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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Sun. Jan. 16 - 2:51 am
Sat. 01/15/22
Tsunami advisory issued for Oregon Coast
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/15/22 9:38 AM

The National Tsunami Warning Center has issued a tsunami advisory this morning, Saturday, January 15, for the coast of Oregon, Washington and California, due to a large undersea volcanic eruption near Tonga. Residents in coastal areas are advised to move off beaches and out of harbors and marinas. Waves of 1 to 3 feet along the coast of Oregon and Washington are expected. The first waves arrived at the Oregon Coast around 8 a.m. and could continue for up to 24-hours.

“Stay away from port harbors and low-lying beaches because those strong currents can still cause a lot of damage, and you could be potentially risking your life,” Oregon Office of Emergency Management Geologic Hazards Coordinator Althea Rizzo said.

Rizzo said it is important to know if your home, work, school, etc., are in a tsunami inundation zone.

For information on tsunami and tsunami hazards visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/hazardsprep/Pages/Tsunami.aspx

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You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.


Fri. 01/14/22
City of Richland Body Worn Camera Implementation
City of Richland - 01/14/22 4:26 PM

During the last legislative session, the Washington State Legislature enacted the Uniform Electronic Recordation of Custodial Interrogations Act (RCW 10.122.030(1). The act requires Law Enforcement officers to record custodial interrogations of juveniles and custodial interrogations related to a felony. This law went into effect on January 1, 2022.  It is important to note that while Body Worn Cameras (BWC) are the easiest way to comply with the new law, the law does not mandate Law Enforcement agencies to operate using Body Worn Cameras. 

Prior to the implementation of this law, the Richland Police Department (RPD) was in the process of obtaining funding for a complete video recording system consisting of Body Worn Cameras, and In Car Video (ICV), both of which are paired to our Taser and pistol holsters.  We were fortunate to receive the funding with the support of the City of Richland and the City Council late last year. 

In late 2021, we received our Body Worn Cameras and began training our officers regarding their use.  By the end of next week, our program will be up and running with each officer using a Body Worn Camera. 

In the coming weeks, we will be implementing the In Car Video system to complete the package. There are many moving parts to this project and it truly is a team effort. RPD department trainers and professional staff have been working tirelessly, as have our partners at the City of Richland. 

The video linked below, created by Axon, demonstrates the camera system that we have adopted and will be in place after the implementation of ICV. The video was filmed by Axon using actors and is meant to demonstrate the capabilities of the entire Axon BWC and Fleet camera system. It is not meant to demonstrate patrol or tactical techniques.

The Richland Police Department is committed to earning the public’s trust every day, with every interaction, and at every call for service. We are humbled by and appreciative of the relationship we enjoy with our community. The implementation of our BWC/ICV program is yet another piece to add to that trust and will assist us in our goal of making our community safer.

https://vimeo.com/180906946?fbclid=IwAR3PGyXzi491Dc8rPaW67797_GEDkm4vx-QHmvTRfFoG0WzUWv_eIdb9ShQ


Board on Public Safety Standards & Training Policy Committee Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/14/22 3:15 PM

Board on Public Safety Standards & Training

Policy Committees

Open Vacancy – Recruitment

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

 

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association
  • Public Member who has never been employed or utilized as a telecommunicator

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Non-Management Corrections employed by Department of Corrections

 

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon.

If interested in applying for a Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form found under the ‘Board and Committee Resources’ section of the website listed above.

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


Oregon reports 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 2:33 PM

January 14, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 13 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,883, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,672 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 513,391.

Pediatric cases rise

COVID-19 cases continue to rise sharply among children ages 0 to 17 with the spread of the highly contagious Omicron variant, according to the latest weekly dashboard report of pediatric COVID-19 case data in Oregon. In the most recent full week’s data, published today, hospitalized pediatric case rates are increasing for children ages 0 to 4 and 12 to 17. OHA will continue to monitor trends in pediatric case hospitalizations.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of Jan.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 352,492 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 647,508 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 811, which is 34 more than yesterday. There are 153 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine more than yesterday.

There are 42 available adult ICU beds out of 666 total (6% availability) and 222 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,122 (5% availability).

1/14/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

42 (6%)

17 (5%)

2 (2%)

15 (16%)

2 (3%)

1 (10%)

3 (7%)

2 (8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

222 (5%)

25 (1%)

18 (3%)

49 (9%)

32 (7%)

9 (18%)

51 (12%)

38 (32%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,623 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 13. Of that total, 1,870 were initial doses, 1,170 were second doses and 8,011 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,498 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 13.

The seven-day running average is now 16,382 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,924,838 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 189,543 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,587,045 doses of Moderna and 260,849 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,088,356 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,799,040 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (36), Benton (196), Clackamas (806), Clatsop (40), Columbia (58), Coos (179), Crook (96), Curry (56), Deschutes (746), Douglas (79), Gilliam (1), Grant (5), Hood River (50), Jackson (424), Jefferson (99), Josephine (150), Klamath (122), Lake (10), Lane (590), Lincoln (116), Linn (246), Malheur (153), Marion (787), Morrow (38), Multnomah (1,660), Polk (202), Sherman (4), Tillamook (29), Umatilla (249), Union (42), Wallowa (3), Wasco (47), Washington (1,184) and Yamhill (169).

Oregon’s 5,871st COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Marion County who died Dec. 2, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,872nd COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Lane County who died Dec. 3, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,873rd COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 7, and died Jan. 12, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,874th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Jan. 1, and died Jan. 12, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,875th COVID-19-related death is a 60-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 31, and died Jan. 12, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,876th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 24, and died Jan. 12, at Asante three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,877th COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 8 and died Jan. 12, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,878th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 13, at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,879th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive for COVID-19 and died Jan. 12. Date of positive test, location of COVID-19-related death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,880th COVID-19-related death is a 44-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 8 and died Jan. 9, at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,881st COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 3 and died Jan. 11, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,882nd COVID-19-related death is a 64-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 30, and died Jan. 7, He had underlying conditions. Location of death is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,883rd COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 11 and died Jan. 12, at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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OHA updates recommendations for COVID-19 contact tracing, reduces reporting requirements in K-12 settings
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 2:31 PM

January 14, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA updates recommendations for COVID-19 contact tracing, reduces reporting requirements in K-12 settings

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will release new COVID-19 contact tracing and notification recommendations for K-12 settings to lessen the overall burden of contact tracing on K-12 schools, while ensuring school staff and health officials continue tracing and reporting high-risk exposures.

Under the updated guidelines, to be released in the coming days, Oregon will no longer consider masked contact in K-12 settings, including school buses, to be an exposure, regardless of distancing. The updated guidance will strongly advise students and staff to maintain physical distancing to the greatest extent possible.

The new recommendations are based on accumulated evidence that layered mitigation efforts in K-12 schools have worked well to minimize transmission and that the vast majority of transmission has occurred following indoor unmasked contact.

The new guidance is expected to take effect today.

Officials say it’s a “common-sense” change to contact tracing and notification that will allow schools to focus resources on identifying high-risk, indoor, unmasked exposures most likely to result in transmission. In addition, schools will no longer be required to report negative antigen test results to OHA. Reporting of positive antigen test results will still be required.

Schools that employed universal masking in K-12 settings will continue to perform contact tracing for exposures that occur during unmasked lunchroom encounters, as well as unmasked extracurricular encounters. Oregon Department of Education strongly recommends all schools immediately develop stable lunch cohorts – table groups, lunch bunches and other group situations – where this is not already the practice. If a case occurs within a lunch cohort, the entire lunch cohort group should be considered exposed. Similarly, when a case occurs in an indoor unmasked extracurricular cohort, the entire cohort may be considered exposed. Stable cohorts significantly reduce the burden of contact tracing.

During this period of very high COVID-19 transmission in Oregon, school staff will continue to identify and report new cases among students and staff, which will result in more exposures. Exposed, fully vaccinated children and adults who are up to date with their COVID-19 vaccination series are not subject to quarantine and may continue to attend school.

Individuals exposed to COVID-19 at school remain eligible for test to stay and can continue to attend school during their modified quarantine period.

In addition, support for members of school communities who test positive for COVID-19 can be accessed through the COVID-19 Case Support Hotline, 866-917-8881, or Positive COVID Test website. OHA is also identifying resources to add a school-specific support team to the hotline.

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Vocational Rehabilitation program seeks public comment on rule changes
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/14/22 1:13 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is seeking public comment on changes to its administrative rules. The public may testify at public hearings or submit written comments by Friday, March 4, 2022 at 5 p.m. 

Vocational Rehabilitation seeks input on the proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 582-070-0025 Vehicle repair, modification and purchase. This rule helps clarify the process for vehicle related purchases that may help a VR client overcome disability-related barriers to find, secure, maintain or advance their career. All input will be reviewed, and the proposed rules may be modified as a result of public input during this period.

The proposed rules are posted on the VR Policy web page

Vocational Rehabilitation is updating OAR 582 to align with requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted July 22, 2014 (Public Law No. 113-128) and with state and federal requirements. The rules match requirements in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, state policy, and clarify processes for vocational rehabilitation service. 

How to comment or provide testimony:

  • Email your comments to: .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us
  • Mail written testimony to: Oregon Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Robin Brandt, Policy Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE, E-87 Salem, Oregon 97310-1018
  • Attend a virtual public hearing on Zoom by phone or online. The hearings will be recorded and will end when comments conclude. Staff will be available for comments for at least 30 minutes after the hearing starts. Public hearings will be held on: 

ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided at every public hearing. 

You can request accommodation in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer to submit public comment, attend a public hearing. Contact Robin Brandt at 503-507-5226 or by email at .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us. We accept calls from all forms of relay service for people who are Deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing or have a speech disability. For more information about relay service providers visit www.oregonrelay.com or www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/trs-providersPlease let us know of any accommodations at least a week in advance. We will to our best to accommodate all requests. 

To receive notice of future public hearingssend an email to .Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">VR.Policy@dhsoha.state.or.us. Use the subject line “Public hearings”. 

About Vocational Rehabilitation: ODHS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) assists individuals with disabilities to get and keep a job that matches their skills, interests and abilities. VR staff work in partnership with the community and businesses to provide services that are individualized to help each eligible person receive services that are essential to their employment success.

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Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets Jan. 20
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 11:23 AM

January 14, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligman, 503-910-9239 I.L.SELIGMANN@dhsoha.state.or.us">:ARI.L.SELIGMANN@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets Jan. 20

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 1- 5 p.m., 2022

Where: The meeting will be held via free conference line at 1-971-277-2343, access code 895 646 667#.

Agenda: After the public comment period, ongoing business will include an update on the impact of COVID on the hospital, presented by OSH Interim Chief Medical Officer Dr. Sara Walker. Also planned are the Superintendent’s update and a diversity update. Cee Carver, OSH director of Peer Recovery, and Tony Guillen, OSH lean leader, will discuss meaningful engagement. New business will follow the afternoon break and will include a discussion led by members of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board about the 2021 Annual Board Report, the board’s recent accomplishments and current goals.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State to reopen the portal for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program on January 26 for limited time
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 01/14/22 10:40 AM

Jan. 13, 2022

 

Media Contact: Delia Hernández 

503-986-2051 

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

State to reopen the portal for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program on January 26 for limited time

Nearly 34,000 Oregon households have received more than $235 million rental assistance relief due to hardship from pandemic 

 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) will begin accepting new applications again for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) starting on Wed., Jan. 26, 2022. The state paused accepting new applications in early December due to dwindling funding and the need to make system improvements. This will be a limited reopening for three to five weeks, depending on availability of funds. The agency estimates to have sufficient funding to pay between 6,700-9,300 additional applications. Households with the most need will have priority in accessing these resources, not a first-come, first-served basis. 

 

As directed by the Oregon State Legislature in SB 891 (Second Special Session of 2021), OHCS is first processing applications received before the Dec. 1 pause. Applications received on Jan. 26 will be processed after applications received before Dec. 1. Tenants who apply on Jan. 26 or after may receive safe harbor protections that prevent landlords from evicting tenants until their application is processed. However, those tenants should expect a delay prior to processing and payment. 

 

Other rental assistance is available in many localities in Oregon through local programs that are operating independently from OERAP. Tenants applying for these programs will likely qualify for the safe harbor eviction protections. People can contact 211 or Community Action Agencies in their area.

 

As of Jan. 12, OHCS and local program administrators (LPAs) have paid $235.4 million in federal emergency rental assistance to 33,770 households, up from $222.4 million and 31,816 applicants last week, through OERAP. 

 

OERAP continues to be one of the nation’s top-performing programs and is ranked sixth in the nation, in the percentage of federal Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA) funds paid out and obligated, as tracked by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

 

Information for renters who apply on or after Jan. 26 when the portal reopens

  • Tenants who apply on Jan. 26 or after can receive safe harbor eviction protections that prevent landlords from evicting tenants until their application is processed. Tenants must show proof to their landlord that they applied for the program to receive the protections. Tenant applications will be paid based on remaining funding available and are not guaranteed.
  • Applications still awaiting landlord/tenant response at the time of closure are subject to funds remaining when application is finalized and approved, and prioritization scoring is applied and are not guaranteed for payment.
  • Tenants at immediate risk of eviction should apply for rental assistance right away to access safe harbor protections and should contact a legal organization. 
  • Tenants should expect a delay prior to processing and payment but can count on accessing their safe harbor eviction protections immediately. 

 

Progress and updated numbers  

 

Through its three-point plan, OHCS and its processing partner, Public Partnerships LLC (PPL), have made significant strides in the past several weeks to speed up application processing. Currently, 265 PPL staff are focusing on processing applications. In the past week alone, PPL paid 2,176 applications.  This is in addition to the applications processed by LPAs working across the state to finish paying out ERA 1 funds. 

 

To date, OHCS and LPAs: 

  • Paid $235,428,790 to landlords and tenants to help 33,770 Oregon households, close to 81% of ERA 1 and 2 funds.
  • Currently reviewing for payment 7,905 applications.
  • Need applicant or landlord response for 6,223 applications.

 

 

Visit the OERAP dashboard for more data. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1810/151554/01-13-2022-Reopening-ERA-Update-PR.pdf , Translated to Spanish

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/22 10:30 AM

CORRECTION: This news release has been updated with corrected death information.

Jan. 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 31 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,845, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 494,945.

COVID-19 weekly cases surge, hospitalizations, deaths increase

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today showed a record- smashing total of daily cases, surging hospitalizations, a sharp rise in deaths and a staggering percent positivity.

OHA reported 47,272 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Jan 3, through Sunday, Jan. 9 – six times higher than two weeks ago and three times higher than the previous pandemic record for weekly cases.

There were 486 new COVID-19-related hospitalizations, compared to 290 last week – a 68% increase. There were 113 reported COVID-19-related deaths, up from 89 last week.

Reported test results jumped by 89% from 136,474 to 258,574. This represents a new pandemic high. The percentage of positive tests increased from 15.7% to 21%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 128 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

OHA news conference scheduled Thursday

OHA will host a press conference at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 13 about the status of COVID-19 in Oregon. Speakers will include Oregon Health Director Patrick Allen, Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. The public is invited to watch the press conference on YouTube. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of Jan.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 323,130 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 676,870 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 756, which is 29 more than yesterday. There are 146 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 34 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (5% availability) and 262 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,135 (6% availability).

1/12/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

34

(5%)

18

(5%)

3

(3%)

3

(3%)

2

(3%)

2

(20%)

3

(7%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

262

(6%)

33

(2%)

12

(2%)

58

(10%)

32

(7%)

5

(10%)

64

(15%)

58

(49%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,149 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 11. Of that total, 1,703 were initial doses, 1,192 were second doses and 7,419 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,196 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 11.

The seven-day running average is now 15,532 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,080,739 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,793,941 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (30), Benton (321), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (45), Columbia (50), Coos (244), Crook (53), Curry (31), Deschutes (737), Douglas (155), Gilliam (6), Harney (2), Hood River (39), Jackson (375), Jefferson (110), Josephine (158), Klamath (70), Lake (3), Lane (678), Lincoln (209), Linn (313), Malheur (45), Marion (801), Morrow (21), Multnomah (1,454), Polk (213), Sherman (7), Tillamook (33), Umatilla (325), Union (38), Wallowa (13), Wasco (37), Washington (1,158), Wheeler (12) and Yamhill (154).

Note: Some of the deaths being reported occurred in early to mid-2021 but are being reported now because of data reconciliation. There is often a lag in reporting as OHA epidemiologists review death certificates.

Oregon’s 5,815th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive February 22, and died July 29, 2021, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,816th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Feb. 5 and died Aug. 4, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,817th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 24 and died Aug. 9, 2021, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,818th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Jan. 8, and died Aug.14, 2021 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,819th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 28, and died Aug.3, 2021, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,820th COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive June 6 and died Sept. 6, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,821st COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive May 13, and died Sept. 4, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,822nd COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Multnomah County who died Feb. 23, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,823rd COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 5 and died Nov. 19, 2021, at Legacy Mt Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,824th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 15 and died Nov. 18, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,825th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 15, and died Nov. 24, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,826th COVID-19 related death is a 96-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Sept. 11, and died Nov. 26, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,827th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 6 and died Nov. 15, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,828th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old woman from Jefferson County who tested positive Nov. 4, and died Nov. 15, 2021, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,829th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 16, and died Nov. 15, 2021, at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,830th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 17 and died Nov. 23, 2021, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,831st COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 26, 2021, at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,832nd COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Jan. 8, and died Jan. 8, at Good Shepherd Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,833rd COVID-19 related death is a 59-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 4 and died Jan. 4, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,834th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 26, 2021, and died Jan. 2, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,835th COVID-19 related death is a 48-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 22, 2021, and died Jan. 7, at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,836th COVID-19 related death is a 42-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 20, 2021, and died Jan. 5, at Silverton Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,837th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 9, at Santiam Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,838th COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 2, and died Jan. 9, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,839th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 10, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,840th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Dec. 18, 2021, and died Jan. 10, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,841st COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 30, 2021, and died Jan. 11, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,842nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 14, 2021, and died Jan. 5, at Providence St Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,843rd COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive Jan. 6, and died Jan. 10, at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,844th COVID-19 related death is a 94-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 7, at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,845th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 6, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


College Place Public Schools to Host Town Hall Meeting to Discuss February Educational Programs & Operations Levy
College Place Sch. Dist. - 01/14/22 8:30 AM

College Place Public Schools will host a Town Hall Meeting to discuss the upcoming February 8, 2022 Educational Programs and Operations Levy.  All are invited Wednesday, January 19th at 6:00 at Davis Elementary School (31 SE Ash St., College Place) of via Zoom (link located on District website).


Thu. 01/13/22
OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 5:57 PM

January 13, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

Oregon Health Authority’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, reported 45,334 cases of COVID-19 during the week of Jan. 2 to Jan. 8.

Of those cases, 33,363 or 73.6% were unvaccinated people and 11,971 or 26.4% were vaccine breakthrough cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 36. Forty-five breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 985 cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 72,683 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 44. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is more than five times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 3.5% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 1% have died. The average age of vaccinated people who have died is 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Oregonians are encouraged to get vaccinated and, if eligible, to get a booster shot.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.   


Oregon reports 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 5:23 PM

January 13, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,870, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 9,796 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 504,731.

Press conference highlights state efforts to address testing, hospital staffing and vaccinations

At today’s press conference, OHA Director Patrick Allen provided an update on the state’s efforts to support hospitals and distribute 6 million test kits to Oregon communities and how mass vaccination sites are providing vaccinations and boosters. Kathleen George, Council Member for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, highlighted the outdoor drive-through clinic opening at  Spirit Mountain Casino Jan. 15. ​Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht described ODHS’s ongoing efforts to support facilities and homes licensed by ODHS and in-home care providers. Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill gave an update on the impact of the Omicron surge on Oregon’s schools.

A broadcast of the press conference can be found here. Talking points for today’s event can be found here. Find footage here of test kits being sent from the OHA warehouse in Wilsonville on Wednesday.

Vaccination Metrics Dashboard update

Last week, the Vaccination Metrics Dashboard was updated to include booster projections to determine when individuals become eligible for a booster based on the date they completed their primary series: either two months after their first dose of Johnson & Johnson or six months after their second dose of Pfizer or Moderna.

To stay consistent with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the dashboard was updated today so that individuals will be eligible for a booster five months after their second dose of either Pfizer or Moderna, instead of six months.

Additionally, booster projections for 12- to 17-year-olds will also be included on the dashboard.

This increases the number of people who are eligible now to receive a booster.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 338,154 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 661,846 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 777, which is 21 more than yesterday. There are 144 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 36 available adult ICU beds out of 656 total (5% availability) and 233 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,127 (6% availability).

1/13/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

36

(5%)

19

(6%)

1

(1%)

6

(7%)

4

(7%)

0

(0%)

4

(10%)

2

(8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

233

(6%)

23

(1%)

16

(3%)

51

(9%)

32

(7%)

4

(8%)

61

(15%)

46

(39%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,825 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 12. Of that total, 2,032 were initial doses, 1,269 were second doses and 8,574 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,859 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 12.

The seven-day running average is now 16,057 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,913,885 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 187,454 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,580,064 doses of Moderna and 260,415 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,084,711 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,796,576 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (325), Clackamas (875), Clatsop (97), Columbia (97), Coos (130), Crook (73), Curry (22), Deschutes (671), Douglas (233), Gilliam (1), Grant (11), Harney (6), Hood River (27), Jackson (505), Jefferson (113), Josephine (125), Klamath (122), Lake (1), Lane (686), Lincoln (85), Linn (307), Malheur (46), Marion (862), Morrow (54), Multnomah (1,877), Polk (220), Sherman (1), Tillamook (39), Umatilla (267), Union (31), Wallowa (15), Wasco (79), Washington (1,512) and Yamhill (253).

Oregon’s 5,846th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Sept. 17 and died Dec. 5 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,847th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Oct. 29 and died Dec. 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,848th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Jan. 28, 2021 and died Dec. 4, 2021 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,849th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Nov. 27 and died Dec. 4 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,850th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 20 and died Dec. 4 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,851st COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Oct. 8 and died Dec. 4 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,852nd COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Columbia County who tested positive Nov. 12  and died Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,853rd COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Sept. 30 and died Dec. 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,854th COVID-19-related death is a 97-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive August 25 and died Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,855th COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 27 and died Dec. 2 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,856th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 22 and died Dec. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,856th COVID-19-related death is a 99-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 22 and died Dec. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,857th COVID-19-related death is a 92-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 24 and died Dec. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,858th COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old man from Lincoln County who tested positive Oct. 16 and died Dec. 1 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,859th COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 13 and died Dec. 1 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,860th COVID-19-related death is a 40-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 16 and died Dec. 1 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,861st COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old man from Union County who tested positive Dec. 31 and died Jan. 10 at Grande Ronde Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,862nd COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 25 and died Jan. 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,863rd COVID-19-related death is a 55-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Dec. 21 and died Jan. 11 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,864th COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 7 and died Jan. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,865th COVID-19-related death is a 39-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Jan. 5, 2021 and died Jan. 11, 2022 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,866th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 28 and died Jan. 11 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,867th COVID-19-related death is a 69-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 26 and died Jan. 11 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,868th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Sept. 22 and died Dec. 10 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,869th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Dec. 30 and died Jan. 9 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,870th COVID-19-related death is a 25-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 31 and died Jan. 3 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRN) Rulemaking Hearing
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 3:21 PM

January 13, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, hc@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRN) Rulemaking Hearing

Deadline to offer comment to OHA is Jan. 21, 2022 at 5 p.m.

Agenda: Rules created by the Oversight and Accountability Council regarding the Behavioral Health Resource Networks will be presented. The public is invited to comment on the rules. 

When: January 18, 2022, 3- 4 p.m.

Where: Virtual

Zoom information:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607048357?pwd=ZGlpZUlrNlN3SGdyNXBCUERHbVBmdz09

Meeting ID: 160 704 8357

Passcode: 007417

One tap mobile

+16692545252,,1607048357# US

Meeting ID: 160 704 8357

Passcode: 007417

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) throughout Oregon. The OAC has held regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the BHRNs.

The BHRNS will provide increased access to low-barrier SUD treatment, harm reduction, peer support ,and housing at no cost for people who are not eligible for Medicaid and do not have other insurance.

The BHRNs will provide access to portions of the Oregon Cannabis tax revenue, through a grants process managed by OHA and granted by the OAC, annually to community organizations, non-profits, small businesses, Tribal organizations, governmental organizations, and to Urban Indian Health Centers that serve people who use substances or have a substance use disorder

There will be an increased fiscal impact on community organizations, non-profits, small businesses, Tribal organizations, governmental organizations, and Urban Indian Health Centers that become part of a BHRN due to increased staffing requirements, increased reporting requirements, and increased service requirements.

There will be a positive fiscal impact on rural and frontier counties based on increased grant funding.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


DPSST Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled 1-27-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/13/22 2:49 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY MEMORIAL FUND BOARD

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a regular meeting on January 27, 2022, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting at 9:00 a.m. in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

 

Agenda Items:

1. Approve Minutes of November 16, 2021


2. Brian Gaunt (DPSST #37820) – Beaverton Police Department
    Presented by Suzy Herring


3. Jerry Richardson (DPSST #08757); Portland Fire & Rescue
    Presented by Suzy Herring


4. Next meeting - TBD

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Public Safety Memorial Fund Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Jan. 13, 2022 Oregon Employment Department Media Statement
Oregon Employment Department - 01/13/22 1:31 PM

Our next media availability is scheduled for 1 p.m., Wed., Jan. 19

Economic Update

Today the Employment Department published the latest results from the Oregon Job Vacancy Survey. Oregon’s private employers reported 103,000 job vacancies between October and December 2021. While that’s a slight decline (-4%) from the record-high 107,000 job openings reported in summer 2021, employers are still actively recruiting for 88% more job openings than they were at the end of 2020.

Hiring demand between October and December 2021 was widespread across Oregon’s economy. Five different sectors had at least 10,000 job vacancies. They included health care and social assistance; construction; retail trade; leisure and hospitality; and manufacturing.

Employers were also reporting near-record difficulty filling vacancies. Three out of four job openings (76%) were identified as hard to fill in the fall. In both Oregon and the U.S., there are more job openings than there are unemployed people. For every seven unemployed workers, there are 10 job openings. There just aren’t enough workers for this near-record high number of job openings.

Oregon’s private health care sector reported even greater difficulty, with 9 out of 10 job openings (87%) identified by employers as hard to fill between October and December. Oregon’s health care sector has both the largest number of job openings (16,000), and the largest number of hard-to-fill vacancies (13,900) in the state. Personal care aides, nursing assistants, and registered nurses accounted for the majority (57%) of difficult-to-fill vacancies in health care.

More details about Oregon Job Vacancies are also available on QualityInfo.org, on the publications page under Job Vacancy Survey.

Hiring Healthcare Heroes Job Fair a Success

Nearly 150 employers from across Oregon met yesterday with approximately 300 job seekers during the statewide “Hiring Heroes for Healthcare” virtual and in-person job fair. The job fair was sponsored by the Oregon Employment Department and its WorkSource Oregon partners.

“It is rewarding to connect talented people with Oregon employers. We advertised this event to people working in California, Washington and Idaho, and we are encouraged with the out-of-state participation in our virtual hiring events," said Adalberto Rubio, OED business service analyst.

The next statewide job fair will be in March 2022; however, local offices continue hosting smaller hiring events regularly. “We encourage people to check the events page at WorksourceOregon.org or WorkSource Oregon LinkedIn page,” Rubio said.

Department Issues Scam Alert

The Department has discovered that scammers are calling Oregonians pretending to be with the Employment Department. These scammers are masking their phone number so it looks like the call is coming from an OED phone number.

“The Oregon Employment Department will never ask you to provide your credit card information for you to receive benefits,” said Sara Cromwell, unemployment insurance division deputy director for benefits. “If you are unsure if the phone call is a scam, hang up. Then call us or fill out a Contact us form. We have short phone wait times now, and we are quickly responding to Contact Us inquiries.” 

2020 UI Fraud Report Issued

Paying unemployment benefits in a timely manner, while protecting the Oregon UI Trust Fund, is a core principle of the Oregon Employment Department. Fraudulent claims are an ongoing concern of the department and other UI programs throughout the nation. 

That concern was greatly heightened during the COVID-19 pandemic health crisis, due in part to the increased financial incentives for fraudsters. This week, OED is sharing the Unemployment Insurance Fraud - Calendar Year 2020 report.

“The good news is that Oregon has not seen losses on the scale of some other states,” said Lindsi Leahy, unemployment insurance division director. 

Fraud occurs when a person intentionally provides false or misleading information to obtain unemployment insurance benefits. During the time of skyrocketing pandemic related workloads, preventing fraud became an even greater challenge for the UI system nationally and in Oregon. 

Oregon’s low rate of pandemic era UI fraud compared to some other states is due to the dedication of OED employees who diligently worked to keep up on ever-changing trends in UI fraud and prevent it along with their vigilant efforts to protect Oregon’s UI Trust Fund. Leahy, the Department’s UI division director, serves on the National Association of State Workforce Agencies (NASWA) Integrity Center steering committee, where fraud prevention is a top priority. 

“Fraud remains a significant threat to Oregon’s UI system, but we continue dedicating significant resources and efforts to combat it,” Leahy said. 

The figures in the report represent a snapshot in time. OED continues to receive tips and investigate other potential fraud for benefits paid in 2020. This means that report numbers will increase as more cases are confirmed. This data also does not reflect the many fraudulent or ID theft claims that the department caught before any benefits were paid.

During the height of the pandemic, OED declined to answer specific questions about fraud to prevent the disclosure of information that could be used by fraudsters to further scam the system. 

“Now that the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program has ended and work in the program is winding down, we can publicly share some information about fraud that occurred in calendar year 2020 without creating undue further risk,” Leahy said.

Department Sending 1099G Tax Forms

The Oregon Employment Department is sending more than 400,000 1099G tax forms to people who received unemployment insurance benefits in 2021. 

1099G is used for people filing federal and state income taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Oregon Department of Revenue. 

People can expect to receive the 1099G form by Jan. 31, 2022. The form will be on the Online Claims System in February under the tab “1099G Tax forms” toward the bottom of the page.

Sara Cromwell, unemployment insurance division deputy director for benefits, urges people to inform the Employment Department if they receive a 1099G and did not claim benefits in 2021. “If you didn’t file a claim last year, this means someone may be trying to steal your ID. Please complete our online ID theft form or call 503-947-1995, so we can review the claim for possible fraud,” she said. 

More information on the 1099G form is at unemployment.oregon.gov. For more information on what to do if your identity has been stolen, visit the IRS website.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: 971-673-6400. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/930/151540/22.01.13_Comms_Media_Statement_FINAL.pdf

Media Availability at 2pm TODAY; YSD Staff Shortages Cause Learning to be REMOTE Jan 18-24
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 01/13/22 12:53 PM

Good afternoon local media,

Superintendent Dr. Trevor Greene announced to YSD families today that the district schools must transition to remote learning (with some in-person exceptions) for Tuesday, January 18 - Monday, January 24, 2022.

This is due to continued staffing shortages at the district and at schools nationwide.

To learn more, please go to www.YSD7.org/RemoteLearning

Should you have additional questions not found on the website, please join Dr. Greene and Deputy Superintendent Dr. Rob Darling for a 30-minute media Q&A session at 2pm today. 

For the link to the Google Meet, please send an email to er.kirsten@ysd7.org">fitterer.kirsten@ysd7.org by 1:45 pm today.

Thank you.


Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/13/22 12:28 PM

Note: This is an updated news release with additional case and death information.

January 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 31 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,845, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 494,945.

COVID-19 weekly cases surge, hospitalizations, deaths increase

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today showed a record- smashing total of daily cases, surging hospitalizations, a sharp rise in deaths and a staggering percent positivity.

OHA reported 47,272 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Jan 3, through Sunday, Jan. 9 – six times higher than two weeks ago and three times higher than the previous pandemic record for weekly cases.

There were 486 new COVID-19-related hospitalizations, compared to 290 last week – a 68% increase. There were 113 reported COVID-19-related deaths, up from 89 last week.

Reported test results jumped by 89% from 136,474 to 258,574. This represents a new pandemic high. The percentage of positive tests increased from 15.7% to 21%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 128 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

OHA news conference scheduled Thursday

OHA will host a press conference at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 13 about the status of COVID-19 in Oregon. Speakers will include Oregon Health Director Patrick Allen, Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. The public is invited to watch the press conference on YouTube. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 323,130 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 676,870 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 756, which is 29 more than yesterday. There are 146 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 34 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (5% availability) and 262 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,135 (6% availability).

1/12/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

34

(5%)

18

(5%)

3

(3%)

3

(3%)

2

(3%)

2

(20%)

3

(7%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

262

(6%)

33

(2%)

12

(2%)

58

(10%)

32

(7%)

5

(10%)

64

(15%)

58

(49%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,149 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 11. Of that total, 1,703 were initial doses, 1,192 were second doses and 7,419 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,196 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 11.

The seven-day running average is now 15,532 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,080,739 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,793,941 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (30), Benton (321), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (45), Columbia (50), Coos (244), Crook (53), Curry (31), Deschutes (737), Douglas (155), Gilliam (6), Harney (2), Hood River (39), Jackson (375), Jefferson (110), Josephine (158), Klamath (70), Lake (3), Lane (678), Lincoln (209), Linn (313), Malheur (45), Marion (801), Morrow (21), Multnomah (1,454), Polk (213), Sherman (7), Tillamook (33), Umatilla (325), Union (38), Wallowa (13), Wasco (37), Washington (1,158), Wheeler (12) and Yamhill (154).

Oregon’s 5,780th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on July 17, 2020 and died Dec. 23, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,781st COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died May 12, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,782nd COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive January 5, 2021 and died April 5, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,783rd COVID-19-related death is a 94-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 31, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,784th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 30, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,785th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died April 23, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,786th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Linn County who died April 22, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,787th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died April 26, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,788th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 25 and died April 26, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,789th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 20, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,790th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 23, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,791st COVID-19-related death is a 93-year-old woman from Crook County who died April 14, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,792nd COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Jan. 13, 2021 and died June 6, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,793rd COVID-19-related death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 18, and died May 30, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,794th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old man from Jackson County who died May 28, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,795th COVID-19-related death is a 57-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive February 12, and died May 22, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,796th COVID-19-related death is a 58-year-old woman from Yamhill County who died June 10, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,797th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on August 28, 2020 and died on June 12 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,798th COVID-19-related death is a 77-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive April 1, and died June 4, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,799th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died June 6, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,800th COVID-19-related death is a 61-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive Jan. 19 and died June 18, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,801st COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive September 20, 2020 and died June 29, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,802nd COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 2, 2020 and died July 18, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,803rd COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 30, and died Jan. 7, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,804th death is a 72-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 27, and died Jan. 8, at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,805th death is a 66-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 30, and died Jan. 5, at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,806th COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 4, 2021 and died Jan. 9, 2002 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,807th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26, and died Jan. 9, at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,808th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26, and died Jan. , at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,809th COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Benton County who first became symptomatic Jan. 3, and died Jan. 8, at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,810th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive September 3, and died Dec. 31, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,811th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 22, and died Jan. 7, at Asante Thee Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,812th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old man from Washington County who first became symptomatic Dec. 1, and died Jan. 7, at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,813th COVID-19-related death is a 71-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Jan. 2 and died Jan. 7, at Adventist Health Tillamook. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,814th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old man from Malheur County who died Nov. 2, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Updated information is known for Oregon’s 5,764th COVID-19-related death, which was reported Jan 10, an 81-year-old man from Clackamas County. He was originally reported as a Marion County resident.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Oregon increases income limits for food and child care assistance
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/13/22 10:59 AM

Need to know

  • Oregon has increased the income eligibility limit for food and child care assistance up to 200% of the federal poverty level 
  • Previous income limits were 185% of the federal poverty level
  • Approximately 18,000 additional households in Oregon may qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) under these new income guidelines
  • Approximately $25 million in additional food benefits will be issued to Oregonians annually
  • Find resources to meet your basic needs: Dial 2-1-1, or text your zip code to 898-211, www.211info.org 
  • Oregon Department of Human Services COVID-19 help center 

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has increased the income limits for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Employment Related Day Care (ERDC) program to 200% of the federal poverty level, or $2,147 a month for an individual or $3,660 for a family of three.

The previous income limit for these programs was 185% of the federal poverty level, or $1,986 a month for an individual or $3,386 for a family of three. 

This change took effect in Oregon on Jan. 1, 2022, and approximately 18,000 new households are expected to be eligible to enroll in SNAP. Approximately $25 million in additional food benefits will be issued to Oregonians annually. 

“Coming into the COVID-19 pandemic, life was difficult for many Oregonians, especially people of color, Oregon Tribal Nations, people with disabilities and older adults,” said ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. “As COVID-19 continues to impact our communities, we know that many are struggling to get enough healthy food for themselves and their families. This increase will provide critical food support to thousands of Oregonians.”

The ERDC program has two income limits to participate in the program, for when a family applies to participate in the program and when a family renews their participation in the program. The entry income limit to enroll in the program has increased to 200% of federal poverty level. Families can continue to participate in the program until their income is above 250% of the federal poverty level, or $5,303 a month for a family of three. 

“It’s encouraging to see child care prioritized with other critical benefits to support Oregon families,” said Oregon Early Learning System Director Alyssa Chatterjee. “This change will help more families access child care at a pivotal time – one that’s brought uncertainty and challenges.” 

Oregonians can apply for medical, food, cash, and child care assistance in one place online at ONE.Oregon.gov, over-the-phone at 800-699-9075​, or in-person at a local ​office.​ Due to COVID-19, Oregonians are encouraged to call ahead before their local ​office.

ODHS offers these tips to Oregonians to help them as they apply for benefits:

  • Before you begin an application, compile all documents you think you might need ahead of time. This can prevent your application from being held up and taking additional time. These documents could include: Identification, proof of income, social security numbers or other documents to determine eligibility for anyone in the household who is applying for benefits. 
  • If you have already submitted an online, in-person or over-the-phone application, you do not need to reapply. ODHS has your application and will process it as quickly as possible. 
  • If you applied through the ONE online application, you can track your application’s status using the same system you used to apply. Log in to one.oregon.gov to start tracking. Note: This website is accessible on computers, tablets and phones, but it is not optimized for mobile viewing. 
  • If you prefer to apply over the phone, the ONE Customer Service Center is open Monday-Friday 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Currently hold times are lowest in the morning from 7 until 8 a.m.
  • If you are only applying for medical benefits, you can get free application help from an OHP-Certified Community Partner. Community Partners are trained and certified to help clients understand and use their health coverage options, including helping them complete eligibility and enrollment forms. Find a Community Partner at https://healthcare.oregon.gov/Pages/find-help.aspx 

Resources to help meet basic needs

About the Oregon Department of Human Services

The mission of the Oregon Department of Human Services is to help Oregonians in their own communities achieve wellbeing and independence through opportunities that protect, empower, respect choice and preserve dignity. 

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Oregon OSHA offers free online training for addressing silica dust hazards in the workplace (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/13/22 10:43 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1073/151532/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has launched a free online training course to help employers put protective measures in place for workers against the potential hazards of breathing in airborne crystalline silica dust.

Any worker exposed to dust that contains crystalline silica – from crushed rock, soil, dirt, gravel, or sand, for example – should be concerned about silicosis, a lung disease caused by breathing dust that contains particles of crystalline silica – particles so tiny you can seem them only with a microscope.

Featuring powerful visuals, personal stories, instructional videos, links to resources, and a certificate of completion, the training course is designed to boost the ability of employers to meet the requirements of Oregon OSHA’s silica rules. It offers a tool to employers and workers to bolster their existing training programs. 

“Employers and workers need solid training resources to help light the way toward improvements in the health and safety of their workplaces,” said Julie Love, interim administrator for Oregon OSHA. “And it is in the spirit of continuous improvement that we designed and built this free and flexible training course to address the risks of silica dust.”

Common sources of exposure to silica dust include cutting, sawing, drilling, and crushing concrete, brick, ceramic tiles, rock, and stone products. When inhaled, silica particles become trapped in the lungs and damage the tissue. The lung tissue scars and forms small rounded masses called nodules. Over time, the nodules grow, making breathing increasingly difficult.

The training course covers a variety of topics. They include the different forms of silica and where it can be found; job activities involving building materials that can cause silica dust to become airborne and breathable; Oregon OSHA’s silica standard and its provisions to protect workers; and instructional videos showing protective steps workers can take while using powered tools. 

The course is now available. A Spanish-language version of the course is in development.

For more information about Oregon OSHA’s silica rules, visit the A-to-Z topic page, which includes guides, fact sheets, and checklists. For help with improving workplace health and safety programs – including addressing silica dust hazards – contact Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, which are free and involve no fault, no citations, and no penalties

For help understanding Oregon OSHA’s on-the-job health and safety requirements, contact our experts. For more learning opportunities, visit our education and training resources and review our A-to-Z topic index.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Announcing a second round of relief funding for artists: Artist Resilience Program to provide $1.5 million for Oregon artists (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/13/22 9:17 AM
Artist Resilience Program graphic
Artist Resilience Program graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1418/151529/thumb_Social_graphic.jpg

Salem, Oregon – The application is now live for the Artist Resilience Program, a second round of relief funding for Oregon artists offered by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with the Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. The partnership, which began with 2020’s Artist Relief Program, invests another $1.5 million in support for artists’ recovery from the pandemic. 

Awards will generally range from $1,000 to $5,000 and will be determined by a peer review panel. A geographic distribution model will ensure that applicants from across Oregon are supported. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 10.

“We are incredibly grateful to Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for their dedication to helping us sustain our artists through these difficult times,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “In reaching Oregon's artists, we know we are not only supporting these individuals financially, but also enabling them to continue their creative careers and enliven the cultural environments of Oregon." 

The purpose of the Artist Resilience Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives – they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this second wave of support for artists,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.” 

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2021.

The artistic disciplines supported are: literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; folk & traditional arts; and media arts.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

                 

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Artist Resilience Program graphic

Local Government Grant Program now accepting applications for park and recreation projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/13/22 8:00 AM

The Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) is accepting applications for the 2022 grant cycle. The LGGP helps local government agencies fund outdoor park and recreation areas and facilities, and acquire property for park purposes. Approximately $14 million in reimbursement grant funds are available for the 2022 cycle. 

Eligible applicants are cities, counties, metropolitan service districts, park and recreation districts and port districts. 

A webinar workshop is scheduled from 9-11 a.m. Feb. 15 to help new and returning applicants navigate the application process and learn about the program. Register for the live workshop at https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YAu5zdqwR0ecTR8H-jsaGw. The workshop recording will be available to view after Feb. 15 at oprdgrants.org

Program grants are split into large, small and planning categories. Application deadlines vary for each grant type:

  • Large grants deadline: April 1
  • Small grants deadline: May 1
  • Planning grants deadline: May 15

Access to the LGGP application is online at oprdgrants.org. The site also includes additional information about the LGGP, including the grant manual, application instructions and program schedule.

The Lottery-funded grant program is administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The program has awarded more than $70 million in reimbursement grant funds since 1999.


College Place Public Schools Sets Make Up Days for Snow Days
College Place Sch. Dist. - 01/13/22 8:00 AM

In a Special Meeting Thursday, the College Place Board of Directors voted to make up the two snow days from January 3rd and 6th on February 28th and May 13th.  February 28th was originally slated as a work day for staff to prepare for conferences and attend professional development.  These activities have been moved outside of the school year.  The second make-up day of May 13th was already designated on the calendar as a “snow day.” 

If there are more days canceled this year due to inclement weather or other reasons, CPPS will begin adding the days to the calendar starting June 16th.


Wed. 01/12/22
Oregon National Guard to Start Second Hospital Relief Mission (Photo & B-Roll) (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 01/12/22 7:30 PM
220112-Z-ZJ128-1004
220112-Z-ZJ128-1004
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SALEM, Ore. - With the surge of COVID-19 cases, Oregon Governor Kate Brown has ordered an increase of National Guard Service Members for the second hospital relief mission, with up to 1,200 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen mobilized today. This new activation of the Oregon National Guard is an increased from 500 to over 1,200 Service Members in 40 hospitals across the state. National Guard members will provide much-needed support for understaffed hospitals during this deployment, which will begin no later than Jan. 18, 2022. 

These Soldiers and Airmen will serve in non-clinical support roles as material handlers, equipment runners, in addition to COVID testing support, laundry, custodial services, ensure hospital operations and other services in support of healthcare systems. The mission's planning is ongoing, with guard members placed on orders and assigned to hospitals.

This activation follows a prior deployment of over 1,500 Oregon National Guardsmen that provided the same non-clinical support rolls in Oregon hospitals that began in August of 2021, and ended in December 2021. 

The Oregon National Guard comprises over 8,000 Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen, dedicated to serving the communities they live in and maintaining the ability to serve the nation in times of war. The organization has the motto "Always Ready, Always There" and is the largest part-time employer in the state. Its members, on average, serve one weekend a month with an additional two-week period a year while maintaining civilian employment.  

 

Released Photos:

220112-Z-ZJ128-1001

Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Mathew Odenthal and 2nd Lt. Benjermen Brumhagh of H Company, 145th Brigade Support Battalion, wait in line to receive written orders assigning them to the hospital relief mission at Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon, Jan. 12. The deployment is the second iteration of non-clinical support for Oregon hospitals by the National Guard, which will grow to over 1,200 Soldiers and Airmen by the end of January, filling critical hospital staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220112-Z-ZJ128-1002

Oregon Army National Guard Human resource specialist Sgt. Niki McCurdy from the 821 Troop Command Battalion, assigns Soldiers to specific hospitals at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon, Jan. 12. The guard member's deployment is the second iteration of non-clinical support for Oregon hospitals by the National Guard, which will grow to over 1,200 Soldiers and Airmen by the end of January, filling critical hospital staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220112-Z-ZJ128-1003

Hospital relief mission Joint Task Force Commander Lt. Col. Seth Rogers briefs senior staff members on administrative procedures at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon, Jan. 12. The Joint Task Force deployment is the second iteration of non-clinical support for Oregon hospitals by the National Guard, which will grow to over 1,200 Soldiers and Airmen by the end of January, filling critical hospital staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220112-Z-ZJ128-1004

Oregon Army National Guard Staff Sgt. David Seymour, temporary hospital relief mission Regional Non-Commission Officer in Charge, from C Company, 3rd Battalion, 116 Cavalry Brigade, informs Soldiers of mission requirements at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon, Jan. 12. The Soldier's deployment is the second iteration of non-clinical support for Oregon hospitals by the National Guard, which will grow to over 1,200 Soldiers and Airmen by the end of January, filling critical hospital staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

 

B-Roll: https:/https://dvidshub.net/r/x9esxh




Attached Media Files: 220112-Z-ZJ128-1004 , 220112-Z-ZJ128-1003 , 220112-Z-ZJ128-1002 , 220112-Z-ZJ128-1001

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update -- Jan. 12, 2022 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/12/22 5:05 PM
2022-01/3986/151520/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN-01.png
2022-01/3986/151520/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN-01.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3986/151520/thumb_OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN-01.png

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Jan. 12, 2022, to the Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery website. View today's Wildfire Recovery update here.

Photo Captions:

Campers play at Camp Noah, a day camp established by the McKenzie Valley Long Term Recovery Group for kids impacted by the Holiday Farm Fire. (Credit: McKenzie Recovery)

A double rainbow arches over the location of the former Royal Oaks Manufactured Home Park just outside of Phoenix in Jackson County, where 120 modular homes that are being built right now will be placed. (Credit: Kim Travis, OHCS)

A snow-laden falling tree nearly crushed an ODOT incident responder driving on I-5 (Credit: Oregon Dept. of Transportation)

Oregon Rising Stronger Together Logo (Credit: Oregon Office of Emergency Management)




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/3986/151520/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN-01.png , 2022-01/3986/151520/DMTF.jpg , 2022-01/3986/151520/Royal_Oaks.jpg , 2022-01/3986/151520/Camp_Noah.jpg

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/12/22 4:47 PM

January 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 31 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 31 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,845, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,760 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 494,945.

OHA news conference scheduled Thursday

OHA will host a press conference at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 13 about the status of COVID-19 in Oregon. Speakers will include Oregon Health Director Patrick Allen, Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. The public is invited to watch the press conference on YouTube. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 323,130 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 676,870 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 756, which is 29 more than yesterday. There are 146 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 34 available adult ICU beds out of 653 total (5% availability) and 262 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,135 (6% availability).

1/12/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

34

(5%)

18

(5%)

3

(3%)

3

(3%)

2

(3%)

2

(20%)

3

(7%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

262

(6%)

33

(2%)

12

(2%)

58

(10%)

32

(7%)

5

(10%)

64

(15%)

58

(49%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 20,149 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 11. Of that total, 1,703 were initial doses, 1,192 were second doses and 7,419 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,196 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 11.

The seven-day running average is now 15,532 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,080,739 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,793,941 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (30), Benton (321), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (45), Columbia (50), Coos (244), Crook (53), Curry (31), Deschutes (737), Douglas (155), Gilliam (6), Harney (2), Hood River (39), Jackson (375), Jefferson (110), Josephine (158), Klamath (70), Lake (3), Lane (678), Lincoln (209), Linn (313), Malheur (45), Marion (801), Morrow (21), Multnomah (1,454), Polk (213), Sherman (7), Tillamook (33), Umatilla (325), Union (38), Wallowa (13), Wasco (37), Washington (1,158), Wheeler (12) and Yamhill (154).

Note: Additional information about cases and deaths to follow in an updated news release.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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OHA launches website, hotline for COVID-19-positive people
Oregon Health Authority - 01/12/22 4:45 PM

January 12, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA launches website, hotline for COVID-19-positive people

New services, which allow people to report positive tests and get info on isolation and quarantine, follow shift toward focus on outbreaks at high-risk settings

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority is moving to an opt-in model for investigating COVID-19 cases, launching a new website and hotline as a way for people who test positive for the virus to report results from an at-home test kit or testing provider.

People using the new Positive COVID Test website and COVID-19 Case Support Hotline, 866-917-8881, can complete an online survey linked from the web portal to report their positive case, or get help completing the survey through the hotline. They can also get information on isolation and other ways to keep themselves and those around them safe while they recover.

The launch of the services follows an OHA decision to revise its guidelines for investigating COVID-19 cases to focus less on interviewing individual cases and conducting contact tracing, and more on outbreaks in high-risk settings, such as those in congregate care, health care, K-12 education and food chain industries.

“The current and rapidly growing surge of COVID-19 cases driven by the Omicron variant has outpaced the capacity of Oregon’s public health system to effectively conduct active case investigation and contact tracing, which cannot effectively slow the spread of the disease in the context of widespread community transmission,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist at Oregon Health Authority.

“As a result, given the burdens to the entire public health infrastructure and the need to pivot resources to higher priority public health measures, we are adjusting case investigation and outreach efforts. OHA will move away from individual investigation and contact tracing calls to focus on investigating outbreaks in high-risk settings,” he said.

OHA is adopting an “opt-in” approach to case investigation, with a focus on ensuring people who test positive for COVID-19 or who are exposed to the virus can quickly access information and resources to safely isolate and quarantine. The first offering is the website, Oregon.gov/positivecovidtest, which contains a link to a mobile-friendly Case Investigation Survey. The survey, soon available in 12 languages – it’s now accessible in English, Spanish and Russian – can be used by anyone who tests positive to provide additional information to public health.

OHA does not require individuals to report their at-home test results, but it highly recommends people do so, and let their close contacts know they may have been exposed so they can take steps to limit exposure to others. Hospitals, health care providers, laboratories and local public health authorities are required to report test results.

The COVID-19 Case Support Hotline, 866-917-8881, will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Support staff will be available to provide general health information; answers to questions about isolation and quarantine; answers to questions about how to tell close contacts they may have been exposed to COVID-19; information about resources to help them during isolation; and help filling out the online Case Investigation Survey so callers’ positive tests can be reported. Staff will provide support in English and Spanish, with interpreter services available for additional languages.

Sidelinger said those staffing the COVID-19 Case Support Hotline include members case investigation and contact tracing team from OHA’s COVID Response and Recovery Unit (CRRU), so they are well qualified to answer questions about isolation, quarantine and available resources. Availably of the hotline also will allow local public health authorities to reduce or eliminate phone-based case investigation, “allowing them to redeploy those resources to higher-value mitigation efforts.”

Hotline staff will also be able to triage calls that might normally go to local public health authorities, forwarding them only if they require local follow-up.

The following local public health authorities and Tribes recommend their residents and members use local contact information if they have questions or support needs after they test positive for COVID-19:

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DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 2-2-2022
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/12/22 3:50 PM

TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on February 2, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

The Telecommunications Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

1. Introductions

2. Approve Minutes of November 3, 2021

3. Case Review Process Overview/Update

    Presented by Marsha Morin

4. Rachel Girard; DPSST No. 55285; Wallowa County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Melissa Lang

5. Jennifer Foster; DPSST No. 50183; Harney County Sheriff’s Office

    Presented by Melissa Lang

6. Program Manager Update

7. Director’s Comments

8. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting: May 4, 2022 at 9:00am.

 

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon OSHA fines Seaside contractor for violating job safety requirements (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/12/22 1:46 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1073/151510/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has fined a Seaside-based contractor more than $15,000 for violating job safety standards during a residential roofing project. All three violations were repeat offenses, including one that exposed workers to potential falls that could seriously injure or kill them.

The citation against Synergy Construction Group Inc. stems from an inspection the division launched in response to a complaint about a lack of fall protection for employees at a multi-story house in Seaside.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry.

Oregon OSHA’s inspection found two employees working on the roof with no protection against potential falls to the ground of up to 22 feet. It was a violation of a basic fall protection rule requiring employers to implement protective systems – such as a personal fall restraint system – when employees are exposed to a hazard of falling six feet or more to a lower level. 

In fact, it was the fourth time Synergy Construction Group has violated the standard since February 2020. 

“Repeatedly violating workplace safety standards – standards that are proven to protect workers against fall hazards – serves only one purpose: to increase the risk to employees of serious harm or death,” said Julie Love, interim administrator for Oregon OSHA. “And there is absolutely no excuse for it.”

Altogether, Oregon OSHA cited Synergy Construction Group for the following violations and proposed penalties totaling $15,850:

  • Failure to provide fall protection systems where workers were exposed to a hazard of falling six feet or more to a lower level. It was a repeat violation.
    Total proposed penalty: $15,000
  • Failure to provide documentation of fall protection training for the employees doing the roofing job. It was a repeat violation.
    Total proposed penalty: $500
  • Failure to document, make available, and maintain for three years a written record of safety meetings addressing such issues as hazards related to tools, equipment, the work environment, and unsafe work practices. It was a repeat violation.
    Total proposed penalty: $350

Under Oregon OSHA’s rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses. The citation issued against Synergy Construction Group included a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company. 

Employers have 30 calendar days after receiving a citation to file an appeal. Synergy Construction Group has appealed its citation. 

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers free resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division’s Fall Protection Suite of online video training and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protection.

The Fall Protection Suite includes courses addressing fall protection fundamentals, and constructionroofing, and ladder safety

Employers are encouraged to use free resources – available now from Oregon OSHA and involving no fault, no citations, and no penalties – for help protecting their employees:

Consultation services – Provides free and confidential help with safety and health programs, including how to control and eliminate hazards, and hands-on training

Technical staff – Helps employers understand requirements and how to apply them to their worksites

 

###

 

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Oregon reports 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 35 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/12/22 1:02 PM

January 11, 2022

Note: This is an updated news release with additional case and death information.

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 35 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 35 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,814, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 486,202.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 309,132 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 690,868 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 727, which is 35 more than yesterday. There are 138 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is no change from yesterday.

There are 44 available adult ICU beds out of 663 total (7% availability) and 292 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,094 (7% availability).

1/11/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

44

(7%)

19

(5%)

2

(2%)

9

(10%)

6

(10%)

0

(0%)

6

(14%)

2

(8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

292

(7%)

39

(2%)

12

(2%)

63

(11%)

32

(7%)

4

(8%)

95

(23%)

47

(39%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Health Care Workforce dashboard monthly data refresh now available

For the January refresh, the Health Care Workforce (HCW) COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake dashboard includes data up to Jan. 3, 2022. The overall vaccination rate is 84%.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 19,947 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 10. Of that total, 1,652 were initial doses, 1,221 were second doses and 6,922 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,450 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 10.

The seven-day running average is now 13,555 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,077,304 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,791,575 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (22), Benton (158), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (41), Columbia (43), Coos (93), Crook (54), Curry (64), Deschutes (919), Douglas (83), Grant (31), Harney (1), Hood River (44), Jackson (387), Jefferson (23), Josephine (78), Klamath (207), Lake (3), Lane (550), Lincoln (50), Linn (164), Malheur (78), Marion (611), Morrow (32), Multnomah (1,345), Polk (145), Sherman (3), Tillamook (25), Umatilla (314), Union (13), Wallowa (19), Wasco (63), Washington (1,109), Wheeler (7) and Yamhill (441).

Oregon’s 5,780th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive July 17, 2020 and died Dec. 23, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.  

Oregon’s 5,781st COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died May 12, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,782nd COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive Jan. 5 and died April 5 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,783rd COVID-19-related death is a 94-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 31 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,784th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Washington County who died March 30 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,785th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died April 23 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,786th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Linn County who died April 22 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,787th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died April 26 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,788th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 25, 2021 and died on April 26 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,78th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 20 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,790th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died May 23 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,791st COVID-19-related death is a 93-year-old woman from Crook County who died April 14 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,792nd COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Jan. 13, 2021 and died June 6 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,793rd COVID-19-related death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 18, 2021 and died May 30 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,794th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old man from Jackson County who died May 28 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,795th COVID-19-related death is a 57-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Feb. 12 and died May 22 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,796th COVID-19-related death is a 58-year-old woman from Yamhill County who died June 10 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,797th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Aug. 28, 2020 and died June 12 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,798th COVID-19-related death is a 77-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive April 1 and died June 4 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,799th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died June 6 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,800th COVID-19-related death is a 61-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive Jan. 19 and died June 18 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,801st COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Sept. 20 and died June 29 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,802nd COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Dec. 2 and died July 18 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,803rd COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 7 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,804th COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 27 and died Jan. 8 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,805th COVID-19-related death is a 66-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 30 and died Jan. 5 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,806th COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 4 and died Jan. 9 at Mercy Medical Center. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5.807th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26 and died Jan. 9 at Bay Area Hospital. She had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,808th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Dec. 26 and died Jan. 8 at Bay Area Hospital. She had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,809th COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Benton County who first became symptomatic Jan. 3 and died Jan. 8 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,810th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive Sept. 3 and died Dec. 31 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,811th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 22 and died Jan. 7 at Asante Thee Rivers Medical Center. She had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,812th COVID-19-related death is an 80-year-old man from Washington County who first became symptomatic Dec. 1 and died Jan. 7 at his residence. He had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,813th death is a 71-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Jan. 2 and died Jan. 7 at Adventist Health Tillamook. She had had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,814th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old man from Malheur County who died Nov. 2 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had had underlying conditions.

Note: Updated information is known about Oregon’s 5,764th COVID-19-related death. The 81-year-old man is from Clackamas County. He was originally reported as a Marion County resident.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Revenue provides 2022 tax season tips
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/12/22 12:24 PM

The Oregon Department of Revenue is offering tips to taxpayers in preparation for the 2022 tax filing season. The IRS and DOR will begin accepting efile tax returns on January 24.  The tax filing deadline this year is April 18.

Returns will be processed in the order they are received. However, as in years past, the department won’t issue personal income tax refunds until mid-February. A refund hold is part of the department’s tax fraud prevention efforts and allows for confirmation that the amounts claimed on tax returns match what employers report on forms W-2 and 1099. 

Revenue encourages taxpayers to organize their tax records and check on the following items before filing their 2021 tax return to ensure that it is a complete and accurate tax return:

  • Make sure your information is current at Revenue Online.
  • If you don’t have a Revenue Online account, we encourage you to set one up.
  • See the IRS and DOR websites for tax filing tips.
  • Assemble your W-2 from your employer(s), 1099 forms and other documents you will need to file. 
  • Check the amount of any Child Tax Credit payments you received. Advance payments were sent automatically by the IRS to those eligible. Families who received advance payments need to file a 2021 tax return and compare the advance payments they received in 2021 with the amount of the Child Tax Credit they can properly claim on their 2021 federal tax return.
  • Choose a reputable tax preparer. The Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners offers a License Lookup website and there is more information from the IRS website.

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis (OEA) confirmed a nearly $1.9 billion tax surplus, triggering a tax surplus credit, or kicker, for the 2021 tax year that will be returned to taxpayers through a credit on their 2021 state personal income tax returns filed in 2022.

You're eligible to claim the kicker if you filed a 2020 tax return and had tax due before credits. Even if you don't have a filing obligation for 2021, you still must file a 2021 tax return to claim your kicker credit. There will be detailed information on how to claim your kicker credit in the 2021 Oregon personal income tax return instructions: Form OR-40 for full-year Oregon residents, Form OR-40-P for part-year residents, and Form OR-40-N for nonresidents. Composite and fiduciary-income tax return filers are also eligible. Use the What’s My Kicker calculator to determine what your credit amount will be.

Keep in mind that the state may use all or part of your kicker to pay any state debt you owe, such as tax due for other years, child support, court fines, or school loans. 

Here are a few other things for taxpayers to keep in mind this tax season:

  • E-filing is the fastest way to get your tax refund. On average, taxpayers who e-file their returns and request their refund via direct deposit receive their refund sooner than those who file paper returns and request paper refund checks. There are several free or low-cost preparation options available for both federal and Oregon tax returns, as long you meet the qualifications. Free tax preparation services are available for low- to moderate-income taxpayers through AARP and CASH Oregon. United Way also offers free tax help through their MyFreeTaxes program. Check the DOR website for more information. 
  • Taxpayers can order copies of past returns, letters, or other correspondence—from 2015 to current—through their Revenue Online account. They can also order and pay for these, or older documents, over the phone at 800-356-4222. 
  • Anyone who needs a personal income tax return booklet can download and print it from the department’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor/forms They can also order a copy online, by calling 503-378-4988 or 800-356-4222, or by mailing their request—along with their name, phone number, and mailing address to

Forms

Oregon Department of Revenue

PO Box 14999

Salem, OR 97309-0990 

For more information about the Earned Income Tax Credit and eligibility, visit the IRS website at www.irs.gov. For details on the Oregon Earned Income Credit, visit the DOR website. Even taxpayers who aren’t required to file taxes could be eligible for both credits.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. Call 503-378-4988 or 800-356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing- or speech-impaired, call 800-886-7204.


Coffee Creek Correctional Facility walk away back in custody
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/12/22 11:57 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Brandy Woodward, who walked away from the Corrections Commissary Building in Salem is back in custody. Woodward and Shelly Radan walked away from a work crew based out of Coffee Creek Correctional Facility at approximately 9:10 a.m., Monday, October 11, 2021.

Woodward was arrested in Texas by the Robertson County Sheriff's Office last evening, Tuesday, January 11, 2022. Oregon State Police have been working with Texas local and county law enforcement. Woodward remains in custody in Texas awaiting extradition to Oregon.

Shelly Radan remains at large. Radan is a white female weighing 174 lbs, with brown hair and eyes. Radan entered DOC custody on November 3, 2020, on two counts of burglary in the second degree. Radan’s previous name was Michael Price Crawford. 

The DOC Fugitive Apprehension Unit and the Oregon State Police continue to investigate. Anyone with information regarding Radan’s whereabouts should contact the Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888, the non-emergency number of their local police department, or the DOC Fugitive Apprehension Unit at 503-569-0734. Do not approach these individuals.

 

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Oregon Historical Society Opens New Exhibit Highlighting Paintings of Native Plants by Local Artist (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 01/12/22 10:42 AM
Leslie Gulch by Frances Stilwell. This pastel and watercolor painting of western juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, was painted in Jordan Valley, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.66.1,.2.
Leslie Gulch by Frances Stilwell. This pastel and watercolor painting of western juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, was painted in Jordan Valley, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.66.1,.2.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/2861/151504/thumb_2019-35.66_detail.JPG

Frances Stilwell: Oregon’s Botanical Landscape

On view at the Oregon Historical Society January 14 – May 1, 2022

Portland, OR — Artist Frances Stilwell moved to Oregon in 1969 to continue her work in environmental sciences, including work as an ethologist, a biologist, a fisheries technician, a geomorphologist, and a botanist. However, in 1981 she decided to leave her career in science to pursue her lifelong passion for art. The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is proud to share Stilwell’s stunning depictions of native Oregon plants in its newest exhibition, Frances Stilwell: Oregon’s Botanical Landscape, opening this Friday, January 14, 2022.

Stilwell was introduced to Oregon’s native plants through her friendship with Bessie Gragg Murphy, who grew up in a pioneer family in the Willamette Valley. Through this friendship, Stilwell met other plant enthusiasts and accompanied them on trips across Oregon. Stilwell found that illustrating plants helped her “familiarize [her]self with the whole of [her] new state…” Their friendship inspired Stilwell’s first book, Come Walk Through Spring with Bessie Gragg Murphy (self-published in 2000). 

Working mainly in pastels, Stilwell developed a growing body of work, depicting Oregon plants in their native habitats. Her illustrations became the impetus for her second book, Oregon’s Botanical Landscape: An Opportunity to Imagine Oregon Before 1800. Featuring 81 illustrations, Stilwell traveled across Oregon to paint each plant in its natural habitat. 

In 2019, Stilwell donated all 81 illustrations featured in Oregon’s Botanical Landscape to the Oregon Historical Society’s museum collection. OHS cares for a range of objects that document the history of the region, including clothing and textiles, Native American belongings, artworks, vehicles, equipment, and everyday items. OHS Deputy Museum Director Nicole Yasuhara was overjoyed to be the recipient of the artworks. “The collection is a time capsule of Oregon’s indigenous plants and landscapes, which have been and will continue to be affected by climate change along with cultural and population shifts in Oregon,” said Yasuhara. “In addition to be being beautiful, the illustrations are important historically.” Other notable artists represented in the museum’s art collection include Amanda Snyder, Cleveland Rockwell, J.E. Stuart, Hallie Heacock, Edward Quigley, Melville T. Wire, and Theodore Gegoux.

Stilwell worked closely with OHS’s museum staff to curate the exhibition, which includes scientific information alongside each illustration. Visitors will also have the opportunity to watch an interview with Stilwell where she shares her thoughts and experiences creating the artworks on display. Her wish for visitors who see these pieces of art is that they will, “inspire in you and the next generation a sense of home in the natural world of Oregon.”

For a taste of spring during the chilly winter months, plan a visit to Frances Stilwell: Oregon’s Botanical Landscape, on exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society from January 14 through May 1, 2022. Limited quantities of Oregon’s Botanical Landscape are also available to purchase in the OHS Museum Store. The Oregon Historical Society’s museum and store is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission is $10, with discounts for students, seniors, teachers, and youth. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 




Attached Media Files: Leslie Gulch by Frances Stilwell. This pastel and watercolor painting of western juniper, Juniperus occidentalis, was painted in Jordan Valley, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.66.1,.2. , Sedges Have Edges by Frances Stilwell. This oil painting of tall flatsedge, Cyperus eragrostis, was painted in Adair Village, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.44.1,.2. , Ecstasy in Pink by Frances Stilwell. This pastel painting of Ground [strawberry] pink, Silene hooker, was painted in Corvallis, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.34.1,.2. , Potentilla by the Sea by Frances Stilwell. This pastel and watercolor painting of silverweed, Argentina anserina, was painted in Bandon, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.25.1,.2. , Happy Most Anywhere by Frances Stilwell. This pastel painting of fireweed, Chamerion angustifolium, was painted at Halfway, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.21.1,.2. , Great Aunt of Modern-Day Strawberries by Frances Stilwell. This pastel painting of coastal strawberries, Fragaria chiloensis, was painted in Tillamook, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.11.1,.2. , Goldfields on Table Rock by Frances Stilwell. This pastel painting of goldfields, Lasthenia californica, was painted in Eagle Point (Upper Table Rock), Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.9.1,.2. , Under the Rimrock by Frances Stilwell. This pastel painting of Blanketflower (Gaillardia aristata) and sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata) was painted in Maupin, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.6.1,.2. , Thistle on a Sand Slide by Frances Stilwell. This pastel and watercolor painting of peregrine thistle (Cirsium cymosum) was painted at Miller Lake, Chemult, Oregon. OHS Museum, 2019-35.2.1,.2. , Frances Stilwell (1940–) left a successful career in the sciences to devote herself to art. She resides in Corvallis, Oregon. Image courtesy of Jakob Jones Media. , Close-up of Owyhee clover (“Trifolium owyheense”) painted with pastels. OHS Museum, 2019-35.14.1,.2.

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Awards Nearly $1 Million to Local Veteran Service Providers
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 01/12/22 8:14 AM

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is pleased to announce the award of nearly $1 million in grant funding to support a range of robust and innovative local veteran service efforts and key projects to improve veterans’ access to transportation, housing, health care and other vital services across the state.

ODVA received 31 proposals from across Oregon, totaling more than $3.3 million in requested funds. Of these, 21 organizations received awards, ranging from $7,500 to $99,000 for the one-time grants. The projects were selected through a thoughtful and deliberate process by an evaluation committee composed of members of the Oregon Veterans’ Affairs Advisory Committee, representatives of Oregon’s national service organizations, as well as veterans and other partners from across the state.

Grant funds will provide additional resources that enable organizations to offer services to veterans at no cost, that help improve outcomes in areas such as health or behavioral health care, housing security, employment opportunities or stability, education and training opportunities, transportation accessibility, or other critical services within a community. The Veteran Services Grant Program is made possible by funding from the Oregon Lottery through Measure 96, which voters approved overwhelmingly in November 2016.

“ODVA is thrilled to be able to support the work of so many worthwhile organizations throughout the state of Oregon, who are working tirelessly to increase the availability of needed resources for veterans within their own communities,” ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick said. “With the continued economic, educational, behavioral health, housing and other challenges exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, we rely on these partners now more than ever to help ensure every veteran in our state has access to the benefits, resources and services they’ve earned.”

The Veteran Services Grant recipients for the 2022-23 cycle are:

 

Organization                                                                                            County                              Amount

American Military Encouragement Network (AMEN)                      Clackamas                             $64,389

Chadwick Clubhouse                                                                              Douglas                              $43,677

Clackamas County Children Family & Community 

Connections Workforce Programs                                                       Clackamas                              $74,871

Community Counseling Solutions             Grant, Morrow, Wheeler, Gilliam, Umatilla              $7,500

Crossroads Communities                           Linn, Polk, Marion, Clackamas, Washington       $32,340

Easterseals Oregon                       Multnomah, Douglas, Lane, Jackson, Josephine, Yamhill          $99,000

Fort Kennedy                                                              Clackamas, Multnomah, Washington       $35,000

Linn County Veteran Services                                                               Linn                                     $11,000

Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency                           Marion                               $50,000

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Multnomah                 Multnomah                             $45,000

NeighborWorks Umpqua                                                                      Douglas                              $34,650

Northwest Outward Bound School (NWOBS)                                    Multnomah                             $16,000

NW Veterans in Technology                                                                 Multnomah                              $72,000

Operation Rebuild Hope                                                                       Coos                                  $67,509

Project ABLE                                                                                            Marion                             $61,124

Solid Ground Equine Assisted Activities & Therapy Center             Klamath                              $58,254

Southwest Oregon Veterans Outreach Inc.                                       Coos                                  $14,024

St. Andrew Legal Clinic                                                                          Multnomah                            $63,390

St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County Inc.                                Lane                                   $17,500

Washington County Disability, Aging and Veteran Services            Washington                              $39,600

Yamhill County Health & Human Services                                          Yamhill                               $30,720

 

To learn more about the Veteran Services Grant or other grant opportunities available through ODVA, visit www.oregon.gov/odva. Veterans and families seeking claims and benefits assistance are encouraged to contact their local county or tribal veteran service office. A full listing of veteran service offices can be found at www.oregon.gov/odva.

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Tue. 01/11/22
New Board Chairman: Staff, Programs Empower Communities Across Oregon (Photo)
Urban League of Portland - 01/11/22 5:04 PM
Urban League Of Portland Chairman's Breakfast, Jan. 11, 2022
Urban League Of Portland Chairman's Breakfast, Jan. 11, 2022
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/6971/151488/thumb_2022-01-11_Chairmans_Breakfast-09.jpg

Key Highlights:

  • Urban League honors former Chairman Michael E. Lewellen’s years of leadership, leaving the organization in its best position in decades, and celebrates new Chairman Eric Olson.
  • Salem business owner Olson starts his leadership term during growth and increased services into Marion County by the Urban League of Portland, including youth programs, food assistance and more, while also offering employees the state’s “Number 1” nonprofit workplace, according to annual survey by Oregon Business.
  • President Nkenge Harmon Johnson and Olson commemorate former Chairman Lewellen’s legacy with stories of empowerment among Black youth leaders, renters looking to better understand their rights, and the League’s growing service and advocacy footprint in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

SALEM, Ore. — The more than 75-year leadership and representation of Oregon’s Black families by the Urban League of Portland is as strong and expansive as anyone can remember, said outgoing Chairman Michael E. Lewellen on Tuesday during a celebration of his leadership term on of the Board of Directors. 

The Chairman’s Breakfast, an event to celebrate the League’s leadership, featured a bite to eat with a heaping side of organizational pride and personal connection between supporters, staff and community leaders. Newly elected Chairman Eric Olson told supporters, who gathered at Elmer’s Restaurant on Market Street NE, that the day’s location symbolizes the service growth beyond the Portland metro area to meet the challenges and disadvantages that families, individuals and small businesses face statewide. 

“Our organizers and volunteers have fought at the State Capitol against job and housing discrimination since the 1940s. The League’s advocacy has made life better for Oregonians across the state through policies such as Ban the Box on employment applications and raising the minimum wage. These days our team is growing direct services for Salem residents from Urban League staff,” Olson said before the event. “We owe that growth into Marion County to the leadership from both Chairman Lewellen and President Nkenge Harmon Johnson. Our youth are becoming leaders after school. They organize events that give food boxes to help families sustain the financial stress of pandemic life. At home, mothers, fathers and individuals have learned better money habits and financial management through the League’s services that, by the way, also help them find employment to pay for today’s bills or help find the education needed for the job of their dreams in the future.” 

Chairman Olson grew up in Oregon City and Lincoln City. After studying at Chemeketa Community College, he earned his degree at Brooks Institute of Photography in California. As a Salem-area business owner, Chairman Olson has prioritized quality service to his guests and good jobs for his employees. Whether spending free time at home with his wife and six children or volunteering, he believes that everyone has their part to play to make their lives and our community better. Chairman Olson also served on the Oregon State Contractors Board, in addition to his dedicated volunteerism with the Urban League.

Former Chairman Lewellen’s commitment to the Urban League movement is longstanding, having first served as Chairman of the Portland affiliate in the early 1990s while employed at Nike, Inc. His decorated career in public relations, marketing and corporate communications for other iconic brands carried him to a half-dozen cities around the country, including Orlando where he also served as Board Chairman of the Central Florida Urban League for three years.  An executive position with the Portland Trail Blazers brought him back to the Willamette Valley in 2012, and it wasn’t long before Lewellen reconnected with the Urban League effort in Oregon as Chairman once again.  His leadership and dedication have helped advance the mission of the Urban League across the region while also serving on the boards of the Legacy Health Foundation, All Hands Raised, Trail Blazers Foundation, Oregon Association of Minority Entrepreneurs and the University Club of Portland. 

At the breakfast, which included local leaders from government, business and academia, Lewellen praised President Harmon Johnson and program directors for creating a workplace environment that was named the “Number 1” nonprofit to work for in the state by Oregon Business Magazine in September. 

“Hundreds of employees from employers across Oregon shared their views about life at work, and no other set of employees spoke better about their bosses and workplace than our own Urban League staff,” Lewellen, who now works as Vice President for Marketing and Communications at the University of Portland, said before the event. “That pride of working at the Urban League fuels the empowerment that our program participants benefit from on their journeys toward success. I leave this role with tremendous confidence that the League will continue to lead and help Oregon families for as long as we are needed. I’m pleased to pass the gavel to Chairman Olson who will continue to support the terrific staff.” 

Chairman Olson recently rose from Vice Chairman to lead the board. The Urban League’s Board of Directors is comprised of community leaders of different backgrounds from across the region. Founded in 1945, the League is one of the Pacific Northwest’s oldest civil rights and social service organizations. Its mission is to empower African Americans and others to achieve equality in education, employment, health, economic security and quality of life. This happens by investing in stable housing; through workforce development; and promoting community health, education and well-being for our youth, adults, and seniors. The League's culturally specific programs and services — combined with powerful advocacy and civic engagement — empower Black communities and other to thrive across Oregon and Southwest Washington. 

"We recently helped an expecting mom, who was unlawfully evicted by her landlord and facing homelessness,” said President Harmon Johnson before the event. “Our team moved her into housing, and then, we successfully sued the landlord to get the eviction removed from her record. We know it’s not just Portland-area communities that face unfair barriers, but all over the Northwest. We’re ready and eager to continue growing the League’s capacity to deliver services and advocacy that foster equity and justice in Marion County and beyond.” 

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Attached Media Files: PDF copy of press release , Urban League Of Portland Chairman's Breakfast, Jan. 11, 2022 , President Nkenge Harmon Johnson, Oregon State Rep. Teresa Alonso Leon (Woodburn) , Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett, President Nkenge Harmon Johnson , President Nkenge Harmon Johnson, Outgoing Chairman Michael E. Lewellen, Newly Elected Chairman Eric Olson

Oregon reports 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 35 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/22 4:41 PM

January 11, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 35 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 35 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,814, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 486,202.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 309,132 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 690,868 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 727, which is 35 more than yesterday. There are 138 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is no change from yesterday.

There are 44 available adult ICU beds out of 663 total (7% availability) and 292 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,094 (7% availability).

1/11/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

44

(7%)

19

(5%)

2

(2%)

9

(10%)

6

(10%)

0

(0%)

6

(14%)

2

(8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

292

(7%)

39

(2%)

12

(2%)

63

(11%)

32

(7%)

4

(8%)

95

(23%)

47

(39%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Health Care Workforce dashboard monthly data refresh now available

For the January refresh, the Health Care Workforce (HCW) COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake dashboard includes data up to Jan. 3, 2022. The overall vaccination rate is 84%.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 19,947 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 10. Of that total, 1,652 were initial doses, 1,221 were second doses and 6,922 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,450 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 10.

The seven-day running average is now 13,555 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,892,158 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 183,707 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,564,949 doses of Moderna and 259,593 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,077,304 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,791,575 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The 8,040 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (22), Benton (158), Clackamas (820), Clatsop (41), Columbia (43), Coos (93), Crook (54), Curry (64), Deschutes (919), Douglas (83), Grant (31), Harney (1), Hood River (44), Jackson (387), Jefferson (23), Josephine (78), Klamath (207), Lake (3), Lane (550), Lincoln (50), Linn (164), Malheur (78), Marion (611), Morrow (32), Multnomah (1,345), Polk (145), Sherman (3), Tillamook (25), Umatilla (314), Union (13), Wallowa (19), Wasco (63), Washington (1,109), Wheeler (7) and Yamhill (441).

Note: Additional death and case information to follow in an updated news release.

Note: Updated information is known about Oregon’s 5,764th COVID-19-related death. The 81-year-old man is from Clackamas County. He was originally reported as a Marion County resident.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

###


Fatal Crash on Hwy 22W-Polk County
Oregon State Police - 01/11/22 2:08 PM

On Tuesday, January 11, 2022 at approximately 7:04 AM Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle collision on Hwy 22W near MP 9. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound maroon Toyota Camry, operated by Elisabeth Robin (34) of Grand Ronde, crossed over into oncoming lanes for unknown reasons and collided head-on with an eastbound maroon International semi-truck hauling logs, operated by Travis Flatt (31) of Toledo. 

Robin was transported to the Salem Hospital with life threatening injuries and was later pronounced deceased.  Flatt remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

Hwy 22W was closed for approximately 7 hours. NWFF Environmental Services responded to address a fuel spill as a result of the collision. 

OSP was assisted by Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire and Medics and ODOT.


DPSST Background Workgroup Meeting Scheduled 1-18-2022
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/11/22 12:47 PM

BACKGROUND WORKGROUP

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

 The DPSST Background Workgroup will meet on January 18, 2022, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Marsha Morin at 503-378-2155.

DPSST’s campus is closed to the public at this time, members of the public can view this meeting via the DPSST Facebook page.

Streamed Live on Facebook @

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

1. Introductions

2. Personal History Questionnaire

3. Uniform Background Checklist

4. Identify Additional Discussion Topics for Workgroup

5. Requirement to Share Background Information

6. DPSST Fingerprinting Requirement

7. Next Workgroup Meeting: TBD

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Research Subcommittee meets January 20, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/22 12:06 PM

January 11, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Research Subcommittee meets January 20, 2022

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Research Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, January 20, 2022, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Meredith Rider at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or edith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us">meredith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board meets Jan. 20
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/22 12:06 PM

January 11, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets Jan. 20

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve December meeting minutes; 2023-’25 public health modernization planning; continue racial equity capacity building training.

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1602414019#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee meets Jan. 13
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/22 12:05 PM

January 11, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee meets Jan. 13

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, Jan. 13, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 and older for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Meredith Rider at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or edith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us">meredith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Behavioral Health Committee continues meeting in January
Oregon Health Authority - 01/11/22 11:40 AM

January 11, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Behavioral Health Committee continues meeting in January

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board’s Behavioral Health Committee

When: Tuesday, Jan. 18: (meeting rescheduled in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day): 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Monday, Jan. 24: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Monday, Jan. 31: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Virtual:   

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607956557?pwd=WkpPY0hFTmFOUnVodk9FYVNsYnZ5Zz09

Join by phone: 669-254-5252

Zoom Meeting ID: 161 689 7835

Zoom Passcode: 413375

Agenda: Committee members will discuss the Behavioral Health Committee’s recommended outcomes and metrics. Agendas will be posted on the Behavioral Health Committee web page prior to each meeting.

The meeting will include time for public comment. Comments may also be sent ahead of time to the Behavioral Health Committee support staff at  hc@dhsoha.state.or.us">bhc@dhsoha.state.or.us

Purpose: In 2021, the Oregon State Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2086, which included multiple provisions and called for the establishment of the Behavioral Health Committee of the Oregon Health Policy Board. The committee’s purpose is to increase the quality of behavioral health services and transform Oregon’s behavioral health system through improved outcomes, metrics, and incentives. The committee will direct this work for the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and will be supported by staff from OHA’s Office of Behavioral Health Services

The Behavioral Health Committee will use a health equity lens. It will center the voices of those with lived experience, community members impacted by health inequities, and members of the community with behavioral healthcare knowledge.

Read more about the Behavioral Health Committee.

Questions? Contact Behavioral Health Committee support staff at hc@dhsoha.state.or.us">bhc@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jesse Rawlins at 503-689-7941, 711 TTY, or at hc@dhsoha.state.or.us">bhc@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


New Program Aims to Prevent Aquatic Invasive Species Spread (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 01/11/22 11:00 AM
Quagga mussel motorboat propeller contamination
Quagga mussel motorboat propeller contamination
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/4139/151464/thumb_AISPropContam.PNG

The Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) initiated a new program to prevent delays during the transport of watercraft destined for the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The program, “Call Before You Haul,” provides a toll-free phone number boat transporters can call prior to transporting watercraft from outside the Pacific Northwest to one of the aforementioned states. The program is currently being piloted in 10 states and is intended to be expanded to all states in 2022.

By calling the toll-free number, 1-844-311-4873, prior to hauling, and providing some basic information about the watercraft being transported, the destination state representative will reach out to boat transporters and provide them with information to facilitate and expedite the watercraft inspection process, and if needed, decontaminate. Proactively arranging watercraft inspections can prevent costly and timely delays at inspection stations, or if boat transporters are intercepted hauling an infested vessel by law enforcement. All four states are communicating with one another and working with one of the four states will expedite transport across two or more Pacific Northwest states.

All Pacific Northwest states have regulations that make it illegal to transport aquatic invasive species (dead or alive) within their respective states, including penalties up to, and including, a no bond felony. Much of the ongoing spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) to inland waters throughout North America can be attributed to the overland movement of watercraft that can be towed on trailers or atop vehicles. Invasive species can be carried in bilge water, live wells, and bait buckets as well as on boat and motor exteriors and trailers. Every time a boat is transported overland after use in an infested waterway, there is the possibility that it will transfer aquatic invasive species to uninfested waterways. 

In addition to reaching out to boat transport companies, PSMFC is working directly with Departments of Transportation in 10 states (as part of the pilot program) to notify them of the toll-free number and make this information available on their permitting websites.

Call Before You Haul is intended to prevent unnecessary delays for boat transporters and their customers and help to ensure these companies will not be violating state, or federal, laws pertaining to unlawful transport of aquatic invasive species (e.g., quagga or zebra mussels). 

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife manages border inspection stations where all boats being transported are required to stop. Inspections generally take only 10 minutes and go a long way to help protect Oregon’s waterways. Fees from waterway access permits, out-of-state aquatic invasive species prevention permits and motorboat registrations through the Oregon State Marine Board help pay for inspection stations and other prevention efforts. 

For more information on aquatic invasive species in the West, see: www.westernais.org.

Visit myODFW for more information about inspection stations in Oregon and required permits. 

###




Attached Media Files: Quagga mussel motorboat propeller contamination

DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/11/22 10:12 AM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation 
 

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for January 26, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. has been cancelled. The next Applicant Review Committee meeting is scheduled for February 23, 2022 at 1:00 pm.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 30-Columbia County
Oregon State Police - 01/11/22 9:27 AM

On Monday, January 10th, 2022 at approximately 8:51 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motor vehicle crash on Hwy 30 near milepost 59.

Preliminary investigation revealed an eastbound white 2021 Toyota Camry, operated by Austin Nash (28) of Rainier, lost control while negotiating a curve and slid into the oncoming lane, colliding head-on with a black Ford Explorer, operated by Brendan Smith (29) of Clatskanie.

Nash suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Smith remained at the scene. 

Highway 30 was closed for 3 hours following the crash.  

OSP was assisted by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office, Columbia River Fire & Rescue and ODOT.


U.S. Attorney's Office Commemorates National Human Trafficking Awareness Day--January 11, 2022
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/11/22 9:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Today, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon commemorates National Human Trafficking Awareness Day—January 11, 2022—and joins its federal, state, local, and Tribal law enforcement partners in declaring a continued commitment to combating all forms of human trafficking.

“More than 150 years have passed since our nation ratified the 13th Amendment, abolishing the cruel and repugnant practice of enslaving humans. And yet, in its modern form of trafficking, this abhorrent crime persists here in the U.S. and across the globe. Combatting human trafficking is a top priority for the Justice Department and our office. Together with our law enforcement partners, we will do everything in our power to end this horrible crime,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“We are a country built on the promise of freedom and dignity for every person. Unfortunately, it’s a promise that we see broken all too often for the most vulnerable among us,” said Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Victims of labor trafficking and sex trafficking are not only exploited in the worst ways, they also live in constant fear. They wake every morning to threats of violence and outright abuse. Help us help them. If you have information about trafficking in your area, please call us.”

Human trafficking, sometimes referred to as trafficking in persons or modern slavery, is a serious federal crime involving the exploitation of individuals for labor, services, or commercial sex through force, fraud, or coercion. This coercion can be subtle or overt, physical or psychological. Exploitation of a minor for commercial sex is human trafficking, regardless of whether any form of force, fraud, or coercion was used.

Victims of human trafficking can be anyone regardless of race, color, national origin, disability, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, education level, or citizenship status. Although there is no defining characteristic that all human trafficking victims share, traffickers around the world frequently prey on individuals who are poor, vulnerable, living in unsafe or unstable environments, or are in search of a better life.

In the U.S., trafficking victims can be American or foreign citizens. Some of the most vulnerable populations for trafficking in the U.S. include American Indian and Alaska Native communities, LGBTQ individuals, individuals with disabilities, undocumented migrants, runaway and homeless youth, temporary guest-workers, and low-income individuals.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon is committed to continuing its victim-centered, trauma-informed approach to detecting hidden human trafficking crimes, holding perpetrators accountable, and helping to restore the lives of survivors, while strengthening strategic anti-trafficking partnerships.

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you believe you or someone you know is a victim of human trafficking or may have information about a trafficking situation, please call the National Human Trafficking Hotline toll-free at 1-888-373-7888 or visit https://humantraffickinghotline.org. You can also text the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 233733.

January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Every year since 2010, the President has dedicated the month to raising awareness about the different forms of human trafficking and educating people about this crime and how to spot it. To learn more, visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/12/30/a-proclamation-on-national-human-trafficking-prevention-month-2022/.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Announcement

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Job Verification Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/11/22 9:00 AM
TT - Job Verification Scams - GRAPHIC - January 11, 2022
TT - Job Verification Scams - GRAPHIC - January 11, 2022
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3585/151259/thumb_TT_-_Job_Verification_Scams_-_GRAPHIC_-_January_11_2022.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against job verification scams.

In Oregon, the FBI has been receiving more and more reports from people getting scammed as they try to apply for jobs or unemployment benefits. The reports, from the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, show that bad actors are targeting victims who are already in financially difficult situations.

Many businesses and government agencies use private, third-party companies to verify that you are really you. The goal is to cut down on fraud. These verification companies are legitimate, but fraudsters, of course, are gaming the system.

In one scenario, the bad actor posts a fake job online and directs you to the verification company. You complete the process, and the bad actor comes back and asks for your login or verification info to finish processing your application. He accesses the account and uses your profile to apply for unemployment in one or more states.

In another scenario, the bad actor posts a job online and directs you to what appears to be a legitimate verification company but one that is, in fact, fake. Again, he harvests your information and goes about committing all kinds of identity crimes.

How do you protect yourself?

  • Make sure you the job you are applying for is real. Research the company, and call a publicly available number to confirm that it is.
  • Make sure that the verification company you are dealing with is legitimate. Research the company. Know exactly what information is required, how that company will communicate with you, and what are the official channels through which it will communicate.
  • Be wary of social media contacts that ask for information to “verify your identity.” Legitimate companies will not ask for your highly personal or financial information this way. 

If you are the victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Job Verification Scams - AUDIO - January 11, 2022 , TT - Job Verification Scams - GRAPHIC - January 11, 2022

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Kicks Off 2022 Girl Scout Cookie Season with New Cookie (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 01/11/22 8:47 AM
Adventurefuls Cookie with Bite
Adventurefuls Cookie with Bite
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/6250/151463/thumb_Adventurefuls_Bite.png

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Kicks Off 2022 Girl Scout Cookie Season with New Cookie
Girl Scouts in Oregon and SW Washington are now selling the new brownie-inspired Adventurefuls™ cookie alongside longtime favorites like Thin Mints® and Samoas®.

PORTLAND, OR (January 11, 2022)—Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington has kicked off the 2022 Girl Scout Cookie season, and with it comes a brand new cookie. For the first time, Girl Scouts will offer Adventurefuls™, an indulgent brownie-inspired cookie with caramel-flavored crème and a hint of sea salt—and an incredible taste of adventure in every bite. Adventurefuls joins a lineup of nine iconic Girl Scout Cookies for sale in Oregon and Southwest Washington, including favorites like Thin Mints®, Samoas® and Tagalongs®.

100% of the proceeds from every Girl Scout Cookie purchase fuel local Girl Scouts’ adventures throughout the year: exploring what interests them, discovering their passions, and taking action on issues they care about. Whether they’re using their STEM skills to solve a problem, changing a law to help their community, having a courageous outdoor experience, or starting an innovative nonprofit, Girl Scouts ages 5-18 build a better future for themselves and the world. And through the Girl Scout Cookie Program, including earning new Cookie Business badges, girls get a taste of being entrepreneurs and learn important online and offline business skills that set them up for success in life.

“Local Girl Scouts do incredible things with their cookie earnings,” said Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington CEO, Karen Hill. “Whether earning their way to camp or funding a service project, they’re setting goals and serving as leaders in their own lives and in their communities.”

How To Purchase Girl Scout Cookies This Season
Girl Scout Cookie season in Oregon and SW Washington runs now through March 13, 2022. This year, consumers have a variety of ways to purchase their favorites:

  • If you know a registered Girl Scout, reach out to her today to find out how she’s selling cookies in ways that meet local and state safety protocols.
     
  • Beginning February 18, enter your zip code into the Girl Scout Cookie Finder at girlscoutcookies.org to find a booth near you, to purchase cookies from a local Girl Scout troop for delivery or shipment, or to donate cookies to first responders and local causes.

###

About the Girl Scout Cookie Program
A little more than a century ago, Girl Scouts began participating in what would evolve into the largest girl-led entrepreneurial program in the world: the Girl Scout Cookie Program. The program helps girls fund life-changing experiences and learning for themselves and their troops all year long, while gaining valuable life skills like goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills and business ethics. To learn more about the history of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, please visit girlscoutcookies.org.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington
In partnership with more than 6,800 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares more than 11,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 35 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information or to join or volunteer, visit girlscoutsosw.org.




Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Kicks Off 2022 Girl Scout Cookie Season with New Cookie , Adventurefuls Cookie with Bite , Adventurefuls Box , Girl Scout with Adventurefuls

OSP Fish & Wildlife Division is seeking public assistance in locating the person(s) responsible for shooting a wolf in the Sled Springs Wildlife Management Unit- Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/11/22 8:37 AM
2022-01/1002/151462/20220108_124503.jpg
2022-01/1002/151462/20220108_124503.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1002/151462/thumb_20220108_124503.jpg

On January 8, 2022, at 10:36 A.M. a concerned citizen reported to the Oregon State Police and ODFW personnel of finding a collared deceased wolf on Parsnip Creek RD in Wallowa County, approximately 6 miles southeast of Wallowa, OR. OSP Troopers and ODFW personnel responded to the area and located a deceased collared wolf.  The initial investigation revealed that the wolf likely died as a result of being shot.  The wolf, OR 106, was a two-year-old collared female.  OR 106 was a lone wolf that dispersed from the Chesnimnus Pack. 

OSP is urging anyone with information regarding this case to call the Oregon State Police Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email at TIP@state.or.us. Reference case # SP22006179.

 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1002/151462/20220108_124503.jpg

Virtual meeting set for Jan. 24 to discuss rules guiding take-off and landing of drones in state parks and the ocean shore
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/11/22 8:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon—The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) Rule Advisory Committee will meet virtually Jan. 24 to review and discuss proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules. The agency intends to create rules to provide the clarity needed for drone pilots, hobbyists and the general public to know where drone take-off and landing is allowed and prohibited within a state park and along the ocean shore.

The meeting starts at 10:30 a.m. and will be live streamed on YouTube for the public at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkqL6iVPBrfCTO27cNmCTwg. The meeting agenda does not include time for public comment.

The committee will also discuss any financial or economic effects of the proposed rules on businesses, local governments or other stakeholders. 

After the committee review, the proposed rules will open for public comment. Details will be posted on the Proposed OPRD Rules web page.

OPRD appointed members to the Rule Advisory Committee. Members comprise individuals who are drone pilots, agency representatives, conservationists, and active visitors to state parks. Additional RAC members have been added for this second meeting.The first meeting was held in November 2021. 

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Katie Gauthier at least three days in advance of the meeting at 503-510-9678 or katie.gauthier@oregon.gov.

###


Mon. 01/10/22
Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board's Training Subcommittee meets Jan. 13
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 4:38 PM

January 10, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board’s Training Subcommittee meets Jan. 13

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, Jan. 13, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Meredith Rider at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or edith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us">meredith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board's Research Subcommittee meets Jan. 20
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 4:19 PM

January 10, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board’s Research Subcommittee meets Jan. 20

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Research Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Meredith Rider at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or edith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us">meredith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Applications accepted for Advance Directive Adoption Committee
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 4:10 PM

January 10, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Applications accepted for Advance Directive Adoption Committee

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Office of Governor Kate Brown and Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division are seeking applicants for two positions on the state Advance Directive Adoption Committee (ADAC).

The ADAC provides guidance to OHA on necessary revisions to Oregon’s Advance Directive form, and ensures that the form is available and accessible across all Oregon communities. The committee reviews the Advance Directive form every four years.

OHA invites applications from people who meet the following criteria:

  • One member of the Oregon State Bar who has extensive experience in health law.
  • One member who represents individuals with disabilities.

Each position serves a term that begins March 1, 2022. The end dates for the positions listed above is typically four years. Board members are appointed by the Governor. Individuals with lived and/or professional experience related to health, disability or racial equity are encouraged to apply.

Under Oregon Revised Statutes 292.495, board members may qualify to receive compensation for their service.

To apply, complete the electronic application process at https://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx by Feb. 8. These recruitments will remain open until filled. Those applying will be asked to provide the following:

  1. A resume.
  2. A short personal biography.
  3. A brief statement of interest, which should include the positions the applicant is applying for.
  4. A brief statement on opportunities the applicant sees for the board to address equity.
  5. A brief statement on the applicant’s understanding of diversity, equity and inclusion.

Those unable to complete the form electronically should contact the Executive Appointments Office at executive.appointments@oregon.gov for assistance.

Information about the Advance Directive Adoption Committee is available on the board’s website at:

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/AdvanceDirectiveAdoptionCommittee.aspx.

For more information, contact Charina Walker, OHA Public Health Division, at 503-314-8605 or ina.walker@dhsoha.state.or.us">charina.walker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Charina Walker at 503-314-8605 or ina.walker@dhsoha.state.or.us">charina.walker@dhsoha.state.or.us or 711 TTY.


Oregon reports 18,538 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 18 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 4:01 PM

January 10, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 18,538 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 18 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 18 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,779, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 18,538 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 478,203.

The 18 new deaths and 18,538 new cases reported today include data recorded by counties for the three-day period between Jan. 7 and Jan. 9.

Consider alternatives for non-urgent health issues

With a record number of cases recorded and the spread of the Omicron variant statewide, Oregonians are being asked to ease the burden on health systems and emergency rooms. If you are looking for non-emergency COVID-19 treatment, please call your doctor or an urgent care clinic. Not sure who to call? Start with 211. You can find a test here.

social card

Daily testing numbers reach near all-time high

COVID-19 testing is in high demand, and OHA is recording a high volume of tests being performed. The number of COVID-19 tests reported for Jan. 7, at 51,996, is the third highest single daily count reported statewide during the pandemic.

For anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested regardless of your vaccination status.  You should stay home and away from others while you wait for the results of your COVID-19 test. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should also seek testing regardless of vaccination status. Fully vaccinated people should be tested five to seven days after their last exposure. People who are not fully vaccinated should get tested when they find out they are a close contact. If their test result is negative, they should get tested again five to seven days after their last exposure or immediately if symptoms develop. Learn more here.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 295,471 more Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 704,529 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 692, which is 33 more than yesterday. There are 138 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 11 more than yesterday.

There are 46 available adult ICU beds out of 647 total (7% availability) and 295 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,061 (7% availability).

1/10/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

46

(7%)

19

(6%)

5

(6%)

6

(7%)

3

(5%)

0

(0%)

6

(14%)

7

(27%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

295

(7%)

41

(2%)

12

(2%)

76

(13%)

33

(7%)

4

(8%)

83

(20%)

46

(39%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 9,110 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 9. Of that total, 683 were initial doses, 428 were second doses and 4,517 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 3,454 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 9.

The seven-day running average is now 11,247 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,882,246 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 181,274 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,557,943 doses of Moderna and 259,278 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,073,899 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,788,981 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (600), Clackamas (1926), Clatsop (95), Columbia (146), Coos (214), Crook (73), Curry (91), Deschutes (1337), Douglas (136), Grant (8), Harney (5), Hood River (86), Jackson (898), Jefferson (181), Josephine (202), Klamath (84), Lake (1), Lane (1367), Lincoln (67), Linn (448), Malheur (33), Marion (1366), Morrow (46), Multnomah (4393), Polk (267), Sherman (1), Tillamook (53), Umatilla (214), Union (102), Wallowa (10), Wasco (25), Washington (3781) and Yamhill (254).

Oregon reports 8,156 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 7, 6,292 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 8 and 4,090 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 9.

Oregon’s 5,762nd COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Multnomah County who died Aug. 4, 2020 at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,763rd COVID-19-related death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who died Oct. 1, 2020 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,764th COVID-19-related death is an 81-year-old man from Marion County who died Oct. 22 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,765th COVID-19-related death is a 96-year-old man from Benton County who died Oct. 20, 2020 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,766th COVID-19-related death is a 41-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Oct. 22 and died Nov. 6 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,767th COVID-19-related death is a 51-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive Oct. 14 and died Nov. 11 at St. Charles Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,768th COVID-19-related death is a 68-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 13 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,769th COVID-19-related death is a 78-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Oct. 28 and died Nov. 14 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,770th COVID-19-related death is a 64-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive Nov. 11 and died Nov. 11 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,771st COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Dec. 21 and died Jan. 3 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,772nd COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 31 and died Jan. 7 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,773rd COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 2 and died Jan. 7 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,774th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 27 and died Jan. 6 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,775th COVID-19-related death is an 82-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 17 and died Jan. 6 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,776th COVID-19-related death is a 63-year-old man from Crook County who died Nov. 3 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,777th COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive Jan. 7 and died Jan. 7 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,778th COVID-19-related death is an 84-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died Nov. 4 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,779th COVID-19-related death is a 73-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 28 and died Dec. 20 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Walla Walla Public Schools Bond Oversight Committee Meeting: January 11, 2022
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 01/10/22 3:37 PM

In accordance with their duties to review the 2018 Bond program, a meeting of the WWPS Bond Oversight Committee will be held on Tuesday, January 11, 2022, at 5:45 p.m. at the WaHi Commons, 800 Abbott Road, Walla Walla.

Members of the public who wish to listen to the meeting via telephone may do so.  An access code is required and may be obtained ahead of time by contacting Susie Golden at 509-526-6715 or sgolden@wwps.org.

Details are available via the following link:  http://www.wwps.org/bond/bond-oversight-committee


Marketplace Community Conversations meets January 18 and 20 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 12:51 PM

January 10, 2022

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Dawn Shaw, 503-951-3947, Dawn.Shaw@DCBS.Oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

Marketplace Community Conversations meets January 18 and 20 via Zoom

What: A public meeting intended to give interested parties a voice in the shaping of health insurance policy in Oregon.

When: January 18 and 20, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. Information about how to join each meeting is listed below.

Meeting Topics:

  • Oregon Public Option and Usability of Marketplace Plans

When: Jan. 18, 2022 from 10 a.m. to noon

How to join: https://bit.ly/3GbeDcV

Meeting ID: 160 790 0786

Passcode: 598499

One tap mobile +16692545252,,1607900786#,,,,598499# US (San Jose)

  • Medicaid Migration to the Marketplace

When: Jan. 20, 2022 from 10 a.m. to noon

How to join: https://bit.ly/3qLBW6l

Meeting ID: 161 725 2401

Passcode: 181655

One tap mobile +16692545252,,1617252401#,,,,181655# US (San Jose)

Public comments are welcome. Comments should be submitted by Friday, Jan. 21 at 11:59 p.m. by completing the form at https://go.usa.gov/xtxt6.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the Marketplace Community Conversations webpage at https://go.usa.gov/xtxt6.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (live captions)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Dawn Shaw, 503-951-3947, Dawn.Shaw@DCBS.Oregon.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


New Gresham ODHS trauma-informed building opens January 2022 (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/10/22 12:35 PM
Entry way for the new OPDHS Building in Gresham
Entry way for the new OPDHS Building in Gresham
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/973/151443/thumb_IMG_3078.JPG

The new Oregon Department of Human Services trauma-informed building in Gresham is expected to open this month, January 2022. 

Child Welfare Division offices in the new building are expected to be open January 24. Self-Sufficiency Programs offices are expected to be open January 31.   

The three story, 96,000 square-foot building, located at 635 S.E. 223rd Avenue, will house Child Welfare and Self-Sufficiency Programs There will also be conference rooms available for community meetings. The addition of ODHS programs brings more access to anti-poverty resources to this community. 

The trauma-informed design creates a physical environment that promotes a sense of safety and calm for the children, adults, and families we serve as well as ODHS staff. Trauma-informed design helps visitors and staff have a positive experience in our building. Research has shown that environments can increase or reduce our stress levels. 

Some of the design features include: quiet areas that respect the privacy of people; outside seating; the type of art on the walls will selected to help reduce stress and bring a feeling of connection and an open plaza outside the building will have a bioswale watered from the roof’s rainwater runoff. A little bridge will cross the bioswale.  

 

 

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Attached Media Files: News release in Spanish , Entry way for the new OPDHS Building in Gresham , New ODHS Gresham Building, SE 223rd Avenue

Oregon Department of Human Services to preview priorities for the 2022 Legislative Session during Jan. 14 webinar
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/10/22 10:29 AM

The public is invited to join Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) leaders online for a preview of the ODHS’ priorities for the 2022 Oregon Legislative Session. This year’s priorities are centered on the ODHS’ commitment to equity and supporting human potential. 

ODHS 2022 legislative priorities include requests to improve equity in service delivery; responding to emergencies and disasters; and to strengthen staffing to meet the growing demand for ODHS services. A presentation will be followed by a questions-and-answers session.

ODHS Community Briefing: 2022 Legislative Session Preview

Date: Friday, Jan. 14, 2021

Time: 9 to 10 a.m. PST

How: Online participation only. Pre-registration is required. Register online now

Accessibility: ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided. A link for live captioning will be provided prior to the event.

About the Oregon Department of Human Services

The mission of the Oregon Department of Human Services is to help Oregonians in their own communities achieve wellbeing and independence through opportunities that protect, empower, respect choice and preserve dignity. 

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OSP Fish & Wildlife Division seeking public assistance in Geese and Duck poaching- Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/10/22 9:55 AM
2022-01/1002/151436/Geese.JPG
2022-01/1002/151436/Geese.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1002/151436/thumb_Geese.JPG

On January 6, 2022, Grants Pass Parks & Recreation contacted the Oregon State Police to report that a deceased goose had been located in a suitcase at Riverside Park in Grants Pass. Previous incidents have occurred at Riverside Park and Baker Park involving both geese and ducks shot and disposed of in a garbage bag. All of the birds were left to waste. 

OSP is seeking anyone with information regarding this case to call the Oregon State Police Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email at TIP@state.or.us. Reference case #SP22004647.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1002/151436/Geese.JPG , 2022-01/1002/151436/Geese_2.JPG

OHA Lifts Enrollment Restriction on Trillium in Tri-County Area
Oregon Health Authority - 01/10/22 8:27 AM

January 10, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt (503)383-6079

OHA Lifts Enrollment Restriction on Trillium in Tri-County Area

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) notified Trillium Community Health Plan (Trillium) last week that due to progress made on its corrective action plan, the coordinated care organization could begin enrolling members in the Tri-County area again. Trillium had been suspended from enrolling new members in December 2021, due to continued non-compliance with provisions of the corrective action plan.

OHA noted that Trillium had made sufficient progress on portions of the following findings of non-compliance in the corrective action plan, though certain actions within the findings remain open.

Read the letter OHA sent to Trillium.

Read the appendix to the letter, summarizing the action plan steps.

Background:

Trillium was placed on a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) in September of 2020, concurrent with its entry into the Tri-County service area. The CAP was imposed after Trillium’s failure to adequately address OHA’s concerns around the plan’s expansion into the Tri-County service area. The CAP was comprised of four main finding areas: network development, health equity & language access, community engagement, and intensive care coordination (ICC). Between October 2020 and February 2021, Trillium and OHA collaborated to develop action areas sufficient to address OHA’s concerns regarding each of the four CAP findings.

In a Nov. 1, 2021 Notice, OHA notified Trillium of continued non-compliance with minimal progress towards correcting the violations set forth in the Sep. 2, 2020 Notice. The CAP was extended for an additional period of at least six months (through March 2022). OHA elected to impose additional Sanctions until Trillium resolved the violations set forth in the Nov. 1, 2021 Notice. Effective Dec. 1, 2021, OHA suspended all new enrollment, including automatic enrollment, in Trillium’s Tri-County service area. The Nov. 1, 2021 Notice outlined the CAP findings requiring resolution within three (3) months of issuance.

About coordinated care organizations

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.

# # #


Quedan cinco días para inscribirse en la cobertura de salud para 2022, ¡aún hay ahorros disponibles! El plazo para inscribirse en la cobertura médica para 2022 a través de CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov es el 15 de enero. (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/10/22 3:00 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1073/151414/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

Salem, Ore. – 142,783 personas en Oregon se han inscrito en la cobertura de salud a través del Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon al 15 de diciembre de 2021. Todavía hay tiempo para inscribirse si aún no ha tomado acción. La fecha límite para obtener cobertura médica con ayuda financiera es el 15 de enero de 2022.

La Ley del Plan de Rescate Americano (2021) ha hecho que los seguros médicos comprados a través del Mercado sean más asequibles que nunca. Las personas y las familias pagarán solo un cierto porcentaje de sus ingresos en el seguro médico gracias a la ayuda financiera disponible a través de CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov.

“Incluso si cree que gana demasiado dinero, debe analizar sus opciones de cobertura médica a través del Mercado”, dice Chiqui Flowers, administradora del Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon. “Las reglas de elegibilidad han cambiado y hemos escuchado que muchas personas se sorprenden al ver cuánto pueden ahorrar ahora en cobertura médica”.

Todos los habitantes de Oregon, ya sean sin seguro, inscritos en COBRA o inscritos directamente a través de una compañía de seguros, deben revisar las opciones de cobertura a través del Mercado, incluso si no eran elegibles anteriormente. Más del 75 por ciento de las personas que se inscribieron en 2021 recibieron ayuda financiera para planes que incluyen beneficios esenciales como visitas al médico, medicamentos recetados, atención de emergencia y servicios de salud mental.

  • Una pareja de 40 y tantos años en el área de Portland que gana $70.000 puede obtener cobertura médica por tan solo $300 por mes.
  • Un joven de 26 años que viva en Eugene y gane $28.000 por año puede obtener cobertura médica por tan solo $1 por mes.
  • Unos padres que tienen 30 y tantos años y dos hijos en La Grande que ganan $80.000 pueden obtener cobertura médica por tan solo $145 por mes.

Los habitantes de Oregon pueden obtener una vista previa de los planes y ahorros disponibles para ellos si responden algunas preguntas breves en CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov. El sitio web también es el mejor lugar para encontrar expertos en seguros médicos que puedan brindar ayuda personalizada con la solicitud y el proceso de inscripción por teléfono, correo electrónico o en persona. Visite CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov o llame al 855-268-3767 hoy para comenzar.

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El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon, una parte del gobierno estatal, ayuda a las personas a obtener seguro médico cuando no tienen cobertura basada en el trabajo y no califican para el Plan de Salud de Oregon u otro programa. El Mercado es el socio a nivel estatal de CuidadoDeSalud.gov. Para obtener más información, visite CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Five days left to enroll in health coverage for 2022, savings still available!:Deadline to enroll for 2022 health coverage through OregonHealthCare.gov is Jan. 15 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/10/22 3:00 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1073/151412/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

Salem, Ore. – 142,783 people in Oregon have enrolled in health coverage through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace as of Dec. 15, 2021. There is still time to enroll if you have not yet taken action. The deadline to get health coverage with financial help is Jan. 15, 2022. 

The American Rescue Plan Act (2021) has made health insurance purchased through the Marketplace more affordable than ever. Individuals and families will pay only a certain percentage of their income on health insurance thanks to financial help available through OregonHealthCare.gov. 

“Even if you think you make too much money, you should look into your health coverage options through the Marketplace,” says Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Eligibility rules have changed and we have heard many people are surprised to see how much they can save on health coverage now.” 

Every Oregonian, whether uninsured, enrolled in COBRA, or enrolled directly through an insurance company, should look into Marketplace coverage, even if they were not previously eligible. More than 75 percent of people who signed up in 2021 received financial help for plans that include essential benefits such as doctor visits, prescriptions, emergency care, and mental health services.

  • A 40-something couple in the Portland area making $70,000 can get health coverage for as low as $300 per month.
  • A 26-year-old living in Eugene making $28,000 per year can get health coverage for as low as $1 per month.
  • Parents who are 30-something and have two children in La Grande earning $80,000 can get health coverage for as low as $145 per month.

Oregonians can preview plans and savings available to them by answering a few short questions at OregonHealthCare.gov. The website is also the best place to find a health insurance experts who can give one-on-one help with the application and enrollment process by phone, email, or in person. Visit OregonHealthCare.gov today to get started. 

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov. For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo