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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Apr. 25 - 8:51 am
Tue. 04/24/18
PSA - Spring forest burning is planned to reduce risk of summer wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/24/18 5:33 PM

Start date: April 24, 2018

Kill date: May 31, 2018

30-sec. PSA - # 1

Each spring, forest landowners prevent fires by starting fires. Controlled burns reduce hazardous woody debris. That way, when summer comes there is less fuel to feed wildfires. These spring burns are carefully planned to limit smoke entering communities. In contrast, weather patterns during the summer often hold wildfire smoke close to the ground for many days. Learn more about controlled burning from the Oregon Department of Forestry website.

30-sec. PSA - # 2

Last year’s bad wildfire season has passed. Along with the flames and destruction, Oregonians suffered through weeks of thick smoke. This spring, forest landowners are conducting controlled burns to clean up excess woody debris. Burning when weather conditions are right limits smoke entering communities. It also reduces the risk of high-intensity wildfires later on. Learn more about controlled burning from the Oregon Department of Forestry website.


Wapato Students Plan Community Clean-up
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 04/24/18 3:42 PM

Hi all,

Attached is a release regarding a community clean-up event Wapato High School students will embark on this Thursday afternoon.

It should make for some good visuals if you have an interest in coming out to cover it as a story.

I will not be in the District on Thursday, the contact person the day of the event would be Kathleen Brown.  She is one of our high school teachers and taking the lead in organizing the clean up.  She is aware I’m sending out a press release and is prepared if any of you have an interest in learning more about the clean-up or want to come out the afternoon of the event.

If you think you may come out to give it some coverage please shoot me an email just so I have a heads ups.  I will be checking email and be available on my cell phone.

My contact number as well as one for Ms. Brown is on the release.

Thanks

 

                                  

 

 




Attached Media Files: Wapato Students Plan Community Clean-up

OHA amends 2018 CCO capitation rates
Oregon Health Authority - 04/24/18 3:35 PM

Media availability: Laura Robison, OHA’s chief financial officer and Chelsea Guest, OHA’s manager of actuarial services, will be available to answer questions at 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 25. To participate, please call 877-873-8017 and enter the participant code 8257371.

http://bit.ly/2FduRBW

April 24, 2018

OHA amends 2018 CCO capitation rates

The Oregon Health Authority has amended and finalized 2018 capitation rates for coordinated care organizations (CCOs). These rates are the per-member-per-month amounts the state pays CCOs to coordinate health care for nearly 1 million Oregonians on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid).

The adjustment will result in an average net payment of $427.70 per month for each member, which is $8.04 more than the initial 2018 rate, and $21.49 more than the average per-member-per month payment in 2017, an increase of 5.3 percent.

“OHA set 2018 rates last fall, but we committed to review the impact of recent eligibility renewals and update rates, if needed,” said Laura Robison, OHA’s chief financial officer. “The majority of the increase is driven by the impact of these renewals.”

The amended rates also include the 1.5 percent managed care tax and the reduction of Health Share of Oregon's rates due to the February 1 transition of FamilyCare members to Health Share of Oregon. As of February 1, Health Share of Oregon’s average rate decreased by 0.6 percent due to the member transition, reflecting the lower average health risk of FamilyCare’s members relative to Health Share of Oregon’s existing members.

CCOs' capitation payments are divided into 12 rate categories. The rates take into account the average cost for members in these specific categories. For example, the state pays CCOs more for members who are disabled than it does for children because members who are disabled generally have higher health care costs.

Why did renewals increase the CCO capitation rates?

After Cover Oregon failed in 2014, the state received permission from the federal government to hold off on annual Medicaid renewal reviews until it could implement a new renewal system. The state implemented the new Oregon Eligibility (ONE) system in late 2016 and completed renewal reviews for the final group of cases in August 2017.

During this effort OHA determined that more than 67,000 members were still eligible for Medicaid benefits, but more than 47,000 no longer qualified, either because they didn’t meet the income criteria or because they didn’t respond to the state's letters requesting additional information.

On average, CCOs had been spending less on these members because they were healthier and needed fewer services. This shift in the CCO membership left fewer healthy members in the system to compensate for the higher costs of less-healthy members who continued to qualify for Medicaid.

“The rate-setting process already accounts for natural fluctuations in the Medicaid market," Robison said. "But we needed to make an adjustment because such a large number of members were deemed ineligible at one time.”

“We don’t expect this to be an issue going forward, as we have finished the renewal eligibility work and the ONE system reviews Medicaid eligibility annually,” added Robison.

Since 2012 Oregon has avoided $2.2 billion in Medicaid costs through the coordinated care system and other health system reforms. A recent independent evaluation of the first five years of Oregon’s Medicaid waiver found Oregon’s health reforms lowered per-member costs compared to Washington’s Medicaid program.

“Now that enrollment has stabilized, we look forward to working with our CCO partners to build on Oregon’s success in reducing health care costs," Robison said. "We want to use the lessons we’ve learned in the first five years of health system transformation to further improve the quality of care and meet our cost-saving targets.”

A full breakdown of final amended 2018 CCO rates is on the OHA website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/OHPRates/2018-Aggregate-CCO-Rate-Comparison.pdf

Additional information is available on the OHA website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/OHP-Rates.aspx

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Oregon Parks and Recreation Department seeks candidates for Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/24/18 2:30 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting applications for a seat on the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC). The ideal candidate will have experience in community engagement—especially to underserved groups or communities—and have an interest in trail planning and recreational trail opportunities on the Oregon coast.

Qualified candidates must submit an appointment interest form by June 1. The form is available online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/2017_ORTAC_Interest_Form.pdf

ORTAC advises OPRD and its allies on subjects related to the development and promotion of high quality, non-motorized recreational trail systems throughout Oregon. The council strives to create safe, sustainable trails for the well-being and enjoyment of Oregon’s residents and visitors.

Council members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission and serve four-year terms. The seven-member council has representation from each congressional district, with at least two members from separate counties bordering the coast. ORTAC conducts four public meetings per year.

In addition to advising OPRD, council members are responsible for reviewing applications for state trail designations, representing ORTAC on a variety of other trail-related committees and helping develop the 10-year statewide Trails Plan.

For more information about serving on ORTAC, contact David Stipe at 503-509-4752 or david.stipe@oregon.gov.


Open House to Plan Drollinger Park Amenities (Photo)
City of Richland - 04/24/18 1:07 PM
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Residents living near Drollinger Park in Richland are invited to an open house at the park on Saturday, May 5, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. to provide input and help choose future park amenities.  

Richland Parks and Public Facilities began development of the park in 2014 with irrigation and turf, and in 2017 with trees planted during the annual Arbor Day event. The next phase includes choosing park amenities and playground equipment and staff wants your help.

Drollinger Park is a neighborhood park located off of the Bypass Highway and Duportail. The address is 460 Tanglewood Drive.

For more information, visit https://bit.ly/2J7pnuC, call 942-7463 or email d@ci.richland.wa.us">ppinard@ci.richland.wa.us.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5957/113852/drollinger_park_new.jpg

Grandview school to celebrate Arbor Day with tree planting ceremony
Grandview Sch. Dist. - 04/24/18 12:30 PM

With National Arbor Day fast approaching, the more than 600 students who attend McClure Elementary School are stepping up to help make a difference.

On Friday, April 27, the students, along with their teachers and other school staff members, will celebrate Arbor Day by planting 11 trees around the school playground. Students chose to scatter the trees throughout the playground to help bring more shade to the area as the trees grow.

Principal Elyse Walker has been working hard to ensure the students understand the importance of what they are doing and the impact they can have on their school and their community.

On Friday, April 13, students, staff and school supporters were asked to bring a one-dollar donation to go toward the purchase of the trees. That event helped raise nearly $700, which helped buy several flowering pear trees and three different types of maple trees. The fundraising push also helped give students ownership of the project. They know the money they raised helped purchase the trees they are helping plant.

The school’s Arbor Day celebration will begin at 9:30 a.m. on Friday, April 27, in the McClure Elementary School gym with a presentation by Grandview Mayor Norm Childress and Parks and Recreation Director Mike Carpenter.

Then at 10 a.m., all of the students, teachers and staff will move outside where students will be divided into smaller groups to help plant the new trees. Walker said during the planting the students will learn how to plant trees and role trees play in our environment.


New Medicare cards are coming: what beneficiaries need to know
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/24/18 10:38 AM

(Salem) – Oregonians with Medicare coverage will be issued a new card from the federal government by the end of June. Each person’s new card will have a unique Medicare number, instead of a Social Security number, to prevent fraud and identity theft. Medicare coverage and benefits will stay the same.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will automatically mail the new cards, at no cost, to each beneficiary's address on file with Social Security. 

Here’s what Oregonians on Medicare can expect, and what they should know:
•    Make sure Social Security has your current address. You can update your address online by signing in to or creating a “my Social Security” account at ssa.gov. 
•    Don’t worry if you get your new card before or after friends or family members here in Oregon or in other states. The cards are being sent on a variety of dates to prevent mail theft.
•    When your new Medicare card arrives, destroy the old one. Do it in a secure manner, such as shredding it.
•    Doctors, other health care providers, and plans approved by Medicare know that Medicare is replacing the old cards. They should be ready to accept your new card when you need care.
•    Even people with a Medicare plan through a private insurance company, also known as a Medicare Advantage plan, will get a new Medicare card from the federal government. Keep it in a safe place, but continue to use the member card your insurance company sent you. 
•    Beware of people contacting you about your new Medicare card and asking you for your Medicare number, personal information, or to pay a fee for your new card. Protect your Medicare number like you treat your Social Security or credit card numbers. Remember, Medicare will never contact you uninvited to ask for your personal information.

More information is available at go.medicare.gov/newcard. Oregonians also can contact the state’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program with questions. SHIBA’s phone number is 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free), and the line is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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Oregon SHIBA is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.


FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Medicare Card Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/24/18 10:00 AM
New Medicare Card
New Medicare Card
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113830/thumb_New_Medicare_Card.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against Medicare card fraud schemes.

Over the years, we have constantly warned people to protect their Social Security number. Don’t give it out unless you have to, and don’t carry your card in your wallet. That’s good advice – but if you have Medicare, then it was good advice that was hard to follow since your Medicare card had your Social Security number right on it.

Help is on the way! Medicare is now changing out all of its beneficiaries’ cards and replacing that Social Security number with an 11-character “Health Insurance Claim Number.” This new card will be paper instead of plastic, and the ID on it will include randomly-generated numbers and uppercase letters. Medicare’s goal is to better protect private health care and financial information with this new system. This new Medicare number will be used for transactions such as billing and for the checking of eligibility and claim status.

The first of the new cards are going out in the mail starting this month, but it could take some time to get them all out – so don’t worry if your neighbor gets hers right away but yours takes a bit of time. It’s important to note that if you are part of a Medicare Advantage plan, you will continue to have that separate card as well. You should carry both with you to facilitate service from health care providers.

Of course, with a new system there are always scam artists looking for ways to cash in. If you receive a call, email or visit from someone asking for personal information about your Medicare number or plan, about your new card or about your Social Security number, it is likely a scam. Medicare will never call you uninvited and ask you for personal information to get a new card. You do not have to pay for the new card, either. As long as your address is up-to-date, Medicare will send this replacement version automatically.

Another potential twist on this scam: seniors who are told they have a refund due on their old card, which the caller is happy to process as soon as he gets your bank account information. Don’t fall for it!

Here’s what you need to remember:

  • The new card is free – there is no replacement fee or activation fee. Do not pay anyone who says you owe money for the new card.
  • Do not give out personal information, including your Social Security number, to people who contact you unsolicited.
  • If someone calls and threatens to cancel your benefits because you do not yet have a new card, ignore them. Your Medicare benefits and coverage are not changing.
  • When you receive your new card, destroy the old one.
  • If you have any questions about your new card or unsolicited contacts you receive asking for your personal information, contact Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE. You can also find more information at www.medicare.gov/newcard.

Also, if you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, you can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Medicare audio file , New Medicare Card , TT - Medicare Card Tips

Ceremony will honor fallen Oregon workers April 27
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/24/18 9:10 AM

(Salem) – It’s a day to remember those who died on the job. It’s a day to grieve with families, friends, and communities. It’s a day to renew our responsibility to create and maintain safe and healthy workplaces. Oregon workers who died on the job will be honored with a ceremony Friday, April 27, at noon in Salem. The state’s Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) and the Oregon AFL-CIO invite all Oregonians to attend the Workers Memorial Day observance.

The event will take place at the Fallen Workers Memorial outside the Labor and Industries Building, 350 Winter St. NE, on the Capitol Mall. The memorial service, coordinated by the Oregon AFL-CIO, will feature remarks from State Rep. Teresa Alonso Leon and Elana Pirtle-Guiney, workforce and labor policy advisor to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown.

The ceremony will include the reading of the names of Oregon workers who died on the job in 2017.

“We must continually renew our efforts to seek stronger safety and health protection and improve standards and enforcement so that we can prevent tragedies like these in the future,” said Gov. Brown.

“Oregon’s workers make significant sacrifices every day to serve their communities and their state,” Alonso Leon said. “I am honored to be reading the names of our fallen workers to recognize those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for us all. As a legislator, I am committed to serving Oregonians and their families to ensure that they are safe and healthy in the workplace.”

Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood and Oregon AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Byrd will also be among the event speakers.

Oregon workplaces are safer today than in previous decades. Yet, there are still far too many preventable on-the-job deaths each year.

“On Workers Memorial Day, we mourn fallen workers and members of the armed services who died in the line of work and duty,” said Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain. “Through that mourning, we will reinvigorate our commitment to fight as hard as we can for the living by making sure Oregon's workers are getting the right gear, the right training, and the right precautions to do their jobs as safely as possible.”

Through a partnership of labor, business, and government working together to bolster on-the-job safety and health, Oregon’s fatality and injury and illness rates have steadily declined for decades.

Nevertheless, there is room for improvement.

“Each name that will be read during Workers Memorial Day tells a story of dreams lost, of family, friends, and co-workers grieving the untimely death of a friend or loved one,” Wood said. “And each story is a reminder that we must strengthen our efforts to fully confront the risks of death in our workplaces, and to identify and eliminate their causes.”

The annual Workers Memorial Day serves as a nationwide day of remembrance. It recognizes the thousands of U.S. workers who die each year on the job and the more than 1 million people in the U.S. who are injured each year at work. The observance is traditionally held on April 28 because Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act on that date in 1970.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

The Oregon AFL-CIO is the statewide federation of affiliated unions, representing over 300,000 working Oregonians.  Learn more at www.oraflcio.org.

 


Marine Law Enforcement Academy Training May 8 through May 10 on Hagg Lake (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 04/24/18 8:51 AM
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The Oregon State Marine Board will be conducting marine law enforcement training in Forest Grove between May 1 and May 10, with the last three days (May 8-10) spent on nearby Henry Hagg Lake in Washington County.  This training is for new or seasonal marine law enforcement officers who are new to boating laws, boat handling and water safety fundamentals. 

This in-depth training encompasses boating law, navigation skills, knot tying, theft, patrol strategies, and even jumping into the deep end of the swimming pool with full utility gear on.  “The pool training is eye-opening for some of the students,” said Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager.  “Last year, one officer went right to the bottom of the pool, pulled the cord to inflate his life jacket, and nothing happened. The CO2 canister wasn’t quite screwed in all the way.  He was able to return to the surface, but with the additional weight, was heavily winded.  It’s a cautionary tale for all boaters to make sure gear is serviced and ready to go.”  Henry notes that divers and extra staff are on hand to ensure student safety.

The training also covers accident investigation and detecting and apprehending operators boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII). At Hagg Lake, students will develop basic boat handling skills and participate in real-world scenarios that emphasize safety, courtesy, enforcement tactics, and accident prevention.   

This academy is hosted by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, along with highly skilled deputies from around the state taking an active role as instructors.  Pool sessions will be conducted at the Forest Grove City Aquatic Center, 2300 Sunset Drive, in Forest Grove.

For more information about the Marine Board’s partnership with marine law enforcement, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/4139/113841/MLEA2018.jpg

Mon. 04/23/18
Oregon Department of Forestry prepares for 2018's wildfires with seasonal hiring, contracting, training and technology (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/23/18 3:00 PM
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SALEM, Ore. — With smoke from the 2017 wildfires still fresh in the minds of Oregonians, the Oregon Department of Forestry is already gearing up for this summer’s wildfires.

The agency’s Interim Fire Operations Manager Blake Ellis said a lot of preparation goes on behind the scenes each winter and spring. “We work to ensure firefighters are equipped and ready to respond quickly and effectively to wildfires all year, with a special emphasis on being staffed and ready for the drier months,” said Ellis. ” We essentially double our firefighting forces going into the summer, when wildfire risk is highest.”

Readiness activities include:

  • Contracts and agreements for firefighting equipment, aircraft and other resources have been signed
  • A new policy governing use of remotely piloted aerial vehicles (also known as drones or UAVs) has been adopted. These systems will support fire protection and natural resource management.
  • Hiring of seasonal firefighters is underway. New firefighters will attend training at ODF and interagency fire schools across the state in June.
  • Permanent and returning firefighters will take fire line refresher training over the next two months.
  • Hundreds of miles of fire hose have been cleaned and rolled, ready for use statewide.

Last year ODF had great success testing out infrared technology. Carried on aerial vehicles, the equipment was able to see through heavy smoke on two Oregon wildfires – Horse Prairie and Eagle Creek. These systems provide sharp images and real-time fire mapping for fire managers, boosting safety and tactical planning. This year ODF is incorporating these technologies into its toolkit.

ODF’s Aviation Manager Neal Laugle said the increasing use of various types of aircraft in recent years highlights the importance of keeping up with new technology to achieve the agency’s mission. “From detection to fire mapping and active wildfire suppression, aircraft continue to play a critical role in the fight to save lives, resources and property,” said Laugle.

Last year, contracted aircraft flew 1,477 hours on firefighting missions for ODF, more than 100 hours above average, he said. For 2018 the agency has contracted the same number of aircraft as last year.

“We have 27 aircraft based across the state, including helicopters, fixed-wing detection planes, single-engine air tankers and a large airtanker, all of which we’ve secured for our exclusive use. We also have call-when needed agreements with a number of companies for additional firefighting aircraft. Among these agreements is one for the use of a 747 modified to carry 19,000 gallons of retardant should the situation warrant.”

ODF will continue to have access to aviation resources from other states and federal agencies upon request.

“Uncontrolled fires can be devastating. Our relationships with our partners are invaluable to support prevention and suppression efforts statewide," said Ellis.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1072/113822/Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_daisies_+_hand_crew_photo_(39).JPG

DPSST Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/23/18 2:09 PM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 23, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on May 2, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes Meeting Minutes Meeting
Approve Minutes of February 7, 2018 Meeting

3.  ORS 183.405-Five Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted Informational Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010, 259-008-0070, 259-009-0070, 259-020-0200, 259-060-0300 and 259-061-0300; Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Admin Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Brooks, Debbie DPSST #33906 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Telecommunicator Certifications and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certification; Lane County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Stolt, Jennifer DPSST #42217 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Junction City Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Tobin, Kenneth DPSST # 21784 – Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications; Willamette Valley Communication Center

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Staff Update

10. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting
Wednesday, August 1, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

Background Information ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Be aware of harmful algae blooms this summer
Oregon Health Authority - 04/23/18 1:42 PM

April 23, 2018

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-522-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Be aware of harmful algae blooms this summer

Increasing temperatures create potential for toxins in water

As summer approaches, the Oregon Health Authority is reminding outdoor enthusiasts to be alert for harmful algae blooms when recreating in Oregon lakes, rivers and reservoirs.

Most blooms are harmless but under the right conditions some can produce toxins capable of causing illness in people and animals.

If toxin levels are above OHA guideline values for human health, the agency issues a health advisory warning people to stay out of affected water to avoid illness. This year after evaluating current research, OHA is reducing the toxin guideline values to further protect the public. Although this change should not affect the number of advisories that may be issued, it could affect the length of time an advisory is in place. This is because it may take longer for toxins to drop below these reduced values.

Since only a fraction of Oregon’s fresh waters are monitored, OHA advises people to stay out of the water if it looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint and pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red in color. Exposure to toxins can cause skin rash, diarrhea, cramps, vomiting, numbness, dizziness and fainting. Children and pets are most vulnerable to illness due to their size and level of activity. Note that OHA guideline values are for human health; animals are much more sensitive than people. Within hours of being exposed to extremely low levels of the toxin, dogs can become gravely ill and even die.

Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people with skin sensitivities can develop a rash when wading, playing or swimming in or around a bloom. More serious symptoms occur when water is swallowed while swimming, or through inhalation of water droplets via high-speed activities such as water-skiing.

By being aware of signs of a bloom and taking proper precautions when a bloom is suspected, people can continue to visit their favorite lake, river or reservoir and enjoy water activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is also safe when speeds do not create excessive water spray.

To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, you can visit the Harmful Algae Bloom website at healthoregon.org/hab or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

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**Update** Fatal Stabbing in Wolf Creek (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/23/18 9:58 AM
Josephine County Jail
Josephine County Jail
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Update

The victims have been identified as 64 year old Kevin MATTHEWS and 55 year old Helen MATTHEWS, both from Grants Pass.  Kevin MATTHEWS was deceased at the scene and Helen MATTHEWS was transported to Three Rivers Medical Center with non-life threatning injuries, where she was treated and released.

An additional charge of Assault in the Fourth Degree was added to WINN, who remains lodged at the Josephine County Jail.

End of Update

On April 20, 2018 at approximately 9:15 p.m., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a reported fatal stabbing in the Wolf Creek area of Jospehine County. 

Law enforcement responded and found the suspect, Kyle L. Winn (age 32 from the Grants Pass area) , had barricaded himself in a nearby residence. The Oregon State Police SWAT team responded to area. Winn was taken into custody, without incident, at 3:00 a.m. 

The victim was an adut male who Winn had just met on April 20, 2018. His name will be released at later time. The case is still under investigation. 

Winn was lodged at the Jospehine County Jail for Murder and a outstanding felony warrant for probation violation. 

Oregon State Police was assisted from Grants Pass Department of Public Safety. 

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Attached Media Files: Josephine County Jail

Sun. 04/22/18
Fatal Crash Highway 212 -- Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 10:28 PM
2018-04/1002/113802/HWY_212_Crash_B.jpg
2018-04/1002/113802/HWY_212_Crash_B.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113802/thumb_HWY_212_Crash_B.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday afternoon’s fatal crash on Highway 212 and SE 130th Avenue near Happy Valley. 

On April 22, 2018 at about 4:58 p.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle crash involving a passenger car and a motorcycle. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver Kia Rio, operated by Uriy DUDKO, age 20, from West Plains MO, was stalled in the fast lane of Highway 212 heading eastbound.  A Honda B6S motorcycle operated by, Mitchell VANDOREN, age 25, from Milwaukie, was traveling eastbound on Highway 212 at a high rate of speed and hit the rear of the Kio Rio. 

DUDKO exited his vehicle to check the damage and then proceeded southbound onto SE 130th Ave. After going a short distance DUDKO again exited his vehicle to look at the crash scene. DUDKO again left the scene in his vehicle and was stopped by a Happy Valley Police Sergeant. DUDKO was arrested and lodged at Clackamas County Jail on Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver to injured persons. VANDOREN was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Investigators are looking at speed on VANDOREN’S part as a contributing factor in the crash. 

Highway 212 was closed  about 3 ½ hours for the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Happy Valley Police Department, Oregon Department of Transportation and Clackamas County Fire.

Photographs courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113802/HWY_212_Crash_B.jpg , 2018-04/1002/113802/Hwy_212_Crash_A.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 30 -- Clatsop County (Photo) -- County Correction
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 8:32 PM
2018-04/1002/113800/HWY_30_CRASH.jpg
2018-04/1002/113800/HWY_30_CRASH.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113800/thumb_HWY_30_CRASH.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday afternoon’s fatal crash on Highway 30 near Astoria. 

On April 22, 2018, at 1:48 PM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle crash on Highway 30 near milepost 94. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a maroon Chevrolet Tahoe, driven by Lori COURTWRIGHT,  age 43, from Warrenton, was eastbound when for an unknown reason crossed the double yellow centerline into the path of a westbound white Toyota Prius, driven by Douglas MORGAN, age 54, from Astoria.  The two vehicles collided nearly head-on. 

MORGAN died on scene as a result of the collision and COURTWRIGHT was taken to an air ambulance in Astoria and flown to a Portland area hospital with serious injuries. 

Highway 30 was closed for approximately three (3) hours for the investigation.  The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) provided traffic control and detour information to motorists.     

OSP was assisted on scene by John Day/Knappa Volunteer Fire Department, Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office, Astoria Police Department and ODOT.

Photograph courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113800/HWY_30_CRASH.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 237 -- Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 7:52 PM
2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg
2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113799/thumb_HWY_237_CRASH.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday morning’s double fatal crash on Highway 237 near Cove in Union County. 

On April 22, 2018 at 7:45 a.m., OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a rollover crash on Highway 237 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white Ford F350 pickup, operated by David GRAY, age 34, from Baker City, was traveling southbound on Highway 237 near milepost 16 when the pickup exited the highway via the right-hand shoulder for unknown reasons. The pickup traveled down an embankment and rolled at least once before coming to rest on its top in a creek.

GRAY and passenger, Casey WENDT, age 27, from Baker City, were extricated from the vehicle and were both pronounced deceased on scene.

Highway 237 was closed for approximately four hours.

OSP was assisted by Union County Sheriff's office, Cove Fire Department and La Grande Fire Department.

Photograph courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113799/HWY_237_CRASH.jpg

Assault Investigation - Sauvie Island Wildlife Area
Oregon State Police - 04/22/18 10:53 AM

The Oregon State Police (OSP) is asking for the public’s assistance in identifying an assault suspect.

On April 19, 2018, between noon and 3:00 PM, an adult male victim stated he was at Collins Beach #6 at the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area when he was approached by a nude male adult that was upset about the victim’s dog being off-leash. The victim stated that he was held down and punched repeatedly by the irate beach goer causing visible injury. The suspect has reportedly accosted others in the past regarding off-leash dogs on the wildlife area and is a regular at Collins Beach.

The suspect is described as a white male approximately 35-40 years old with a medium muscular build. The suspect is approximately 6’3” tall with a salt and pepper color crew cut hairstyle with a receding hairline.

OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers are continuing to investigate the assault and anybody with information on this suspect, including past encounters is asked to call the OSP Northern Command Center at OSP or email Trooper Joe Dezso at Joseph.Dezso@state.or.us.

No further information for release. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Sat. 04/21/18
Oregon National Guard participates in University of Oregon Spring Game (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 04/21/18 7:13 PM
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PHOTO CAPTIONS:

180421-A-VK948-001: Oregon Air National Guard F-15 Fighter Jets fly over Autzen Stadium prior to the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-002: University of Oregon ROTC cadets present the U.S. flag during a pre-game ceremony for the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-003: Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Alexander Wolf, with the 1186th Military Police Company, pauses for a photo with fans prior to the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game, April 21, at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180421-A-VK948-004: The Oregon National Guard Funeral Honors Team presents the U.S. flag during a ceremony at halftime during the University of Oregon Ducks Football Spring Game at Autzen Stadium, April 21, in Eugene, Oregon. Veterans from every branch of service participated in Military Appreciation Day activities during the game. (Photo by 1st Lt Jessica Clarke, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-004.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-003.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-002.jpg , 2018-04/962/113792/180421-A-VK948-001.jpg

Fri. 04/20/18
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/20/18 4:34 PM
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6250/113529/thumb_29497221_10155014247020882_2331831955106037760_n.jpg

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photos and PDFs Attached)

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 18, 2018 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018.

Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature. There will be a special dedication of one of the trees to a longtime GSOSW volunteer and special friend of Camp Arrowhead.

“Thousands and thousands of girls have built outdoor skills and made memories here,” says Allie Roberts, Outdoor Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Whether a girl attended camp for one summer or came back year after year, her time on this mountain had an impact. She learned to care for the environment here. She made lifelong friends here. She discovered her own strengths and leadership potential here. Those lessons last.”

That lasting impact will continue this summer, when more than 340 Girl Scouts will experience archery, climbing, canoeing, white water rafting, llama trekking, hikes up Dog Mountain and other outdoor adventures.

ARROWHEAD SPRING 2018 FAMILY/TROOP WORK PARTY—April 21, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]
On Saturday, April 21, 2018, more than 100 volunteers will help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the summer camp season. Activities will include cleaning, installing furniture, sweeping and more.

“More than 100 volunteers--Girl Scouts and their family members and friends--will work together to help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the Summer camp season,” says Eileen Skidmore, Volunteer with Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “This is a special place for many of us – 3 generations of my family have camped at Arrowhead and we love working to help preserve it.”

[Registration is now closed.]

CAMP ARROWHEAD 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—April 22, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]

WHO:          80+ community members, camp alumni, camp staff alumni, Girl Scouts and their family members and friends.

WHAT:        An event to commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, featuring slide shows, camp sing-alongs, tree-plantings and trail restoration as well as activities such as rock-climbing, archery, canoeing and hiking.

FOOD:       Sandwiches, salads, chips and refreshments will be provided and there will be cake for the celebration.

WHEN:      Sunday, April 22, 2018 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

WHERE:   Camp Arrowhead, Stevenson, WA 97648

[Registration is now closed.]

INTERESTED MEDIA—PLEASE R.S.V.P.

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s Director of Program, Sarah Brown, and Outdoor Program Manager, Allie Roberts, as well as Girl Scouts, Girl Scout alumna and volunteers, will be available on-site for media interviews at Camp Arrowhead on the day of the events (April 21-22, 2018).

Interested media should R.S.V.P. in advance by emailing communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

ABOUT CAMP ARROWHEAD
Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington, is open to all girls entering grades 1-12, no camping or Girl Scout experience required. Programs range from classic camp (swimming, campfires and cookouts) to specialty programs in water sports, hiking and trekking. Families can visit www.girlscoutsosw.org/camp to see available programs or sign up. Financial assistance is available.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps/camp_arrowhead.html

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary PRESS RELEASE 04 18 2018 , Program for GSOSW Earth DAy and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary 04 22 2018 , Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch_Alone , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch , Happy Earth Day GSOSW

Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/20/18 4:34 PM
GSOSW Campers
GSOSW Campers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6250/113742/thumb_Campers.jpg

Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 19, 2018 – This weekend, local Girl Scouts will roll up their sleeves and honor Earth Day by participating in service projects throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

“Through Girl Scouting, girls develop a lifelong respect and love for the Earth,” says Karen Hill, CEO of Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington. “Earth Day service projects, camping and other outdoor adventures with Girl Scouts help girls understand their relationship to the Earth, and the vital role they have in caring for it and conserving it for future generations.”

BEAVERTON, OR—Parks and Trails Preparation

Troop 40110 will help to inspect parks and trails throughout the Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District in order to identify areas that need attention before the summer season. Girl Scouts will also complete trash pickup during their inspections.

CLACKAMAS, OR—Cemetery Clean-Up

Girl Scout Service Unit 11 (Milwaukie, Clackamas and Gladstone, Oregon) will join SOLVE for Weekend Cemetery Clean Up at Clackamas Pioneer Cemetery in Clackamas, OR. Clean up will include debris, tree branches and blackberry removal and mulch spreading.

KLAMATH FALLS, OR—Clean-Up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail

Girl Scout Service Unit 65 (Klamath, Lake and Harney counties) will join SOLVE, along with other community organizations, to do litter clean-up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail in Klamath Falls. Girl Scouts will focus on the portion of the trail that spans from Washburn to Altamont.

SHERWOOD, OR—Garden Preparation and Spring Nature Mandala

Together with the Sherwood Rotary Club, members of Girl Scout Troop 45496 prepared and weeded the garden at the Our Table Cooperative. At 9 a.m. on the morning of April 22 (prior to an Earth Day Celebration), girls from Troop 45496 will create a spring nature mandala around the peace pole at Our Table Cooperative. Mandala-making is an ancient art form—traditionally, mandalas are bright and vibrant mosaics representing the universe, made from colored sand or rice. Nature mandalas, like those made by Troop 45496 will be made from found items including leaves, pine cones, shells, stones and flowers from the Girl Scouts’ own gardens. The Earth Day celebration at Our Table Cooperative takes place on April 22, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

UMATILLA, OR and PASCO, WAImproving Habitat at McNary National Wildlife Refuge

On April 21, Girl Scouts from Service Unit 22 (Gilliam, Morrow, Umatilla and Wheeler counties in OR) will work with the Army Corps of Engineers to clean-up a local pond in West Park, part of the McNary National Wildlife Refuge in the Columbia Basin, minutes from the Tri-Cities of Washington (Kennewick, Pasco and Richland, WA). Local Girl Scouts—from the Pendleton and Hermiston areas of Oregon—will plant Coyote Willows and Cottonwood trees, remove invasive Russian Olive trees, and help make the wildlife area more habitable for the many species of animals that live there. In addition, they will remove debris and rubbish around the wildlife park. Afterwards, the girls will get to travel to the Bechtel National Planetarium, at Columbia Basin College, in Pasco, WA, to hear a special presentation about the life of trees.

STEVENSON, WA—Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, Tree-Plantings and Trail Restoration

More than 80 Girl Scouts and their family members and friends will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018. Attendees are traveling from Englewood, CO; Boardman, OR; the Portland/Willamette Valley area; Westchester, CA; Seattle, WA; and Irrigon, OR to attend the celebration. Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s local outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps.html. Additional information about outdoor programming in Girl Scouts, including 34 outdoor skill-building badges, can be found at: https://www.girlscouts.org/en/our-program/our-program/outdoors.html.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day Service Projects Press Release , GSOSW Campers , Camp Arrowhead Fun Patch , Camp Arrowhead , Happy Earth Day Girl Scouts , Girl Scouts Fall Nature Mandala

Marine Board Teleconference Scheduled April 24
Oregon Marine Board - 04/20/18 3:37 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will be meeting via teleconference at 9 am on Tuesday, April 24.  The Board will be finalizing a legislative concept on the agency budget for the 2019 legislative session.

Members of the public are invited to attend the teleconference being facilitated at the Marine Board office, located at 435 Commercial St. NE, in Salem.  A public call-in option will not be available.   

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Marine Board Approves Boating Facility Grants, Other Items
Oregon Marine Board - 04/20/18 2:10 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board met in Salem on April 18, and approved a new rule for Lake Billy Chinook, corrected a prior meeting’s rule language error, approved Cycle Two boating facility grants and gave agency staff direction for their 2019-2021 budget and legislative fee concept. 

Chair Val Early announced at the beginning of the meeting that Member Cliff Jett (Rufus, OR) was stepping down from the Board.  Jett joined the Board in 2013 and was serving his second term.  Chair Early thanked him for all of his time and experience on the Board, as well as the on-the-ground representation he provided to eastern Oregon’s recreational boaters.  The Board hopes replace his seat with someone with as much wisdom and insights as Member Jett from the eastern Oregon.   

For the first two agenda items, the Board approved a slow-no wake zone within the Fly Creek Inlet on Lake Billy Chinook.  The Board also corrected language for the Foam Encapsulation rule that was mistakenly stricken during the March meeting and will allow for some types of non-treated wood. 

The Board also considered 20 boating facility grant requests.  Over $3.5 million in needs were identified with only $1.8 million available for 2017-2019 funding.  The needs exceed available funding by 3:1.  Grants were scored and ranked based on applicant matching funds, permit status, and the ability to complete a project within the biennium.  Several grant requests were excellent examples of what could be considered in the future under a proposed Waterway Access Program to improve access for paddlers; however, the priority for facility funding goes toward motorized boating access projects.

The following grants were approved:

  • Lane County Parks –Secure floating restroom on Siltcoos Lake with piles.  In June 2017, the floating restroom broke free of its moorings.  The Board approved $11,250 in federal Clean Vessel Act funds and $3,750 in state boater funds to match $3,250.60 in applicant match for a total project cost of $18,203.60.
  • City of Nyssa –Replace a broken pile to stabilize the dock at Nyssa River Park.  The City is also pursuing replacing the boat ramp and docks.  Because there are limited contractors in the area with the required equipment and capability to install piling, the cost for mobilization is higher than typically observed in more populated areas.  The City is committed to improving the facility for their community and offered a cash contribution to the project.  The Board approved $39,850 in state boater funds to match $8,000 in applicant match for a total project cost of $47,850.00.
  • Port of the Dalles –Replace the broken pumpout and port-a-potty dump station at the marina and add a monitoring system.  The nearest pumpout and dump stations are 20 miles upstream from the Port of Hood River and 55 miles downstream from the Port of Arlington on the Columbia River.  The Columbia River is the heaviest used waterbody in the state for recreational boaters.  The Board approved $15,000 in federal Clean Vessel Act funds to match $5,440 in applicant match for a total project cost of $20,400.   
  • Port of Coos Bay –Repair three of the existing boarding dock strings and replace rubstrips, wales and hinge connections at the Charleston Marina while replacement docks are being pursued.  The cost to replace the docks is estimated at $400,000 which is approximately a 20 percent increase as a result of the aluminum tariff and market volatility, therefore the Port will complete this project in phases.  Repairing the boarding docks will provide short term stability of the dock structure and will allow the Port to keep the docks operational.  The Board approved $38,801 in state boater funds to match $23,452 in applicant match for a total project cost of $62,253.
  • City of Gladstone –Assistance with permitting, design and engineering to dredge the channel for safe ingress and egress for the Meldrum Bar boat ramp.  A bathymetric survey showed the channel is shallowing due to increased shoaling creating a safety concern for boaters.  Dredging requires expertise and a variety of permits.  This will be the first phase of two, toward replacing the over 20-year old boarding docks.  The soonest the dredging work can be done is the fall of 2021.  The Board approved $30,000 in state boater funds to match $16,000 in applicant match for a project total of $46,000. 
  • Oregon Youth Conservation Corps –Maintenance assistance and job skills for youth crews in Lane and Clackamas Counties.  These opportunities for youth help save boating facilities money for maintenance, general repairs and site improvements while providing youth with valuable work experience.  The Board approved $27,183 in state boater funds to match $28,138 in applicant cash, materials, equipment and administration for a total project cost of $55,321.
  • City of Coquille –Replace existing boarding docks and short term tie-up docks at Sturdivant Park.  In 2015, the docks were damaged during a storm event which washed away the gangway and broke out an old creosote wood piling, making the dock unsafe.  The City has been diligently working to secure funding for the massive repairs needed.  The grant will help pay for replacing the existing boarding and short term tie-up docks with new aluminum docks and steel piles.  The City is also pursuing a grant through the Sport Fish Restoration Fund administered by ODFW to create a designated a section of the dock for fishing in an effort to reduce user conflict.  The Board approved $72,247.80 in state boater funds to match $458,752.20 in applicant match for a project total of $531,000.
  • Metro Parks – Fill the parking lot cracks with slurry seal, seal coat and add new striping for the parking lot at Chinook Landing.  These improvements will add to the useful life of the parking lot.  The Board approved $87,659.50 in state boater funds to match $29,519.50 in applicant match for a project total of $117,179.00.    
  • Douglas County Parks –Repair and overlay existing asphalt, install asphalt over gravel areas and install curbing and stripe the parking area at Amacher Park.  These improvements will help delineate traffic flow and better identify boat trailer and single car parking spaces to reduce user frustration caused by traffic flow.  The Board approved $80,000 in state boater funds to match $26,680 in applicant match for a project total of $106,680.
  • US Forest Service –Replace the boat ramp at Mason Dam to improve safety for boaters.  This project will be completed in phases due to water levels and the construction window for permitting.  The Marine Board has been in discussions with the Forest Service about improvements since 1997.  This site was identified by ODFW as a high priority for Sport Fish Restoration funding which reduces the amount of funds requested from the Marine Board.  The Board approved $92,500 in state boater funds to match $233,744 in applicant match for a project total of $326,244. 
  • City of Portland Parks and Recreation –Assistance with permitting to replace the boat ramp, boarding dock and pilings at the Swan Island boat ramp.  This project will be completed in phases: phase one, prepare and submit environmental permit applications to replace the boat ramp, docks and pilings; phase two, construction of the permitted items; and, phase three, future improvements to parking and sanitation..  There’s complexity to the project since the facility is in a Superfund site with a proposed sediment cap in some areas of the lagoon.  Staff recommended the City obtain a consultant to assist with the permitting phases and will assist the City and consultant with coordination of the in-water structure design and permit application process.  The Board approved $86,054.50 in state boater funds to match $200,794 in applicant match for a project total of $286,848.50.
  • South Wasco Parks and Recreation District –Replace the upper 75 feet of concrete for the South Pine Hollow boat ramp.  The Parks and Recreation District plan to replace both the north and south boat ramps in the future.  Replacing the upper portion of the south boat ramp will allow for safer access while the District secures funding for future site improvements.  The Board approved $34,900 in state boater funds to match $21,500 in applicant match for a project total of $56,400.           

During the remainder of the meeting, the Board discussed the agency’s budget and provided staff direction on a legislative concept for a voluntary cuts to agency programs in conjunction with a fee increase at a level that will have the least impact to motorized boat owners. 

For more details about the grant applications and meeting materials, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

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Oregon Non-Profit, Safety Compass, Presented with FBI Director's Community Leadership Award (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/20/18 12:57 PM
FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass
FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113585/thumb_2018_DCLA_photo_-_Safety_Compass_Esther_Nelson.jpg

On Friday, April 20, 2018, Christopher Wray presented Safety Compass with the FBI Director's Community Leadership Award for its service to victims of violence in Oregon. Receiving the award on behalf of Safety Compass was Esther Nelson, founder of the non-profit. This organization focuses much of its work on the women and children who are survivors of commercial sexual exploitation, and it runs programs in Washington, Clackamas and Marion counties. 

Safety Compass is able to provide direct services to survivors in addition to online support for families of missing and chronically exploited youth and adults, specialized training for professionals and community members, and advocacy as survivors work through the criminal and social service systems in our area.

"Our approach is the extend respect and free confidential advocacy services to commercial sexual exploitation survivors as they seek safety. We believe that instead of operating from a "rescue mentality" we exist to show up for survivors from a strengths-based posture; to listen, encourage, foster resilience, and believe in who they are as over-comers of difficult experiences. I am grateful to accept this award on behalf of the hard working staff and incredibly brave survivors I have the privilege of working alongside every day at Safety Compass, " said Esther Nelson, FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient.

Under Ms. Nelson’s direction, the staff and volunteers at Safety Compass demonstrate their commitment to survivors of violence every day with a promise to respect each victim’s unique background and set of experiences.  Another core belief of those who serve at Safety Compass is that people in need deserve a diverse community of social service providers, law enforcement and community leaders who are willing to work together to bring about real change. 

“The FBI’s partnership with Safety Compass is incredibly important to our shared responsibility of ensuring justice for those we both serve,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Sex trafficking is not something law enforcement can effectively address alone. Our collaboration with Ms. Nelson and Safety Compass allows us take a holistic approach to breaking that cycle of violence; we can work through the legal system while at the same time their counselors are helping survivors build a path forward.” 

About the Award

Every year, each of the FBI’s 56 field divisions chooses one person or organization to receive the Director’s Community Leadership Award. Each recipient must have shown a commitment to crime prevention or community service.

You can find out more about Safety Compass on its webpage at http://www.safetycompass.org




Attached Media Files: FBI Director Wray and Esther Nelson, Safety Compass

Fatal Crash Trans Pacific Highway -- Coos County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/20/18 12:47 PM
2018-04/1002/113772/Trans_Pacific_Highway.jpeg
2018-04/1002/113772/Trans_Pacific_Highway.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113772/thumb_Trans_Pacific_Highway.jpeg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s fatal crash on Trans Pacific Highway north of Coos Bay/North Bend. 

On April 20, 2018 at approximately 6:06 a.m., OSP troopers responded with the Coos County Sheriff's Office for a crash on Trans Pacific Highway near milepost 1.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a white Chevy Caprice, operated by Jourdan ACKERMAN, age 30, from North Bend, was traveling eastbound at a high rate of speed and left the roadway for unknown reasons.  After leaving the roadway the Chevy Caprice collided with a power pole and came to rest near the bay.  The crash resulted in the fatality of ACKERMAN.  The passengers in the Chevy Caprice were identified as Zane WOOD, age 18, from Coos Bay and Rebekah AARON, age 19, from North Bend.  Both WOOD and AARON received non-life threatening injuries and were transported by ambulance to Bay Area Hospital. 

Investigators are looking at speed as a contributing factor in the crash.  

The crash is being investigated in coordination with Coos County Interagency Crash Team with OSP as the primary investigating agency. 

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Myrtle Point Police Department, Coquille Police Department, North Bend Fire Department, North Bay Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, Coos County District Attorney’s Office and Pacific Power. 

Photo courtesy of OSP


### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113772/Trans_Pacific_Highway.jpeg

Break-in at BPA substation threatens power service, endangers employees
Bonneville Power Administration - 04/20/18 12:25 PM

PR 06-18

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 20, 2018
 

Portland, Ore. – Bonneville Power Administration security officials report that a recent break-in at the McNary Substation in Umatilla, Oregon, resulted in the theft of 29 copper ground wires. The substation is McNary Dam’s first point of integration to the region’s power grid. 

A BPA employee discovered the theft Monday morning during a routine inspection. Officials say the crime likely occurred over the weekend, between April 13 and 16. 

“This is a serious concern on several levels,” said Doug Dailey, BPA physical security specialist. “The number of copper grounds stolen creates a safety issue for our transmission employees and could have caused significant damage to equipment had it not been discovered.”

Officials say there was no interruption of power transmission and that they are evaluating the damage to determine what resources are needed to make necessary repairs.

The BPA Security Office is taking additional steps to further secure property, equipment and materials to minimize and prevent theft at other BPA facilities.

“We learned that this break-in is one of four similar incidents at utility substations in the area over the past couple of months,” said Dailey. “We are coordinating closely with local, state and federal law enforcement agencies. Additionally, our people have been checking other BPA substations near McNary to determine if any of those locations have been affected.” 

Anyone with information about the theft is encouraged to contact the Umatilla County Sheriff’s office at 541-966-3600.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 143 electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest.   www.bpa.gov


BLM Seeks Nominations to Resource Advisory Councils
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 04/20/18 9:56 AM

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced that it is seeking public nominations for positions on 30 citizen-based sounding boards for BLM initiatives, proposals, and policy changes.

Resource Advisory Councils (RACs) provide advice and recommendations for the BLM to consider on a range of resource and land management issues. The BLM maintains 37 such chartered advisory committees located in the West. Of those committees, 30 are RACs. Each Council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land management issues. Established by charter, RACs are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities that the agency serves.

"The BLM Resource Advisory Councils are an important forum for the community conversation that is a key component of public land management," said BLM State Director Jamie E. Connell. "By ensuring that RAC representation reflects a variety of perspectives, RAC members provide a valuable service to the Bureau by delving into issues and proposing solutions on a wide variety of land and resource uses issues."

Individuals may nominate themselves or others to serve on a Council. Nominees, who must be residents of the state or states where the RAC has jurisdiction, will be reviewed on the basis of their training, education, and knowledge of the Council’s geographic area. Nominees should also demonstrate a commitment to consensus building and collaborative decision-making. Letters of reference must accompany all nominations from any represented interests or organizations, a completed RAC application, and any other information that speaks to the nominee’s qualifications.

Each of the 30 RACs has different positions open in the following categories:

Category One – Public land ranchers and representatives of organizations associated with energy and mineral development, the commercial timber industry, transportation or rights-of-way, off-highway vehicle use, and commercial recreation.

Category Two – Representatives of nationally or regionally recognized environmental organizations, archaeological and historical organizations, dispersed recreation activities, and wild horse and burro organizations.

Category Three – Representatives of State, county, or local elected office; representatives and employees of a state agency responsible for the management of natural resources; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the RAC is organized, Alaska Natives as appropriate to the state of Alaska; representatives and employees of academic institutions who are involved in natural sciences; and the public-at-large.

The BLM administers 8 advisory councils and committees in Oregon and Washington. More information, including an Oregon/Washington RAC boundary map, can be found online at https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

As published in a notice in today’s Federal Register, the BLM will consider nominations for 45 days (until June 4, 2018).  Requests for more information, nominations and completed applications for RACs should be sent to the appropriate BLM personnel listed below:

Coastal Oregon RAC

Megan Harper, BLM Coos Bay District Office, 1300 Airport Lane, North Bend, OR 97459, 541-751-4353.

 

Eastern Washington RAC

Jeff Clark, BLM Spokane District Office, 1103 North Fancher Road, Spokane, WA 99212, 509-536-1297.

 

John Day-Snake RAC

Lisa Clark, BLM Prineville District Office, 3050 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754, 541-416-6864.

 

Northwest Oregon RAC

Jennifer Velez, BLM Northwest Oregon District Office, 1717 Fabry Road SE, Salem, OR 97306, 541-222-9241.

 

San Juan Islands National Monument Advisory Committee

Marcia de Chadenedes, BLM San Juan Islands National Monument Office,

P.O. Box 3, 37 Washburn Avenue, Lopez Island, Washington  98261, 360-468-3051.

 

Southeast Oregon RAC

Larisa Bogardus, BLM Lakeview District Office, 1301 S. G Street, Lakeview, OR 97630, 541-947-6237.

 

Southwest Oregon RAC

Christina Breslin, BLM Medford District Office, 3040 Biddle Road, Medford, OR 97504, 541-618-2371.

 

Steens Mountain Advisory Council

Tara Thissell, BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, OR  97738, 541-573-4519.

 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.


PACE Awards recognize Klamath County SD as Safety Star, others
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 04/20/18 8:55 AM

Six programs and two individuals were recognized Thursday during PACE Awards presentations. Debbie Laszlo, chair of the PACE Board of Trustees, presented the awards during the “PACE Day: Safe and Secure Schools” event in Salem.

The awards highlight significant contributions made in 2017 to the Property and Casualty Coverage for Education (PACE) program. PACE (pace.osba.org) is an insurance pool made up of roughly 300 Oregon member school districts, charter schools, education service districts (ESDs) and community colleges.

The Klamath County School District was recognized as the statewide Safety Star, selected from among all applicants. The award carries with it $5,000 from PACE to be used in a school safety improvement effort. Klamath won the award for its half-day active shooter drill. Over 500 people participated by acting as students in classrooms as more than 50 first responders fired blanks. The goal was to have staff experience an active shooter event so they could be better prepared for such a crisis.

Dave Harvey, PACE administrator, said Klamath County schools had exemplified PACE’s values by working together to keep students and staff safe.

“Nothing is more important to us than getting every child and every employee home safe, every day,” he said. “That requires a lot of planning from our members, and through the PACE Awards we can thank them for their hard work.”

Other awards included:

Outstanding programs – Clatskanie SD, which retrofitted all its lights to LED, saving money and reducing eye strain on students and staff; Seaside SD, for its monthly school safety contest for students, designed to reduce workers compensation claims; Springfield SD, for its risk evaluation of boiler and mechanical rooms, a continuous program that has identified and reduced safety hazards; Chemeketa CC, for its centralized Title IX compliance program, which assures compliance and standardizes practices; and InterMountain ESD, for its interest in door-locking systems.

Outstanding individuals – Tim Witcher, chief financial officer of the Clackamas ESD, for establishing a culture of caring, safety and wellness; and Michelle Brady, safety and emergency preparedness manager of the Hillsboro SD, for improved safety and compliance tracking and training.


Thu. 04/19/18
Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 04/19/18 4:41 PM

April 19, 2018

Contact: Jennifer Uhlman, 503-939-5267, .m.uhlman@state.or.us">jennifer.m.uhlman@state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup

When: April 20, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

The public may also attend by webinar or by conference call at 877-848-7030, participant code 695684. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6656206289436141313.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; reflections from March meeting; scope and work plan refresher; review draft conceptual framework; review draft criteria for measure recommendations; public comments open at 4:45 p.m.

Details: For more information including a full agenda, please visit the technical workgroup’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/KR-Health.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

# # #


Chess for Success celebrates 25 years with a Game Changer Luncheon (Photo)
Chess for Success - 04/19/18 3:53 PM
2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0200.jpg
2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0200.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1811/113746/thumb_IMG_0200.jpg

Portland, OR – Chess for Success is a non-profit organization that teaches chess to children in high-poverty schools. Chess for Success would like to announce the Game Changer Luncheon annual fundraiser on April 26th at the Hilton Portland. The doors will open at 11:30, with the program starting at 12:00 p.m. Business and community leaders from Portland and beyond will be in attendance to support and celebrate the 25th Anniversary.

The keynote speaker is Shemia Fagan. Thanks to great Oregon schools, Shemia was able to put herself through college and law school. Today, Shemia is running to represent East Portland in the Oregon Senate. When Shemia isn’t fighting for issues that matter to Oregonians, she’s polishing her 1991 Oregon State chess championship trophy and passing on the tradition of chess to her children.

Richard Meeker, President of City of Roses Media Company, and Founder of Willamette Week’s Give!Guide will emcee the event. With a special guest appearance by Guadalupe Guerrero, Superintendent of Portland Public Schools.

The mission of Chess for Success is to help children develop the skills necessary for success in school and in life through learning chess. During the 2017-2018 school year, Chess for Success reached over 3,800 students in 78 school clubs in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Chess for Success also organizes the state chess tournament, and a variety of other tournaments. To find out more information about Chess for Success or to buy tickets to the event, visit their website at www.chessforsuccess.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0200.jpg , 2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0165.jpg , Shemia Fagan

Grandview High School hires new head football coach
Grandview Sch. Dist. - 04/19/18 1:57 PM

This fall there will be a new captain at the helm of the Grandview High School football program. In June, current Kiona-Benton High School head football coach Darren Mezger will begin his career as a Grandview Greyhound.

Mezger has been hired as the new head football coach for Grandview High School. 

“We are very excited to have Coach Mezger lead our football program,” said GHS Athletic Director and Assistant Principal Scott Parrish. “He is going to be a great fit for our school and community, not only on the field but also in the classroom. We are fortunate to have someone with his enthusiasm and successful experience.”

Mezger has a long history with the sport. He played high school football at Mark Morris High School in Longview, graduating in 1997, then he played at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon.

Mezger also has more than a decade of coaching experience under his belt. He has been at the head of the Kiona-Benton football program for the past three years and before that he was assistant coach at Sunnyside High School for 10 years.

Mezger said he’s excited to be heading up Grandview’s football program and plans to bring his offensive philosophy to the field, a philosophy that broke rushing and passing records at Ki-Be.

“The offensive and defensive formations we use will be built to maximize the talents of the athletes in Grandview,” Mezger said. “My message for the athletes of Grandview is simple, be ready to compete for your position. The best players play on Friday nights. Competition in practice will lead to excellence in the games we have this season.”

Mezger is also a National Board-certified teacher, who will be teaching math at Grandview High School this fall.


Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council to meet May 4 in Klamath Falls
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/19/18 12:57 PM

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on May 4 at Klamath Falls City Hall, 500 Klamath Ave., Klamath Falls. The meeting will be open to the public. 

On the agenda: presentations from local trail advocates and land managers about area trail projects; an update on the Oregon Office of Outdoor Recreation; a presentation on the review of the Umpqua River Greenway designation application; a discussion of the Doug Newman Award nominee; and the committee’s vision for trails statewide.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. The council’s seven volunteer members are appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission and represent the five Oregon congressional districts. ORTAC meets four times annually in different locations across the state. 

For more information about the meeting or ORTAC contact Nicole Sprecher, Administrative Support Specialist, at 503-986-0968, echer@oregon.gov">nicole.sprecher@oregon.gov. Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Nicole Sprecher at least three days in advance.


Wapato High School NASA HUNCH "Apples in Space" Project
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 04/19/18 10:57 AM

Good morning all,

 

A group of Wapato High School students are getting ready to make a trip to the Johnson Space Center in Houston , TX.  See the attached release for the latest regarding the Wapato High School’s NASA HUNCH “Apples in Space”.            

 

 




Attached Media Files: Wapato High School Apples in Space Project

Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet in Medford May 2
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/19/18 10:07 AM

News Release

Date:     April 19, 2018

Contact:

Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-910-4311
Kyle Abraham, Private Forests Division, Salem, 503-945-7473

 

SALEM, Ore.—The Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet Wednesday, May 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inn at the Commons, 200 N. Riverside Avenue, Medford.

Agenda items that the committee will discuss and may take action on include:

  • Private Forests Division update
  • Siskiyou streamside literature review
  • Tethered logging
  • Marbled Murrelet rule analysis
  • Food plots rulemaking
  • Incentives


This is a public meeting and everyone is welcome. The agenda includes time for public comment at the beginning of the meeting. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.
 
Regional Forest Practices Committees are advisory groups made up of forest landowners and the public who advise the board on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Additional information about Regional Forest Practices Committees is available at: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.
 
###
 


DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/19/18 9:39 AM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 19, 2018

Contact:              Mona Riesterer
                              (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 8, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approval of Meeting Minutes

Approve the minutes of the February 13, 2018 Corrections Policy Committee meeting.

3.  Review of Pilot Curriculum – BPP76

Presented by Chris Enquist

4.  Quarterly Review of DOC BCC

Presented by Robert Sigleer

5.  ORS 183.405 – Five Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted Information Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010, 259-008-0070, 259-009-0070, 259-020-0200, 259-060-0300 and 259-061-0300; Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation

Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.  Administrative Closures-Corrections

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Edison, James DPSST #38290 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications; Department of Corrections – PRCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Lagao, Mario DPSST #53203 – Basic Corrections Certifications; Department of Corrections-EOCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Hanson, Shawn K. DPSST #58352 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Department of Corrections – CCCF

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Beers, Tyler DPSST #58455 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Department of Corrections – EOCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12.  Department Update

13.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – August 14, 2018 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


DPSST Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/19/18 9:26 AM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 18, 2018

Contact:              Linsay Hale

                              503-378-2427

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup will hold a regular meeting on April 26, 2018 at 1:30.  The meeting will be held at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon 97317. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Discussion regarding Supervisory, Management and Executive level training for criminal justice professionals – Dr. Steve James, Washington State University
  2. Next Steps

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Fatal Crash Highway 97 near Klamath Falls -- Update Names Released (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/19/18 9:11 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113717/thumb_Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Wednesday morning’s fatal crash on Highway 97 north of Klamath Falls. 

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, at approximately 7:40am, OSP Troopers and First Responders were dispatched to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 97, near milepost 266.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a gold Buick Century operated by Timothy KENYON, age 27, from Klamath Falls, was attempting to turn onto Highway 97 from Algoma Road.  However, for unknown reasons, KENYON turned directly in front of a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV), which was traveling northbound on Highway 97.  The CMV, operated by Robert GRIFFITH, age 32, from Central Point, was unable to avoid the collision and crashed into the Buick.

KENYON was ejected from the Buick and was pronounced deceased at the scene. The passenger of the Buick, Cassandra DAVIS, age 28, from Klamath Falls, was transported to the hospital with minor injuries.  GRIFFITH was not injured.

Highway 97 was closed for about seven (7) hours with a detour put in place by Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).  OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office, Klamath County Fire District and ODOT.

Photograph courtesy of OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113717/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

Wallowa County begins transferring public health authority to OHA May 1
Oregon Health Authority - 04/19/18 9:08 AM

April 19, 2018

Wallowa County begins transferring public health authority to OHA May 1

OHA to continue some services after county unanimously passes ordinance April 16

The Oregon Health Authority is preparing to take over some public health services in Wallowa County after the county’s Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Monday to transfer its local public health authority to the state agency.

“Because of shrinking funds, the board made the difficult decision to close the public health department as of May 1,” said county commissioner Susan Roberts. “We have been working closely with Jodi Beck, current local public health administrator, OHA and other partners to ensure a smooth transition.”

By law, the county was required to pass an ordinance before the transfer could happen. While legally the transfer does not occur until Oct. 13, 2018, Wallowa County will no longer have a local public health administrator as of May 1. That means OHA will assume responsibility for continuing services it is statutorily obligated to provide to protect the public’s health, including:

  • Monitoring communicable diseases and controlling outbreaks.
  • Enforcing the Indoor Clean Air Act.
  • Ensuring access to safe drinking water.
  • Ensuring access to WIC services.
  • Licensing and inspecting food, pool and lodging facilities.

Vital records will move to the Wallowa County Clerk’s office as of May 1. Immunization and reproductive health services will continue to be provided through some local health clinics.

All other governmental public health services will end in Wallowa County. Over the next six months, the OHA Public Health Division will evaluate which of these services the division will take on.

“We recognize the Wallowa County Board of Commissioners has the legal ability to transfer local public health authority to OHA,” said Lillian Shirley, director of the OHA Public Health Division. "We will work closely with the board and its staff during the shift from local to state provision of public health services.

“We will thoroughly examine and address any potential gaps in public health services that have been provided in the county, although just what those gaps in services are has yet to be determined,” Shirley said.

In response to the county’s decision, the Public Health Division has established an incident management team with staff representatives from across the division to plan for and communicate about the transition, including sharing information with local partners, clients and the general public.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2Jbrz4x


Oregon State Police, Portland Bureau of Environmental Services and EPA joint investigation into unlawful wastewater discharge
Oregon State Police - 04/19/18 8:33 AM

On April 19, 2018, the Oregon State Police (OSP), with assistance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and The Portland Bureau of Environmental Services executed a criminal search warrant at the business of Oregon Oils, Inc. located at 2515 NW 28th Ave, Portland, Oregon. The joint OSP and EPA investigation began in early February of 2018 after investigators learned about possible violations of the State and Federal laws pertaining to wastewater treatment and discharges. The City of Portland administers an industrial wastewater discharge permit for the facility and is assisting with the effort.

This case remains under investigation by the OSP and the EPA. Inquiries about the investigation can be directed to the Oregon State Police’s Captain Tim Fox, at (541) 419-8843.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality work in partnership to investigate and enforce Oregon’s Environmental laws. You can report pollution complaints to the DEQ Hotline at 1-888-997-7888 or to the Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.


Wed. 04/18/18
Jackson County Grand Jury Indicts Man on Sex Charges (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/18/18 11:06 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113710/thumb_Cooley.png

On April 17, 2018, a Jackson County Grand Jury indicted eighteen year old Daniel Michael Cooley on one count of Rape in the first degree, one count of Unlawful Sexual Penetration in the first degree and one count of Sexual Abuse in the first degree. The charges are related to a several month long investigation by the Oregon State Police in multiple counties.  The current charges involve a juvenile female who was reportedly under 11 years old at the time some of the offences occurred.

Cooley was arrested on March 14, 2018, in Josephine County where he remains lodged on a $100,000 bail. On March 20, 2018, a Josephine County Grand Jury indicted Cooley on two counts of Sexual Abuse in the first degree and one count of Unlawful Sexual Penetration in the second degree. 

The investigation is ongoing and additional charges may be forthcoming in separate counties. Anyone with information regarding this case is encouraged to contact Oregon State Police Detective Bryan Scott at (541) 618-7957.     




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113710/Cooley.png