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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Oct. 17 - 4:24 pm
Wed. 10/17/18
CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/18 4:12 PM

October 17, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 19

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, October 19, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly known as Lincoln Building), 7th Floor Suite 775 Transformation Center Training Room, 421 SW Oak St. Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523 and conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and updates; public testimony from 9:15-9:25; state of public health in Oregon and opportunities for incentive measures to aid in improvement; break; HPQMC recommendations and strategic planning for measure set; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2pWzquX


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets October 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/18 3:50 PM

October 17, 2018

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets October 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group

When: Thursday, October 18, 2-4 p.m.

Where: 421 SW Oak St., Suite 850 Abraham Room, Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at   and conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; 2020 Administrative Rule; public comments

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2QWctnd


Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Nov. 9-11 in Redmond
Oregon Farm Bureau - 10/17/18 2:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Nov. 9-11 in Redmond 

Young farmers, ranchers, and others interested in agriculture are encouraged to register for the 2018 Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) Leadership Conference, set for Nov. 9-11 at the Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond.

Open to Farm Bureau members ages 16 through 35 (as of Jan. 1, 2018), the conference is geared toward young people interested in improving their leadership and communication skills, learning about the most important issues impacting Oregon agriculture, gaining business tips from experts, networking with peers, and having fun!

The $50 registration is due by Nov. 2. Find the registration form and more information at https://oregonfb.org/yfrconference/.

Featured speakers at the YF&R Leadership Conference include: 

  • Steve Gannaway, Director of Training & Development for Illinois Farm Bureau, speaking on "Why Do People Do the Things They Do?"
     
  • PR Expert Shannon Berg and Oregon Rancher Elias Eiguren speaking on "Lessons from the Owyhee Canyonlands"
     
  • Past National FFA Officer Jason Wetzler
     
  • Closing Speaker Damian Mason on "The F Words of Ag"

Breakout sessions with ag industry experts will be offered in the topic tracks of ag business, natural resources, industry support, and leadership.

Social events include a Friday game night and Saturday night karaoke party with DJ Brennan Cooper!

Find the registration form, conference agenda, and hotel information at https://oregonfb.org/yfrconference/.

For more information, email yfr@oregonfb.org or call Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694 or Jenny Freeborn at 970.214.8143.

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state’s largest general agriculture organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing farm and ranch families in the public and policymaking arenas.

First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families professionally engaged in agriculture.

 

 


Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills!
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 10/17/18 1:48 PM

Millions of people worldwide will practice how to Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:18 a.m. on October 18, 2018 during the Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills! The Yakima School District, among them will be participating in the Great Shakeout Earthquake Drill to practice and improve preparedness during earthquakes. We encourage everyone to participate in this annual event to help be prepared to survive and recover quickly from big earthquakes. The safety of Yakima School District students, staff and community is our number one priority.

YSD Participating Schools

Wilson Middle School –  10:07 am

Discovery Lab School–  10:18 am

Garfield Elementary School –  10:19 am

 


BPA selects new executive vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 10/17/18 12:09 PM
Scott Armentrout
Scott Armentrout
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1236/118865/thumb_Armentrout_10_15_18_-_blue_background.jpg

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration has chosen Scott Armentrout to be its executive vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife. Armentrout begins his new position at BPA’s Portland headquarters Oct. 29.

“Scott has extensive experience in program management, fish and wildlife biology, restoration programs and teamwork with 30 years of experience working for the U.S. Forest Service,” said BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer. “His skills and background make him ideal to lead BPA’s Environment, Fish and Wildlife organization. Scott grew up in the Pacific Northwest, so he’s also looking forward to returning home.”

In his new position, Armentrout will serve as top policy-maker and strategist, ensuring environmental compliance while addressing fish and wildlife issues integral to BPA’s business responsibilities and its commitment to stewardship of the region’s environmental resources.

Armentrout will also oversee BPA’s Fish and Wildlife program, one of the largest fish and wildlife mitigation efforts in the world. The program is implemented to mitigate for the inundation, construction and operation of dams in the Columbia and Snake river basins.

“I am excited to be part of BPA’s efforts to protect and enhance the environment and the region’s fish and wildlife,” says Armentrout. “I’m looking forward to tackling the many complex issues and working with BPA’s partners to find creative solutions for a better Pacific Northwest.”

Armentrout comes to BPA from the U.S. Forest Service in Montrose, Colorado, where he’s served as forest supervisor over the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests that comprise 2.9 million acres and together make up the largest national forest in the Rocky Mountain Region.

He replaces Lorri Bodi, who retired in July 2018.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 261 substations to 475 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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Attached Media Files: Scott Armentrout

Walla Walla Public Schools Board of Directors earns prestigious Board of Distinction award
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/17/18 10:26 AM

WALLA WALLA – The Washington State School Directors’ Association announced Walla Walla Public Schools Board of Directors has been selected to receive the ‘Board of Distinction Award’. The district will receive the award at the state directors’ conference ceremony to be held Nov. 15 in Spokane. This is the first Board of Distinction award in district history for Walla Walla.

The Board of Distinction award program recognizes school boards that show evidence of applying best practice standards endorsed by the Washington State School Directors’ Association. Recipients must document they meet rigorous accountability and leadership practices through evidence-based actions. Selection criteria also includes aligning and incorporating high quality governance attributes to improve district operations and student learning.

The application process was open from July 9 to Sept. 20. School board applications included an accounting of the most relevant work accomplished leading up to submission. Focus areas included ensuring there were non-negotiable goals in place for student achievement. Recipients also had to demonstrate how they were providing for learning essentials, including rigorous curriculum, technology and actions to attain high-quality facilities. Award merit was also based on evaluating the superintendent on clear and focused expectations, including evidence of making gains on the opportunity gap based on student achievement data.

School board member Ruth Ladderud helped coordinate the award submission. She has served on the school board since 2012.

“I’ve always felt as a board this is something we should aspire to and this spring as a board we felt we were making the adjustments and turning the corner so the timing was right to apply,” said Ladderud. “All means all in Walla Walla and we were able to demonstrate that every student is valued, cared for and important, and I believe this is what led to the award selection.”

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Mega Millions $900 Million Jackpot Largest Ever
Oregon Lottery - 10/17/18 10:07 AM

October 17, 2018 - Salem, Ore. – Friday’s estimated Mega Millions jackpot is at an all-time Mega Millions high of $900 million! This jackpot is also the second largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history, trailing only the $1.586 billion Powerball jackpot from 2016. That jackpot was shared by three lucky players from California, Florida and Tennessee.

Across all Mega Millions lotteries, there were over 4.5 million winning tickets in the Oct. 16 drawing.

Oregon Mega Millions Winners

For the Oct. 16 drawing, in Oregon, there were over 37,000 winning Mega Millions tickets ranging from $10,000 to $2!

Oregon has also had several larger Mega Millions winners in the last few years. The largest winner recently was Joemel Panisa, who purchased a ticket in January 2016 then found it during a snow day, mere days before the $1 million ticket was to expire in Jan. 2017.

More recently, in Wayne Harder of Lebanon won $30,00 playing Mega Millions in August. Harder said he plays all three draw games, Powerball, Oregon’s Game Megabucks and Mega Millions. He used his prize to fund a family reunion trip to the Oregon Coast.

The Oregon Lottery began offering Mega Millions in March 2010. While Oregon is still waiting for its first Mega Millions jackpot winner, since 2010 there have been over $83 million in Mega Millions prizes in Oregon! And since 2010, Mega Millions has had over $164 million in sales.

Just like the Lottery's other big jackpot games, Powerball and Oregon’s Game Megabucks, the winner of the Mega Millions jackpot can choose to take the prize either in a 30-year annuity or a one-time lump sum.

After taxes, the 30-year graduated annuity will average $20.4 million each year. The one-time cash option, after taxes, is over $349 million.

The next Mega Millions drawing is Friday, Oct. 19.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Coffee Creek Correctional Facility reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/17/18 8:50 AM
Sally Ann Bicandi
Sally Ann Bicandi
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1070/118852/thumb_Bicandi.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Sally Ann Bicandi, died on the evening of October 16, 2018. She was incarcerated at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) and passed away in the hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Bicandi entered DOC custody on May 31, 2018, from Washington County.  Her earliest release date was November 7, 2019. She was 54 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,800 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

CCCF is a multi-custody facility in Wilsonville that houses more than 1,200 women. It provides intake and evaluation of all female and male inmates committed to state custody. CCCF delivers a range of correctional services and programs including alcohol and drug treatment, education, work opportunities, cognitive programming, and pre-release services. The minimum facility opened in 2001 and the medium facility opened in 2002. CCCF is Oregon’s only women’s prison.




Attached Media Files: Sally Ann Bicandi

Time to ShakeOut Oregon! (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/17/18 8:48 AM
2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png
2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3986/118851/thumb_Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png

In partnership with the Portland Bureau of Emergency Management and Rigler Elementary School in Portland, the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is inviting media to observe Rigler students drop, cover, and hold on during the nation’s largest earthquake drill, “The Great ShakeOut” scheduled Thursday, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m.

As of today, nearly 560,000 are registered in Oregon for the Great Oregon ShakeOut!

OEM would also like to encourage the public and media outside Portland to participate on ShakeOut day! If you have questions about how to observe or participate in your area please contact lic.info@state.or.us">public.info@state.or.us.

“Earthquakes are one of the natural hazards we face in Oregon and “The Great ShakeOut is a safe and fun way to practice what to do when seismic activity occurs,” says Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards awareness program coordinator at Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management.

If you would like to observe please arrive at 9:30 a.m. at Rigler elementary school, 5401 NE Prescott St, Portland, OR 97218.

This year’s Great ShakeOut is happening as the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) along with a coalition of state and university partners are developing and testing the ShakeAlert, an earthquake early warning (EEW) system that detects significant earthquakes so quickly that alerts can reach many people before shaking occurs.

"ShakeAlert is a critical investment in reducing risk for our nation’s future," said USGS Director, Jim Reilly. "Our country’s first public earthquake early warning system will allow citizens, institutions, and managers of essential infrastructure to take timely actions that will save lives and property."   

Learn more about ShakeAlert by visiting the USGS website that offers ShakeAlert science, multimedia, news and more. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png , 2018-10/3986/118851/130424-FS713-25.jpg

Tue. 10/16/18
UPDATE -----Semi Truck loaded with cattle crashes on I-84 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/16/18 7:21 PM
2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg
2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118829/thumb_IMG_3389.jpg

Investigation revealed that a 2012 Peterbilt semi truck, being operated by Shannon Dwinell (46) of Great Bend, KS, was westbound on I-84 when for unknown reasons left the roadway, struck the guardrail, and overturned.  

Dwinell sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The stock trailer was loaded with 28 cattle, 5 died as a result of the crash.

 

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are on scene of a single vehicle semi truck crash on I-84 near milepost 284 westbound.  

A commercial motor vehicle hauling cattle has struck a guardrail and flipped over on Interstate 84 - 2 miles west of North Powder.  

The operator sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Several cattle escaped and are loose on the freeway, unfortunately several cattle also died in the crash.

Investigation is continuing no more information to be released at this time.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3387.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3383.jpg

Feedback sought on Elliott State Forest report
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 10/16/18 4:54 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Public feedback is being sought on a report that captures tribal and stakeholder perspectives regarding the future of the Elliott State Forest. 

The State Land Board today heard a summary of the Oregon Consensus report, which explored issues and interests regarding decoupling the forest from the Common School Fund. Decoupling would compensate the school fund for the value of the forest and release the forest from its obligation to generate revenue for schools. The forest would remain publicly owned, potentially by a different public owner. 

Between March and August 2018, Oregon Consensus conducted interviews with individuals representing federal, tribal, state and local governments, as well as individuals representing timber, conservation, school funding beneficiaries, recreation, land trusts, labor and others. The resulting report summarizes what was heard in interviews and discusses key themes, issues, and considerations for successful decoupling. 

The report is available on the Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) website. Paper copies are also available from DSL on request. DSL is inviting the public to read the final report and provide feedback. Feedback may be submitted until 5 p.m. on Thursday, November 15 via the DSL website or by U.S. mail to 775 Summer St. NE, Ste. 100, Salem OR 97301.  

Discussion regarding the future of the Elliott State Forest will continue in December. The Board asked that potential public owners, including Oregon State University, indicate their interest to DSL and come before the Board at the December 18 meeting. DSL will also present a summary of public feedback at the December meeting. 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit. 


Board on Public Safety Standards and Training Meeting Agenda
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/16/18 3:45 PM

The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 25, 2018 in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.  For further information, please contact Theresa Janda at (503) 373-1553 or esa.janda@state.or.us">theresa.janda@state.or.us.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

1.  Introductions

Welcome new Board member, Thomas Thomas.

2.  Minutes

Approve minutes from the July 26, 2018 Meeting.

3.  Fire Policy Committee

a.  Fire Policy Committee Update – James Oeder, Chair

b. Consent Agenda  (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

      A. OAR 259-009-0010 and OAR 259-009-0059 – Proposed rule change – Approve

      Application for Personnel Affiliation and Certification Eligibility (E-1 Form)

      Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018. 

B. OAR 259-009-0062 – Proposed rule change – Approve

Fire Ground Leader

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

C. Cheyenne McEwen DPSST#36822 (Jefferson County RFPD#1) – Deny

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

D. Samantha Morey DPSST#18786  - (West Valley Fire District ) – Deny Application to Instruct and Revoke Certifications

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

E.  David R. Morey DPSST#13538 (West Valley Fire District) –  Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

F. Committee Appointments

Fire Policy Committee Appointment

  • Richard Cearns; Appointment to the FPC to replace Jim Whelan; 1st term effective 10/25/18
  • John Rinier; Re-appointment to the FPC; 2nd term effective 7/26/18.

5.  Criminal Justice Policy Committees

a. Police Policy Committee Update – Jeff Hering, Chair

b. Telecommunications Policy Committee Update – Kelly Dutra, Chair

c. Corrections Policy Committee Update – Jason Myers, Chair

d. Consent Agenda  (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. OAR 259-008-0075 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Sheriff Eligibility Determinations

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018. 

B. Eric Petersen DPSST#33872 (Molalla Police Department) - Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

C. Bradley Johnston DPSST#27723 (Astoria Police Department - retired) – No Action

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

D. Daniel Thurman DPSST #43666 (Silverton Police Department) – Suspend

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

E. Thomas Fleming DPSST#55747 (Marion County Sheriff’s Office) – No Action

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

F. Brock Mittelbach DPSST#41816 (Dept. of Corrections CCCF) – Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

G. Mario Lagao DPSST#53203 (Dept.of Corrections EOCI)  – Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

H. Colin Duncan DPSST#44454 (Klamath County Sheriff’s Office)  - Revoke and Deny Application for Training

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

I.  Talissa Baldovino DPSST#58666 (Union County Sheriff’s Office) – No Action against application for Training and Subsequent Certification

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

J. Shawn King DPSST#49251 (Department of Corrections - SRCI) - Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

K. Cory Thornton DPSST#53006 (DOC – currently not employed)  - Revoke

8/3 Vote Recommended to the Board by the TPC on August 1, 2018.

L. Jennifer Stolt DPSST#42217 (Junction City Police Department) – No Action

Unanimous vote minus one recusal to recommend to the Board by the TPC on August 1, 2018.

M. Committee Appointments

Telecommunications Policy Committee

  • Matt Dale; Appointment to the TPC position previously held by Sherry Bensema; 1st term effective 10/25/18

e. Sergeant John Lawrence DPSST#31555 - City of Bend Police Department – Memorial Wall Nomination - Approve

Add Sergeant John Lawrence’s name to the Law Enforcement Memorial Wall during the 2019 Law Enforcement Memorial Ceremony.

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

f. Changes to the Basic Parole & Probation Curriculum – Approve

Presented by Chris Enquist:  Revised curriculum and testing method (two pilots) for the DPSST Basic Parole & Probation curriculum.

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

6.  Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee

a.  Private Security Investigator Policy Committee Update – Bill Geiger, Chair

b. Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. OAR 259-060-0450 and 259-061-0200 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Removal of cease and desist language.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

B. OAR 259-060-0010 et al – Proposed Rule Change  – Approve

Temporary work permits.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

C. OAR 259-060-0010 et al – Proposed Rule Change  – Approve

Emergency suspension for failure of annual firearms training or renewal training standards      and changes to the annual due date requirement – with staff-recommended amendments.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

D. Committee Appointment

Private Security Investigator Policy Committee

Richard Valencia, Appointment to the PSIPC position previously held by Edward Sharpe; 1st term effective 10/25/18.

7.  Administrative

a. OAR 259-012-0005, 259-013-0300 and 259-025-0000 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Presented by Jennifer Howald: Related to Public Records Requests and Fees.

Recommended to the Board by DPSST Staff on October 25, 2018.

b. Information Only:  2018 Customer Service Questionnaire 

9.  Director's Report - Director Gabliks

  • Training Reminder – Required Training due by 12/31/18.  Preventing Sexual Harassment and Maintaining a Professional Workplace. 
  • 2019 Board and Policy Committee schedule
  • DPSST Update

10.  Next Meeting Date:  January 24, 2019

 

# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

 


OHA to hold technical forum on CCO 2.0 service areas
Oregon Health Authority - 10/16/18 3:15 PM

October 16, 2018

Contact: Janet Zeyen-Hall, 503-945-6938, janet.l.zeyen-hall@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

OHA to hold technical forum on CCO 2.0 service areas

As the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) develops contracts for the next five years of coordinated care for Oregon Health Plan members, the agency is seeking public comment on how to best define service areas for current and potential new applicants.

Fifteen CCOs operate in service areas defined in 2012 through the state’s RFA process. A service area is the geographic footprint where a plan accepts members based on where they live.

Through the CCO 2.0 public engagement process, OHA proposed regional service areas for new applicants for the 2020-2025 CCO contracts. OHA is considering an alternative proposal that would require all participants to define service areas by county. CCOs could serve counties or portions of counties. If they propose serving less than a full county, they would need to demonstrate: how the proposed service area would better achieve the transformation priorities of CCO 2.0; its benefit to members and the community; and that the proposal is not designed to minimize financial risk and does not create adverse selection.

OHA’s main priorities and values guiding the service area approach include:

  • Behavioral health: Align with local mental health services and systems.
  • Social determinants of health: Avoid the possibility of redlining and carve-out of underserved and culturally diverse populations.
  • Value-based payments and cost containment: Ensure that CCOs can maintain financial viability, implement value-based agreements with providers, and create administrative efficiencies to reduce costly duplication.
  • Community engagement and governance: Decision-making should reflect local priorities and be accountable to members of the community.

What: Public meeting of OHA to seek public comment on service area approaches for the 2020-2025 CCO contracts

When: Monday, October 22, 3-5 p.m.

Where: University of Oregon Portland at the White Stag Block, 70 NW Couch St., Portland.

Attendees can also join remotely through a telephone conference line at 888-363-4735, participant code 1593726.

The meeting will also be live-streamed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuYRYLHBTm8.

Public comment: The public can submit comments about the service area approaches before the meeting by email at CCO2.0@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Public comment will also be accepted over the phone during the meeting. Please submit your name and organization (if applicable) to the CCO 2.0 email address if you’d like to submit public comment at the meeting.

Agenda: Welcome; priorities and values for service area approach decision-making; presentation of service area approaches; public comment; adjourn

For more information about the approaches, go to the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Janet Zeyen-Hall at 503-945-6938, 711 TTY, janet.l.zeyen-hall@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2ykyyVE


DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/16/18 2:41 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

October 15, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                 (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on November 7, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.  Minutes of August 1, 2018
Approve Minutes of August 1, 2018 Meeting

3.  Approval of Changes for the Basic Telecommunications Curriculum

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0085; Updating the Course Description and Testing Standards for the Three-week Basic Telecommunicator Course and Course Challenge

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0025; Relating to the Three week Basic Telecommunicator Course and Course Challenge Eligibility Standards.

Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0060; FA & CPR Requirements for Obtaining DPSST Certifications as a Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Jennifer Howald 

7.  Administrative Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Coy, Gibson DPSST #58809 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Columbia 911 Communication District

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Pickard, Amy DPSST #54512 – Basic Emergency Medical Dispatch Certification; American Medical Response

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Staff Update

11.  Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting February 6, 2019 @ 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications  Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Payroll Phishing Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/16/18 10:00 AM
TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC
TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3585/118795/thumb_TT_-_Payroll_Phishing_Graphic.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: Building a digital defense against payroll phishing scams.

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center is out with a new warning about fraudsters who are targeting your paycheck via direct deposit. Any worker can be affected by this scam – but the industries getting hit the hardest include education, healthcare and commercial airway transportation.

Here’s what happens: the bad guy uses your work login info to get into your employer’s HR system to replace your direct deposit information with his own.

It starts when an employee receives an email that looks just familiar enough that he doesn’t question it too much. The email includes a link or web address that the user clicks on. Once he clicks, he will be directed to a fraudulent site or portal where the victim will be asked to enter his work credentials to confirm his identity. The bad guys use that login ID and password to change the employee’s direct deposit information in the company’s files. Often, the fraudsters even change other account settings in the system, preventing the victim from receiving an email warning that changes have been made to his account.  

Here’s how employees can avoid being scammed:

  • Make sure you verify with your employer that a suspicious email is valid. Send it to your office’s HR or IT departments for confirmation.
  • Keep an eye out for any misspelled words, odd phrasing and poor grammar. These could be indications that the email is coming from elsewhere in the world.
  • If the email includes any links to web pages, hover your mouse over the link and confirm that the URL is exactly the same as that used by the payroll company. Don’t click if you are not 100% sure.

Here are some steps that businesses can take to protect their employees:

  • Teach your employees what a phishing scam is and how to avoid it.
  • Require that login credentials used for payroll purposes differ from those used for other purposes, such as employee surveys.
  • Use two-factor authentication on sensitive systems and information.
  • Create protocols that require additional scrutiny to banking changes that appear to be requested by employees.

Iin the end, a little extra hassle in the short term may prevent a big headache in the long run. As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - AUDIO File , TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon September 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 10/16/18 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Remained at a Record Low of 3.8 Percent in September

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in September, the same as in August. These were Oregon’s lowest unemployment rates since comparable records began in 1976. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped from 3.9 percent in August to 3.7 percent in September.

Oregon’s labor market was unusually tight in September, as indicated not only by the low unemployment rate, but also by the low number of Oregonians who are considered “short-term unemployed.” In September, 80,000 Oregonians were unemployed. Of those, 16,000 had been unemployed for 27 weeks or more (“long-term unemployed”), and 64,000 had been unemployed for less than 27 weeks (“short-term unemployed”). The number of short-term unemployed was quite low historically and was well below levels seen at the end of the prior expansion in 2006 and 2007, when an average of 86,000 people were categorized as short-term unemployed.

In September, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by a modest 300 jobs, following a revised gain of 2,400 jobs in August. Monthly gains in September were concentrated in leisure and hospitality (+900 jobs) and professional and business services (+800 jobs). These gains were offset by losses in retail trade (-1,300 jobs) and wholesale trade (-800 jobs).

Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment increased by 40,200 jobs, or 2.1 percent, since September 2017. This growth rate is very close to the 2.2 percent annual growth rate the state has experienced over the prior 21 months, cooling off from the 3.0 percent average annual growth rate seen during the prior three years dating back to 2013.

More than one-quarter of Oregon’s payroll employment growth over the past 12 months was in the construction industry, which added 11,100 jobs, expanding by 11.2 percent. Over the year, no other industry has grown nearly as fast as construction. Next in line are three major industries that each grew by close to 3 percent: leisure and hospitality (+6,600 jobs, or 3.2%); other services (+2,000 jobs, or 3.1%); and professional and business services (+7,400 jobs, or 3.0%). Several industries remained close to their year-ago job totals, including information (+100 jobs, or 0.3%); government (-200 jobs, or -0.1%); retail trade (-700 jobs, or -0.3%); and wholesale trade (-300 jobs, or -0.4%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the September county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, October 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Wednesday, November 14th. 


Notes: 
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February, and March 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.


The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon September 2018 News Release

SAIF's free ag safety seminars return later this month
SAIF - 10/16/18 9:10 AM

Summary: Annual trainings will be held in 16 cities between October and March and—for the first time—online as a webinar.

-----

Whether operating large farm equipment or spraying chemicals, agricultural workers face a lot of risks on the job.

That’s why SAIF is bringing our free ag safety seminars back to 16 cities across Oregon this fall and winter. The first of 28 seminars will be held October 30 in Ontario and they will continue through March. Nine seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish.

The full schedule, registration details, and the list of speakers can be found at saif.com/agseminars. You can also register by calling 800.285.8525.

“We see about 1,500 injuries in the ag industry a year,” said Reva Hartenstein, senior safety management consultant at SAIF. “We created these seminars to help reduce those numbers—our goal is for every ag worker to go home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s sessions will focus on four safety topics: training new employees, best practices for chemical use, conscious decision making, and safe driving on and off the farm.

“Motor vehicle accidents account for some of the most severe injuries in the ag industry—and across Oregon industries,” said Hartenstein.  

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

Each of the one-hour seminar topics will be presented via webinar on March 12, 14, 19, and 21. Participants are encouraged—and required if seeking an exemption for random OSHA inspections—to watch all four presentations. The webinars will be available at saif.com/training.

Each seminar is held from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and includes lunch. 

In-person seminars will be in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement, one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

The Landscape Contractors Board has approved the seminar for three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits. The Department of Consumer and Business Services has also approved producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.     


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 99W north of Eugene - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/16/18 8:59 AM
2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG
2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118809/thumb_IMG_0517_(2).JPG

On Monday, October 15, 2018 at approximately 6:35 PM. Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 99W near milepost 117 - approximately 2 miles north of Eugene.

Investigation revealed that a 2005 Toyota Prius, operated by Sandra Boynton (78) from Eugene, was attempting to turn left onto Hwy 99W from a private driveway.  Boynton turned in front of a northbound 2005 Ford Explorer, operated by Rebecca Weston (34) from Eugene.  

Boynton and her passenger Gail Purkerson (74) from Eugene both sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Weston and her juvenile male passenger received minor injuries.

Oregon State Police were assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, Lane County Fire and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG

Holiday Wishes come true for Lebanon Lottery winner (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/16/18 8:13 AM
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4939/118804/thumb_Yolanda_R._Lebanon_100k_Scratch.JPG

October 16, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Holiday wishes came true for Yolanda Reyes of Lebanon, when she won $100,000 playing one of the new Holiday Wishes Scratch-it from the Oregon Lottery.
“I was at Bingo and scratching the ticket and thought I won $10,” she said. “When I asked a friend, we realized I won $100,000!”
Reyes won playing the $10 Holiday Wishes Scratch-it, which is part of the new featured holiday tickets offered by the Oregon Lottery this winter that also includes the $1 Stocking Stuffer, $2 Snow Globe Cash and the $5 Holiday Cheer. The tickets went on sale earlier this month and will run through the end of the year to celebrate the season. The Holiday Wishes Scratch-it still has one $100,000 jackpot prize left.
Reyes, who recently retired from the Oregon Department of Human Services after a 20-year career, said the money was going toward her retirement.
“It comes at a great time for me,” she said. “I just retired and this will be a nice cushion.”
In addition to her retirement nest egg, she said she will probably purchase a small pickup with the money.
Reyes purchased the ticket at B&G Bingo in Salem. 
During the 2015-17 biennium in Linn County, where Reyes lives, more than $42.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
###




Attached Media Files: Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner

Mon. 10/15/18
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee meets Oct. 19
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 4:40 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Advisory Committee for the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 19, in Room 166 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include public comment, advisory committee planning, old business, discussion and new business, subcommittee reports, roundtable and future agenda items.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, (503) 934-1400, and using Conference ID # 360372. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Request.ODHHSP@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown at 503-945-6993 or ODHHS.Info@state.or.us

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Service Program (ODHHSP) by providing information and expertise on issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disability.

                                                                                            # # #  


Grants available for EV charging innovation
Pacific Power - 10/15/18 1:06 PM

Media contact:                                                          
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, 503-813-7291

Grants available for EV charging innovation

Pacific Power opens grant applications Oct 15 to help provide wide range of charging options for customers

 

PORTLAND, Ore. —Oct. 15, 2018-- Have a great idea of how to provide charging options for the growing number of electric vehicles in Oregon? Pacific Power wants to hear from you.

Applications for electric vehicle charging station grants are now open. Up to $300,000 is available in this funding cycle for projects that help communities and businesses develop creative electric transportation infrastructure projects. A total of $1.5 million will be awarded to customer projects through the end of 2019.

“We see collaboration and partnership with community groups, employers and local governments as an important jumpstart in bringing charging technology forward,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions.

To apply, entities need to complete and submit an application along with supporting materials by 5 p.m. Nov. 15, 2018.

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Oregon are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

 

Funding awards will cover up to 100 percent of eligible costs to purchase and install electric vehicle charging stations.

 

Some examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please go to pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

 

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

 

Grants will be awarded in quarterly cycles through 2019. The next grant cycle will open on Jan. 15, 2019.
 

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev

 

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.

 


Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer #2 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:58 PM
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118774/thumb_Woodland-buck.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck near the Woodland snow park off of Hwy 204.  Woodland snow park is 16 miles west of the City of Elgin in the Umatilla National Forest.

On Sunday, October 7, 2018  an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded to a complaint of a buck deer that was shot and left to waste at the Woodland Snow Park. The dead buck was located approximately 70 yards from the parking lot on an old skid road.  The buck was visible from the parking area.  The Trooper confirmed the buck had been shot behind the front shoulder, with a rifle, and left to waste 

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg

The Oregon Department of Corrections two reports in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/15/18 12:35 PM
Douglas Miller
Douglas Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1070/118773/thumb_DouglasMiller.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Douglas Miller, died the morning of October 12, 2018. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) and passed away at the institution’s infirmary. He was 72 years old and was incarcerated out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date was January 11, 2021.

Raymond Madrigal, died the morning of October 14, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) and passed away in the hospital. Madrigal entered DOC custody on March 16, 2006 from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was August 8, 2022. He was 81 years old. Next of kin have been notified for both men.

As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.
 

TRCI is a multi-custody facility in Umatilla that houses more than 1,800 men.  It delivers a range of correctional services and programs including education, work opportunities, and cognitive programming.  The minimum facility opened in 1998 and the medium facility opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Douglas Miller , Raymond Madrigal

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:33 PM
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118772/thumb_Elgin-buck#2.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck in the Mt. Emily Wildlife Management Unit near the City of Elgin in Union County. 

On Sunday, October 7, 2018 the Union County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a dead buck deer on South 11th Street near Birch Street in the City of Elgin.  The Deputy along with a Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded and located the buck dead and the meat spoiled. The buck was found to have been shot in the hindquarters with an arrow. The buck had been observed alive the day prior and a photo of him was taken by a resident.  

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-Buck#1.jpg

Public comment sought on contracting, Medicaid waiver amendments
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 12:31 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) is seeking public comment on amendments to the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) waiver.

APD is amending the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waiver to allow Waivered Case Management services to be provided by Oregon Tribes. These amendments are part of an ongoing effort to work more closely with Oregon’s Nine Federally Recognized Tribes and the Urban Indian Health Program to better serve their members.

APD intends to submit the waiver amendments on Dec. 1, 2018, with a proposed effective date of April 1, 2019. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approval of these amendments will authorize Oregon tribes to provide case management services to tribal members receiving Medicaid LTSS and receive Medicaid reimbursement for providing these services to tribal members.

APD and Oregon Tribes continue to work collaboratively to develop and operationalize the provision of case management services, including identifying tribes that choose to participate, identifying tribal members that would be served, and developing qualifications, capacity and case management rates. APD is committed to ensuring that participating tribes have access to all technology, tools and training available to LTSS case managers currently being provided by the Area Agencies on Aging and Department of Human Services local offices. These amendments affect tribes that choose to participate and provide these services. APD staff and management and tribal members have been participating in workgroups since June 2018 to develop a plan to operationalize the provision of case management services and ensure a smooth transition of these services to participating tribes.

APD invites you to review the attached documents for further information:

  • Draft of 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver
  • Draft of 1915(c) LTSS waiver

Comments, suggestions and questions may be submitted directly to Chris Pascual, APD policy analyst, via email at chris.pascual@state.or.us;  by phone at 503-779-6408. Interested parties may also send written comments addressed to Chris Pascual, Aging and People with Disabilities Policy Analyst, Department of Human Services, 500 Summer Street NE E-10, Salem, OR 97301. Print versions of the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waivers will be posted in APD district offices.  Print versions may also be obtained from Chris Pascual.

The deadline for comments is Nov. 15, 2018. Mail responses must be received by this date to be considered.




Attached Media Files: APD 1915 b4 Waiver Amendment 2018 Tribal Case Management , APD 1915c Waiver Amendment

Medicare annual enrollment is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 11:48 AM

(Salem) – Annual open enrollment for Medicare starts today, and Oregon’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) Program is available to help.

Medicare is health insurance for people 65 years or older or younger than 65 with Social Security Disability Income. People living in Oregon who are 65 years or older may be eligible to sign up and find health insurance that best meets their needs. Medicare covers many medical costs, including visits to the doctor, prescription medications, and preventive care, such as mammograms, colonoscopies, diabetes treatment, and blood pressure screenings.

Medicare annual enrollment runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2018. Any Medicare Advantage (MA) or prescription drug plan (Part D) changes must be made between these dates so that coverage begins without interruption on Jan. 1, 2019. Those who are late to enroll may face a lifetime of premium penalties.

“It is important to compare Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans every year,” SHIBA Program Manager Lisa Emerson said. “Plans change year to year, as do people’s individual health care needs. People could potentially save money by shopping for a new plan.”

SHIBA provides free health insurance counseling to explain how the Medicare program works, additional insurance options that work with Medicare, and help with reducing out-of-pocket costs. SHIBA staff members, along with more than 200 certified counselors, serve many of Oregon’s more than 860,000 Medicare beneficiaries to help them understand their Medicare benefits and enrollment options. Free information and help is available by calling 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting shiba.oregon.gov.

SHIBA counselors help beneficiaries compare plans and enroll by using the plan finder tool found online at www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan. Beneficiaries and their families can also choose to use this tool to compare plans and enroll on their own.

SHIBA also publishes an annual Medicare guide, which will be available online in early October and in print in mid-November.

Tips from SHIBA to prepare for Medicare open enrollment:

Review your plan notice. Be sure to read any notices from your Medicare plan about changes for next year, especially your Annual Notice of Change letter.

Think about what matters most to you. Medicare health and drug plans change each year and so can your health needs. Do you need a new primary care doctor? Does your network include the specialist you want for an upcoming surgery? Is your new medication covered by your current plan? Does another plan offer the same value at a lower cost? Take stock of your health status and determine if you need to make a change.

Find out if you qualify for help paying for your Medicare. SHIBA can help you learn about a state program that helps with the costs of Medicare premiums, your Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and Medicare Part B (medical insurance) deductibles, co-insurance and co-payments, and Medicare prescription drug coverage costs.

Apply for help with drug costs. If you have limited income and assets, you may qualify for extra help with prescription drug costs. SHIBA counselors can help you apply for this benefit through Social Security.

Contact your doctor, hospital, and pharmacy before making changes. Not all health and drug plans contract or work with the same providers. If you switch plans, make sure you understand which providers you can see for the best price.

SHIBA is also advising people to protect their identity by guarding their Medicare card like they would their credit card or Social Security number. Identity theft from stolen Medicare numbers is becoming more common. To protect against identity theft, don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone or email, or approaches you in person, unless you have given that person permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you (unless you ask them to) for your Medicare number or other personal information. Also, don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number. 

More information

SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit https://healthcare.oregon.gov/shiba to find local help in your county, obtain a copy of the 2018 Oregon Guide to Medicare Health plans, and find Medicare education and enrollment events in your area.

Follow SHIBA on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/OregonSHIBA.

SHIBA is part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on topics such as insurance, mortgages, investments, and workplace safety.


Harrisburg Man Sentenced to Five Years in Federal Prison for Dealing Heroin and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/15/18 11:14 AM

EUGENE, Ore. – Shawn Sherman Wilson, Jr., 27, of Harrisburg, Oregon, was sentenced today to 60 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for dealing heroin and illegally possessing a firearm.

According to court documents, law enforcement began investigating Wilson in July 2017 after receiving a tip from a confidential source that he was trafficking heroin in and around Eugene. An undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) contacted Wilson and arranged to purchase an ounce of heroin. They agreed to meet on July 24, 2017 in front of Taylor’s Bar & Grill, a popular night spot in Eugene near the University of Oregon.

At the meeting location, the ATF agent entered Wilson’s car, sitting in the front passenger seat. Wilson had a Smith & Wesson 9mm semi-automatic pistol sitting between his legs with the pistol’s handle positioned for easy access. The agent said “I see you got the heat.” Wilson replied, “yeah, while I’m running around town.” Wilson grabbed the firearm and showed it to the agent, telling the agent the firearm belonged to his girlfriend and he was interested in purchasing another.

The ATF agent subsequently completed the heroin purchase, giving Wilson $1,200 in cash. Wilson was later arrested in Douglas County on August 6, 2017. When arrested, Wilson possessed a Smith & Wesson 9mm pistol matching the description of the firearm observed by the undercover agent during the controlled buy.

Wilson previously pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute heroin and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on May 30, 2018.

This case was investigated by ATF and prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6325/118759/SENTENCING-Wilson-Final.pdf

Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/18 11:11 AM

October 15, 2018

Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future

On October 15 the Oregon Health Policy Board (OHPB) voted to approve a comprehensive set of policies that will improve the health of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. This next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0."

"We’ve taken this opportunity to really look at what’s working with CCOs and where we need to push the system to advance health transformation in Oregon," said Zeke Smith, OHPB chair. Together, these policies have the potential to significantly change how our members experience care and how the state pays for that care."

The end of the first five-year contracts with coordinated care organizations (CCOs) marks an opportunity for OHA and OHPB to improve the services that 1 million Oregonians receive through OHP. CCOs are community-governed organizations that bring together physical health, mental health, addiction medicine, and dental health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. Since 2012 Oregon’s coordinated care model has saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, while also reducing unnecessary emergency department visits and improving preventive care for children and adults.

OHA heard directly from more than 850 Oregonians who participated in public meetings and forums held across the state in more than a dozen locations, which were led by OHA Director Patrick Allen. Additionally, multiple surveys and online outreach tools were used to gather perspectives from a diverse cross-section of Oregonians. OHP members and other stakeholders issued support for the policy direction and expressed satisfaction with Oregon’s coordinated care system.

"Our members feel good about the coverage they’re receiving from OHP, but they also let us know that we have areas where we can improve," Allen said. "It was clear that our top focus needed to be improving access to mental health and addiction services. We also heard that CCOs can play a stronger role in working with community partners to help patients with the factors that influence health outside the doctor’s office, particularly access to safe and affordable housing."

The resulting CCO 2.0 policies build on Oregon’s strong foundation of health care innovation and tackle our biggest health problems. They cover four priority areas identified by Governor Kate Brown:

1. Improve the behavioral health system and address barriers to access to and integration of care

CCOs will be accountable for developing a person-centered mental health and substance use disorder (behavioral health) system that OHP members can count on, no matter who they are or where they live. CCOs will remove barriers between behavioral, physical and dental health. The policies include:

  • Require CCOs to be fully accountable for the behavioral health benefit.
  • Address prior authorization and network adequacy issues that limit member choice and timely access to providers.
  • Use metrics to incentivize behavioral health and oral health integration.
  • Expand programs that integrate primary care into behavioral health settings.
  • Require CCOs to support electronic health record adoption and access to electronic health information exchange.
  • Develop a diverse and culturally responsive workforce.
  • Ensure children have behavioral health needs met with access to appropriate services.

2. Increase value and pay for performance

Over the next five years, CCOs will make a significant move away from fee-for-service payments toward paying providers based on value. OHA will incentivize providers and health systems for delivering patient-centered and high-quality care. CCOs will develop value-based payments (VBPs) to improve health outcomes specifically in the areas of hospital care, maternity care, behavioral health, oral health, and children’s health care. The policies include:

  • Require annual, CCO-specific value-based payment growth targets.
  • Each CCO will be achieve an annual VBP growth target and have 70 percent of their payments to providers be VBPs by the end of the five-year period.
  • CCOs will be required to make "infrastructure and operations" payments to patient-centered primary care homes.
  • OHA will work to align VBP efforts in OHP with Public Employees’ Benefit Board (PEBB), the Oregon Educators Benefit Board (OEBB), and commercial payers participating in the Primary Care Payment Reform Collaborative.
     

3. Focus on social determinants of health and health equity

Over the next five years CCOs will increase their investments in strategies to address social determinants of health and health equity. CCOs will align goals at the state and local level to improve health outcomes and advance health equity. OHA will develop measurement and evaluation strategies to increase understanding of spending in this area and track outcomes. The policies include:

  • Increase strategic spending by CCOs on social determinants of health, health equity and disparities in communities.
  • Increase CCO financial support of non-clinical and public health providers.
  • Align community health assessment and community health improvement plans to increase impact.
  • Strengthen meaningful engagement of tribes, diverse OHP members and community advisory councils (CACs).
  • Build CCOs’ organizational capacity to advance health equity.
  • Increase the integration and use of traditional health workers (THWs).

4. Maintain sustainable cost growth

To support sustainability of OHP, CCO 2.0 policies address the major cost drivers currently in the system. OHA will also identify areas where CCOs can increase efficiency, improve value and decrease administrative costs. The policies include:

  • Strengthen financial incentives and set up new tools to reward CCOs for improving health outcomes and containing costs.
  • Ensure program-wide financial stability and program integrity through improved reporting and strategies to manage a CCO in financial distress.
  • Use program purchasing power to align benefits and reduce costs, with a focus on pharmacy costs.

"In order to make these improvements a reality for our members, our team at OHA needs to hold ourselves accountable to monitor and enforce new and existing contracts with CCOs," said Jeremy Vandehey, director of OHA's Health Policy and Analytics Division. "We also need to set clear expectations and support providers and CCOs in making these changes so together we can improve health while containing costs."

The request for applications for the coordinated care contracts for 2020-2025 will be released in January, and the contracts are expected to be awarded in summer 2019.

For more information and to download the complete report, visit the CCO 2.0 webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/CCO-2-0.aspx.

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http://bit.ly/2NI1YSk


BBB Employment Scams Increase In 2018
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 10/15/18 9:20 AM

                                                                  More Than $3 Million Lost to Schemes

Portland, Oregon Oct. 15,?2018 - Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker reveals employment scams are on the rise. With the busy holiday hiring season underway, job seekers should be aware of the scope of these scams. Since January, North America residents have reported more than 3,465 employment scams to BBB Scam Tracker with over $3 million reported lost. Compare this to the estimated 1,751 employments scams with over $800,000 lost from January to October of last year. Locally, Oregonians have already reported 27 employment scams with over $57,480 lost this year.  

Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific wants job seekers to be aware of employment scams that often trick “new employees” into giving out their personal information or their hard-earned money. With fall upon us, many job-seekers may be looking for an easy way to make some extra cash to get through the upcoming holidays. Scammers may take advantage of this opportunity to prey on job seekers with scam job postings, fake recruiter emails and work-at-home schemes.   

To avoid employment scams, job hunters should look out for these red flags:  

  • Positions that require little training.?Always be wary of?work-from-home or secret shopper positions, or any job with a generic title such as a caregiver, administrative assistant, or customer service rep.?These positions don't?usually?require special training or licensing, which makes it appealing?to a wide range of applicants. Scammers?know this and use these otherwise legitimate titles in their fake ads.  
  • Vague company descriptions.?It’s a huge red flag if you can’t identify the company’s?contact information,?owner,?headquarters?or?even product from its online ad. Pro tip: check?online at bbb.org/northwest-pacific?to see if the employer has a good rating. Also, watch for legitimate companies being impersonated. Find the real employer website to verify if a job posting is real.  
  • No interview. If you are offered a job without a formal interview or job application, it’s most likely a scam. Be wary of jobs that hire on the spot or conduct interviews via online chat or instant messaging services.  
  • Job applications that require a fee.?The federal government and the U.S. Postal Service never charge for information about jobs or applications for jobs. Be wary of any offer to give you special access or guarantee you a job for a fee —if you are paying for the promise of a job, it’s probably a scam.  
  • Recruiters who don’t disclose information. A legitimate recruiter will provide you with a complete contract for their services with cost, what you get, who pays (you or the employer), and what happens if you do not find a job.  

If you've been a victim of an employment scam, help others avoid being scammed by filing a report at BBB.org/ScamTracker.?

 

ABOUT BBB:?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.??

 

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Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council presents Doug Newman Award at Oregon Trails Summit (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/15/18 9:05 AM
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1303/118753/thumb_Photo_credit_-__Gabriel_Amadeus_Tiller.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) presented the annual Doug Newman Memorial Award to Bruce Ronning at the 2018 Oregon Trails Summit Oct. 5.

Bruce Ronning is from Deschutes County and began his recreational career at the City of Eugene Parks Department. Bruce worked in their Outdoor Programs section, helping many Oregonians learn to ski, paddle, hike and bike.

During his career, Bruce served on several committees overseen by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: ORTAC, the Recreational Trails Program advisory committee, the Local Government Grant Program advisory committee, and review committees for development of Oregon’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) and the Oregon Statewide Recreation Trails Plan.

Bruce retired from public service after 24 years with the Bend Park and Recreation District. During his tenure Bruce served as the Outdoor Programs Manager, Long Range Planner, and finally as the Director of Planning and Development. During that time 65 miles of the 95-mile Bend Urban Trails Plan were developed.

The Doug Newman Memorial Award recognizes an Oregonian whose efforts have inspired, benefitted and contributed to the trails and trail users of Oregon. The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an avid outdoorsman, author and writer for the Eugene Register-Guard. He also worked extensively with the University of Oregon Outdoors Program. Diagnosed with polio as a child, Newman died in 1992.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise OPRD and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon. The Council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The Council meets four times annually in different locations across the state.

For more information about the Doug Newman award or ORTAC, contact Jodi Bellefeuille at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.




Attached Media Files: Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair

Oregon Community Bank Week recognizes a vital member of communities statewide
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 8:34 AM

Salem - Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 15-19, as Oregon Community Bank Week. The week honors local banks and their employees for their economic and civic contributions in communities across the state.

 

Oregon’s community banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, play an essential role in promoting the economic health and prosperity of the state. In some communities they are the sole provider of banking products and services and sometimes the largest employer.

 

Community banks provide $400 million in agriculture-related loans, $5.9 billion in small business loans, and 5,400 family wage jobs annually. 

 

“Our state banks take a relationship-based approach to doing business by providing banking services, creating jobs, and educating customers and students about a variety of financial matters,” said Cameron Smith, DCBS director. “They actively participate in every corner of the state and are a major financing source for our small businesses and farms.”

 

State chartered banks throughout Oregon are celebrating Community Bank Week in their local neighborhoods. Many of them will host consumers, students, small businesses, and local elected officials to showcase the positive effect banks have on the people they serve.

 

To learn more about the Oregon banks recognized during Community Bank Week, go to oregonbankers.com/community-bank-week.html.

 

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

 

About Oregon DFR:

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


Klondike West Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/15/18 8:33 AM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Klondike Fire, burning near Agness, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

 

The Office of State Marshal’s Red Incident Management Team led by Chief Ian Yocum, and five structural task forces from Lane, Rogue Valley, Linn, Benton, and Marion counties will arrive early this afternoon.  Three task forces will be assigned to day shift and two will be working the night shift.

 

 A level 3 "GO" evacuation is in effect for the Oak Flats and Spud Road areas of the Agness community.

 

More information on evacuations is available at Curry County Emergency Services Facebook.

 


Sun. 10/14/18
Photos: Oregon National Guard honors military police unit in demobilization ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 10/14/18 4:05 PM
2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg
2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/962/118745/thumb_181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

181014-Z-FS713-007: Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel (right), Adjutant General, Oregon, and 1186th Military Police commander, Capt. Richard Smith, pause for a photo during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers in the unit returned from Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-003: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Deparment Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-002: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-010: Brig. Gen. William J. Prendergast IV, Land Component Commander, shakes hands with Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of the 1186th Military Police Company to welcome them home from their overseas deployment during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit deployed to Afghanistan providing Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-002.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-003.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-007.jpg

Sat. 10/13/18
Oregon National Guard to honor military police unit in demobilization ceremony
Oregon Military Department - 10/13/18 8:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The 1186th Military Police Company, Oregon Army National Guard, is scheduled to be recognized in a demobilization ceremony on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 2:00 p.m., at the Anderson Readiness Center, located at 3225 State Street, Salem, Oregon, 97301. 

Approximately 30 Citizen-Soldiers were mobilized in May 2017 for deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel (OFS). The Soldiers provided Personal Security Details (PSD), protecting high-profile individuals.

Scheduled to attend the ceremony and welcome the Soldiers home will be Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon; Brig. Gen. William J. Prendergast, Land Component Commander; as well as other community and military leaders.

The 1186th MP Company is based in Salem, Oregon. The unit has often partnered with local law enforcement agencies for training. The 1186th MPs partnered with district and federal agencies to provide security, crowd management and traffic control during the 58th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C., in January 2017.

This unit has previously deployed overseas twice: to Afghanistan in 2011 and to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 2004. The company also provided domestic operations support in Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. 

The unit is comprised of Soldiers from Portland, Salem, Keizer, Beaverton, Lake Oswego, West Linn, Gresham, Monmouth, Eugene, Springfield, Veneta, Central Point, Oakland, Roseburg, Redmond, Milton-Freewater, Ontario, and Nyssa, Oregon. A few Soldiers are from Vancouver, Aberdeen, and Everett, Washington.

The event is open to the public and media is encouraged to attend.


Fri. 10/12/18
Enterprise Security Office Proactive Assessment Discovers Security Vulnerability
State of Oregon - 10/12/18 4:50 PM

During a regular cybersecurity assessment, security specialists at the Enterprise Security Office identified an information security vulnerability on an internet-connected system with the Oregon Department of State Lands.

In coordination with the Department of State Lands, the Enterprise Security Office began the assessment on October 5, 2018. The impacted system was taken offline on Monday, October 8, after a potential vulnerability was determined. The vulnerability was confirmed on Thursday, October 12, during the course of the assessment.

The system contained some personal information, including names, addresses, birthdates, and social security numbers. Through forensic investigations, security specialists have determined it is likely outside entities may have accessed some of this information.

The Department of State Lands will notify individuals whose information may have been compromised, and those individuals will be offered free credit monitoring.

At the direction of Governor Brown, the Enterprise Security Office conducts regular cybersecurity assessments of state agencies. These assessments are a proactive effort to minimize risk to the state’s electronic information systems and to best protect the information of Oregonians and businesses.

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Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee application deadline extended to October 31
Oregon Health Authority - 10/12/18 4:42 PM

October 12, 2018

Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee application deadline extended to October 31

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division has extended the deadline for applications for the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee to Oct. 31 to allow time for additional applications across all the recommended areas of expertise.

OHA invites applications from people who meet the criteria outlined in HB 4133, Section (3).

Board members are appointed by the Governor. Member terms are, in general, four years each. As this is a new committee, initial terms of office will be assigned by the Governor so that terms expire at staggered intervals.

To apply, submit the following to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Oct. 31:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, available on the Governor’s Office website at http://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

Information about the legislation is available on the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee website.

For more information, contact Cate Wilcox, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-0299 or cate.s.wilcox@state.or.us.

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http://bit.ly/2NEJdPK


Oregon Sends Second Team to Support Hurricane Michael Response
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/12/18 3:59 PM

Salem, OR – October 12, 2018 – The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal and Oregon Department of Forestry, through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), is working with Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management to support a request from the Florida Division of Emergency Management for a second All-Hazards Incident Management Teams (IMTs) to support the response to Hurricane Michael.

 

The EMAC is a mutual aid agreement among states and territories of the United States. Essentially working as a mutual aid system, the agreement offers assistance during governor-declared state of emergency or disaster through a responsive, straightforward system. This system allows states to send personnel, equipment, and commodities to assist with response and recovery efforts in other states.

 

The OSFM IMT, led by Chief Ted Kunze, also includes staff from the Oregon Department of Forestry who are qualified within the Incident Command Structure.

 

“We value our working relationships and partnerships with fellow states agencies,” said Oregon Department of Forestry's Interim Operations Manager, Blake Ellis. “Florida has been there for us in our time of need, sending a full IMT to our aid during this year’s challenging fire season, and Oregon is fortunate to have the opportunity to return the favor”

 

The team heads to Florida tomorrow morning and anticipates a full deployment of 14 days.

 

We wish success to the team and will keep Florida in our thoughts as they recover from this devastating storm.


Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest and Southwest Oregon will meet Oct. 25 in Eugene
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/12/18 2:09 PM

EUGENE, Ore. — The Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest Oregon and Southwest Oregon will meet Thursday, Oct. 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Valley River Inn, 1000 Valley River Way in Eugene. The committee will hear about the pesticide stewardship partnership between the Oregon Department of Forestry, Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Committee members will also receive updates on:

  • the work of the Oregon Department of Forestry’s monitoring unit
  • tethered logging guidance
  • forest health
  • analysis of rules concerning a bird called the marbled murrelet

 

In addition, committee members will decide on which nomination to accept as operator of the year for their respective area.

 

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to ODF’s Susan Domenique at 503-945-7502.
 

Regional Forest Practice Committees are panels of citizens - mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Northwest, Southwest and Eastern Oregon regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.


Oregon’s forests are among one of the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

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Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committee will meet Oct. 18 in central Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/12/18 2:01 PM

SUNRIVER, Ore. — The Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committee will meet in Sunriver on Thursday, Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The meeting will be held in Sunriver's main lodge. The committee will hear about the pesticide stewardship partnership between the Oregon Department of Forestry, Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Department of Agriculture. It will also receive updates on:

  • the work of the Oregon Department of Forestry’s monitoring unit
  • tethered logging guidance
  • forest health
  • analysis of rules concerning a bird called the marbled murrelet

In addition, committee members will decide on which nomination to accept as operator of the year for Eastern Oregon.

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to ODF’s Susan Domenique at 503-945-7502.

Regional Forest Practice Committees are panels of citizens - mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest and regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

 
Oregon’s forests are among one of the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

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City of Richland to Present Lamb Weston with a $266,500 Energy Efficiency Incentive Check
City of Richland - 10/12/18 1:43 PM

The City of Richland City Council will present Richland’s Lamb Weston Inc. a $266,500 incentive check at the October 16, 2018, Council Meeting for its most recent energy efficiency project. Lamb Weston recently completed operational and equipment improvements at its Richland plant that will save more than 12,000,000 kWh annually. This is enough energy to serve 833 Richland homes.

City of Richland Energy Services (RES) provides energy efficiency incentives to customers as part the Bonneville Power Administration’s (BPA) Energy Smart Industrial Program to help offset the incremental cost of high-efficiency systems and operations and encourage customers to pursue energy-efficient projects.

“Energy efficiency and conservation are the lowest cost and risk resources compared to building new generation facilities,” said Clint Whitney, the City’s Energy Services Director. “Lamb Weston is a great corporate partner committed to saving energy. This helps reduce Richland’s wholesale power costs and keeps retail electric rates low which benefits all customers.”

Since 2010, Lamb Weston has worked diligently with RES staff, participated in RES and BPA programs, and invested $2.4 million in operational and equipment improvements saving more than 15,580,000 kWh annually – enough energy to serve 1,082 Richland homes.

“Our company cares about being a good steward of our natural resources, which also creates an efficient plant operation,” said Warren Staples, Richland Plant Manager, Lamb Weston. 

Lamb Weston selected Richland as the site of its $200 million, 290,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art potato processing plant Line 5, which began operating in 2017 and added 150 permanent jobs to the local economy. The plant converts raw potatoes into 2 million pounds of frozen potato products per day of operation, or 600 million pounds a year, that are enjoyed by people throughout the U.S.

In addition to presenting the incentive check, the City Council will also issue a proclamation recognizing Lamb Weston for its corporate partnership that positively impacts Richland’s economy and enhances the well-being of the community and citizens. The City Council Meeting will be at Council Chamber at 505 Swift Blvd., Richland on October 16 at 7:30 p.m.


Partners united for salmon, steelhead and lamprey extend Columbia Basin Fish Accords
Bonneville Power Administration - 10/12/18 11:16 AM

Portland, Ore. – States, tribes and three federal agencies continue to work side by side for the good of endangered salmon and steelhead as they extend the historic Columbia Basin Fish Accords for up to four more years.

The original agreements, signed in 2008, provided states and tribes more than $900 million to implement projects benefiting salmon, steelhead, and other fish and wildlife, and $50 million for Pacific lamprey passage improvements at federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The Accords partnerships over the past 10 years balanced the agencies’ needs to perform their missions of navigation, flood risk management, hydropower production, fish and wildlife mitigation, recreation, water supply and irrigation in a manner consistent with tribal trust and treaty rights.

The new Accords extensions could run through September 2022 and will set aside more than $400 million for fish and wildlife mitigation and protection.

Since 2008, Accord dollars have: protected more than 36,000 acres of riparian habitat and improved nearly 7,000 acres; protected nearly 100,000 acre-feet of water; restored nearly 600 miles of streams and tributaries; opened access to nearly 2,000 miles of blocked fish habitat; and improved Pacific lamprey passage at dams operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The agreements also committed funding for hatcheries.

"With this renewed commitment, we look forward to building on the momentum and progress of the past 10 years," said Brig. Gen. Pete Helmlinger, commander of the Corps’ Northwestern Division.

 “These agreements continue to represent a significant, regional partnership,” says Lorri Gray, Pacific Northwest Regional Director for the Bureau of Reclamation. “The work we’ve accomplished with the Accords illustrates the progress we can make for fish when we work together. We've seen that spending dollars on improving habitat is good for the fish and good for the region.”

“These extensions ensure we will continue to benefit from years of collaboration and direct coordination with our Accords partners,” says Elliot Mainzer, administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration. “The alignment derived from these agreements ensures we will continue to get the highest value for the fish and wildlife investments we make in the region.”

Accord agreements were extended with the Shoshone Bannock Tribes, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the states of Idaho and Montana, BPA, the Corps and Reclamation.To read the new agreements, go to  www.bpa.gov/goto/FishAccordsExtensions.


Keno prize at the end of the rainbow (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/12/18 9:31 AM
Keno stock art
Keno stock art
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4939/118685/thumb_Keno-hand-fan.jpg

October 11, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Sitting at home checking his numbers on his iPad, it didn’t sink in when Larry Bowser of Eugene realized he had won the Keno 8-Spot bonus.
Bowser, purchased his tickets while at the Fred Meyer on 11th Avenue in Eugene, and at the time didn’t think much of playing a $3 wager with Special Keno and Bulls-Eye. As luck would have it, Bowser not only matched all 8-numbers, but also hit the Bulls-Eye number, and with his $3 wager, multiplied his prize by 3.
In the end, his $3 wager led to a $247,914 prize, the third-highest Keno 8-spot winner since 2000. His win also makes him one of the biggest Bulls-Eye winners since the introduction of the Bulls-Eye Keno feature. The Bulls-Eye option is $1 extra and after the 20 winning numbers are revealed, the Bulls-Eye arrow randomly lands on one of those numbers. Then the Bulls-Eye prize is added to whatever you already won. Bowser hit the Bulls-Eye number which was worth $40,000, but since he had three tickets, it meant he’d won $120,000.
“I dropped the kids off this morning and was headed to Salem on Highway 126 and as I turned on the road, a rainbow came out,” he said. “That was amazing. That’s when I realized I won.”
Bowser said he was going to use his prize for his kids and they are planning a vacation.
During the 2015-17 biennium in Lane County, where Bowser lives and played Keno, more than $50.8 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
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Attached Media Files: Keno stock art , Rainbow

Thu. 10/11/18
Wapato Schools "U Can Be College Bound" Day
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 10/11/18 3:40 PM

Good afternoon all,

Please see the attached release regarding our “U Can Be College Bound” Day scheduled for tomorrow, Friday, October 12th.

If you are interested in covering this please let me know.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Wapato Schools "U Can Be College Bound" Day

Oregon Military Department scheduled to sell National Guard armory in Burns (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 10/11/18 2:43 PM
2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg
2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/962/118697/thumb_Front_view_Armory_.jpg

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Military Department is scheduled to sell the Oregon Army National Guard armory in Burns, Oregon, for a fair market price of $250,000. The property is located at 619 S. Fairview Ave.

The Burns Paiute Tribal Council will purchase the property once terms of the Land Sale Agreement are completed.  The terms of the Land Sale Agreement are $225,000 down and $5,000 each year for the next five years. The tribal council approved the purchase last week.

“We are so grateful for the opportunity to purchase the armory and turn it into a wellness center for our community,” said Eric Hawley, Tribal Counsel Chief.

The Burns Armory has been vacant since 2013. At that time, there were only eight Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers living in Burns assigned to a 21-person engineer unit. The remainder of Soldiers in that unit lived in the greater Bend, Oregon, area. In 2012, the unit began conducting drill training at the Bend Armory and was officially re-stationed there in 2013.

Legislative approval to sell the armory was achieved in 2017 as part of Senate Bill 5506 and the sale was listed under terms defined by The Department of Administrative Services.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg

SAFE SECURE SCHOOLS WORKSHOP by YSD and YPD Friday, October 12 at IKE (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 10/11/18 11:41 AM
2018-10/3536/118698/SAFE_SECURE_WORKSHOP-Pic.JPG
2018-10/3536/118698/SAFE_SECURE_WORKSHOP-Pic.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3536/118698/thumb_SAFE_SECURE_WORKSHOP-Pic.JPG

Yakima School District and the Yakima Police Department have collaborated to provide a SAFE SECURE SCHOOLS WORKSHOP to approximately 300 Yakima School District employees on Friday, October 12, from 8am-4pm at Eisenhower High School (there is no school for students on October 12th).  Participants will learn how to identify, prevent, and react to potential school violence. Sessions include: Graffiti  Awareness and School/Community Impact; Cyber Safety and Education; Workplace Violence, De-Escalation and Prevention; Child Interviews Do’s and Don’ts; Emergency 1s Aid; Identifying Traits and Characteristics that Lead to Violent Behavior; Creating a Safe School Culture; Active Shooter Response; and Live Gun Fire Preparedness Simulation. The safety of Yakima School District students, staff, and community is our number one priority.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/3536/118698/SAFE_SECURE_WORKSHOP-Pic.JPG

Oregon State Police investigating rollover truck crash on Hwy 99W south of Dundee Bypass - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/11/18 10:48 AM
2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118694/thumb_Coke_2.jpg

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are currently on scene of a roll over truck crash on Hwy 99W near mile post 26.

This is a single vehicle crash with minor injuries to the operator.

Expect delays in the area for the next couple of hours.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_1.jpg

Find pumpkin patches with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 10/11/18 10:00 AM
Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne.
Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/5507/118688/thumb_smithrockranch.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Use a smartphone to easily find pumpkin patches, u-pick orchards, farm stands, and harvest festivals with Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org.

Pumpkins, apples, pears, and squash are just a few examples of autumn’s agricultural bounty. But if you want to venture out into the countryside to buy seasonal food directly from a farmer or rancher, where do you go?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is, but not everyone knows where to find roadside farm stands, pumpkin patches, u-pick orchards, and harvest events. That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Smartphone-friendly, the Oregon’s Bounty website allows visitors to search for a specific agriculture product — like pumpkins or apples — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state, such as Portland Metro, the Gorge, or the Willamette Valley. Visitors can also do a search for “u-pick” or “events” to locate those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of Oregon agriculture, we can buy an enormous variety of fruits, vegetables, meat, dairy products, nuts, and flowers directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members, who are proud of what they’ve raised and are happy to answer questions about what they do,” said Moss. “Fall is an ideal time to take a trip into the scenic countryside, meet a few of these family farmers, and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state’s largest general agriculture organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing farm and ranch families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families professionally engaged in agriculture.




Attached Media Files: Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne. , 2018-10/5507/118688/OregonsBountyFall.png

Schools Make Continued Gains in ELA and Math (Photo)
ESD 123 - 10/11/18 6:00 AM
2018 SOD Banner
2018 SOD Banner
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1212/118635/thumb_2018_SOD_Banner-3.31x2.14-01.jpg

PASCO, WA – The Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) announced today the list of Washington State’s highest improving schools.  For Educational Service District 123, six school districts in Southeast Washington are celebrating their notification as 2018 Schools of Distinction – and EVERY school is a repeat winner!

Now in its 12th year, the School of Distinction award recognizes schools who are improving performance for all students over a sustained period of time in English Language Arts (ELA) and mathematics.  Among the 91 schools statewide, the following schools represent our region:  Dayton Elementary, Dayton Middle School, Hawthorne Elementary (Kennewick), Wahitis Elementary (Othello), Pasco High School, Paterson Elementary, and Waitsburg Elementary.

ESD 123 Superintendent, Mr. Darcy Weisner, is proud to congratulate these schools for their well-deserved recognition.

“We congratulate the staff, students, administrators, and communities of these schools for their continued focus on helping each student succeed,” states Superintendent Weisner.

Each winning school expects to coordinate a local celebratory ceremony in late November or December in honor of the school’s award.  For more information, contact ESD 123 Director of Communications, Molly Curtiss, at 509.544.5787 or tiss@esd123.org">mcurtiss@esd123.org.

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About ESD 123:  Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018 SOD Banner