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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Mon. May. 20 - 10:24 am
Mon. 05/20/19
Fatal Crash Territorial Highway & High Pass Road near Junction City -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 10:11 AM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s two vehicle fatal crash on Territorial Highway and High Pass Road near Junction City. 

On May 17, 2019 at about 10:20 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle fatal crash at the intersection of Territorial Highway and Highway Pass Road. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevy Cavalier, operated by Russell Lee NICKERSON, age 81, from Eugene was traveling westbound on High Pass Road when for unknown reasons he failed to stop at the intersection.  NICKERSON’s vehicle was struck by a  Ford Econoline Van, operated by Cary Allen RAMSAY (male), age 55, from Eugene. 

NICKERSON suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  RAMSAY was transported to Riverbend Hospital with serious injuries. 

Territorial Highway was closed for approximately four hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Junction City Fire and Lane Fire Authority.

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ### 
Twitter: @ORStatePolice 
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG

Sat. 05/18/19
[PHOTO RELEASE]- 23rd Annual Living History Day at Camp Withycombe (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/18/19 4:35 PM
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
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190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon and hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, Oregon's official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy this more historically accurate model used by the United States Army throughout WWII. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

Hi-res photos available on our Flickr account at:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/oregonmildep/1hE1MX

 

 




Attached Media Files: 190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste , 190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy , 190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Co

Fri. 05/17/19
Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/17/19 2:59 PM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 17, 2019

Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon’s Bounty

Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm events with Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org

Strawberries, asparagus, rhubarb, mushrooms, salad greens — along with bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers — are just a few favorites of Oregon’s agricultural bounty in spring.

But outside of the local farmers market, where can you buy these things directly from a farm or ranch?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about roadside farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm events out in rural areas? That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Oregon’s Bounty allows visitors to do keyword searches for specific agriculture products — such as blueberries, cucumbers, honey, or eggs — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state. Visitors can also do a keyword search for “u-pick” or “events” to find farms that offer those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of agriculture in this great state, we can buy an enormous variety of seasonal fruits, vegetables, flowers, foliage, meat, and nuts directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members who are proud to share what they’ve raised with the public,” said Moss. “Spring is a great time to take a trip into the beautiful countryside and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5507/124649/oregonsbounty.png

Construction Contractors Board Takes Steps to Stop Data and Security Breach, Inform Contractors
Oregon Construction Contractors Board - 05/17/19 10:47 AM

The Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB) has discovered a security breach involving 8,013 online contractor accounts. Unauthorized individuals gained access to some contractors’ usernames and related password information. The incident occurred between October 27, 2018 and October 29, 2018, and was discovered on April 12, 2019, during a routine audit conducted by the Enterprise Security Office of the agency’s information technology databases.

Unfortunately, personally identifying information in 466 of these accounts was accessible, and the CCB determined this constitutes a data breach for that subset of accounts.

Upon detection of the issue, the CCB took immediate steps to determine the scope of the problem and then to remediate the problem. This work included closing the pathways used by the unauthorized individuals to gain access to the contractor accounts. The CCB is also enhancing its password protection security and is requesting that each affected account holder reset his or her password.

The compromised information included the email, name, address, and password hash (the code that protects the password) of the affected individuals. Of those compromised accounts, 466 also included an ID number such as state ID or driver license. At this time, there is no evidence that the information has been misused.

In addition to asking that all affected account holders reset their passwords, the CCB is sending letters to all affected account holders. These letters advise account holders that CCB is offering identity theft protection and fully managed ID theft recovery services to each of them for one year. Information on how to access these free services is included in the letters being mailed.

The Construction Contractors Board is committed to protecting the privacy and security of its licensees, and its systems are frequently reviewed and audited. 

###

About the CCB

The Construction Contractors Board regulates more than 40,000 licensed contractors. The agency also promotes contractor education and protects consumers by preventing and resolving construction contracting problems. Learn more about the CCB at www.oregon.gov/ccb.


Wapato Elementary School Receiving State Honor
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 05/17/19 9:54 AM

Good morning all,

Please see the attached release regarding one of our elementary schools receiving State recognition.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Wapato Elementary School Receiving State Honor

Celebrate State Parks Day June 1 with free camping, parking and special events (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/19 9:30 AM
Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
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Saturday June 1 is State Parks Day and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors for a day of free camping, free parking and special events at Oregon’s state parks.

Several state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and individual horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 1 and 2 at the 25 parks that charge a day-use fee.

“State Parks Day is our way each year of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, OPRD director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.”

State Parks Day is organized by OPRD and has been held annually since 1997.

Oregon Lottery returns as an event sponsor this year and they’re providing support for events at six state parks: Champoeg State Heritage Area, Fort Stevens State Park, Tumalo State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park, Wallowa Lake State Park and Silver Falls State Park.

Oregon Lottery is also sponsoring a new addition to State Parks Day: commemorative State Parks Day pins. The limited-edition pins will be available for free at more than two dozen state parks on June 1. See the full list of parks distributing the pins at the end of this release. Note: parks have a limited supply of pins and they will be given away first come, first served.

In total, 11 state parks will host free events June 1:

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park

Coast

  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Portland Metro Area

  • Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Collier Memorial State Park
  • Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include disc golf, living history, outdoor concerts, ranger-led programs and more. Full details about events at each park are on the official State Parks Day webpage

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.

List of state parks giving away State Parks Day pins on June 1

Coast

  • Bullards Beach State Park
  • Cape Arago State Park
  • Cape Lookout State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site
  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Humbug Mountain State Park
  • Shore Acres State Park
  • Sunset Bay State Park
  • William M. Tugman State Park

Columbia River Gorge

  • Ainsworth State Park
  • Guy W. Talbot State Park

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Dexter State Recreation Area
  • Elijah Bristow State Park
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park
  • Thompson's Mills State Heritage Area

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • LaPine State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Clyde Holliday State Park
  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area
  • Farewell Bend State Recreation Area
  • Hat Rock State Park
  • Lake Owyhee State Park
  • Minam State Recreation Area
  • Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Site
  • Wallowa Lake State Park



Attached Media Files: Wallowa Lake State Park , Tryon Creek State Natural Area , Silver Falls State Park , Milo McIver State Park , The Cove Palisades State Park , Peter Iredale wreck at Fort Stevens State Park , State Parks Day pin

Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/17/19 8:30 AM
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Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History  

23rd Annual Living History Day Honors All Service Men and Women

CLACKAMAS, Oregon – The 23rd Annual Living History Day is scheduled for Saturday, May 18th, at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore., from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

The event celebrates Armed Forces Day, a nationally recognized holiday held on the third Saturday each May.  Visitors of all ages can explore military displays, vehicles, and historic buildings.  This free event is co-sponsored by the Oregon Military Museum and the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon (MVCCO).

The Armed Forces Day celebration pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military’s role in our communities, our nation, and the world.  

“This annual event helps us fulfill our mission to inspire and educate visitors about Oregon's military heritage and legacy, to include the National Guard, the early militia, and all branches of the Armed Forces,” explains Tracy Thoennes, curator of the museum. “We showcase military equipment and capabilities throughout the past two hundred years.  Visitors have the opportunity to see, touch, and experience first-hand our military past and learn more about today’s military.” 

Displays include multi-era historical artifacts as well as current operational military equipment.  A few examples include:  U.S. field artillery from 1841 through today, exhibits in two circa 1911 rescued and relocated historic buildings, and many military vehicles from ambulances, trucks, and tanks to amphibious, tactical, and utility vehicles.  Food and beverage for purchase or by donation will be available.

Drivers will be required to show a valid driver’s license to enter Camp Withycombe.  The address is 15300 SE Minuteman Way, just off Interstate 205 and Highway 212, near SE 102nd Avenue.  

For more information about Living History Day, please call the Oregon Military Museum at (503) 683-5359. 

The Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon is dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of military vehicles and related equipment.  Monthly meetings are held at Camp Withycombe, and members participate in parades and community events throughout each year. 

The Oregon Military Museum is Oregon’s official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe.  The museum is currently undergoing major renovations.  

 

Photo Caption:

Rory Jensen from Camas, Washington, dressed in his vintage WWII-era uniform, holds a WWII-era Speed Graphic camera during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum will once again host the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country on May 18, 2019. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124610/180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg

Thu. 05/16/19
HERC removes OHP opioid tapering requirement for neck and back pain
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 4:51 PM

May 16, 2019

Commission votes on two proposals regarding chronic pain coverage

The Health Evidence Review Commission (HERC) today voted unanimously to update Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage for neck and back pain, by removing requirements for opioid tapering. The change will be effective October 1.

Meanwhile, the HERC unanimously declined to cover treatments for the five chronic pain conditions that had been under consideration since 2017, citing a lack of evidence of clinical effectiveness for both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for those conditions.

The five conditions under consideration were: chronic pain due to trauma, post-procedural chronic pain, chronic pain syndrome, other chronic pain, and fibromyalgia.

In 2017 OHA convened the Chronic Pain Task Force to explore whether OHP should cover these five chronic pain conditions. Currently, they are not intended to be covered by OHP. The proposal that was informed by the task force garnered considerable concern and attention from advocates, providers and experts across the country, prompting deeper dives into the evidence and revisions to the proposal. Most recently, OHA commissioned a third-party review by Washington-based Aggregate Analytics Inc. (AAI) to appraise the evidence under consideration for these chronic pain conditions.

"The HERC is often faced with important decisions with limited clinical evidence available," said Dana Hargunani, M.D., chief medical officer at OHA. "We want to thank the members for their thoughtful deliberations. We are committed to reviewing new forthcoming evidence ahead."

Previously in 2016 the HERC expanded OHP coverage for neck and back pain, newly approving non-pharmacological services such as physical and occupational therapy, chiropractic care, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and yoga. The benefit package had also required opioid tapering neck and back pain patients from long-term opioid therapy.

Today the HERC voted to remove the tapering requirement if not clinically indicated. The neck and back pain coverage will be further revisited this winter, with a focus on opioid coverage.

"Pain is complicated and different for everyone," said Kevin Olson, M.D., HERC chairman. "We heard loud and clear that pain treatment and opioid tapering should be individualized based on the patient-clinician relationship. I am pleased that we were able to align the neck and back coverage with these principles."

About the HERC

The Health Evidence Review Commission reviews medical evidence to prioritize health spending in the Oregon Health Plan and to promote evidence-based medical practice statewide through comparative effectiveness reports, including coverage guidances and multisector interventions, health technology assessments and evidence-based practice guidelines.

The commission consists of 13 governor-appointed and senate-confirmed volunteer members, including five physician representatives (one of whom must be a doctor of osteopathy and another a hospital representative), a dentist, a public health nurse, a behavioral health representative, a provider of complementary and alternative medicine, a retail pharmacist, an insurance industry representative and two consumer representatives.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2w54BY4

 


FBI Profiles Oregon Fugitive as Part of National Police Week Remembrance Events: Reward of up to $10,000 Still Available
FBI - Oregon - 05/16/19 4:01 PM

The FBI has chosen eight cases - including one from Oregon - to highlight during the national Police Week events honoring those officers killed and injured in the line of duty. The Oregon case focuses on fugitive David Anthony Durham who is wanted in connection with the 2011 attempted murder of a Lincoln City Police officer.

On Thursday, May 16th, the FBI highlighted the Durham case on its website (www.fbi.gov) and will showcase Durham across its national social media platforms including www.Facebook.com/FBI and @FBIMostWanted on Twitter.

Background Information 

At approximately 11:00 p.m. on January 23, 2011, a Lincoln City Police officer pulled over an SUV for a traffic violation. During the traffic stop, the driver of the vehicle, later identified as Durham, shot the officer multiple times and critically wounded him. Durham then fled the area. A police chase ensued, and Durham exchanged gunfire with officers before abandoning his vehicle in Waldport, Oregon. Durham disappeared, and there have been no confirmed sightings since. 

"This was a well-known, outstanding, veteran police officer who was ambushed during a traffic stop,” said Lincoln City Police Chief Jerry Palmer of the injured officer. “He will never be the same.” Palmer stressed that it remains a priority of the department to find Durham.

Local authorities obtained an arrest warrant for Durham in Lincoln County on January 27, 2011, charging him with dozens of counts - including four counts of attempted aggravated murder. The FBI obtained a federal arrest warrant on January 29, 2011, charging Durham with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution (a federal fugitive warrant.) Since that time, the FBI has assisted the Lincoln City in the fugtive hunt - providing resources, following up on potential leads and assisting with publicity efforts. 

Durham is known to possess survival skills. He was wearing full green camouflage at the time of his disappearance, as well as tan or dark boots, and a dark-colored beret. In the past, he has expressed a desire to travel or is believed to have traveled to California, the Caribbean, and Thailand. 

The FBI continues to offer a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the location and arrest of Durham. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI, by submitting a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov or calling the nearest FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: Durham Wanted Poster

Memorial Day reminds us of our highest ideals -- and the price we must sometimes pay for them (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/16/19 3:42 PM
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
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The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs welcomes our news and media partners to consider sharing with your audiences the following Memorial Day message from Director Kelly Fitzpatrick:

Every year, I’m struck by the powerful — and often, opposing — emotions that Memorial Day stirs.

We celebrate our freedoms, and yet, we mourn the cost that they required. We look ahead to a bright future, while we remember the trials and challenges of the past. We honor those who served, but we grieve their loss.

Celebration, and sadness. Gratitude, and remorse. Hope, and helplessness. Memorial Day is unique in evoking such a broad spectrum of feeling, because it is this holiday that speaks most keenly to our highest ideals, as well as the steep price we are willing to pay for them.

Sadly, it is also a day that, for many, has lost its significance. President George W. Bush would often tell the story of asking schoolchildren what the meaning of Memorial Day is, only to have them respond, “That’s the day the pool opens!”

For many Oregonians, Memorial Day is primarily the unofficial start of the summer recreation season, a chance to enjoy our amazing forests and beaches, rivers and lakes and mountain trails.

We should enjoy all that our state has to offer, but we should also keep in mind the words of another president, John F. Kennedy: “A nation reveals itself not only by the citizens it produces but also by the citizens it honors, the citizens it remembers.”

We must remember the fallen because the courage, the strength, the selflessness and the sacrifice of each one of these brave warriors is the ideal to which we all should aspire.

On this Memorial Day, I think of Bob Maxwell, a great American and Oregonian whom we lost earlier this month. Bob was a World War II combat soldier, and until his death, the only Medal of Honor recipient still living in our state. While he did not die fighting for our country he fearlessly faced death in a way few Americans ever have.

He earned that medal — the U.S. military’s highest decoration for valor — for the courage he showed during a battle in September 1944, when a live German hand grenade was tossed in the midst of his squad. Without a second thought, he hurled himself upon it, shielding his comrades from the blast with nothing but a blanket and his unprotected body.

Maxwell cheated death that day, though he carried shrapnel in his body for the rest of his life.  It was a life he dedicated in humble service to the veteran community, and to the memories of his brothers in arms, who never got the chance to come home.

We must never forget the true cost of war. It is a price paid not in dollars and cents, but with the blood of our heroes. They were nothing less than the best America had to offer, those who answered the call when their nation needed them, who paid the ultimate price to protect us and our way of life.

The stories of their sacrifice are forever woven into the fabric of our nation and its history. They gave their lives on the foreign soils of Europe, the black sands of the South Pacific, the frozen reaches of Korea, in the sweltering jungles of Vietnam, the scorching deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq, and in many other places across the globe.

The United States lost more than 400,000 of its sons and daughters in World War II — 2,826 from Oregon. 54,246 American service members gave their lives in Korea (287 Oregonians); 58,209 in Vietnam (791 from our state).

In Iraq and Afghanistan, we lost 6,713 American service members — 142 Oregonians. Each one of their names is etched on slabs of granite that form the heart of the Afghan/Iraqi Freedom Memorial, located just a few steps from the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs office building. Each one of their names is read aloud each year at our Memorial Day ceremony, as we seek to honor and remember their sacrifice.

Each one represents the loss of a bright and shining light in the lives of their families, a pain that they feel each and every day — not just on Memorial Day. We remember and honor their sacrifice as well. They, too, paid a great price for the freedoms we now enjoy.

On behalf of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, I urge all Oregonians to take a moment this Memorial Day, to remember our fallen heroes who gave their lives in service to our nation, and say, “Thank you.”

Kelly Fitzpatrick is a U.S. Army veterans and the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick

Just Released! State Recognized Schools: Davis, Gilbert, Hoover, McClure, Nob Hill (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 05/16/19 2:24 PM
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May 16, 2019:  At 1:16 pm PDT today, Superintendent, Dr. Jack Irion, was notified from the Washington State Board of Education that five schools in the Yakima School District are being honored in June as "State-Recognized Schools" for closing gaps and demonstrating improvement among student groups identified for support. 

Congratulations to:

A.C. Davis High School, Ryan McDaniel, Principal

Gilbert Elementary, Stephanie Rosbach, Principal 

Hoover Elementary School, Julio Sanchez, Principal

McClure Elementary, Deb Lavis, Principal

Nob Hill Elementary, Erin Thomas, Principal

These schools will be honored at a School Recognition Event on June 6th with simultaneous ceremonies in Olympia and Spokane.

Recognition criteria

SBE, OSPI, and EOGOAC are recognizing schools who have demonstrated performance along a continuum of improvement, closing opportunity gaps in the Washington School Improvement Framework (WSIF) measures. Measures for the first year include both academic indicators (proficiency, growth, graduation rate, English language progress) as well as school quality and student success measures (dual credit participation, regular attendance, and ninth grade on track rates).




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/3536/124613/State_Recognized_School.png

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 2:10 PM

May 16, 2019

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review of minutes from Feb. 27 meeting; status updates on surveys, complaints and waivers; committee updates, overtime documentation discussion; nurse staffing complaint discussion; emerging issues in nurse staffing; and public comment. The agenda is available on the OHA’s nurse staffing website.

When: May 22, 1-5 p.m. There will be a public comment period at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. By conference call at 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the basis of those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

For more information, see the agency nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

Program contact: Matt Gilman, 971-673-2317, matt.s.gilman@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Matt Gilman at 971-673-2317, 711 TTY or matt.s.gilman@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2EeQUuh


ADDRESS CORRECTION - State Interoperability Executive Council to meet
State of Oregon - 05/16/19 1:22 PM

The original release included an incorrect address for the meeting location. The address is now updated (DPSST - 4190 Aumsville Highway SE).

--------------------

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, May 21, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in the Hall of Heroes (Room A) at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those attending in person and via audioconference.

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

The meeting agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.


Taylor named School Business Official of the Year (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 05/16/19 11:30 AM
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WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools Director of Fiscal Services Nancy Taylor has been named School Business Official of the Year by the Washington Association of School Business Officials. Taylor oversees the district’s budget operations, accounts payable, payroll and numerous compliance regulatory functions linked to district business procedures. The award includes a trip to the National School Business Official's conference in Maryland.

"There are so many talented School Business Officials across the state that I consider it an honor to be considered among them,” said Taylor. “I appreciate my team and others for nominating me."

Taylor was nominated by Business Office employees Melinda Gee and DeeDee Delaney. Her application packet included letters of recommendation from Superintendent Wade Smith, Executive Director of Teaching and Learning Christy Krutulis and Administrative Assistant Kim Locken. Taylor was honored at the Washington Association of School Business Officials awards ceremony May 9.

"Nancy works diligently on her own tasks, but she does not hesitate to drop what she's doing to help others and put them first,” said Gee. “She is committed to her duties and is dedicated to the staff. Her extensive knowledge on all aspects about Washington State school finance makes her an outstanding leader."

The Washington Schools Business Officials Association coordinates monthly fiscal user group meetings, trainings, certification programs and an annual professional development workshop and awards program.

###

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1288/124600/Nancy_Taylor.jpg

ESD 123 ECEAP Preschool Expanding for 2019-20 (Photo)
ESD 123 - 05/16/19 10:00 AM
Preschool teacher with students at ECEAP site
Preschool teacher with students at ECEAP site
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PASCO, WA – With the conclusion of the 2019 legislative session, Educational Service District 123 received confirmation of a major expansion to our ECEAP Preschool program. ESD 123 has managed the Early Childhood Education & Assistance Program (ECEAP) since 2014. The new award of an additional 152 slots means ESD 123 will be serving more than 500 preschool students across 15 different school districts starting in the 2019-20 school year.

ESD 123’s ECEAP Preschool currently serves children ages 3-5 in Columbia (Burbank), Finley, North Franklin (Mesa and Connell), Pasco, Othello, Touchet, and Waitsburg/Prescott/Dixie School Districts, as well as at two subcontractor sites in Kennewick and Benton City. The 2019 expansion brings services to Moses Lake, College Place, Walla Walla, and Prosser School Districts.

“We have a strong team, full of people with good backgrounds and experience in early learning,” says Matt Bona, ESD 123 Director of Early Learning. “That helps districts feel confident in our work and want to partner with us.”

ECEAP provides free preschool services to qualifying families, as well as nutritious meals and snacks, health screenings, and family support. Families looking to apply for the 2019-20 school year or receive more information are encouraged to contact the ESD 123 ECEAP office at 509.544.5704 or the regional recruiter at 509.637.2312. For more information on the ECEAP preschool expansion, contact Molly Curtiss, Director of Communications, at tiss@esd123.org">mcurtiss@esd123.org or 509.544.5787.

###

About ESD 123:  Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.




Attached Media Files: Preschool teacher with students at ECEAP site , ECEAP preschool student

Richland Seeks Public Facilities District Board Member (Photo)
City of Richland - 05/16/19 9:04 AM
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The Richland City Council is accepting applications from individuals interested in serving on its Public Facilities District Board. The term of the appointment is four years, from July 16, 2019 through July 15, 2021. Interested citizens must submit an application and resume.

Details are available on the city’s website at www.ci.richland.wa.us/bccvacancies or by calling the city at 942-7388. The application deadline is May 28, 2019.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5957/124593/involvement_opp-01.jpg

Wed. 05/15/19
Oregon National Guard 'Run 2 Remember' 5K Run/Walk event (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/15/19 6:00 PM
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SALEM, Oregon – The 3rd Annual Oregon National Guard ‘Run 2 Remember’ 5K Run/Walk is scheduled for May 18, 2019 at the Salem Riverfront Park, 200 Water Street, NE, Salem, Oregon. A brief registration period will be open beginning at 8:00 AM, as participants are highly encouraged to register before the day of the event at:

https://www.oregonarmyguard.com/ausa5k

Oregon Army National Guard Brig. Gen. William J. Edwards, Assistant Adjutant General Army, is scheduled to deliver remarks to those in attendance at 8:30 AM. The Kids Fun Run (1/2 mile run) will take place at 8:40 with the featured event 5K Run/Walk starting at 9:00 AM.

The route for the race is a 2.5K out-and-back course with an aid station at the turn-around point. There will also be an aid station at the Start/Finish line.

The remembrance run/walk is in honor of Fallen Service Members from all branches of the Armed Forces. In addition to the run/walk events, a resource fair will be open for surviving family and Service Members. Food cart vendors have been invited and service provider booths will be open onsite throughout the event. The day’s activities will conclude at 11:00 AM.

Helping host the event is the Oregon National Guard Service Member Family Support Branch along with The Association of the United States Army and The United States Army Survivor Outreach. Resource Fair participants include the Polk County Veteran Services Office, Team Red, White and Blue, Military One Source, The Returning Veterans Project and other veteran service organizations. Additional information can be found at the link provided above.

PHOTO Caption:

Participants walk through Salem Riverfront Park during the 'Run to Remember' 5K Run/Walk, May 19, 2018, in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon National Guard’s Service Member & Family Support Branch hosted the event in honor of Fallen Service Members and Gold Star Families. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124585/180519-Z-OT568-041.jpg

Jury Convicts Portland Drug Trafficker
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 4:21 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland returned guilty verdicts today against a Portland man who was accused of distributing large quantities of methamphetamine throughout Multnomah County, Oregon.

Amadeo Lupercio-Quezada, 39, was convicted after a two-day trial of conspiring to possess within intent to distribute methamphetamine; possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine; and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

According to court documents and information entered at trial, in October 2017, a Gresham Police detective learned that Lupercio-Quezada and co-defendant Maribel Sebastian-Evangelista were distributing large amounts of methamphetamine throughout Multnomah County. Lupercio-Quezada would physically complete the sales after Sebastian-Evangelista would arrange deals by phone. Thereafter, the detective and other members of the Gresham Police Department Special Enforcement Team initiated four controlled purchases of methamphetamine from Lupercio-Quezada and Sebastian-Evangelista between October and December 2017.

All four controlled purchases took place at Lupercio-Quezada’s residence on E. Burnside Street in Portland and resulted in the officers successfully purchasing ounce quantities of methamphetamine. Officers later searched the residence pursuant to a state search warrant and found distribution quantities of methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine, an ID card with Lupercio-Quezada’s photo, $14,500 in cash as well as a .380 caliber Glock model 42 semi-automatic pistol located near the drugs.

Lupercio-Quezada faces a maximum sentence of life in prison with consecutive mandatory minimum sentences of 10 and 5 years for the drug and gun charges, respectively; a $250,000 fine and a life term of supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 21, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

This case was investigated by the Gresham Police Department Special Enforcement Team and was prosecuted by Kemp L. Strickland and Sarah Barr, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124582/VERDICT-Lupercio-Quezada-Final.pdf

Death Investigation Highway 38 near Elkton -- Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 05/15/19 4:14 PM

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Wednesday morning’s accident that lead to the death of a North Bend man on Highway 38 near Elkton. 

On May 15, 2019 at about 11:10 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a log truck that had gone into a ditch on Highway 38 near milepost 37. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a loaded Kenworth log truck operated by John DICKENS, age 63, from North Bend, was eastbound on Highway 38.  DICKENS stopped at a wide spot along the highway and exited the log truck.  The log truck started rolling and struck DICKENS while he was outside of it causing fatal injuries. 

OSP is continuing the investigation into what caused the log truck to roll while it was unattended.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigators responded to the scene to assist with the investigation. 

OSP was assisted at the scene by Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, Elkton Fire Department , OSHA, and Mast Brothers Towing. 

No photographs for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Jury Convicts Beaverton Man for Assaulting Federal Task Force Officers with Explosive Device
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 3:29 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland returned guilty verdicts today against a Beaverton, Oregon man who detonated an improvised explosive device containing triacetone triperoxide (TATP), assaulting two members of the Portland Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) on October 11, 2017.

Jason Paul Schaefer, 27, was convicted after a six-day trial of two counts of assaulting a federal officer and one count each of carrying and using a destructive device during and in relation to a crime of violence, carrying and using an explosive during the commission of a federal felony, unlawful transport of explosive materials, possession of an unregistered destructive device and being a felon in possession of explosives.

“Without the hard work and dedication of the JTTF agents and partners who pursued and investigated Mr. Schaefer, he might still be on the street furthering his deadly pursuits. We are extremely fortunate that Mr. Schaefer did not succeed in his attempt to take the lives of two JTTF officers in October 2017,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “This case affirms the critical work of our law enforcement partners on the JTTF in keeping Oregon communities safe.”

“Our JTTF agents and task force partners put their lives on the line every day for the people of Oregon,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Mr. Schaefer made a series of choices that led to his encounter with law enforcement on that day. He alone is responsible for the physical harm that both he and the responding task force officer suffered. Today's verdict is just and will help ensure the safety of the community in the future.”

“The Oregon State Police is proud of the collaboration among our local and federal partners on the JTTF, with our mutual goal to keep Oregon safe. We are grateful that our troopers and taskforce officers were not seriously injured during this rapidly developing event. OSP is also appreciative of the time and attention of the U.S. Attorney's Office to seek justice in this case,” said Travis Hampton, Superintendent of the Oregon State Police.

“The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the JTTF and partnering agencies for their hard work in this investigation. We value these important public safety partnerships that work tirelessly to keep our communities safe,” said Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff.

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, on or about September 21, 2017, FBI Portland determined that Schaefer had purchased several items that could be used to make a bomb. Schaefer was known to federal investigators after an April 2017 incident where he threatened to kill his landlords and used mercury to deter people from entering an apartment garage he rented in Beaverton. The incident led to Schaefer being arrested and prosecuted for illegally possessing body armor.

On October 11, 2017, federal agents and task force officers executed a search warrant on Schaefer’s Beaverton apartment. Schaefer arrived that morning at a meeting with his probation officer to find two federal agents there to meet him. They notified Schaefer of the warrant and asked if his property was booby trapped. Schaeffer told the agents that it was not and the search commenced.

After a brief conversation with the agents, Schaefer departed in a white sport utility vehicle. The agents followed Schaefer, but lost him. Meanwhile, agents searching Schaefer’s apartment found several explosive precursors and electronic matches. While the search was ongoing, Schaefer returned to the apartment and threatened a task force officer before fleeing.

Two task force officers pursued Schaefer who soon got stuck in traffic. The officers approached Schaefer on foot and ordered him out of the vehicle. Schaefer did not comply, threatened to kill the officers and ignited an explosive device concealed in a cigarette pack. The blast caused significant injury to Schaefer’s hand and sent debris flying into one of the officers, who suffered bodily injury. Following the explosion, Schaefer was arrested and officers found a second cigarette pack containing explosives in his vehicle.

Schaefer faces a maximum sentence of life in prison with a 30-year mandatory minimum. He will be sentenced on August 13, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Marco A. Hernandez.

This case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. It was investigated by the Portland JTTF. The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124580/VERDICT-Schaefer-Final.pdf

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors holds inaugural meeting May 22 at Silver Falls (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/15/19 12:56 PM
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SALEM, Ore. – Gov. Kate Brown has established a task force to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. 

Task force members will work over the next year to produce a report recommending policies, legislation and initiatives to support economic development in both rural and urban areas, balance improved outdoor recreation access with resource protection, and increase outdoor recreation participation, especially among youth and traditionally underserved communities.

The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force will meet for the first time 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. May 22 at the Silver Falls Conference Center, Silver Falls State Park, 20024 Silver Falls Highway SE, Sublimity. The meeting is open to the public.

The meeting will encompass the current state of affairs, including past and ongoing efforts to improve outdoor recreation and business opportunities. View the full meeting agenda online: oregon.gov/orec/Documents/052019ORECTaskForceMeeting.pdf

The meeting is the first in a planned series; the group will hold subsequent meetings on the coast, the Portland area, and in southern and eastern Oregon.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and will be chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, Director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. A full list of task force members is included at the end of this release. More detail about each member is online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD executive assistant, at 503-986-0733 or rie.Lovellette@oregon.gov">Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.

More information about Silver Falls State Park, including maps and driving directions, is on the park’s webpage.

Task force members

  • Jonathan Blasher (Chair), Director - Parks and Nature, Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission
  • Asha Aiello, Communications Director; Secretary/Treasurer, American Forest Resource Council; Oregon Outdoor Council
  • Kelley Minty Morris, Klamath County Commissioner, Association of Oregon Counties; Klamath County
  • Chris Hager, NW Regional Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers
  • Amanda Welker, Global Trade & Recruitment Manager, Business Oregon
  • Queta Gonzalez, Director, Center for Diversity and the Environment
  • Esmeralda Horn, Development & Recreation Manager, City of Umatilla
  • Chuck Sams, Communications Director, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
  • Ed Morgan, General Manager, Guaranty RV, Inc.
  • Mike Wallenfells, VP Sales; President, Hydro Flask; Oregon Outdoor Alliance
  • Matthew Drake, CEO, Mount Hood Meadows
  • Jennifer Magby, Interim Tillamook District Recreation Manager, Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Roger Fuhrman, Information and Education Division Administrator, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • Susan Peithman, Active Transportation Policy Lead, Oregon Department of Transportation
  • Lillian Shirley, BSN, MPH, MPA, Director, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority
  • Mary Jo Evers, CPA, Finance Director; Chairperson, Ontario School District; Ontario Recreation District
  • Chris Havel, Associate Director, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
  • Senator Chuck Thomsen, District 26 (R), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Representative Ken Helm, District 34 (D), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Matthew Weintraub, Founding Member; Member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition; Clatsop County Parks and Recreational Lands Advisory Committee
  • Hugh Morrison, Network Coordinator, Oregon Outdoors
  • Steph Noll, Coalition Director, Oregon Trails Coalition
  • Randy Henry, Boating Safety and Education Manager, Oregon State Marine Board
  • Lindsey Shirley, University Outreach & Engagement Associate Provost, Oregon State University
  • Sue Bal, Business Development Manager, Athletic & Outdoor Industry, Prosper Portland
  • Sara Morrissey, Public Affairs Manager, Strategy, Travel Oregon
  • John Omlin, Owner; Several Statewide ATV Committees, Valley Powersports
  • Dan Little (ex-officio), First Gentleman, State of Oregon
  • Cailin O'Brien-Feeney (ex-officio), Director, Oregon Office of Outdoor Recreation
  • Tracy Tophooven (ex-officio), Director for Recreation, WWSR, Lands, and Minerals, USFS Region 6
  • Aaron Curtis (ex-officio), Section Chief for Social Sciences, Bureau of Land Management OR/WA

# # #

The mission of the Office of Outdoor Recreation is to elevate the personal, community, and economic benefits of outdoor recreation for all Oregonians. The Office of Outdoor Recreation is a resource to businesses and nonprofit organizations, a partner to agencies and communities, and an advocate for the outdoors.




Attached Media Files: Logo RGB horizontal , Logo RGB vertical

Convicted Felon Sentenced to Over 13 Years in Prison After Bend Police Seize Large Quantity of Methamphetamine and Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 11:29 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—Christopher Michael Soares, 35, of Southern Oregon, was sentenced today to 160 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for possessing with the intent to distribute methamphetamine in Bend, Oregon.

According to court documents, on June 28, 2016, police officers in Bend stopped Soares while he was driving a vehicle with two other occupants. When officers searched Soares’ person, they found 99 grams of methamphetamine, 56 grams of heroin and a 9mm firearm. Soares was later arrested on three separate occasions in Jackson County for additional drug and firearms offenses.

In September 2016, Soares was charged by federal criminal complaint for the June 2016 incident in Bend. He later pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Facing state and federal charges, the parties, including state prosecutors in Jackson County, agreed to a global resolution to resolve all of Soares’ pending criminal cases.

This case was jointly investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Bend Police Department, Medford Police Department and Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124563/SENTENCING-Soares-Final-Updated.pdf

Tue. 05/14/19
Oregon National Guard celebrates Armed Forces Day (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/14/19 7:47 PM
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SALEM, Oregon - The Oregon National Guard honored all military members and veterans during the annual Armed Forces Day ceremony held at the State Capitol Mall in Salem, Oregon, May 14, 2019.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown and Maj. Gen. Mike Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon both spoke at the ceremony that included an F-15 Eagle fly over by the Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Fighter Wing and a howitzer salute by the "Governor's Own" Bravo Battery, 2-218th Field Artillery Battalion.

The Oregon Army National Guard’s 234th Army Band provided music during the ceremony.  Salem residents Rita Hathaway, a ‘Rosie the Riveter’ during WWII and war bride, Joy Beebe, were also honored, along with families and other war era veterans.

This year’s Armed Forces Day ceremony paid special acknowledgment to WWII veterans and families as well as those that support the war effort.

A large display of military equipment from various units throughout the Oregon National Guard was on display for visitors attending the ceremony, along with Soldier and Airmen to answer questions. The celebration gave Oregonians a chance to see the capabilities of the Oregon National Guard.

 

Photo Captions:

190514-Z-ZJ128-002: Two Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers render a hand salute following a howitzer salute by the "Governor's Own" Bravo Battery, 2-218th Field Artillery Battalion, during Armed Forces Day, May 14, 2019, Salem, Oregon. (Oregon National Guard photo by Maj. Wayne Clyne)

190514-Z-ZJ128-004: Maj. Gen. Mike Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon deliver remarks to those attending Armed Forces Day at the Oregon State Capital, Salem, Oregon, May 14, 2019. (Oregon National Guard photo by Maj. Wayne Clyne)

190514-Z-ZJ128-046: Oregon Governor Kate Brown (left) along with Maj. Gen. Mike Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon (center) and official honoree Joy Beebe, a WWII war bride, (right) stand for a howitzer salute by the "Governor's Own" Bravo Battery, 2-218th Field Artillery Battalion during the Armed Forces Day ceremony at the Oregon State Capital, Salem, Oregon, May 14, 2019. (Oregon National Guard photo by Maj. Wayne Clyne)

Additonal images from today's event can be found at https://www.flickr.com/photos/oregonmildep/albums/72157678251596907




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124544/190514-Z-ZJ128-046.jpg , 2019-05/962/124544/190514-Z-ZJ128-004.jpg , 2019-05/962/124544/190514-Z-ZJ128-002.jpg

Oregon's Community Hospitals' Economic Impact Tops $20 Billion
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 05/14/19 4:26 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon’s Community Hospitals’ Economic Impact Tops $20 Billion

Lake Oswego, Ore. – May 14, 2019 – Oregon’s 62 community hospitals accounted for $20.9 billion in economic output in 2017, according to a new study prepared for the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) by ECONorthwest.

“Today’s report shows that the state’s hospitals make vital contributions not just to the personal and community health of Oregonians, but to the economic health of the communities they serve,” said Andy Van Pelt, OAHHS executive vice president. “From the ranches of Harney County to the urban centers of the metro Portland area, hospitals bring jobs and economic vitality to Oregon.”

As the report shows, hospitals are major employers in our state and in many cases a community’s largest employer. They support 137,839 direct and secondary jobs, meaning that more than one in 20 Oregon jobs is connected to hospitals and health systems. In addition to the total economic impact, hospitals contributed more than $12 billion to the Gross State Product (GSP).

“I just think you can’t underscore enough the important role of hospitals in the regional economies,” said John Tapogna, president of ECONorthwest, the economics research firm that produced the report. “They provide thousands of the types of middle-wage jobs that are disappearing in other industries.”

To read the full report, click here.

Tapogna also said the state’s early embrace of the Medicaid expansion made possible by the Affordable Care Act has produced significant economic benefits. One in four Oregonians is now covered by the Oregon Health Plan. The care they receive, often at a community hospital, brings revenue to the region where it’s delivered. “Those are dollars that are coming into Oregon from outside the state,” said Tapogna. “That Oregon was early in that process really helped push our numbers.”

The report found that rural hospitals play an outsized role in the economic health of their regions. Hospitals are among the steadiest sources of jobs, and their totals often comprise a higher percentage of total employment than in urban areas. 

Oregon’s economy has been healthy of late with low unemployment, and the health care sector has performed even better as a job creator. From 2015 to 2017, Oregon’s health care system experienced significantly higher job growth compared to other private sectors, with a net increase of 10% over that time (or a 52% employment increase since 2001).

Those well-paying hospital jobs are a major source of tax revenue for the state, generating almost $700 million in state and local taxes directly or indirectly.

The ECONorthwest study was commissioned by OAHHS and utilizes state-specific data from the American Hospital Association.

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1635/124540/Econ_Impact_Release_051419_Letterhead.docx

Oregon's Community Hospitals' Economic Impact Tops $20 Billion
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 05/14/19 4:26 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon’s Community Hospitals’ Economic Impact Tops $20 Billion

Lake Oswego, Ore. – May 14, 2019 – Oregon’s 62 community hospitals accounted for $20.9 billion in economic output in 2017, according to a new study prepared for the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) by ECONorthwest.

“Today’s report shows that the state’s hospitals make vital contributions not just to the personal and community health of Oregonians, but to the economic health of the communities they serve,” said Andy Van Pelt, OAHHS executive vice president. “From the ranches of Harney County to the urban centers of the metro Portland area, hospitals bring jobs and economic vitality to Oregon.”

As the report shows, hospitals are major employers in our state and in many cases a community’s largest employer. They support 137,839 direct and secondary jobs, meaning that more than one in 20 Oregon jobs is connected to hospitals and health systems. In addition to the total economic impact, hospitals contributed more than $12 billion to the Gross State Product (GSP).

“I just think you can’t underscore enough the important role of hospitals in the regional economies,” said John Tapogna, president of ECONorthwest, the economics research firm that produced the report. “They provide thousands of the types of middle-wage jobs that are disappearing in other industries.”

To read the full report, click here.

Tapogna also said the state’s early embrace of the Medicaid expansion made possible by the Affordable Care Act has produced significant economic benefits. One in four Oregonians is now covered by the Oregon Health Plan. The care they receive, often at a community hospital, brings revenue to the region where it’s delivered. “Those are dollars that are coming into Oregon from outside the state,” said Tapogna. “That Oregon was early in that process really helped push our numbers.”

The report found that rural hospitals play an outsized role in the economic health of their regions. Hospitals are among the steadiest sources of jobs, and their totals often comprise a higher percentage of total employment than in urban areas. 

Oregon’s economy has been healthy of late with low unemployment, and the health care sector has performed even better as a job creator. From 2015 to 2017, Oregon’s health care system experienced significantly higher job growth compared to other private sectors, with a net increase of 10% over that time (or a 52% employment increase since 2001).

Those well-paying hospital jobs are a major source of tax revenue for the state, generating almost $700 million in state and local taxes directly or indirectly.

The ECONorthwest study was commissioned by OAHHS and utilizes state-specific data from the American Hospital Association.

##

About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1635/124539/Econ_Impact_Release_051419_Letterhead.docx

G. Lewis Clevenger's "Moving On" to be exhibited in the Governor's Office May 26 -- July 25 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 05/14/19 2:35 PM
G. Lewis Clevenger, “Copa,” 2018. Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Photo Aaron Johanson.
G. Lewis Clevenger, “Copa,” 2018. Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Photo Aaron Johanson.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1418/124536/thumb_Clevenger_Copa.jpg

Salem, Oregon – Portland artist G. Lewis Clevenger will exhibit “Moving On” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem from May 26 to July 25.

Clevenger paints abstract compositions with bold colors and overlapping, softly geometric forms. To him, painting each piece is a give-and-take process that takes time: “The paintings develop as I ‘push’ the mark making and the canvas pushes back in response. The colors and composition shift and settle in as the painting progresses. My paintings develop and change daily.” The final works both reveal and hide these storied layers, inviting the viewer’s eye to return to the lines and colors again and again, searching for a meaning that is just out of reach.

Born in Roseburg, Clevenger attended the Pacific Northwest College of Art in the early 1970s. His work has been exhibited in numerous group and solo exhibitions throughout the Pacific Northwest, including at the Portland Art Museum, the Tacoma Art Museum and the Corvallis Arts Center. He was selected for the Oregon Biennial in 1982, 1999 and 2003, and received the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award in 2004. Clevenger’s work can be found in public collections such as the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University (Salem), the Portland Art Museum and the Meyer Memorial Trust (Portland). He is represented by Russo Lee Gallery (Portland), where additional works by Clevenger will be on view from June 6 to 29.

The Art in the Governor’s Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor’s Office in the State Capitol. Artists are nominated by a statewide committee of arts professionals who consider artists representing the breadth and diversity of artistic practice across Oregon, and are then selected by the Arts Commission with the participation of the Governor’s Office. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor’s office is regarded as a “once in a lifetime” honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor’s office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: G. Lewis Clevenger, “Copa,” 2018. Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Photo Aaron Johanson.

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets May 17
Oregon Health Authority - 05/14/19 2:24 PM

May 14, 2018

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets May 17

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; public testimony 9:15-9:25 a.m.; individual measure review (assessment for kids in DHS custody; depression screening and follow-up; colorectal cancer screening; diabetes: HbA1c poor control; controlling hypertension; effective contraceptive use; CAHPS access to care; cigarette smoking prevalence); review findings from stakeholder survey; adjourn.

When: May 17, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775, Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

Program contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, or .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Wapato High School's Prevention Club Plans Student Social Promoting Drug Free Campus
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 05/14/19 2:14 PM

Afternoon all,

This is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Prevention Week. Wapato High School’s (fairly new) Prevention Club is organizing a student social tomorrow afternoon as a way to help promote a drug free campus.  See details in attached release.

You are more than welcome to come out to the event tomorrow afternoon, if you think you will I ask that you please let me know so I can give the folks at the High School a heads up.

Thanks for your consideration.




Attached Media Files: Wapato High School Prevention Club Student Social

Dental Pilot Project Program Technical Review Board meets May 16
Oregon Health Authority - 05/14/19 2:02 PM

May 14, 2018

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Program Technical Review Board meets May 16

What: A public meeting of the state Dental Pilot Project Program’s Technical Review Board. Purpose of the meeting is to review an application to the Dental Pilot Project Program from Willamette Dental titled “Dental Hygiene Restorative Function Endorsement Model.” The purpose of the project is to investigate the feasibility of adopting a dental therapist model as a new category of dental care provider for Oregon.

Agenda: Review pilot project application to the Dental Pilot Project Program.

When: May 16, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be no public comment period.

Where: Oregon Oral Health Coalition, 9140 SW Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon. No call-in option is available.

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, 711 TTY, or ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets May 15 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/14/19 1:24 PM

May 14, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets May 15 in Portland

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates, release of payer-specific information, Payment Arrangement File Workgroup, TAG membership, public comment.

When: May 15, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building Suite 775, Transformation Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also can join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2239280069326082306 and call the conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

Program contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, or .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Initial filings reveal stabilization as rate review season kicks off
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/14/19 12:00 PM

Salem — Oregon consumers can get a first look at requested rates for 2020 individual and small group health insurance plans.

In the individual market, seven companies submitted rate change requests ranging from an average 3.2 percent decrease to an average 13.5 percent increase, for an average of 3.3 percent. In the small group market, nine companies submitted rate change requests ranging from an average 0.3 percent decrease to an average 13.1 percent increase, for an average of 8.7 percent. See the attached chart for the full list of rate change requests.

“It’s early in the process, but we are encouraged to see carriers providing more options to Oregonians by expanding into both rural and coastal communities, and the market stabilizing in spite of uncertainty at the federal level,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Now it is time to start our open and thorough review process that allows Oregonians to provide input on the filings that affect them.”

Moderate rate increase requests, recent health insurance company financial statements, and expansion into additional counties by multiple carriers reveal that the Oregon health insurance market is stabilizing in spite of continued uncertainty at the federal level. The Oregon Reinsurance Program continues to help stabilize the market as well. It consistently lowers rates by 6 percent each year.

Health insurance companies submitted rate requests to the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation on May 13. Over the next two months, the division will analyze the requested rates to ensure they adequately cover Oregonians’ health care costs. The division must review and approve rates before they are charged to policyholders.

The requested rates are for plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer.

Later this month, Oregonians will be able to compare their health plans and submit comments at oregonhealthrates.org. Public hearing dates will also be posted to the site.

Oregonians are encouraged to comment on rate change requests during the public comment period, which opens later this month and runs through early July. The public can submit comments online and during the public rate hearings.

Preliminary decisions are expected to be announced late June, and final decisions will be made in late July.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.

 

 

 


State Partners to Educate Oregonians about Scams Targeting Veterans and Seniors
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/14/19 11:08 AM

Every two minutes, someone in the United States becomes a victim of fraud. A disproportionate number of scams target the nation’s most honorable and vulnerable — veterans and the elderly. These victims are defrauded out of millions of dollars every year.

In partnership with the Oregon Department of Justice, Department of Consumer and Business Services and AARP, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is hosting a first-of-its-kind event to educate veterans and their families about fraud and scams that target them.

Operation Stop Scams will be hosted on Monday, May 20, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at World of Speed, 27490 SW 95th Ave. in Wilsonville. Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum will speak at the event, which includes learning sessions by several state agencies focused on helping veterans understand how scams target them and how they can protect themselves. Organizations that provide direct services to veterans and Oregon’s aging population will also be available throughout the event.

“It is critically important that all veterans understand how to protect themselves from being defrauded. These scams are particularly despicable because the veterans involved are in the stage where they don't have the opportunity to recover financially, so these losses are devastating to them,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “Moreover, the impacted veterans are often our nation’s heroes who served during World War II, or the wars in Korea or Vietnam.”

“A 2017 AARP study found that U.S. military veterans are twice as likely as nonveterans to lose money to fraud. Fraudsters come at ex-service members from many angles, employing vet-focused twists on identity theft, phishing, impostor scams, and investment and loan deceptions,” said Ruby Haughton-Pitts, AARP Oregon State Director. “Getting this information, education and resources about potential fraud in front of veterans, military and their families is the best way to stop these con artists.”

Just this month, Multnomah County Circuit Court fined Future Income Payments LLC $5.9 million for executing a scheme on approximately 240 Oregon veterans and retirees. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation and the Department of Justice sued Future Income for the scheme, which provided illegal loans to low-income Oregonians with interest up to 200 percent.

“While scammers can lurk everywhere, and can target anybody, veterans can be an easy target because scammers know they may have access to pensions and other resources. Even though the scams keep changing, there are easy things we can do to protect ourselves and our families and neighbors. But, we must all work together in order to educate ourselves. I am looking forward to an informative and fun event,” said Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum.

This event is open and free to the public. Veterans and family are encouraged to attend.  A light breakfast and lunch is provided for all attendees as well as an opportunity to tour the museum following the event. 

Register to attend at https://aarp.cvent.com/StopScams2019 or call 1-877-926-8300.

To learn more about protecting yourself from financial fraud visit https://dfr.oregon.gov/financial/protect/Pages/senior-safe.aspx. To learn about veteran benefits, please visit www.oregon.gov/odva or call 503-373-2085 to find a local Veteran Service Office.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1082/124521/ODVA_Flyer_Operation_Stop_Scams_FINAL.pdf

Media Invite: Richland Water Treatment to Receive an Award for Exceptional Water Quality
City of Richland - 05/14/19 10:36 AM

Today, at 1:00 p.m., representatives from the Washington State Department of Health will be in town to present an award to Richland’s Water Treatment Facility for performing above and beyond federal water quality requirements four years in a row. Exceeding these standards means Richland is detecting contaminates beyond the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) standards or limits.

The Washington State Treatment Optimization Program or TOP recognizes surface water treatment facilities who go above and beyond federal requirements for turbidity. Turbidity is the clarity of water and it is an important factor in water quality. It is measured in nephelometric turbidity units (NTU).

The DOH Office of Drinking Water review and tracks the turbidity data submitted by systems on their monthly operations reports to ensure compliance with regulations. In addition, maximum daily turbidity values reported in the reports are entered into the Optimization Assessment Software computer program.  Using this software, they are able to rank systems according to their relative performance.

Federal NTU requirements are 1.0 and Richland has exceeded that number by 95%, achieving less than 0.1 NTU.

The performance of rapid rate filters for turbidity (particle) removal is a key element in protecting consumers from microbial contaminants and maximizing public health.

Awards Program Today

  • Tuesday, May 14, 1:00 p.m.
  • Water Treatment Plant
  • 110 Saint Street, Richland WA



Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5957/124520/top_poster.pdf

District celebrates graduation rates soaring above state average
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 05/14/19 10:08 AM

WALLA WALLA - School board members received an update during their May 7 board meeting on last year's graduation rates, which have soared past the state average. Walla Walla High School's four-year graduation rate is 91 percent for the Class of 2018, which is 10 percent higher than the state average. Lincoln High School's four-year rate is 85 percent, which represents a 15 percent improvement over the past five years and nearly 5 percent above the statewide mark. Wa-Hi has seen a seven percent increase over a five-year span and represents one of the highest rates in recent years, despite increased diploma rigor. The district's overall graduation percentage is 83 percent, nearly reaching the Board's 2022 strategic plan goal of 85 percent.  

Graduation rates for Hispanic students at Wa-Hi have rocketed 11 percent above state averages to 86 percent. District-wide Hispanic rates have increased 15 percent increase over the last five years, nearly matching the graduation rate for all students. 

This year's statistics represent the last year that the Walla Walla Community College ran AEP Program, that accepts students from across the valley, will impact Walla Walla district-wide performance data.    

“This is exceptional performance we should all be proud of as a community and school district,” said Superintendent Wade Smith. “Regardless of your role as teacher, neighbor, coach, business leader or support services staff, you all play a part in connecting, inspiring and supporting our students across the finish line.” 

Board members also learned fewer district graduates who entered college are needing to take remedial courses based on National Student Clearinghouse data. This data target is also a strategic plan focus area for the School Board. Walla Walla Public Schools college enrollment numbers dipped slightly in students attending two and four year college institutions last year. However, the district still maintained more than 56 percent of its students attending post high school education and this figure does not include many of the trade school and other institutions not tracked by the College Clearinghouse.

“Our post-secondary enrollment and remediation rates also showed positive signs,” said Smith. “What was very impressive is that we saw the lowest remediation rates in history for our four-year college going students at eight percent, with the state average sitting at 12 percent. And, although we are still above the state average, we saw an 8 percent decrease in students taking remedial courses who attended two-year institutions.”  

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against the Chinese Embassy Scam (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/14/19 10:00 AM
TT - Chinese Embassy Scam - GRAPHIC - May 14, 2019
TT - Chinese Embassy Scam - GRAPHIC - May 14, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/3585/124278/thumb_TT_-_Chinese_embassy_-_GRAPHIC_-_May_13_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against the Chinese Embassy Scam. 

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (www.ic3.gov) has received reports from hundreds of victims in what’s called the Chinese Embassy Scam. In just a 15-month period, victims reported a total loss of $40 million or an average loss of $164,000 each. 

There are several different variations of this scheme… but, typically, it involves the victim receiving a message by phone, text or chat application from someone claiming to be from a Chinese embassy or consulate or Chinese business. The fraudster may claim that the victim’s passport, Social Security card or credit card was found with a suspicious person or in a suspicious package overseas. 

The fraudster tells the victims they are under investigation and, in order to assist Chinese law enforcement, they must speak to an investigator. 

In another variation of the scam, victims receive messages from people claiming to work for Chinese credit card companies. The victims are told they have overdue balances and must work with Chinese law enforcement to address the outstanding payment. 

Either way, the victims end up getting connected with "investigators," who advise victims they must wire funds to resolve the issue. The money almost always is sent to accounts located in China or Hong Kong. The fraudsters may also tell the victims that they can pay by via credit card or virtual currency… or encourage them to take out loans if they don’t have the cash. If the victims do not cooperate, the scam artists threaten them with deportation, loss of assets, and/or jail. 

The fraudsters appear to be targeting victims who have names of Asian descent. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • If you receive a call from a number that appears to be from the Chinese embassy or a Chinese credit card company or business, find a publicly available number and call back yourself. Confirm the details of the situation and any requests. 

  • Be cautious if you are asked to keep a situation or matter secret. This is a red flag. 

  • Know that the Chinese government itself has said that it will not contact you by phone for personal information, parcel pick-up, bank account information or to answer questions from Chinese law enforcement officers.. 

Remember - if you have been victimized by an online scam, you can report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Chinese Embassy Scam - AUDIO - May 14, 2019 , TT - Chinese Embassy Scam - GRAPHIC - May 14, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon April 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 05/14/19 10:00 AM

Oregon Adds 3,300 Jobs in April  

Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment rose 3,300 in April, following a gain of 6,500 jobs in March. Monthly gains were strongest in health care and social assistance and in leisure and hospitality, which each added 1,000 jobs. Several other major industries added at least 500 jobs: manufacturing (+700 jobs), government (+600), and construction (+500). Only one major industry shed a substantial number of jobs: professional and business services dropped 1,000 jobs.

Looking at longer-term trends, Oregon’s economic growth appears to have accelerated. Since April 2018, total payroll employment is up 48,200 jobs, or 2.5 percent. Job gains were relatively weak, averaging 2,300 per month, during mid-2017 through mid-2018. More recently, job growth has averaged 5,400 jobs per month since September 2018. The most rapid gains over the past year were in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+4,900 jobs, or 7.6%) and construction (+7,000 jobs, or 6.7%). Job gains were widespread, with six other major industries adding between 2.3 percent and 3.5 percent to their jobs base in the past 12 months.

Job totals for recent months were revised upward substantially, indicating more rapid hiring in Oregon in late 2018 and early this year. Total nonfarm employment was revised upward by approximately 10,000 jobs for each month of December 2018 through March 2019. Upward revisions were most pronounced in professional and business services (revised upward by 2,600 jobs); construction (+1,800); transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+1,800); retail trade (+1,600); and finance and insurance (+1,500).

Oregon’s unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 4.3 percent in April. It was 4.4 percent in March. Oregon’s unemployment rate has held within a tight range between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for the past two and a half years, since November 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate declined to 3.6 percent in April from 3.8 percent in March.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the April county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, May 21st, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for May on Tuesday, June 18th.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2018 tax records data. In addition, data for July through September 2018 were revised by a total of up to 800 jobs per month. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon April 2019 News Release

U.S. Attorney Letter to Portland City Council on Police Bureau Gun Violence Reduction Team
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/14/19 9:45 AM

Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, sent the following letter to the Portland City Council today in support of the Portland Police Bureau Gun Violence Reduction Team.

Dear Mayor Wheeler and Commissioners,

I am writing in support of the Portland Police Bureau’s Gun Violence Reduction Team.  I want to make sure you are aware this unit of PPB’s Tactical Operations Division is part of a multi-agency metro region collaboration to reduce gun violence in Multnomah County.  This unit is made up of officers with significant regional expertise and a deep knowledge of the community.

As part of the Justice Department’s National Project Safe Neighborhood program, the Portland Area Crime Gun Initiative was formed in August 2017 with partners from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Portland Police Bureau, Gresham Police Department, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office, Oregon State Police, Oregon State Crime Lab, FBI and ATF.  Using national research in reducing gun violence, partners committed to improving policies, practices and collaboration when responding to shootings in the metro area including outreach and prevention efforts.  Part of the improvements undertaken by PPB included revised policies on investigating gun crimes and creating the Gun Violence Reduction Team to examine and triage investigations on every shooting in the city.  Some of the data and successes of this effort were contained in a recent PPB press release on gun violence in Portland.

Using objective ballistics technology and shared investigative resources, we are connecting the dots more rapidly on shootings and increasing the opportunity to prevent the next tragedy.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team has been a critical partner in the Portland Area Crime Gun Initiative and officers have been active in training other investigators in Oregon and Washington.  Local and federal partners have committed resources to this effort for the benefit of the community including providing needed training and federally funded equipment for investigators.

Thank you for your continued support for this critical public safety effort.

Sincerely,

BILLY J. WILLIAMS

United States Attorney




Attached Media Files: U.S. Attorney Letter

Public Comment Period: 2019 Proposed Annual Action Plan
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 05/14/19 8:49 AM

NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD

The State of Oregon through its agencies: Oregon Housing and Community Services, Oregon Health Authority, and Oregon Business Development Department, are seeking public comments for our priorities for housing and community development on the Oregon:

Proposed 2019 Annual Action Plan (AAP)

The AAP addresses the use of HOME Investment Partnership Program, National Housing Trust Fund, Community Development Block Grant, Emergency Solutions Grant, and Housing Opportunities for People with HIV/AIDS funds and Oregon Fair Housing Issues for the program year January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019.

All Oregon residents are invited to submit comments during the 30-day public comment period beginning May 14, 2018 and ending June 14, 2019. Written comments may be submitted to Oregon Housing and Community Services; attention Rick Ruzicka, Operations and Policy Analyst, 725 Summer Street NE, Suite B, Salem, OR 97301-1266, or by e-mail at ick.Ruzicka@oregon.gov">Rick.Ruzicka@oregon.gov.  Verbal comments may be submitted by calling 503-986-6824. Comments are due no later than Monday, June 13, 2019 at 5 pm.

A copy of the Proposed 2019 AAP, and attachments, are available at Oregon Housing and Community Services at http://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/pages/consolidated-plan-five-year-plan.aspx, or visit 725 Summer Street NE, Ste. 200, Salem, OR.

People who are deaf or hearing-impaired may use the TTY by calling 503-986-2100, or the 711/Oregon Relay Service.  People needing copies in other languages or other accommodation should contact Joe Saltarello, ello@oregon.gov">Joe.Saltarello@oregon.gov, at 503-986-5215 at the earliest convenience.  

 

Las personas sordas o con impedimentos auditivos pueden usar un TTY llamando al 503-986-2100, o al servicio de relevos 711/Oregon. Las personas que necesitan copias en otros idiomas u otro acomodación deben comunicarse con ello@oregon.gov">Joe.Saltarello@oregon.gov, al 503-986-5215 a la brevedad posible.

Questions, concerns, or requests for information in alternative formats from individuals with disabilities must be submitted to ick.Ruzicka@oregon.gov">Rick.Ruzicka@oregon.gov before June 14, 2019.

 

Oregon Housing and Community Services programs are administered in a nondiscriminatory manner, consistent with Equal Opportunity Employment Opportunities, Affirmative Action, and Fair Housing requirements.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1810/124509/2019-Proposed-Annual-Action-Plan-Public-Notice.pdf

Finalists named for Edison Elementary School Principal position
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 05/14/19 8:33 AM

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools announces JP Richards and Jason Olson have been named finalists for the Edison Elementary School Principal position. A required qualification, both candidates are bilingual. Parents and staff are encouraged to meet candidates Thursday, May 16 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. during public meet and greet sessions at the Edison Elementary School Library. Attendees are asked to complete candidate feedback cards and be present, if possible, for both candidate sessions (translation services will be available). 

JP Richards currently serves as the Director of Human Resources in the Three Rivers School District in Grants Pass, OR. Prior to that he was in Tillamook, OR. He began as their Director of ELD before being promoted to elementary principal. Before his tenure in Tillamook, JP was a Vice Principal, and then Principal of Ponderosa Jr. High in Klamath Falls, OR. Before administration, he spent eight years as a Spanish teacher at the secondary level in addition to supervising Migrant/ELL summer school for K-6 students.

Jason Olson began his career in education as a middle school Spanish teacher, spending 6 years teaching Spanish at Valor Middle School in Woodburn, Or. He later served as student services specialist at the middle school for two years and was then promoted to assistant principal, where he served for four years. Jason then worked as an elementary principal at a dual language school in Hillsboro before moving to the West Linn/Wilsonville area, where he has since served in various elementary and middle school teaching and coordinator roles.  

Meet and Greet Sessions (Thursday, May 16 - Location: Edison Elementary School Library):
•    3:30 p.m.    Candidate JP Richards
•    4:00 p.m.    Candidate Jason Olson

Current Principal Dr. Julie Perron has accepted the WWPS Director of Bilingual Education position. Her last day as Edison Elementary School Principal is June 30, 2019. The new principal will report July 1. 

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