trooper of the Year" award.

The Shikar-Safari Club International, formed in 1952, is a worldwide organization dedicated to the protection, enhancement and preservation of wildlife and has placed particular emphasis on endangered and threatened species through the promotion of enforcement of conservation laws and
regulations.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1002/86829/IMG_2923.jpg
Man Sentenced For Poaching Trophy Bull Elk - Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 08/07/15
2015-08/1002/86827/Elk_Antlers.jpg
2015-08/1002/86827/Elk_Antlers.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1002/86827/thumb_Elk_Antlers.jpg
On August 5th, 2015, an Enterprise area man was sentenced in Wallowa County Circuit Court following a July 23, 2015, conviction for Taking Elk without a Valid Elk Tag and Criminal Trespass - Second Degree.

On September 7th, 2014, Skyler WILLIS, age 23, Enterprise, shot a trophy 6-point bull elk with his bow on the Zumwalt Prairie, which is located in the Chesnimnus Wildlife Management Unit. WILLIS did not have a valid Chesnimnus Unit Tag and was also trespassing on The Nature Conservancy property when he retrieved his bull elk.

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division Troopers from the Enterprise Worksite soon became aware that WILLIS had unlawfully killed the bull elk and began a three month long investigation into the crime. As a result of the investigation, the elk antlers, which scored 319 Boone and Crockett, the elk meat as well as the bow that WILLIS used to unlawfully kill the bull elk were subsequently seized. At the conclusion of the lengthy investigation which included the use of DNA evidence, WILLIS was cited for Taking Elk without Valid Elk Tag and Criminal Trespass - Second Degree in early February of 2015.

On August 5th, 2015, WILLIS was sentenced by Judge Russell West in Wallowa County Circuit Court. As part of WILLIS' sentence, his hunting privileges were suspended for three years; he was placed on 24 months of supervised probation, during which time WILLIS is prohibited from possessing any firearms as well as archery equipment and is not to accompany anyone who is hunting. Willis also had a one-year suspended jail sentence and received eight days of work crew and seven days of community service. The elk antlers, elk meat and bow are forfeited to the State.

Additionally, WILLIS is to write a letter of apology to the hunters of Oregon and the letter is to be published in the Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) magazine. WILLIS is to also write a letter of apology addressed to The Nature Conservancy. WILLIS was further ordered to pay $5000 in restitution for the trophy bull elk as well as $200 in fines.


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1002/86827/Elk_Antlers.jpg
Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 7, 2015 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/07/15
2015-08/1072/86816/Aug_7_Morning_Update.jpg
2015-08/1072/86816/Aug_7_Morning_Update.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/1072/86816/thumb_Aug_7_Morning_Update.jpg
Stouts Creek Fire
Morning Update
August 7, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
@StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Night crews continued to work on the flare-up of the east flank of the Stouts Creek Fire. The fire actively burned in this area till 3:00 am. Crews were able to maintain the fire within the constructed hand dug lines south of the 3220 road and west of the Tiller-Trail Highway.

A structure protection task force, comprised of engines' protected homes near the community of Drew. A second task force of engines from structural protection fire districts in Jackson County arrived last night to provide additional structure protection. Both task forces are working a flex schedule to maximize protection during the afternoon and evening burning periods. The tasks forces are under the direction of an Oregon State Fire Marshal incident management team.

Fire activity around the rest of the 20,804-acre Stouts Creek Fire was relatively calm overnight. Mop-up continued along the north and west flanks. Fire line construction also continued along the lower portion of the west flank, the south flank and portions of the east flank. Heavy equipment being used includes bulldozers, excavators and feller-bunchers. The equipment is not only building a wide fire line but is removing excess trees and brush adjacent to the line. Where the heavy equipment cannot work, due to steep terrain, fire crews are building fire line by hand.

The fire is 25 percent contained. 1,545 personnel are assigned to the fire suppression effort.

The cost of suppression so far is $10.4 million.

The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road area, Milo and Drew remained at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 (Ready) evacuation alert.

Smoke will continue to drift from the fire area and will be stronger when burnout operations are taking place. Most of the smoke will drift in a south/southeast direction from the fire. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, see www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands.

The Stouts Creek Fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1. Structural fire protection is being handled by task forces under the command of the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Green Team.

###


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1072/86816/Aug_7_Morning_Update.jpg
South Jetty Fire Update - Friday, August 7, 2015 FINAL
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/07/15
South Jetty Fire
Oregon Department of Forestry -
Astoria District
Incident Commander: Neal Bond, ODF
August 7, 2015 8:30 AM
FINAL REPORT

Fire Information Phone: 503-338-8442


Current Situation:
Fire officials and State Park managers removed the road block yesterday at 2:00 pm. The public has full access except for parking lot C, which will remain closed for fire management purposes. ODF appreciates the public's patience during the closure.
Today only one hand crew assisted by two ODF engines will be working on the fire. Incident Commander Neal Bond says "We are taking advantage of the cooler weather and making good progress and plan to have this fire in patrol status this weekend".
This is the final report for this incident.

Fire at a Glance
08/07/2015
Size: 27 acres
Containment: 90 %
Expected Containment: 08/08/15
Cause: under investigation
Resources on fire:
Crews: 1 (10 man)
Air Tankers: 0
Helicopters: 0
Engines: 2
Dozers: 0
Water Tenders: 0
Total Personnel: 14
Estimated Costs to Date: UNK
Threatened Structures: 0
Injuries: 0

For additional information:
Ashley Lertora, PIO at 503-338-8442 or Ashley.M.Lertora@oregon.gov

Follow ODF on Facebook for updates.

###
Cable Crossing Fire Update - Friday, August 7, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/07/15
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update
8/07/2015

CONTAINMENT ESTIMATE REACHES 60 PERCENT
REHABILITATION EFFORTS BEGIN


Fire managers now estimate containment on the Cable Crossing Fire at 60 percent. "We are quickly winding down this fire and wrapping it up. Your hard work and dedication brought us to this point and I want to thank you for that," Link Smith, Incident Commander on the Cable Crossing Fire, told fire crews gathered at the morning briefing.

Fire crews continue to make steady progress on mop up operations, making nightly use of hand-held infrared scanners to detect residual heat. "We want to be very thorough as we mop up and make a smooth transition back to the Douglas Forest Protective Association," remarked Mike White, Night Shift Operations Section Chief.

The day shift remains focused on mop up, tonight's operations will shift to patrol status with three crews scanning for lingering heat and two engines scouting for smoke and flare ups from the road network.

As the fire winds down, rehabilitation efforts have begun to mitigate damage from suppression activities. Crews will be installing water bars on dozer line to control soil erosion, protect water quality and prevent sediment from entering streams and rivers. Several small creeks in the burned area flow into the North Umpqua Wild and Scenic River which is home to renowned populations of salmon and steelhead.

The current acreage for the fire is at 1,848. The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public. Both lanes of Highway 138 are now open.

Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,848 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 60%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 39
Helicopters: 5
Engines: 22
Dozers: 4
Water Tenders: 23
Total personnel: 1,037
Estimated Cost to Date: $7,600,000

For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire



# # #
Oregon Army National Guard to welcome home infantry unit from Afghanistan
Oregon Military Department - 08/07/15
SALEM, Oregon - The Oregon Army National Guard is scheduled to honor nearly 300 Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 186th Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, in a formal demobilization ceremony, Saturday, August 8, at 10:00 a.m.

The ceremony will be held at the Spiegelberg Stadium, located at 815 S. Oakdale Ave., Medford, Oregon. The event is open to the public and media is encouraged to attend.

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden; Oregon State Senator Alan Bates, representing Oregon Governor Kate Brown; Oregon Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins; City of Medford Mayor Gary Wheeler; Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon; Brig. Gen. Todd A. Plimpton, Land Component Commander; Col. William J. Prendergast, IV, Commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, along with other dignitaries are scheduled to attend.

The 1-186th Infantry Battalion conducted the Guard Force mission, providing security and force protection, for a joint task force operating throughout Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from September 2014 through December 2014, and Operation Freedom's Sentinel from January 2015 through June 2015. The battalion was headquartered at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan.

Due to the continual drawdown of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, Alpha Company, 1-186th Infantry Battalion, was re-missioned in December of 2014 and moved to support 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, in Kandahar until April 2015. Alpha Company provided force protection in static positions, on mounted patrols, and as part of the internal Quick Reaction Force for Kandahar Airfield.

During the deployment, Soldiers within the battalion were awarded two Bronze Star Medals, 112 Army Commendation Medals, 91 Army Achievement Medals, and four Combat Infantry Badges.

The 1-186th Infantry Battalion is headquartered in Ashland with companies based in Medford, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Coos Bay and St. Helens. The battalion is under the command of Lt. Col. Noel Hoback and Command Sgt. Maj. Brad Huppunen.
08/06/15
Oregon Army National Guard continues fire suppression efforts at Stouts Fire (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/06/15
2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-038.jpg
2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-038.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/86799/thumb_150805-Z-PL993-038.jpg
ROSEBURG, Oregon - The Oregon Army National Guard continues assisting local, county and state agencies with fire suppression efforts at the Stouts Fire near Milo and Canyonville, Oregon, in Douglas County.

Two HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters with crew members and support personnel were dispatched to the Roseburg Municipal Airport, August 3, to assist with fire suppression efforts utilizing "Bambi buckets." An additional CH-47 Chinook helicopter with crew members arrived in Roseburg on Wednesday, August 5.

Photo Captions:
150805-Z-PL993-064: Smoke plumes over the forests outside Milo, Oregon, in Douglas County on Wednesday, August 5. Two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Roseburg Municipal Airport since Monday to support ground firefighting crews and were joined by one Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter, Wednesday. The Stouts Fire currently covers more than 19,000 acres. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-053: HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter crew chief Spc. Beth Bechard, with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, unleashes 500 gallons of water on a target at the request of firefighting ground crews working the Stouts Fire in Douglas County, Aug. 5. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "Bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Roseburg Municipal Airport since Monday to support ground firefighting crews and have been joined by one Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter based out Pendleton, Ore. The Stouts Fire currently covers more than 19,000 acres. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-060: Oregon Army National Guard pilots, Chief Warrant Officer-4 Dennis Cooper, Chief Warrant Officer-2 Logan Bass, and crew chief Spc. Beth Bechard, with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, navigate through smoke on the way to their drop site in support of firefighting ground crews, August 5, at the Stouts Fire in Douglas County. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "Bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Roseburg Municipal Airport since Monday to support ground firefighting crews and have been joined by one Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter based out Pendleton, Ore. The Stouts Fire currently covers more than 19,000 acres. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-041: Oregon Army National Guard pilots, Lt. Col. Brian Houston, Chief Warrant Officer-2 Rafael Toler, and crew chief Sgt. Tracy Braeme, with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, navigate through smoke on the way to their drop site in support of firefighting ground crews on Wednesday, August 5, at the Stouts Fire in Douglas County. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "Bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Roseburg Municipal Airport since Monday to support ground firefighting crews and have been joined by one Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter based out Pendleton, Ore. The Stouts Fire currently covers more than 19,000 acres. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-035: An Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter, based out of Pendleton, Oregon, arrives at the Roseburg Municipal Airport, on Wednesday, August 5. The Chinook, along with two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters, are working with local, county and state agencies to support fire suppression efforts at the Stouts Fire near Canyonville, Oregon in Douglas County. The Chinook is capable of carrying up to 1,500 gallons of water in its "Bambi bucket." (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

150805-Z-PL993-038: Oregon Army National Guard pilots, Lt. Col. Brian Houston, Chief Warrant Officer-2 Rafael Toler, and crew chief Sgt. Tracy Braeme, with Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation, gather water at a dip point near the Stouts Fire in Douglas County, August 5. The Blackhawk helicopter is equipped with a "Bambi bucket" which carries approximately 500 gallons of water. Two Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters have been working out of the Roseburg Municipal Airport since Monday to support ground firefighting crews and have been joined by one Oregon Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter based out Pendleton, Ore. The Stouts Fire currently covers more than 19,000 acres. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-038.jpg , 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-035.jpg , 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-041.jpg , 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-060.jpg , 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-053.jpg , 2015-08/962/86799/150805-Z-PL993-064.jpg
North Bend resident appointed to Oregon historic cemeteries commission
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/06/15
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director Lisa Sumption has appointed Mark Petrie of North Bend to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries.

"I am happy to have been accepted onto the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and look forward to working with the other accomplished commissioners and staff to protect and preserve our heritage," said Petrie, an enrolled Coos tribal member of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. "Protecting, respecting and honoring our ancestors is something I feel very strongly about. I am eager to contribute all I have to offer to the commission and its programs."

"I am looking forward to Petrie joining the commission," stated Kuri Gill, coordinator for the state historic cemeteries program. "His interest and cultural knowledge will be an asset to our work."

The seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries supports OPRD historic cemetery preservation efforts by offering training, educational resources, coordination and grants. Its other members are Diane Elder of Paisley, Mike Leamy of Astoria and Charlotte Lehan of Wilsonville. OPRD will be seeking additional commissioners in the fall.

For more information about the commission and the historic cemeteries program visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Historic Cemeteries Program Coordinator, Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or (503) 986-0685.
Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update - Thursday, August 6, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/06/15
This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Thursday, August 6, 2015.

NEW FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the previous 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES CURRENTLY BURNING ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

Astoria District: The South Jetty Fire, reported August 3 burning on the South Jetty in the Fort Stevens State Park near Warrenton, remains at 27 acres and is now 80 percent contained. Yesterday, crews made good progress and have built fire line around the entire fire perimeter and anchored to the river beach dune on each end, with almost 2.8 total miles of hose laid. A small amount of drizzle was received on the fire earlier this morning, providing some small relief. Today crews will grid the burn area - systematically walking the fire, identifying and flagging hot spots for the hand crews to dig up and douse with water. Twenty-six firefighters are currently assigned to this fire. Fire officials and State Park managers will remove the road block today at 2:00 p.m. The public will have full access, except for parking lot C, which will remain closed for fire management purposes. The cause of this fire remains investigation.
South Jetty Fire Information: Ashley Lertora, 503-338-8442; Ashley.M.Lertora@oregon.gov.

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Cable Crossing Fire, reported July 28 burning on DFPA-protected private and public forestlands six miles east of Glide, is currently estimated at 1,848 acres and approximately 50 percent contained. Mop-up is well underway on the fire; however, firefighters remain cautious, as warm and dry weather as well as gusty winds, mixed with burned forest fuels, creates a potentially dangerous environment of falling trees and other hazards. Today, approximately 1,000 firefighters are assigned to this fire. The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public, and Highway 138 remains open with the aid of a pilot car. Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) assumed command of this fire July 30. The cause of the Cable Crossing Fire remains under investigation.
Cable Creek Fire information:
PH: 541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The Stouts Fire, reported July 30, burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo on forestlands protected by DFPA, is currently estimated at approximately 19,971 acres and approximately 20 percent contained. Working together through the night, wildland firefighters from 17 states continued carving out control lines and doing controlled burn-outs; work which will continue today. Structural crews supported wildland firefighting efforts and are on hand to protect homes if needed, as some homes in the area of the fire remain in Level 1 (Get Ready) and Level 2 (Get Set) evacuation status. Today, crews' fire suppression efforts will focus on connecting and widening existing fire lines. If conditions are favorable, more burn-out operations may be done on the east and south flanks. Crews on the fire's west and north flanks are running hose lays and doing mop-up along the fire's edge. Helicopters will continue supporting them by dropping thousands of gallons of water to calm fires threatening existing lines and spot fires, and air tankers are available on an as-needed basis. The Stouts Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, and both Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The fire is being managed cooperatively by ODF's Incident Management Team 1 (Incident Commander Buckman), the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal's Green Team, and the U.S. Forest Service. The firefighting team includes 1400 people. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.
Stouts Fire Information:
PH: 541-825-3724
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StoutsFire
E-mail: StoutsFire@gmail.com
#StoutsFire

The Phillips Creek Fire, reported August 1 burning seven miles northwest of Elgin in brush, grass, slash, and heavy timber predominantly in the Phillips Creek Drainage on the Umatilla National Forest, is reported this morning having burned 1,801 acres, including approximately 431 acres of ODF-protected private forestlands, and is now 10 percent contained. Yesterday's fire behavior moderated, with cooler temperatures, and firefighters continued work on direct and indirect containment line around the fire's perimeter, in addition to helicopter water drops to minimize fire spread. Today's fire behavior may display areas of active, rapid spread, including high intensity flare-ups. Today's operations plan for mop-up on the fire's south end along the dozer line, protecting private land; pursuing opportunities to secure the fire's west edge with direct line construction; and, on the north and east flanks, focus on securing the established line and continuing to shepherd the fire down to Highway 204. Helicopter water drops will be used to prevent the fire from crossing Highway 204, with contingency lines being improved on the other side (east) of that highway. Firefighting operations may continue to impact travel in that area on Highway 204, with pilot cars or temporary closures. Travelers need to drive with caution as smoke may reduce visibility, and firefighters and equipment could be present. For the latest status of Highway 204, visit www.tripcheck.com. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Brett Fillis), assumed management of the Phillips Creek Fire on August 5. Due to the impact and continuing threats to ODF-protection, ODF is fully engaged with the team, who is officially working for both the Umatilla National Forest and ODF. This involvement and participation with the team includes ODF divisions assigned specifically to help protect ODF-protected private forestlands, as well as several other ODF personnel who are either assigned directly to the team or serving as liaisons.
Phillips Creek Fire Information:
PH: 541-975-4271
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4443/
https://www.facebook.com/Phillipscreekfire2015
https://twitter.com/PhillipsCK2015
http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/
#Phillipscreekfire

WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may continue to persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, see www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through August 4:
Lightning-caused fires: 206 fires burned 2495 acres
Human-caused fires: 478 fires burned 966 acres
Total: 684 fires burned 3461 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the August 4):
Lightning-caused fires: 143 fires burned 16,977 acres
Human-caused fires: 356 fires burned 2980 acres
Total: 499 fires burned 19,957 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
the national Incident Information System site.

For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
the department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
the Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
the Douglas Forest Protective Association Twitter feed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.
Oregon State Penitentiary reports smoke in ventilation duct
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/06/15
Earlier this morning, staff at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) noticed a smoking ventilation duct within the Oregon Corrections Enterprises (OCE) furniture factory; it is now smoldering. The Salem fire department responded and is currently sill on site.

Inmates, with the exception of a small number in the culinary section, have been returned to their cells and the facility is locked down. Morning visiting has been canceled and will reopen for the afternoon session. No injuries to staff or inmates have been reported, and the damage was contained to the furniture factory. Staff have accounted for all inmates.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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State Land Board to consider Elliott State Forest recommendation
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/06/15
Aug. 13 public meeting will address process for seeking new ownership

Salem - After more than a year of research, public input and technical analyses, the Department of State Lands (DSL) will present the State Land Board with the final results of the Elliott State Forest Alternatives Project, and a detailed process to transfer ownership of the forest in Coos and Douglas counties.

Approximately 84,000 acres of the 92,000-acre forest are Common School Trust lands overseen by the Land Board to fund K-12 public schools in Oregon. Revenue from timber management of these lands is deposited in the Common School Fund. In recent years, policies adopted to assure compliance with the Endangered Species Act have resulted in the forest producing a net deficit to the fund of about $5 million since 2013.

DSL staff will present the board with a structure and process for seeking qualified buyers and for reviewing plans submitted for new ownership of the Elliott.

Key elements of any transfer plan must include:
Ownership of the entire property
Compensating the Common School Fund for the fair market value of the forest
Retaining other values such as recreational access, older forest stands and watersheds for species habitat, and local economic benefits from the forest

"Our hope is that diverse interests will come together to present creative ownership scenarios to make the Common School Fund whole, while also addressing other values provided by the forest that are important to the public," said Mary Abrams, DSL director.

In December 2014, the Land Board asked staff to further explore three options - 1) hiring a new manager for the forest; 2) managing the forest under a new habitat conservation plan; and 3) transferring the Elliott out of Common School Fund ownership. In June 2015 the board asked staff to further develop a process for transferring ownership that would also address the public values provided by the forest.


This work included a second round of meetings in July with education beneficiaries of the Common School Fund, conservation groups, timber interests, tribal representatives, local and state officials, and economic development organizations. Staff included information from these discussions as they developed and refined the transfer protocol.

The Aug. 13 staff recommendation will present the Land Board with the protocol and findings to support it.

The meeting will be held:

August 13, 2015
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Department of State Lands
775 Summer St. NE, Salem
Land Board Room

The meeting agenda also includes a recap of the 2015 legislative session and a request to initiate rulemaking to amend DSL's ocean renewable energy rules.

Public Comments:
Comments on agenda items may be presented to the Land Board at the meeting either orally or in writing. People interested in presenting oral input will need to sign in. A maximum of 3 minutes will be given to each speaker. Due to potential time limitations, people are encouraged to bring written copies of comments for the official record.

The meeting is in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities. If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please notify Lorna Stafford at (503) 871-4323 or lorna.stafford@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.

Meeting agenda: http://www.oregon.gov/dsl/SLB/Pages/2015_slb_meeting_schedule.aspx

The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne P. Atkins and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon's Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregonstatelands.us
Stouts Fire Morning Update - August 6, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/06/15
Stouts Creek Fire
Morning Update
August 6, 2015

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
@StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Working together through the night, which will continue through today, wildland firefighters from 17 states continued carving out control lines and doing some controlled burn outs. Structural crews supported wildland firefighting efforts and were on hand to protect homes, if needed. 1,400 people are working on the firefighting team. The fire grew about 4,000 acres over the last three days to 19,971 acres. The fire is 20 percent contained.

Last night's Milo community meeting drew about 75 people out for an update. Oregon State Fire Marshal "Green Team" Incident Commander Ted Kunze said, "We greatly appreciate all the community support, especially the thank you signs. We've prepared area around the homes to help protect them. The wildland crews have a lot of work ahead, please hang in there with them. This is a big, tough fire."

Today, crews' fire suppression efforts will focus on connecting and widening existing fire lines. If conditions are favorable, more burn out operations may be done on the east and south flanks. Crews on the fire's west and north flanks are running hose lays and doing mop-up along the fire's edge.

While crews dig lines, eight helicopters will continue supporting them by dropping thousands of gallons of water to calm fires threatening existing lines and spot fires. Another helicopter is on standby to respond to medical emergencies. Air tankers are available on an as-needed basis.

A structural protection task force continues monitoring the Drew area. Residences and other structures have been evaluated for defensible space. Crews reduced shrubs, brush, and other vegetation to make homes more defensible against fire. Crews strategically placed portable water ponds, pumps, hoses and sprinklers among the homes as a contingency measure.

The Douglas County Sheriff's office will reduce to Level 1 (Ready) evacuation status the areas of Milo Academy, Stouts Creek Road, Ferguson Lane and Conley Road, effective at 10 a.m. The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road and Drew remain at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 evacuation alert.

Smoke might continue drifting from the fire area and will be stronger when firefighters conduct controlled burn outs. Most of the smoke will drift in a south/southeast direction from the fire. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, see www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The Stouts Creek Fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1. Structural fire protection is being handled by task forces under the command of the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Green Team.
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Cable Crossing Fire Daily Update - Thursday, August 6, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/06/15
CREWS CAUTIOUS DURING MOP UP
Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Cable Crossing Fire Morning Update
8/06/2015


CREWS CAUTIOUS DURING MOP UP

Managers of the Cable Crossing Fire are pleased by the effectiveness of mop up operations. While the fire is now 50 percent contained, firefighters are not taking their advancement for granted.
Conditions are expected to be warm and dry, with gusty winds and temperatures into the upper 80s. This is what firefighters call "heads up" weather, because a critical point has been reached in the fire operation where the weather mixed with the burned forest fuels create a potentially dangerous environment of falling trees and other hazards. Fire crews remain cautious as they continue to mop up.
The current acreage for the fire is at 1,848. The fire area and forest roads remain closed to the public. Highway 138 remains open with the aid of a pilot car.
Last night's Open House at the Glide Fire Station was well attended by members of the community. About 40 people came by throughout the evening to talk to fire managers and express their gratitude. Fire managers are grateful for the Glide Fire Department's help in organizing events and providing a meeting space to keep the community informed.

Fire At A Glance

Size: 1,848 acres
Cause: Under Investigation
Containment: 50%
Expected Containment: unknown
Crews and Equipment:
Crews: 39
Helicopters: 5
Engines: 22
Dozers: 4
Water Tenders: 6
Total personnel: 1,037
Estimated Cost to Date: $6,300,000

For More Information:
541-496-0902
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.oregon.gov/odf

https://www.facebook.com/CableCrossingFire
#cablecrossingfire



# # #
Photo Release: Oregon National Guard concludes two-day multi-agency, multi-state disaster preparedness exercise on Oregon's north coast (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/06/15
2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-020.jpg
2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2015-08/962/86763/thumb_150805-Z-CH590-020.jpg
Photo Release

The annual Pathfinder-Minutemen 2015 exercise, hosted by the Oregon National Guard, Oregon Disaster Medical Team (ODMT), and the U.S. Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron, at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon has concluded. The two-day exercise, held Aug. 4-5, brought together a number of military, civilian and volunteer agencies throughout the country to train and practice medical first response based on an earthquake and tsunami scenario. Officials believe the northwest is overdue for a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake as a result of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Participants included Air National Guard units from Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, U.S. Air Force Reserve units, the Oregon Army National Guard's Medical Command, and civilian first-responder and medical agencies from across the region. Event planners hope to grow the exercise for next year, and include more government and private agencies.

150805-Z-CH590-798
A U.S. Coast Guard HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter, from Air Station Astoria, drops a rescue diver into Slusher Lake at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Oregon, during the Pathfinder-Minutemen Exercise 2015, Aug. 5 at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon. The annual event is a joint multi-agency, multi-state disaster preparedness exercise based on response to a possible Cascadia Subduction Zone event. Officials believe the Northwest is overdue for a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150805-Z-CH590-712
Chaplain Ian Howarth, of the 124th Fighter Wing, Idaho Air National Guard, (left), assists with counseling causalities during post recovery operations during the Pathfinder-Minutemen Exercise 2015, Aug. 5 at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon. The annual event is a joint multi-agency, multi-state disaster preparedness exercise based on response to a possible Cascadia Subduction Zone event. Officials believe the Northwest is overdue for a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150805-Z-CH590-501.jpg
Capt. Jonathon Miller, (left), with the 124th Medical Group, Idaho Air National Guard, and Oregon Army National Guard Capt. Amy Kerfoot, lift a simulated casualty during Pathfinder-Minutemen Exercise 2015, Aug. 5 at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon. The event is a joint multi-agency, multi-state disaster preparedness exercise based on response to a possible Cascadia Subduction Zone event. Officials believe the Northwest is overdue for a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)

150805-Z-CH590-020
Dr. Jon Jui, Oregon Disaster Medical team lead, delivers a morning brief to the participants taking part in the Pathfinder-Minutemen Exercise 2015, Aug. 5 at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, Oregon. The event is a joint multi-agency, multi-state disaster preparedness exercise based on response to a possible Cascadia Subduction Zone event. Officials believe the Northwest is overdue for a magnitude 7.0 or greater earthquake. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs/Released)


To see more photos from this set, please visit our Flickr page:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/sets/72157656850062975


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-020.jpg , 2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-501.jpg , 2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-712.jpg , 2015-08/962/86763/150805-Z-CH590-798.jpg
Stouts Fire - Night Operations Video
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/06/15
Night operations are an important part of the plan to help stop the Stouts Fire. This video shows crews monitoring the progression of the fire along the 3230 Road south of Tiller, OR. Even with increased humidity levels during the overnight hours, the fire remains active. The latest estimates have the Stouts Fire at 17,500 acres and 15% contained.

For more information, videos and photos from the fire, find Stouts Fire on Facebook or on Twitter (@StoutsFire).


Attached Media Files: 2015-08/1072/86764/IMG_1035[1].mov
08/05/15
Stouts Fire Evening Update - August 5, 2015
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/05/15
Stouts Creek Fire
Evening Update
August 5, 2015

Video option with message from State Forester Decker https://www.periscope.tv/w/aJK3SDQ3MzI5ODZ8NTQ4MzI0MDcloQupLVwCmcxvjk15KIdkZXfSpXkEhY3RoNiXCL6hqQ==

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire
Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
@StoutsFire
#StoutsFire

Firefighters spent today focusing their efforts on connecting fire control lines and doing burnout operations along the east and south flanks. Crews on the fire's west and north flanks installed hoses delivering water across greater distances, and strengthening the control lines. Late afternoon winds pushed hard against containment lines on the northeast and south.

Airplanes, specifically heavy air tankers, and seven helicopters supported ground firefighters throughout the day over the Stouts Creek Fire because the smoke cleared away earlier than usual today, so the aircraft could help sooner than normal. Another helicopter is on standby to respond to medical emergencies. The air-tankers were used as the fire picked up this afternoon and evening.

"We're a tough people in Douglas County," said County Commissioner Tim Freeman. "It's going to take a while, but know the county is throwing all the resources it can bear to support the firefighters. We've gotten through these tough fires before and we'll do it on this one."

The fire is 15 percent contained. Tonight's infrared mapping will provide a more accurate number of acres burned. Crews are working day and night shifts with over 1,400 personnel assigned to the fire.

Two task forces of structural fire protection firefighters and engines, from Lane and Lincoln Counties, continued supporting the suppression effort. One was working around Upper Cow Creek Road and the other around Drew. Crews reduced shrubs, brush, and other vegetation to make homes more defensible against fire. Crews strategically placed portable water ponds, pumps, hoses and sprinklers among the homes as a contingency measure.

Smoke will likely continue drifting from the Stouts Creek Fire and possibly other fires. The smoke may become dense later into the evening as winds increase and if crew do controlled burnouts. Most of the smoke will drift in a south and southeast directions from the fire. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, see www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.

The evacuation levels remained the same throughout today. The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road area, Milo and Drew remained at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 alert.

The Stouts Creek Fire is burning on private timberlands, other tracts of private land, Bureau of Land Management and Umpqua National Forest lands. The Stouts Creek Fire is being managed cooperatively by the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal and the U.S. Forest Service. Wildland fire suppression direction is coming from the Oregon Department of Forestry's Incident Management Team 1. Structural fire protection is being handled by task forces under the command of the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Green Team.

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