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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Mon. Jun. 18 - 7:51 am
Mon. 06/18/18
NASA Camp at DAVIS Monday June 18 - Thursday June 21
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 06/18/18 7:00 AM

Today, 40 students are beginning NASA sponsored Rocketry and Remote Sensing and Environmental Science and Remote Sensing Camps in conjunction with the University of Washington at no cost to the participants.

The camp is located at Davis High School Monday, June 18th through Thursday, June 21st from 8 AM – 2 PM.  This camp, already full, is for high school students and is being conducted by teachers Brian Richardson, Dr. Cheryl Young, Jason Klingele of Davis Science Department and Matt Meyer of Wilson Middle School.  Campers use hands-on scientific principles to investigate properties of S.T.E.M. subjects of Biology and Physics.

If media would like to learn more or coordinate a visit to the camp, please contact Brian Richardson, 509-969-3692, Email: ichardson.brian@yakimaschools.org" target="_blank">Richardson.brian@yakimaschools.org.


Sat. 06/16/18
Governor Ceremoniously Signs State Tuition Assistance Bill For Oregon National Guard (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/16/18 5:39 PM
2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0031.JPG
2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0031.JPG
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SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon National Guard hosted a Governor’s Ceremonial Signing of House Bill 4035 June 16, at Kingsley Field, Air National Guard Base.

Governor Kate Brown, Oregon Rep. Mike McLane (House Minority Leader, HD 55), Oregon Rep. Gene Whisnant (HD 53), and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, were in attendance.

House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard. The bill, passed by the Oregon Legislature on March 3, details the requirements that will qualify Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen to receive state-funded tuition assistance towards an associate or baccalaureate degree at Oregon public universities and community colleges. The Higher Education Coordinating Commission will administer the grant program, scheduled to begin in the 2018-2019 academic year.

The bill was introduced by Rep. McLane, and received bi-partisan support across the legislature, as well as support from the governor in alignment with her goal to enhance education programs across Oregon.

“I’m proud to sign a bill into law that deepens Oregon’s commitment to our National Guard service members,” said Governor Brown. “Whether they’re fighting on the frontlines, fighting wildfires, or helping prepare our state for the influx of eclipse viewers, our Oregon Guard members are always ready to answer the call to help Oregonians in times of need. Extending tuition assistance to Guard members is one important way to show our appreciation for their service by investing in their education and future.”

In 2017 alone, approximately 15 percent of the Oregon National Guard was called into service for emergencies, disasters, and crisis planning, including wild land firefighting, hurricane relief efforts, search and rescue missions, and traffic assistance during the solar eclipse. Meanwhile, nearly 200 Oregon Guardsmen were deployed overseas last year.

“This new law specifically bridges the federal tuition assistance shortfall and enables our Guard men and women to complete their associate or bachelor degrees,” said Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon. “It aligns with the governor’s education focused agenda and will not only serve as a huge recruitment and retention tool, but it will also provide us with the breadth of knowledge we need to think like leaders and succeed in an increasingly technologically complex world.”

Service members statistically cite money for education as the number one reason they join the military. Those who already have federal education benefits such as the Montgomery G.I. Bill or the Post 9/11 Bill will need to use those benefits prior to using the state tuition assistance funding. Qualified students can use up to 90 credit hours at an Oregon community college and up to 180 credit hours at a public university. To receive the tuition assistance they must be in good standing with their Oregon National Guard commitments and their educational institution.

“We expect the tuition assistance bill’s impact for recruitment and retention within the Oregon National Guard to be substantial,” said Stencel. “Filling the ranks continues to be important not only to provide a capable, ready force for our nation, but to also ensure a robust Oregon National Guard to support Oregonians during disasters here at home.”

Photo Captions:

180616-Z-NV612-0009 - Oregon Rep. Mike McLain, House Minority Leader, speaks during a ceremony to mark the signing of House Bill 4035 June 16, 2018 at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon.  House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

180616-Z-NV612-0019 - Oregon Governor Kate Brown presents the signed copies of House Bill 4035 during a ceremony June 16, 2018 at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon.  House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

180616-Z-NV612-0031 - Oregon Governor Kate Brown speaks during a ceremony to mark the signing of House Bill 4035 June 16, 2018 at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon.  House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

180616-Z-NV612-0014 - Oregon Governor Kate Brown ceremoniously signs House Bill 4035 June 16, 2018 at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon.  House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard.  (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0031.JPG , 2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0019.JPG , 2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0014.JPG , 2018-06/962/115384/180616-Z-NV612-0009.JPG

Vehicle crashes into Hellgate Canyon - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/16/18 2:20 PM
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2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_054626.jpg
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On June 16, 2018 at approximately 12:50 AM Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a 911 call on Galice Rd.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a female from Grants Pass had called 911 and reported that a male had been assaulted and that he was in need of medical attention.    She stayed on the phone with 911 and began driving to the hospital.  As Troopers were responding they located the male in the middle of Galice Rd. and evidence that a vehicle had left the road and went into Hellgate Canyon.

Rural Metro Fire personnel rappelled into Hellgate Canyon and there they located a Honda Civic with a female operator that sustained fatal injuries in the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Josephine County Search and Rescue and Rural Metro Fire.

No further information will be released as investigation is continuing.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_054626.jpg , 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_061507.jpg , 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_054600.jpg

Impairment being investigated in crash on Hwy 99E - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/16/18 11:35 AM
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On June 15, 2018 at approximately 6:26 PM Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle injury crash on Hwy 99E near milepost 43 in Marion County. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2002 Dodge minivan was slowing to make a left turn when it was rear ended by a 2018 Nissan.  The minivan was pushed into the ditch, rolled onto its side, and caught fire.  The six passengers and the operator were able to escape the minivan through broken windows before it became engulfed in flames. All occupants received what are believed to be minor injuries and were not transported to the hospital.

The operator of the Nissan was transported to the hospital where she was cited and released for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants, Reckless Driving, and  Driving while Suspended. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115379/Resized_20180615_190527.jpeg , 2018-06/1002/115379/Resized_20180615_184332.jpeg , 2018-06/1002/115379/image000000.jpg

Single vehicle fatal car crash Interstate 5 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 06/16/18 11:06 AM

On Friday June 15, 2018 at approximately 4:15PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 95. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a gold colored Mazda sedan operated by Giancarlo FUELA (male), age 26, of Princeton, MA was traveling northbound on I-5 when for unknown reasons the sedan impacted the concrete median near milepost 95.  The vehicle then veered off the road, crossed both lanes of travel, and struck a rock embankment.  After hitting the rock embankment it rolled and came to rest on the shoulder of I-5. 

A passenger in the vehicle suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. (name will be released next week) 

I-5 northbound traffic was delayed due to single vehicle lane restriction at this location for approximately 3 hours while the scene was being investigated. 

Oregon State Police was assisted by medical personnel and the Oregon Department of Transportation. 

 


Fri. 06/15/18
2nd Update - Father and Son Tragedy on the Beach in Rockaway (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/15/18 8:28 PM
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On Friday June 15, 2018 at approximately 11:00 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a deceased person in the surf near Rockaway Beach.  The deceased was determined to be Samuel Vicente ALLEN.  ALLEN was missing and presumed to have drowned after a surfing incident on June 6, 2018.  Allen was found approximately one half mile from where he was last seen on June 6.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Rockaway Beach Fire and Rescue, Rockaway Beach Police Department, and the Tillamook County Medical Examiner.

Robert Joseph Allen, age 50, from Fort Collins, CO and Samuel Vicente Allen, age 17, from Fort Collins, CO.

The Coast Guard is continuing the search for Samuel Allen.  

 

On Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at about 2:21pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a water rescue occurring on the Pacific Ocean beach adjacent to the city of Rockaway Beach. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a 17 year old male from Fort Collins, Colorado was riding a Boogie Board in the surf when a wave knocked him off his board.  Family members, on the shore, could see he was in distress.  His father, age 50, from Fort Collins, Colorado entered the surf in an attempt to rescue his son.  After several minutes, family members lost sight of both father and son.

A search and rescue effort was begun involving the US Coast Guard and local emergency responders.  While flying over the area, a US Coast Guard helicopter located and recovered the 50 year old male, who was deceased.  The 17 year old male is still missing and is presumed to be deceased.

At this time the search is still ongoing for the 17 year old male.

OSP was assisted by Rockaway Beach Fire and Rescue, the Rockaway beach Police Department, the Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office, Tillamook Regional Medical Center Ambulance and the United States Coast Guard.   

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115095/20180606_163312.jpg

Health advisory issued for Upper Klamath Lake June 15
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/18 6:24 PM

June 15, 2018

High algae toxin levels found in Upper Klamath Lake

A health advisory was issued today for Upper Klamath Lake. The lake is located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce in this area of Upper Klamath Lake. These toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. Oregon public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people connected to public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Upper Klamath Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Eagle Ridge County Park for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Wapato Schools' Dedication of Simcoe Elementary School
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 06/15/18 4:06 PM

Hi all,

Attached is a release and a document sharing more details about our brand new elementary school we will be dedicating on Monday afternoon.  (June 18, 2018).

The release is not so much for you to broadcast as it is an invite to the media to join us for this event.

We expect at least a couple of state legislators to join us for this dedication.

Drop me an email or give me a buzz if you think you might make it out on Monday.

 

                                  

 

 




Attached Media Files: The Simcoe Story , Wapato Schools Dedication of Simcoe Elementary School

MEDIA ALERT: SEWASA Banquet Awards Leaders in Education Across Southeast Washington (Photo)
ESD 123 - 06/15/18 2:58 PM
Youth suicide prevention and mental health community leader, Kristi Haynes, presented by Darcy Weisner
Youth suicide prevention and mental health community leader, Kristi Haynes, presented by Darcy Weisner
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RICHLAND, WA – Members of the Southeast Washington Association of School Administrators (SEWASA) celebrated the end of the 2017-2018 school year yesterday evening at the annual SEWASA Honorary Awards Banquet.  On the evening of June 14, superintendents, community educational advocates, and school administrators representing the twenty-three school districts across southeast Washington gathered at the Meadow Springs Country Club in Richland to recognize outstanding contributions to education.

The annual SEWASA Awards ceremony is hosted each year by Educational Service District (ESD) 123 in partnership with the Washington Association of School Administrators (WASA). During the June 14 ceremony, the following recognitions were presented:

  • Award of Merit – Dr. Ray Tolcacher, former superintendent of Prosser School District.  This award was presented to Dr. Tolcacher for his demonstrated effective leadership at a regional level and for significant contributions to WASA through his work in the field of education in Washington.
  • Community Leadership Awards:
    • Dan Martin, Burbank Grange (Columbia School District)
    • Judi Pilcher, Community Member (Dayton School District)
    • Ed Townsend, Community Member (Dixie School District)
    • Kristi Haynes, Prevention Education Consultant (ESD 123)
    • John Doran, Finley Athletic Director (Finley School District)
    • Paul Schneidmiller, World Wide Travel (Walla Walla Public Schools)
    • Kathy Valdez, Becky McGuin, and Katherine Bingham, Franklin County Graphic (North Franklin School District)
    • Dr. Rebekah Woods, Columbia Basin College (Pasco School District)
    • Julie Funfar, Mary Guay, Pam Kindle, Denise Homer, and Mary Gies, Richland Education Foundation (Richland School District)
    • Joe Green, Charlotte King, Doris Brower, Eleanor Ferreira, Dorothy Larimore, and Myrlen McKinnon, Brookdale Canyon Lakes (Kennewick School District)
    • David McIlroy, Community Member (Starbuck School District)
    • Chris Wallace, Community Member (Touchet School District)
    • Russ Knopp, School Board Member (Waitsburg School District)

The Community Leadership Award is presented to community members or groups in recognition of their outstanding contributions toward education. Recipients are non-WASA members. Specific criteria includes: benefit to students, leadership, motivation, success, cooperation/coordination with local district, recognition by others, and history of service.

  • Retirement Award:
    • Dr. Ray Tolcacher, Prosser School District
    • Dr. Lou Gates, Columbia School District
    • Gregg Taylor, North Franklin School District

The Retirement Award honors service to the profession. This award is presented in honor of service to the profession to a recipient who is retiring from his/her administrative responsibilities and no longer eligible for active WASA membership.

ESD 123 Superintendent Mr. Darcy Weisner states, “The winners of these awards have made a lasting impact on the students and schools across our entire region. Their work is the kind that unfortunately doesn’t always receive the recognition it deserves, but does more for student success than people can imagine.”  Superintendent Weisner went on to say, “Our mission statement at ESD 123 is ‘One Team…Helping all students realize their dreams and aspirations.’ We are proud to have these people on our team.”

ESD 123 wishes to congratulate all of the award recipients recognized at the 2018 awards banquet. To view all photographs from the evening’s celebration, visit the ESD 123 Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ESD123. For more information, contact Molly Curtiss at 509.544.5787 or tiss@esd123.org">mcurtiss@esd123.org.

###

About ESD 123:  Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.




Attached Media Files: Youth suicide prevention and mental health community leader, Kristi Haynes, presented by Darcy Weisner , Kennewick Superintendent Dave Bond with members from Brookdale Canyon Lakes , Retiring Columbia Superintendent Dr. Lou Gates with ESD 123 Superintendent Darcy Weisner

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers requesting public's help in locating suspect(s) involved in the Unlawful Taking of buck deer. (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/15/18 2:55 PM
2018-06/1002/115358/Pics_06-15-18_016.jpg
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On June 15, 2018, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers received information of a dead deer located in west Eugene near Churchill High School.  Troopers located a deceased buck deer with an arrow protruding from its mid-section.  This is the second occurrence in the same area of west Eugene and is believed to be related.  Anyone with information regarding the Unlawful Taking of this buck deer or any other deer is asked to contact Trooper Wolcott at 541-868-5056.     

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

Poaching wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges. 

The Oregon Hunters Association offers rewards to persons, through their T.I.P. fund, for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) for illegal possession, killing, or taking of bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, elk, deer, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, furbearers and/or upland game birds and water fowl. T.I.P. rewards can also be paid for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of game fish, and/or shell fish, and for the destruction of habitat.

In addition rewards may be paid for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) who have illegally obtained Oregon hunting/angling license or tags. People who “work” the system and falsely apply for resident license or tags are not legally hunting or angling and are considered poachers.

Rewards:

Bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose                                                                      $1,000

Elk, deer, antelope                                                                                                         $500

Bear, cougar, wolf                                                                                                           $300

Habitat destruction                                                                                                         $300

Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags                                  $200

Game fish, shell fish                                                                                                         $100

Upland birds, waterfowl                                                                                                  $100

Furbearers                                                                                                                          $100

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115358/Pics_06-15-18_016.jpg

Oregon State Police seeks assistance in Oakridge area poaching case (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/15/18 2:14 PM
2018-06/1002/115356/elk.jpg
2018-06/1002/115356/elk.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1002/115356/thumb_elk.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person (s) responsible for the unlawful taking of a cow elk on private property near Oakridge.

On the evening of June 2, 2018 Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division Troopers and Oakridge Police Department Officers responded to a report of a trespass in progress with an elk down on private property in the Dunning Road area. The suspect fled the area prior to police arrival.  Investigation revealed a cow elk had been shot and left at the location.

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact Fish and Wildlife Senior Trooper Marshall Maher   through the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-953-9942

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

Poaching  wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges. 

The Oregon Hunters Association offers rewards to persons, through their T.I.P. fund,  for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) for illegal possession, killing, or taking of bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose, elk, deer, antelope, bear, cougar, wolf, furbearers and/or upland game birds and water fowl. T.I.P. rewards can also be paid for the illegal taking, netting, snagging, and/or dynamiting of game fish, and/or shell fish, and for the destruction of habitat.

In addition rewards may be paid for information leading to the issuance of a citation to a person(s), or an arrest made of a person(s) who have illegally obtained Oregon hunting/angling license or tags. People who “work” the system and falsely apply for resident license or tags are not legally hunting or angling and are considered poachers.

Rewards:

Bighorn sheep, mountain goat, moose                                                                        $1,000

Elk, deer, antelope                                                                                                         $500

Bear, cougar, wolf                                                                                                           $300

Habitat destruction                                                                                                         $300

Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags                                         $200

Game fish, shell fish                                                                                                       $100

Upland birds, waterfowl                                                                                                  $100

Furbearers                                                                                                                      $100




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115356/elk.jpg

Recreational use health advisory for Detroit Lake re-issued June 15
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/18 1:26 PM

June 15, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Detroit Lake re-issued June 15

High toxin levels found in Linn-Marion county lake

The Oregon Health Authority re-issued a recreational health advisory today for Detroit Lake, located 46 miles southeast of Salem. The lake spans both Linn and Marion counties.

Water monitoring has again confirmed the presence of harmful algae above Oregon Health Authority recreational guideline values for cyanotoxins. At measured levels cyanotoxins can be harmful to humans and animals. Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of harmful algae and avoid areas with visible scum that looks foamy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, or where small bright-green clumps are floating in the water.

Since May 29, Oregon Health Authority officials have been receiving daily samples for Detroit Lake from the City of Salem. It is unusual for the Harmful Algae Bloom Program to get daily samples. Typically, the program receives sample results for recreational bodies of water on a weekly basis. OHA's guidelines require the agency to issue an advisory whenever cyanotoxin levels exceed recreational guideline values.

This more-frequent-than-usual sampling, along with daily changes in toxin levels measured in that daily sampling from Detroit Lake, is the reason recreational advisories have been issued and lifted so often for Detroit Lake.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. The Santiam River downstream of Detroit Lake is the source of drinking water for several cities, including the City of Salem. On June 10, the City of Salem’s drinking water advisory for vulnerable populations was extended for at least two more weeks. For more information about the city’s water advisory, visit http://www.cityofsalem.net/.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Detroit Lake for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

Drinking water directly from Detroit Lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA Public Health Division officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Detroit Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid activities during which water can be ingested, people are encouraged to visit Detroit Lake and enjoy activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Although inhalation risk is much lower than ingestion, it can present a risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Cannabis Commission Patient Access Subcommittee meets June 22 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/18 1:02 PM

June 15, 2018

Cannabis Commission Patient Access Subcommittee meets June 22 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission Patient Access Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: June 22, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public may also attend by conference call at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and and eight members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, the commission advises the Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Liquor Control Commission about statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, visit the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Deputy Attorney General Recognizes Oregon Appellate Chief (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/15/18 10:58 AM
Award Ceremony Photo
Award Ceremony Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6325/115347/thumb_USAOR-EOUSA-Directors_Awards-2018-Zusman.jpg

WASHINGTON – Kelly Zusman, Appellate Unit Chief for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon, was one of 162 members of the Department of Justice recognized by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, and Executive Office for U.S. Attorney’s (EOUSA) Director James Crowell, IV at the 34th Director’s Awards Ceremony today in Washington, D.C.

The District of Oregon was one of 35 districts represented at the ceremony held in the Great Hall at the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building.

In addressing the award recipients and guests, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said, “Today’s honorees earned the esteem of their colleagues.  But most importantly, they earned the gratitude of our fellow citizens — the people whose communities you made safer, whose lives you improved, and whose trust you rewarded. Today, we pause to honor and recognize a small portion of your work.”

Ms. Zusman was recognized for her outstanding performance in representing the U.S. before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in U.S. v. Mohamud.

On November 26, 2010, Mohamed Mohamud flipped a switch believing it would detonate a bomb planted at the holiday tree lighting ceremony in downtown Portland, Oregon. Fortunately, there was no bomb as Mohamud was the subject of an FBI sting. A jury convicted Mohamud of attempting to detonate a weapon of mass destruction. Litigation was extensive and several novel and complex issues were raised on appeal.

Most significantly, the defendant challenged the constitutionality of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Amendment Act (FAA). The government’s briefing involved over 300 pages of classified and unclassified submissions and a 30,000 page record. After extensive preparation, including moots before the Criminal Division and the National Security Division, Ms. Zusman argued the case in July 2016. The conviction and sentence were later affirmed and the FAA found to be constitutional. The ruling was a significant victory for national security.

“Kelly’s dedicated service to the District of Oregon and the United States is beyond reproach. She’s nationally recognized for her appellate expertise and locally cherished for her leadership, unwavering support of coworkers, and persistent can-do attitude,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

EOUSA provides oversight, general executive assistance, and direction to the 94 United States Attorneys’ offices around the country. For more information on EOUSA and its mission, visit http://www.justice.gov/usao.

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Attached Media Files: Press Release , Award Ceremony Photo

U.S. Attorney Statement On Joint Dismissal of Springfield Veterans Affairs Case
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/15/18 10:43 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced that a joint stipulation of dismissal has been reached with Springfield, Oregon veteran Michael Williamson.

Mr. Williamson is a U.S. Air Force Veteran with a 100% disability rating due to his diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (“ALS”). The VA has contracted for Mr. Williamson’s in-home care for 19 years. Unfortunately, late last year his contracted provider abruptly submitted a 90-day notice to discontinue his care, citing safety concerns. After Mr. Williamson filed suit, the VA in coordination with the U.S. Attorney’s Office worked collaboratively with Mr. Williamson and his attorneys from Disability Rights Oregon, to find additional options for in-home providers that could meet the high level of care needed in this case.

“We are pleased to announce that the VA and Mr. Williamson have reached a joint agreement to dismiss this case,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “The parties have worked hard to reach consensus on this matter. He is an honored veteran and deserving of thoughtful and attentive care.”

“I’m pleased we were able to achieve a successful outcome that honored our veteran and his family’s wishes while also providing a safe environment for his care,” said David Whitmer, Interim Medical Center Director, Roseburg VA Healthcare System. “Because of the complex care needed by an ALS patient, this took some time to negotiate and ensure a home based solution that could meet all of the requirements.”

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115346/USA_Statement-VA_Agreement-Final.pdf

Governor to ceremoniously sign state tuition assistance bill for Oregon National Guard
Oregon Military Department - 06/15/18 9:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon National Guard is scheduled to host a Governor’s Ceremonial Signing of House Bill 4035 at 3:45 p.m.on Saturday, June 16, in Hangar 219, at Kingsley Field, Air National Guard base, located at 211 Arnold Avenue, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 97603.

Governor Kate Brown, Oregon Rep. Mike McLane (House Minority Leader, HD 55), Oregon Rep. Gene Whisnant (HD 53), and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, are among those scheduled to attend.

House Bill 4035 authorizes state tuition assistance for service members in the Oregon National Guard. The bill, passed by the Oregon Legislature on March 3, details the requirements that will qualify Oregon National Guard Soldiers and Airmen to receive state-funded tuition assistance towards an associate or baccalaureate degree at Oregon public universities and community colleges. The Higher Education Coordinating Commission will administer the grant program, scheduled to begin in the 2018-2019 academic year.

The bill was introduced by Rep. McLane, and received bi-partisan support across the legislature, as well as support from the governor in alignment with her goal to enhance education programs across Oregon.

“I’m proud to sign a bill into law that deepens Oregon’s commitment to our National Guard service members,” said Governor Brown. “Whether they’re fighting on the frontlines, fighting wildfires, or helping prepare our state for the influx of eclipse viewers, our Oregon Guard members are always ready to answer the call to help Oregonians in times of need. Extending tuition assistance to Guard members is one important way to show our appreciation for their service by investing in their education and future.”

In 2017 alone, approximately 15 percent of the Oregon National Guard was called into service for emergencies, disasters, and crisis planning, including wild land firefighting, hurricane relief efforts, search and rescue missions, and traffic assistance during the solar eclipse. Meanwhile, nearly 200 Oregon Guardsmen were deployed overseas last year.

“This new law specifically bridges the federal tuition assistance shortfall and enables our Guard men and women to complete their associate or bachelor degrees,” said Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon. “It aligns with the governor’s education focused agenda and will not only serve as a huge recruitment and retention tool, but it will also provide us with the breadth of knowledge we need to think like leaders and succeed in an increasingly technologically complex world.”

Service members statistically cite money for education as the number one reason they join the military. Those who already have federal education benefits such as the Montgomery G.I. Bill or the Post 9/11 Bill will need to use those benefits prior to using the state tuition assistance funding. Qualified students can use up to 90 credit hours at an Oregon community college and up to 180 credit hours at a public university. To receive the tuition assistance they must be in good standing with their Oregon National Guard commitments and their educational institution.

“We expect the tuition assistance bill’s impact for recruitment and retention within the Oregon National Guard to be substantial,” said Stencel. “Filling the ranks continues to be important not only to provide a capable, ready force for our nation, but to also ensure a robust Oregon National Guard to support Oregonians during disasters here at home.”


Thu. 06/14/18
Single vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 138 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 06/14/18 6:23 PM

On Thursday June 14, 2018 at approximately 12:00 PM Oregon State Police, Douglas County Sheriff's Office and other emergency personnel were dispatched to a vehicle in the North Umpqua River near Hwy 138 mile post 44.

Emergency responders located a 2005 Mercury Sable that had for unknown reasons left the roadway, struck a tree, and came to rest partially in the river.  The driver identified as Sandra Mincher, age 68 of Dillard, OR died at the scene as a result of injuries sustained in the crash.  The passenger, a juvenile male, also died at the scene as a result of injuries sustained in the crash.

The Oregon State Police as well as numerous other emergency personnel had been searching for the two and the vehicle since they had been reported as overdue motorists on Wednesday June 13, 2018 at 9:00 PM.  They had been last seen leaving Klamath Falls on Wednesday June 13, 2018 at approximately 1:30 PM enroute to Dillard. 

It is believed that the crash occured sometime around 4:00 PM on Wednesday June 13, 2018. 


Recreational use health advisory lifted June 14 for Detroit Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/18 5:53 PM

June 14, 2018
Reduced blue-green algae and toxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Detroit Lake, located 46 miles southeast of Salem. The lake spans both Linn and Marion counties.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of harmful algae toxins in the lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, Oregon Health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of harmful algae in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for harmful algae by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

Detroit Lake is upstream of the source of drinking water for some public water systems. Data provided by the City of Salem for Detroit Lake and the Santiam River has confirmed that toxins are below OHA advisory values for recreational water, and drinking water. While the recreational advisory for Detroit Lake is being lifted, the drinking water advisory for vulnerable populations for the City of Salem will remain in place, until the city is assured that toxins remain below OHA drinking water advisory values. 

The drinking water advisory levels for vulnerable populations are different for recreational use than for drinking water. The amount of water people incidentally swallow while recreating (swimming, water skiing, etc.) is much lower than when people use it as a primary drinking water source. For drinking water concerns, visit the City of Salem’s drinking water advisory or the Oregon Health Authority’s Drinking Water Services website at http://healthoregon.org/dws. You can also dial 211 for information on the drinking water advisory.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For recreational health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms or cyanotoxins in recreational waters, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440. For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.” 

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Oregon Woman Pleads Guilty for Role in Forced Labor and Visa Fraud Scheme Involving Thai Restaurant Workers
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/14/18 4:55 PM

Defendant financially benefited from co-defendant’s use of debts, fraud, threats of financial and reputational harm, and other means to compel victims to work at restaurants

WASHINGTON – Tanya Jumroon, also known as Thunyarax Phatanakit Jumroon, 59, of Beaverton, Oregon, and a naturalized citizen originally from Thailand, pleaded guilty today in a U.S. District Court in Portland, Oregon, to financially benefitting from forced labor, visa fraud conspiracy, and filing a false federal income tax return, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams of the District of Oregon, Special Agent in Charge Renn Cannon of the FBI in Oregon, and Special Agent in Charge Darrell Waldon of Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Criminal Investigation’s Seattle Field Office. Jumroon waived indictment by a federal grand jury and pleaded guilty to an information filed by the United States Attorney’s Office and the Civil Rights Division.

According to the defendant’s plea agreement, admissions in court, and other court documents, between 2011 and 2014, the defendant, her then-husband, Paul Jumroon, and other associates fraudulently obtained E-2 visas to bring Thai nationals into the United States to provide cheap labor at two restaurants located in Lake Oswego, Oregon, and Ridgefield, Washington. The restaurants were owned and operated by the defendant and Jumroon at the time, but have since been sold and are under new ownership.

Paul Jumroon used the fraudulently obtained E-2 visas to entice four forced labor victims to come to the United States from Thailand. After the victims arrived, Jumroon used inflated travel expenses, debt manipulation, threats of deportation, serious financial and reputational harm, verbal abuse, and control over identification documents, among other means, to compel them to work 12 hours a day, six to seven days a week, for minimal pay at the restaurants he co-owned and operated with the defendant. The defendant witnessed Paul Jumroon’s mistreatment of two of the victims, and she benefitted financially from the victims’ forced labor at the restaurants. As part of the defendant’s guilty plea, she agreed to pay the four victims a combined $131,391.95 in restitution for their unpaid labor in connection with the forced labor scheme.

The defendant further admitted to filing multiple false tax returns with the IRS by failing to report cash income earned from the restaurants between 2012 and 2015. As part of the plea agreement, the defendant agreed to pay tax due and owing in the amount of $120,384 to the IRS.

“The Justice Department remains committed to combatting human trafficking, holding those who choose to exploit vulnerable individuals accountable, punishing those who profit from these crimes, and securing restitution for exploited victims” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Gore of the Civil Rights Division. “Today’s guilty plea exemplifies the hard work of the Civil Rights Division, in coordination with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, to honor that commitment.”

“Human trafficking schemes are seldom carried out by a single person. Tanya Jumroon profited off of her then-husband’s actions while turning a blind eye,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “In too many of these cases, we later learn that someone close by could have taken action to stop the abuse and intimidation of others and did not. I implore all Oregonians to remain vigilant and watch for the signs of human trafficking in their communities. Your attention and perceptiveness could help a victim in need.”

"These victims believed the Jumroons were offering them a chance at a better life. When they arrived in the U.S., however, they faced false promises, forced labor and abuse. Victims such as these often live in the shadows and find it difficult to get the help they need. We are grateful for the community members who were able to bring this case to our attention so we could work together to bring an end to the physical, psychological and financial exploitation," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

“Forced labor schemes, such as the one employed by the Jumroons, are deplorable crimes that have no place in today’s society,” said Darrell Waldon, Special Agent in Charge of IRS Criminal Investigation’s Seattle Field Office. “Falsely reporting income and expenses associated with such schemes will continue to be vigorously investigated by IRS-CI Special Agents.”

The defendant faces a maximum of 20 years in prison for financially benefitting from forced labor, five years in prison for visa fraud conspiracy, and three years in prison for filing a false tax return. Her sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 24 before United States District Judge Anna J. Brown. 

Co-defendant Paul Jumroon previously pleaded guilty on Feb. 14 to forced labor, visa fraud conspiracy, and filing a false federal income tax return. His sentencing is scheduled for Oct. 18, also before Judge Brown.

Attorney General Sessions issued a proclamation on January 31 commemorating January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month.

The District of Oregon is one of six districts designated through a competitive, nationwide selection process as a Phase II Anti-Trafficking Coordination Team (ACTeam), through the interagency ACTeam Initiative of the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security and Labor. ACTeams focus on developing high-impact human trafficking investigations and prosecutions involving forced labor, international sex trafficking and sex trafficking by force, fraud or coercion through interagency collaboration among federal prosecutors and federal investigative agencies.

This prosecution is the result of the joint investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Homeland Security Investigations, Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation and Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service, with assistance from the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division and Portland Police Bureau. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Hannah Horsley and Scott Bradford of the District of Oregon, and Lindsey Roberson of the Civil Rights Division’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit. 


Quarterly Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets June 18
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/18 1:35 PM

June 14, 2018

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its annual  meeting; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Trauma Informed Care; Dental Project Manager; Data Presentation; Project Update; CODA Application; Project Process; Future Site Visits. 

When: June 18, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, participants code: 76-64-09

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.
 


OHA anuncia reuniones comunitarias a lo largo del estado para definir el futuro del Plan de Salud de Oregon 
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/18 12:59 PM

14 de junio, 2018 

El director de Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Patrick Allen, emprenderá una gira este verano para conversar con residentes de Oregon sobre el futuro del Plan de Salud de Oregon. Allen viajará por 10 comunidades (Astoria, Bend, Coos Bay, Corvallis, Hermiston, Hood River, Klamath Falls, Ontario, Portland y Springfield) para hablar sobre lo que se ha logrado con la transformación del sistema de salud en Oregon y lo que se busca mejorar. Además, Allen quiere escuchar opiniones sobre las opciones propuestas para mejorar el sistema de salud coordinada del estado.

La conclusión de los primeros contratos de cinco años con las Organizaciones de Atención de Salud Coordinada (CCOs por sus siglas en inglés) señalan una oportunidad para que el Consejo de Política de Salud de Oregon trabaje con todas las partes interesadas para mejorar los servicios que un millón de personas reciben por medio del Plan de Salud de Oregon.  CCOs son organizaciones gobernadas por la comunidad que ayudan a reunir proveedores de salud física, mental, y dental para coordinar la atención médica de beneficiarios del Plan de Salud de Oregon (Medicaid).

Desde el 2012, el modelo de salud coordinada de Oregon ha ahorrado a los contribuyentes alrededor de $2.2 mil millones, mientras reduce las visitas innecesarias a las salas de emergencias y mejora el cuidado de salud preventivo para niños y adultos.

El 5 de junio, OHA presentó propuestas y estrategias al Consejo de Política de Salud de Oregon para mejorar la atención de salud que proveerá el Plan de Salud de Oregon en los próximos cinco años. Las propuestas se formaron tras consultar al público por medio de sondeos, foros comunitarios, reuniones en persona y por internet, al igual que correos electrónicos.

Las propuestas se enfocan en mejorar cuatro áreas de prioridad identificadas por la Gobernadora Kate Brown.

  • Mantener un crecimiento sostenible de los gastos.
  • Incrementar remuneración basada en acciones—paga según el rendimiento.
  • Enfocarse en los determinantes sociales de la salud y equidad.
  • Mejorar el sistema de salud mental.

OHA continuara recabando aportaciones del público sobre las propuestas a lo largo del verano, y el Consejo de Política de Salud adoptara las recomendaciones en el otoño. Contratos para la atención de salud coordinada para 2020-2025 se espera sean otorgados en el verano de 2019.

Programa de reuniones comunitarias de junio 2018

Lunes, 18 de junio
Hood River, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Hood River Inn 
1108 E Marina Drive 
 
Martes, 19 de junio
Hermiston, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 
Eastern Oregon Trade and Event Center 
1750 E Airport Road 

Ontario, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
Treasure Valley Community College, Weese Building, Room 110 
650 College Blvd 
 
Miércoles, 20 de junio 
Bend, 12-2 p.m. 
Central Oregon Community College, Health Careers Building 
2600 NW College Way 
 
Jueves, 21 de junio 
Portland, 6-8 p.m. 
Madison High School 
2735 NE 82nd Ave 
 
Martes, 26 de junio 
Corvallis, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 
Oregon State University LaSells Stewart Center 
875 SW 26th Street 
 
Springfield, 6-8 p.m. 
Holiday Inn 
919 Kruse Way 
 
Miércoles, 27 de junio 
Astoria, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 
Astoria Armory 
1636 Exchange Street 

Coos Bay, 7-9 p.m. 
Red Lion Inn 
1313 N Bayshore Drive 
 
Jueves, 28 de junio 
Klamath Falls, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 
Henley Elementary School 
8227 Highway 39 
 
Traductores en español estarán presentes en todas las reuniones.

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Todos tienen el derecho de tener conocimiento y utilizar los programas y servicios de la Autoridad de Salud de Oregon (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés). OHA provee ayuda gratuita como, por ejemplo:

  • Traductores en diferentes lenguajes hablados y lenguaje de signos americano
  • Documentos escritos en otros lenguajes
  • Braille
  • Letra grande
  • Audio y otros formatos

Para asistencia o respuestas a preguntas, por favor llame a Lisa Bui al 971-673-3397, 711 TTY o Lisa.T.Bui@state.or.us al menos 48 horas antes del evento.


Boaters Reminded to "CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY Boats and Equipment to Protect Oregon's Waterways (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 06/14/18 9:55 AM
2018-06/4139/115303/AIS2017.jpg
2018-06/4139/115303/AIS2017.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/4139/115303/thumb_AIS2017.jpg

The Marine Board, Oregon Invasive Species Council and Department of Fish and Wildlife are reminding boaters to “CLEAN, DRAIN and DRY their boats and equipment to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.  This effort, in conjunction with border inspection stations will help protect the fragile balance of Oregon’s aquatic ecosystems.

“Clean, drain and dry your boat after every outing," said Glenn Dolphin, the Marine Board’s Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program Coordinator and 2018 Chair of the Oregon Invasive Species Council.  “Recreational boaters, whether propelled by paddle, oar or motor, can help protect our waterways by draining all water within any interior compartments and letting everything thoroughly dry.  If every boater embraces this practice, it will go a long way in preventing the spread of invaders that are already in Oregon.” 

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are non-native animals, plants, microorganisms and pathogens that out-compete or prey on Oregon’s native fish and other wildlife. They can harm the environment, hinder salmon recovery efforts, negatively impact human health and hurt local business economies. They come to Oregon from other states and provinces on trailers, boat hulls, motors, wading boots, fishing equipment and via many other vectors. Once they become established in one lake or river, they can easily spread to more waterways in Oregon.

In addition to boaters taking personal responsibility to ensure their boats are clean, six inspection stations are operating along the Oregon borders targeting out-of-state boats.  Inspection stations are open in Ashland, Ontario, Brookings, Klamath Falls, Umatilla,  and Burns.  Ashland and Ontario operate year-round, while the others are seasonal. 

All boats being transported are required to stop if an inspection station is open.  This includes mounted kayaks, canoes, inflatable boats, stand up paddle boards, catarafts, and trailered boats (including commercially transported boats).  Inspection teams are made up of specially trained personnel from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife who look inside and outside of boats for invasive species.  Inspections take approximately 10 minutes.  If a boat is contaminated, the inspection team will decontaminate the boat on-site.  Decontamination can take anywhere from 20 minutes to one hour.  There is no cost to the boater for decontamination.  “It’s extremely important that people stop at these stations to get their boats inspected,” Dolphin said. 

“We need to make sure plants and mussels are kept out of the state.  Right now, on average between 20- 30% of the people transporting boats don’t stop for inspections and that’s too much of a risk.  All it takes is one contaminated boat.  The cost of an AIS infestation is enormous.  We’ve already experienced our worst fears with Diamond Lake.  All of us need to take action to protect our waterways,” Dolphin added.   

The inspection stations, equipment and personnel are paid for through funds generated from the sale of  AIS permits, which are required on all motorboats and non-motorized boats over 10 feet when boating on Oregon’s waterways.  Oregon registered motorboats pay the AIS fee as part of their boat registration, so no additional AIS permit is required.  Out-of-state registered motorboats and sailboats must purchase a $20 annual permit.  Non-motorized boats have the option of purchasing a $5 annual or $10 two-year permit.  The Marine Board’s Aquatic Invasive Species FAQ page lists all of the purchasing options.        

To do your part to help protect Oregon’s waterways, follow these steps:

Clean: When leaving the water, clean all equipment that touched the water by removing all visible plants, algae, animals and mud.  Equipment includes watercraft hulls, trailers, shoes, waders, life jackets, engines and other gear.

Drain: Drain any accumulated water from boats or gear, including the bilge and live wells and transom wells, before leaving a water access point.  Pull the boat’s bilge plug and allow water to drain. 

Dry: Once home, fully dry all gear before using it in a different waterbody.

In 2017, ODFW technicians inspected 21,035 boats and intercepted 17 with quagga or zebra mussels and 283 with other types of aquatic invasive species such as Eurasian milfoil and brown mussels.    

“There is so much at stake,” Dolphin added. “If quagga or zebra mussels get into our waterways they will have a huge impact on dams, irrigation systems, drinking water supplies and our fisheries.”  

Researchers estimate that invasive zebra and quagga mussels alone could cost the power industry more than $3 billion, and industries, businesses and communities more than $5 billion nationwide over 6 years.

“The Pacific Northwest states (OR, WA, ID, WY, MT) are the last region of the country that is not yet invaded by mussels,” said Dolphin.  Tribes, the federal government, states and nonprofit organizations have come together to address aquatic invasive species contamination through research, inspection and decontamination efforts and rapid response exercises.  “We’ve got a great communication network but we have to remain vigilant.  Inspection stations aren’t open 24/7 so we need everyone’s help.”  Learn to recognize aquatic invaders and report any you find to the toll-free Oregon Invasive Species Hotline: 1-866-INVADER

The Oregon Invasive Species Council is the main coordinating organization for all taxa of invasive species (terrestrial and aquatic) and includes a wide variety of stakeholders, along with state and federal agencies tasked with managing invasive species.  Their next quarterly meeting will be held in Charleston and Bandon on June 19 and 20. 

During 2016, the Council spent a considerable amount of time developing a state-wide strategic and action plan that covers a 10 year time-frame for implementing important management activities.  However, the necessary fiscal resources are not available at this time to fully implement the plan.  The Council has submitted a funding proposal for the 2019 legislative session with the hopes that adequate resources can be allocated to the Council to be able to meet their mission of working to protect Oregon against all taxa of invasive species.  More information can be found at https://www.oregoninvasivespeciescouncil.org/.   

You can also learn which waterbodies already have aquatic invasive species, view the 2017 Annual AIS Program Report, and the Least Wanted list of invaders at https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/boater-info/Pages/Aquatic-Invasive-Species-Program.aspx.

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Pictured:  An outrigger canoe with quagga mussels found during an inspection in 2017 from a contaminated state.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/4139/115303/AIS2017.jpg

Wed. 06/13/18
Oregon State Police looking for witnesses to reckless driver- Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/13/18 8:14 PM
2018-06/1002/115278/20180612_172220_resized.jpg
2018-06/1002/115278/20180612_172220_resized.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1002/115278/thumb_20180612_172220_resized.jpg

On June 12, 2018 at approximately 1:25 PM,  Tillamook County Law Enforcement  received a complaint of a reckless driver traveling southbound on Hwy 101 near Manzanita. 

Rockaway Beach PD located the vehicle southbound on 101 and a pursuit started they quickly terminated due to continued reckless driving.  Manzanita PD / Clatsop County SO located the vehicle northbound on 101 and quickly terminated the pursuit due to continued reckless driving.    

The suspect vehicle eventually went east on Hwy 26, where it crashed into the ditch near mile post 9.  The male occupant attempted a carjacking of a female witness, before fleeing into the woods on foot.  Washington County SO responded and assisted with a K-9 and searched the area. 

On June 13, 2018 a suspect was taken into custody.

Oregon State Police is requesting anyone who witnessed the driving of the vehicle to contact Sergeant Dee Rzewnicki at 971-673-4003.

No further information at this time as investigation is continuing.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115278/20180612_172220_resized.jpg

Bank of Oswego Executives Sentenced to Federal Prison After Jury Conviction for Fraud
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/13/18 5:13 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today in federal court, Dan Heine and Diana Yates were sentenced to 24 and 18 months in prison, respectively, for bank fraud and falsifying bank entries, reports, and transactions.

A jury convicted Heine and Yates, former executives at the Bank of Oswego in Lake Oswego, Oregon, of one count each of conspiracy to commit bank fraud and twelve counts each of falsifying bank entries, reports, and transactions in a trial ending in November 2017.

“Dan Heine and Diane Yates orchestrated one of the largest and most complex bank fraud schemes in Oregon’s history. Their selfish acts of greed are deplorable,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “While we urged the court to impose longer sentences, these sentences still serve as a warning to bank executives and others entrusted with fiduciary responsibilities. We will continue to work with federal investigators to protect investors and ensure the trustworthiness of our financial institutions.”

“For centuries, the American banking system has served as the bedrock of the U.S. economy. Honest bankers are critical to our financial system. By addressing lies and conspiracies at the Bank of Oswego, the FBI and Department of Justice have helped re-establish the integrity of the financial system we all rely on,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

Dan Heine, a co-founder of the bank, was president, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and member of the board of directors from September 2004 through September 2014. Diana Yates was executive vice president, Chief Financial Officer (CFO), and secretary of the board of directors from 2004 through March 2012. During the conspiracy Heine and Yates concealed the true financial condition of the bank to regulators and the board of directors by falsely reporting that the bank had title to a property in a straw buyer transaction, falsely reporting that delinquent loans were paid, and falsely reporting the sale of bank owned property.

A forfeiture and restitution hearing has been scheduled for August 7, 2018. The case was investigated by the FBI and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Office of Inspector General (FDIC-OIG) and prosecuted by Claire Fay, Quinn Harrington, and Michelle Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115290/SENTENCING-Bank_of_Oswego-Final.pdf

Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup to meet June 20 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/18 2:48 PM

June 13, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup.

When: Wednesday, June 20, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

The public also may attend by conference call at 800-278-0296, participant code 843163.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions and process overview; background and workgroup scope and goal; current process for out-of-hospital births prior authorization; challenges with and reflections on PA process; public comment; summary and next steps.

Background: The Out of Hospital Births Workgroup met in 2016-2017 to discuss the Oregon Health Plan's coverage of childbirth in settings other than hospitals. The workgroup presented recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority in summer 2017. OHA is convening this small group to undertake the workgroup's third recommendation, "Prior Authorization Process Review," with the goal of optimizing safety while improving the efficiency of the process. Questions and public comments may be submitted to OOHB.Workgroup@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY or heather.n.johnson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public invited to comment on federal preservation grant awards
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/13/18 1:51 PM

The City of Weston has received a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation projects.

 

Weston, Umatilla County

Masonic Lodge Building, 109-111 East Main Street

$12,000 grant funds

Stabilize the exterior wall.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Jessica Gabriel at riel@oregon.gov">Jessica.Gabriel@oregon.gov or 503-986-0677.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

 

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Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 21 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/18 1:37 PM

June 13, 2018

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 21 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

Agenda: Includes public health modernization funding formula matching funds framework; tobacco prevention and education funding update; Behavioral Health Collaborative update; drinking water and cyanotoxins; maternal and child health strategic plan; training expectations and guidance.

The meeting agenda and related materials will be posted on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/.

When: June 21, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 221, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 971-673-1223, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Recreational health advisory re-issued June 13 for Detroit Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/18 1:17 PM

June 13, 2018

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Recreational health advisory re-issued June 13 for Detroit Lake

High toxin levels found in Linn-Marion county lake

The Oregon Health Authority re-issued a recreational health advisory today for Detroit Lake, located 46 miles southeast of Salem. The lake spans both Linn and Marion counties.

Water monitoring has again confirmed the presence of harmful algae above Oregon Health Authority recreational guideline values for cyanotoxins. At measured levels cyanotoxins can be harmful to humans and animals. Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of harmful algae and avoid areas with visible scum that looks foamy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, or where small bright-green clumps are floating in the water.

On Friday, June 8, OHA lifted a recreational advisory that had been issued May 23 for the lake.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. The Santiam River downstream of Detroit Lake is the source of drinking water for several cities, including the City of Salem. On June 10, the City of Salem’s drinking water advisory for vulnerable populations was extended for at least two more weeks. For more information about the city’s water advisory, visit http://www.cityofsalem.net/.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Detroit Lake for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

Drinking water directly from Detroit Lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA Public Health Division officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Detroit Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid activities during which water can be ingested, people are encouraged to visit Detroit Lake and enjoy activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Although inhalation risk is much lower than ingestion, it can present a risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Recreational health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/18 1:00 PM

June 13, 2018

Recreational health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir

High cell counts of harmful algae found in Lane County lake

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational health advisory today for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of harmful algae above Oregon Health Authority recreational guideline values for cell counts. Harmful algae at this level are likely to be associated with cyanotoxin concentrations that can be harmful to humans and animals.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of harmful algae and avoid areas with visible scum that looks foamy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, or where small bright-green clumps are floating in the water.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternate water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection.

The Row River downstream of Dorena Reservoir is the source of drinking water for the City of Cottage Grove. Drinking water samples at this time show no detections of toxins. If people connected to the City of Cottage Grove public water system have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact the water supplier directly.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Dorena Reservoir for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

Drinking water directly from Dorena Reservoir at this time is especially dangerous. OHA Public Health Division officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Dorena Reservoir and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid activities during which water can be ingested, people are encouraged to visit Dorena Reservoir and enjoy activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Although inhalation risk is much lower than ingestion, it can present a risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

 


Nation's Largest Not-for-Profit Air Ambulance Service Life Flight Network Celebrates 40 Years of Service; Offers $40 New Memberships Through Labor Day (Photo)
Berg & Associates - 06/13/18 12:42 PM
Life Flight Network started in 1978 as Emanuel Life Flight in Portland, Oregon. Today, Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air medical transport service with 25 bases serving Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Montana.
Life Flight Network started in 1978 as Emanuel Life Flight in Portland, Oregon. Today, Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air medical transport service with 25 bases serving Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Montana.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6329/115276/thumb_image074_(002).jpg

Aurora, Ore., June 13, 2018—Life Flight Network, the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, is celebrating its 40th anniversary and offering $40 new memberships in honor of its 40 years of service to communities across Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana.  

“Since 1978, Life Flight Network has provided air medical transport service to people in the Pacific Northwest, saving lives and saving valuable time when every second counts,” said Life Flight Network CEO Michael Griffiths. “It is our privilege to continue to serve the region alongside hospitals and the emergency response community.”

To celebrate its 40 years of service, Life Flight Network will offer $40 annual memberships—for new members only—for a limited time from June 13 through Labor Day, 2018. Memberships are not available in Montana due to state regulations.  Members incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of their reciprocal partners. Membership covers the primary membership holder, their spouse or domestic partner, and dependents claimed on their income tax return. Elderly and disabled family members living in the same household can also be covered. Memberships are normally $65. To enroll, visit www.lifeflight.org/membership or call the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

Started in 1978 as Emanuel Life Flight, the program was owned and operated by Emanuel Hospital (now Legacy Emanuel Medical Center). Emanuel Life Flight was one of the first hospital-based air ambulances on the West Coast and only the fourth in the nation. Transporting 121 patients in its first year, a French-made Allouette-3 helicopter was the program’s inaugural aircraft.

Yachats Fire Chief Frankie Petrick activated the first Emanuel Life Flight transport. “In more than 40 years with the Yachats Fire Department, I’ve worked closely with Life Flight Network in situations where having access to air ambulance transport meant the difference between life and death,” said Petrick. “Life Flight Network has served our region well and since my first call to Emanuel Life Flight in 1978, they’ve always been there when we needed them.”

Today, Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air medical transport service with more than 550 employees and 25 bases covering a large part of Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Montana. Life Flight Network is still committed to its core mission – to serve the community by providing ICU-level critical care transportation to ill or injured patients in a safe, compassionate, efficient, and expeditious manner.

Life Flight Network recently released a new app called LFN Respond that allows hospitals and first responders to call for a life-saving air ambulance transport with the touch of a button. Using the app, hospital and emergency responders can instantly request a Life Flight Network aircraft by tapping the flight call button in the app, sending vital information and GPS location directly to dispatch personnel at Life Flight Network’s Communications Center

The consortium of Oregon Health & Science University, Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, and Providence Health & Services own Life Flight Network. The combined strength of these world-class health institutions ensures the quality of the program remains as safe and strong today as when it started in 1978.

ABOUT LIFE FLIGHT NETWORK

Life Flight Network, a not-for-profit air medical service, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS) and the National Accreditation Alliance of Medical Transport Applications (NAAMTA). Life Flight Network has administrative offices in Aurora, Oregon.  Aviation services provided by: Life Flight Network and Jackson Jet Center, Inc. For more information about Life Flight Network or to become a member, visit www.lifeflight.org.




Attached Media Files: Life Flight Network started in 1978 as Emanuel Life Flight in Portland, Oregon. Today, Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air medical transport service with 25 bases serving Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Montana.

Fireworks not permitted on school district grounds
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/13/18 11:00 AM

WALLA WALLA - As the Independence Day Holiday nears, community members are reminded that fireworks are not allowed on school district grounds. Fireworks cause safety concerns, potentially damage property, and are a nuisance to our neighboring property owners. Thank you for helping protect district property and ensuring students have a safe and clean place to learn.

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Oregon Parks and Recreation Department seeks public feedback on Oregon Scenic Bikeways
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/13/18 11:00 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is soliciting public input on the 17 Oregon Scenic Bikeways. Individuals that have ridden any of the bikeways are encouraged to share their experiences via a short online survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PHPCFFL

OPRD will use the survey results to guide bikeway improvement plans. The Oregon Scenic Bikeways Program was started in 2009 and is overseen by OPRD.

Information about the 17 designated Scenic Bikeways—printable maps, GPS and route descriptions—is online at www.oregonscenicbikeways.org.


Man Sentenced to 78 Months in Federal Prison for Sex Trafficking and Illegal Firearm Possession
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/13/18 10:30 AM

EUGENE, Ore. – Anthony Ballard Jones, 36, was sentenced today to 78 months in federal prison for the interstate transport of individuals for prostitution and being a felon in possession of a firearm. Jones will serve a five year term of supervised release upon the conclusion of his prison sentence.

According to court documents, Jones transported two adult female victims from Idaho to Oregon so they could engage in commercial sex acts. His first victim had been with Jones for approximately eight months prior to Jones’ arrest, and Jones met his second victim in Boise, Idaho, in March 2015. She was homeless at the time, and Jones offered her drugs and convinced her that prostitution could make her rich. After originally telling Jones that she did not want to engage in prostitution, she later agreed to do so.

Jones would talk menacingly about “regulating” his victims and keeping them “in check” in order to intimidate them. On March 7, 2015, at a motel in Eugene, a planned commercial sex act fell apart when the second victim decided not to participate. The John became upset, started tearing at the second victim’s clothing, and threatened to return with a gun. After this incident, Jones threatened to leave the second victim stranded in Oregon if she did not continue to engage in prostitution. The police investigated the disturbance at the motel and subsequently contacted Jones. Jones, a convicted felon, was found in possession of a pistol and was arrested.

Jones previously pleaded guilty to one count each of interstate transport for prostitution and felon in possession of a firearm on Tuesday, November 21, 2017.

This case was investigated by the FBI and Eugene Police Department, and prosecuted by Jeffrey S. Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115273/SENTENCING-Jones-Final.pdf

Oregon Lottery Receives National Financial Reporting Award
Oregon Lottery - 06/13/18 9:26 AM

June 13, 2018 - Salem, Oregon – For the 10th consecutive year, the Oregon Lottery has received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting.

The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting, and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management.

The award is presented each year by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada. The Oregon Lottery received the award for its comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR).

The CAFR has been judged by an impartial panel to meet the high standards of the program including demonstrating a constructive “spirit of full disclosure” to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and user groups to read the CAFR.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets April 25, 1985, it has earned over $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements.

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Tue. 06/12/18
Pacific lamprey return to Umatilla River in record numbers
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/12/18 2:50 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Pacific lamprey, a prehistoric fish native to the Columbia River Basin and treasured by Native American people, are returning to Oregon’s Umatilla River in record numbers.

From the late 1960s through the early 2000’s lamprey were functionally extinct in the Umatilla Basin, and less than five years ago, only a few-hundred Pacific lamprey returned to the Umatilla River each year.   However, through efforts such as adult translocation, scientists with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation have counted more the 2600 of the ancient fish migrating up the eastern Oregon river to spawn this spring.

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla have worked for nearly 25 years to increase lamprey numbers. The Bonneville Power Administration has funded most of the tribe’s lamprey projects since the early 1990’s, with much of the money going toward lamprey research and improving instream passage. Over the past 10 years, BPA ratepayers have invested just over $5 million in the Umatilla Basin for lamprey.

“Lamprey are culturally important and a critical First Food for tribes. And while they’ve been around for millions of years, until rather recently, managers failed to understand their importance within the food web,” says Aaron Jackson, fisheries biologist with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. “Our focus now is to continue lamprey supplementation actions to bolster the overall numbers of lamprey in the Umatilla and other ceded area basins.”

“We understand the cultural significance of Pacific lamprey to the tribes which is one reason we’ve funded lamprey projects in the Umatilla,” says Lorri Bodi, vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife with the Bonneville Power Administration. “As a food source for other creatures, lamprey are also very important to a healthy functioning ecosystem such as in the Umatilla River so it’s great to see our efforts paying off.”

Pacific lamprey spend the majority of their lives as tiny larvae living in Northwest streams from three to seven years before migrating out to sea. Adult lamprey have a sucker-like mouth that allows them to be parasitic while in the ocean. They attach to fish and other marine mammals for feeding.  Lamprey usually live in the ocean for one to three years before returning to fresh water to spawn. Similar to salmon, lamprey die after spawning and their carcasses provide marine rich nutrients to streams.

Lamprey video available upon request

 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

 

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Nine Corvallis-Area Residents Charged with Perpetrating Credit Card Fraud Funding Marijuana Business
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/12/18 1:06 PM

EUGENE, Ore. – Nine defendants residing in and around Corvallis, Oregon face conspiracy charges related to a credit card “bust-out” fraud scheme and an interstate marijuana distribution operation funded by the fraud.

A credit card “bust-out” is a fraud scheme that begins with perpetrators obtaining credit cards and accumulating large balances. Payments are then made from co-conspirator bank accounts, reducing the credit card balances and allowing for additional purchases. After numerous purchases and payments are made, a co-conspirator would report the payments as unauthorized to their banks. Banks then seek and obtain reimbursement from the credit card companies and deposit those funds back into the co-conspirator’s bank accounts. No further payments are made on the credit cards, resulting in losses to those institutions that often exceed a card’s spending limit.

As alleged in the complaint, conspirators opened numerous credit cards, defrauding financial institutions of over $1 million. Proceeds from the fraud were allegedly used to establish and operate illegal marijuana grows and fund a state-licensed marijuana retail business, the Corvallis Cannabis Club located in Corvallis. Some of the marijuana grown in Corvallis is alleged to have been transported and sold outside of Oregon.

Three defendants were arrested today and will make their first appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie A. Russo in Eugene on Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

A criminal charge is only an accusation of a crime; defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case was investigated by the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, and U.S. Postal Inspection Service with the assistance of Oregon State Police and the Corvallis and Philomath Police Departments. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115242/INFORMATION-Jason-Final.pdf

Final Defendant Sentenced for Armed Takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/12/18 11:44 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Blaine Cooper aka Stanley Blaine Hicks, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona, was sentenced today to time served in prison for his role in the 41-day armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge beginning in January 2016.

Cooper is the eighteenth and final defendant sentenced for crimes associated with the occupation. Eleven defendants pleaded guilty to felony conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. Four other defendants were convicted of felonies by a federal jury in a trial ending in March 2017. Three additional defendants pleaded guilty to misdemeanor trespassing. Seven defendants, including occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy, were acquitted of all charges in a trial ending in November 2016.

“I firmly believe that our communities and state are stronger because of our shared experience responding to and litigating the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I want to sincerely thank the countless federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officials that played a role in bringing these eighteen defendants to justice. Our message is clear,” continued Williams, “taking up arms because you don’t like how things are done will never be accepted as a lawful way to protest here in Oregon or elsewhere.”

“The U.S. Constitution granted Americans both rights and responsibilities. With state, local and tribal partners, the FBI responded to this armed takeover by defending the rule of law and protecting the people of Harney County. We stand with Oregonians committed to finding peaceful solutions and will always work to protect our communities from violent conflict,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

Beginning on January 2, 2016, Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, and several dozen followers, seized the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon in Harney County. For forty-one days, the armed occupiers prevented federal officials from performing their official duties at the refuge by force, threats, and intimidation. The Bundys and several other occupiers, were arrested on January 26, 2016 on U.S. Highway 395 near Burns en route to a community meeting in John Day, Oregon. The occupation officially ended on February 11, 2016 when the last four occupiers turned themselves in to federal authorities.          

Summary of sentences imposed:

Dylan Anderson, 37, of Provo, Utah, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

Sandra Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

Sean Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

Jason Blomgren, 44, of North Carolina, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

Brian Cavalier, 47, of Bunkerville, Nevada, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

Blaine Cooper, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona was sentenced to time served in prison and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

Travis Cox, 23, of Bend, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

Duane Ehmer, 47, of Irrigon, Oregon, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

Eric Flores, 24, of Tulalip, Washington, was sentenced to two years’ probation with home detention after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

Wesley Kjar, 34, of Manti, Utah, was sentenced to 250 hours of community service, two years’ probation, and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

Corey Lequieu, 47, of Fallon, Utah, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and three years’ supervised release after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

Joseph O’Shaughnessy, 46, of Cottonwood, Arizona, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

Jason Patrick, 46, of Bonaire, Georgia, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

Ryan Payne, 34, of Anaconda, Montana, was sentenced to 37 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

John Ritzheimer, 34, of Peoria, Arizona, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, one year in a residential reentry center, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

Jake Ryan, 29, of Plains, Montana, was sentenced to 12 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

Geoffrey Stanek, 28, of Lafayette, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

Darryl Thorn, 33, of Monument, Oregon, was sentenced to 18 months in prison and $5,000 restitution after being found guilty of one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

The case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Geoffrey Barrow, Ethan Knight, and Craig Gabriel, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115239/SENTENCING-Cooper-Final.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Timeshare Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/12/18 10:00 AM
TT - timeshare sales slide
TT - timeshare sales slide
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/3585/114933/thumb_TT_-_timeshare_sales_slide.jpg

Welcome to Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against timeshare fraud.

Summer is upon us! The days are getting longer and many people are well on their way to preparing for their vacations – the more luxurious the better! Owning a timeshare can make it easy to plan for repeat vacations in the same resort, with less hassle for booking.

But for some, the trouble comes when you try to sell your piece of paradise. Maybe you can’t afford the maintenance fees any longer – or you received it as part of an inheritance and just want to unload it. Either way, it can be difficult to find someone to take that timeshare off your hands, and if you do – be warned. If someone offers a quick easy sale – particularly one where the offer is double or triple the going rate – the risk is high.

Fraudsters know that the thought of cash-in-hand will make this a tough sale to turn down and will do just about anything to make the deal, including tricking you into thinking they are legitimate businesses with fancy-sounding names.

Here are a few red flags to watch for when seeking out buyers for your timeshare. Bear in mind, some or all may apply:

  1. The caller (or emailer) claims that there’s an up-front fee that you must pay to start the process.
  2. The caller is unwilling to meet in person
  3. There is no physical address in the U.S., or there is a fake address given that leads to an empty field or abandoned building
  4. Scammers keep coming back – asking for fee after fee, amounting to thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars

Unfortunately, senior citizens are the ones oftentimes victimized by timeshare frauds. Here are some steps that you and your family can take to avoid timeshare frauds:

  • Do at least an online search on the business that contacted you. Look for an “About Us” page with contact information, names and locations of the purported business. Is this business rated on Better Business Bureau? Are there complaints from other customers online? Use your favorite search engine and find out.
  • Try searching the street address. If the address is fraudulent or outside the U.S., stop all communication and report it.
  • Listen to the claims that the salesperson is making. No one can guarantee a quick sale.
  • Are there any up-front fees to cover closing costs, maintenance fees or other services? Legitimate fees are typically paid after a sale or out of the proceeds – not up front.

If you own a timeshare – or have friends and family who do - make sure you build a digital defense to ensure a safe timeshare sale. The bad guys are good at what they do, but these pointers might help you from becoming their next victim.

If you have been victimized by this type of scam or any other online scam, you can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Time Share Fraud - Audio , TT - timeshare sales slide

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon May 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 06/12/18 10:00 AM

Oregon Adds 4,800 Jobs in May; Unemployment Rate Holds Steady at 4.1 Percent

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in May. For 17 consecutive months, the rate has been at or near 4.1 percent, its lowest level since comparable records began in 1976. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 3.8 percent in May, from 3.9 percent in April.

In May, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment rose by 4,800 jobs, following a revised loss of 700 jobs in April. Four major industries added at least 900 jobs in May: construction (+1,600 jobs); health care and social assistance (+1,500); professional and business services (+1,000); and leisure and hospitality (+900). Only two major industries dropped in May: wholesale trade (-800 jobs) and retail trade (-600).

Over the past 12 months, Oregon’s nonfarm employment rose by 34,600 jobs, or 1.9 percent. This growth was slightly faster than the national growth rate of 1.6 percent during the same period. In Oregon, over-the-year job gains were strongest in construction (+9,600 jobs, or 9.9%); transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+2,700 jobs, or 4.3%); and leisure and hospitality (+6,200 jobs, or 3.0%). Since May 2017, only two major industries cut jobs: government ( 800 jobs, or -0.3%) and information (-300 jobs, or -0.9%).

Construction added 1,600 jobs in May, reaching an all-time high of 106,400 jobs. This was the first time construction rose above its previous record high reached more than 10 years ago in August 2007 when there were 105,400 jobs in construction. Since 2007, residential building construction has had the fastest growth rate of the industries within construction; at 18,700 jobs in May, it was 19 percent above its 2007 annual average. Building equipment contractors grew 12 percent over the past 11 years and nonresidential building construction grew 8 percent. Most other industries within the construction sector are still slightly below their record highs of 2007. However, heavy and civil engineering construction—at 10,100 jobs in May—remained 18 percent below its 2007 average.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the May county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, June 19th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for June on Tuesday, July 17th.

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the construction component industries.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2017 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon May 2018 News Release

PacifiCorp wins national award for land conservation
Pacific Power - 06/12/18 8:52 AM

PacifiCorp wins national award for land conservation

Recreational, Environmental, & Historical Enhancement Award recognizes PacifiCorp for preserving 5,000 acres for wildlife habitat in Southwest Washington

 

PORTLAND, Ore.—PacifiCorp has won a 2018 Outstanding Stewards of America’s Waters (OSAW) Recreational, Environmental, & Historical Enhancement Award for its efforts in land preservation and environmental stewardship on the Lewis River in Southwest Washington. The annual recognition is made by The National Hydropower Association (NHA).

 

PacifiCorp--a utility serving approximately 1.9 million customers in Oregon, Washington, California, Utah, Wyoming and Idaho--won the OSAW Award in the Recreational, Environmental, & Historical Enhancement category for its Land Acquisition for Wildlife Habitat Mitigation in the North Fork Lewis River Basin project accomplished in partnership with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

 

When PacifiCorp created the Merwin, Yale and Swift dams along the north fork of the Lewis River in Washington beginning in the 1930s, more than 12,000 acres of wildlife habitat was inundated. At that time the company committed to protecting and managing land surrounding its hydropower operations on the Lewis River, and in 2008 decided to protect additional habitat during relicensing...

 

“PacifiCorp went above and beyond to protect the habitat around its three hydropower facilities,” the NHA says. “It showed a true commitment to protecting the local habitat and the wildlife that need the land to thrive. We’re thrilled to recognize PacifiCorp’s efforts.”

 

In 2017, the utility successfully completed the purchase of a fifth parcel of land, resulting in 15,162 total acres of wildlife mitigation lands in the Lewis River basin.

 

“The dams had inundated about 12,000 acres of land,” says Kendel Emmerson, senior environmental scientist for PacifiCorp. “We've exceeded that amount of land and given back to Washington what we had removed by the water.”

 

“The acquisition of another 1,880 acres of wildlife habitat above Swift Reservoir highlights PacifiCorp’s ongoing commitment to conserving wildlife habitat and creating public access for hunting and other recreational activities,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “We appreciate the opportunity to work together in a way that furthers our conservation mission of ensuring the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.”

 

For more information about PacifiCorp’s environmental stewardship, https://poweringgreatness.com/betterfuture/

 

NHA’s OSAW Awards aim to recognize deserving organizations and reflect the changing nature of the hydropower industry, particularly the fact that hydropower can be used in various waterways. OSAW Awards are given out in three distinct categories: Operational Excellence; Recreational, Environmental & Historical Enhancement; and Public Education. PacifiCorp won in the Recreational, Environmental, & Historical Enhancement category, which honors projects that provide enhanced recreational opportunities for the general public; offer measurable benefits that mitigate, conserve, preserve, or enhance the natural resources; or conserve historical aspects of hydropower facilities and their integration with the surrounding community.

 

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Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/12/18 7:52 AM
Anselmo Salinas
Anselmo Salinas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1070/115231/thumb_Salinas.png

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Anselmo Salinas, died on the afternoon of June 10, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution and passed away at a local medical facility. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Salinas entered DOC custody on February 8, 2018 from Yamhill County.  His earliest release date was June 27, 2021. He was 85 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

Next of kin has been notified.  No other details are available at this time.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 male inmates. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institutional work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Anselmo Salinas