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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Thu. Jun. 22 - 5:06 pm
Police & Fire
FBI Tech Tuesday - Building a Digital Defense Against Social Engineering
FBI - Oregon - 06/20/17 10:00 AM
In this week's Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday segment: building a digital defense against social engineering.

So what is social engineering? Basically, it is a scammer who manipulates you into doing something you wouldn't ordinarily do. There is often a sense of urgency combined with fear.

Take this example: a scammer calls, texts or emails you pretending to be your bank. He tells you that your credit card is being used to purchase items overseas. If you can confirm your account number and password right away, he can get the card shut down, and you won't be liable for the losses. If you wait -- well, you will be on the hook for fraud.

Or -- on a happier note -- you receive a message that you have won a great prize. Maybe it is a car or a vacation. If you respond in the next 5 minutes, it is all yours as soon as you pay a small fee for taxes. If you don't respond right away, the scammer says, you will lose out.

Other than fear - social engineering masters have other tricks up their cyber sleeves, too. One such trick: cashing in on the trust you share with others. In some cases, they have gained access to a friend or relatives' email or social media accounts. The scammer -- pretending to be Grandma - just sent you link to a funny video, and she wants you to look at it right away! Click on it, though, and you have just downloaded malware onto your computer.

Fraudsters can also use your innate goodness against you. They take the disaster or tragedy of the day and guilt you into giving money to what you think is a legitimate charity. By spoofing the look of a real non-profit with a bogus link, your money never makes it to the true victims.

So, how do you build that digital defense against social engineering?

The number one thing you can do is to "think before you click." Don't let the fear get in the way of you making a rational decision.

Know that no bank, business or law enforcement agency is ever going to ask you for your account numbers, passwords or payments over the phone. If you get a message asking you for that information, end the conversation.

Use a publicly available resource to look up a legitimate phone number or email address for the business or agency that purportedly contacted you. You should call them to confirm what is or isn't going on.

Report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.


Attached Media Files: Tech Tuesday - Social Engineering - SPANISH written - June 20, 2017 , Tech Tuesday - Social Engineering - SPANISH audio , Tech Tuesday - Social Engineering - ENGLISH audio , Tech Tuesday - Social Engineering - RUSSIAN written - June 20, 2017 , Tech Tuesday - Social Engineering - RUSSIAN audio - June 20, 2017
Prineville Police Captain Graduates from the FBI National Academy (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/20/17 8:55 AM
Capt. Seymour - #3
Capt. Seymour - #3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/3585/105407/thumb_Seymour_3.jpg
Capt. Larry Seymour recently completed one of the toughest challenges available for local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. In early June, Capt. Seymour and two other Oregon law enforcement officers completed the ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process that local law enforcement officers must go through before being selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews of the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the chance to attend the National Academy each year," said Loren Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The exceptional leaders selected to participate have a great opportunity to share their experiences with peers and to learn best practices from officers from across the country and the world."

Capt. Seymour started his law enforcement career as a volunteer reserve officer with Molalla Police Department. Shortly thereafter, the Prineville Police Department hired him as a certified officer, and he has served in Prineville for 13 years. Over his career, Capt. Seymour has served as a Field Training Officer (FTO), a Narcotics K-9 Handler, Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT) member, Narcotics Detective and Sergeant. In January 2016, the department promoted him to the rank of Captain. In his current position, Capt. Seymour serves as operations manager for all functions of the department, and he reports to Chief Cummins. He is a certified trainer in Firearms and Active Threats.

Through the course of his time at the Prineville Police Department, Capt. Seymour attained his Associates Degree and his Bachelor's Degree from Columbia Southern University.

"The FBI National Academy is the premier executive leadership academy for law enforcement executives," said Chief Dale Cummins. "Captain Seymour, through dedication and hard work, earned a nomination and had the privilege to attend. The classes, contacts, and experiences he has had will make him a true asset to our department and our community. I look forward to his return to work where he can share his knowledge with our staff."

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Capt. Seymour took a number of courses, including: "Behavioral Science for Law Enforcement Leaders," "Fitness in Law Enforcement," "Overview of Forensic Science for Police Administrators and Managers," "Legal Issues Impacting Law Enforcement Operations," "Emotional Intelligence," "Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement" and the "National Academy Networking and Enrichment" course. The FBI's National Academy program allows the participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of their studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Capt. Seymour graduated from the 268th session of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States as well as from around the world. While in the Academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging, or travel to and from their home.

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Attached photos include:

#1 - Capt. Seymour
#2 - Capt. Seymour at National Police Memorial Law Enforcement Run (he was running in memory of Seaside Police Department's Sgt. Jason Goodding
#3 - Capt. Seymour on New York City trip with his National Academy class


Attached Media Files: Capt. Seymour - #3 , Capt. Seymour - #2 , Capt. Seymour - #1
Media Reminder - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/22/17 5:00 PM
WHEN: Friday, June 23, 2017 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center
12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO: The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, Clackamas Fire District #1, Portland Fire & Rescue, Oregon Department of Veteran Affairs, Multnomah county animal services, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, education, and safety and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled.

WHAT: Keep it legal, keep it safe
Legal fireworks in legal places
Live demonstration -- Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued more than 709 retail fireworks permits, and 211 display permits. Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman Candles, and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon, without a permit.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Under Oregon law, illegal fireworks may be confiscated and offenders fined up to $500 per violation for possession of illegal fireworks and endangering life and property. Offenders may also be arrested. Any fireworks causing damage, or misuse of fireworks carries a liability for the offender, who may be required to pay for resulting fire or other damage. Parents are liable for fireworks-caused damage by their children. Costs may include assessed fines as well as the cost of suppressing fireworks-caused fires.
Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/20/17 3:01 PM
WHEN: Friday, June 23, 2017 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center
12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO: The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, Clackamas Fire District #1, Portland Fire & Rescue, Oregon Department of Veteran Affairs, Multnomah county animal services, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, education, and safety and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled.

WHAT: Keep it legal, keep it safe
Legal fireworks in legal places
Live demonstration -- Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. To date the Office of State Fire Marshal has issued 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law forbids possession, use, or sale of fireworks that fly, explode, or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches in the air, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Under Oregon law, illegal fireworks may be confiscated and offenders fined up to $500 per violation for possession of illegal fireworks and endangering life and property. Offenders may also be arrested. Any fireworks causing damage, or misuse of fireworks carries a liability for the offender, who may be required to pay for resulting fire or other damage. Parents are liable for fireworks-caused damage by their children. Costs may include assessed fines as well as the cost of suppressing fireworks-caused fires.
Transportation
ODOT eclipse update: T minus 2 months (Arrive early, stay put, leave late) (Photo)
ODOT: PDX, Mt. Hood - 06/21/17 10:19 AM
2017-06/1200/105466/2017_eclipse_map_Oregon_NASA.jpg
2017-06/1200/105466/2017_eclipse_map_Oregon_NASA.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/1200/105466/thumb_2017_eclipse_map_Oregon_NASA.jpg
Don't be a luna(r)-tic: Arrive early, stay put and leave late

Oregon--and a lot of expected visitors from Washington State--will experience quite a show two months from today, when the moon's shadow from a solar eclipse begins its 2,500-mile-per-hour journey across the United States.

But if the predicted one million visitors in Oregon's path of totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse don't properly prepare or aren't paying attention, that show won't be the celestial dance they came for. It'll be a cosmic traffic jam on the roads below...something even Seattleites accustomed to heavy traffic won't like!

ODOT is expecting that many Oregon highways will be especially crowded in the days around the eclipse. We ask that, when you're traveling, you keep your hands on the wheel, your mind on the task, and your eyes on the road--not on the sky.

Statistics show that many crashes are the result of distracted driving and traveling too fast for conditions. So we're encouraging you to avoid unnecessary distractions during your travels--and especially when Oregon highways will be very crowded during the time of the eclipse. That means planning your travel well in advance; knowing where you're going; and for long trips, knowing where you're going to go when the need arises!

ODOT will have crews posted along critical travel routes to keep motorists mobile and safe, and will be providing travel updates via Tripcheck.com and 511 so you can be prepared with the most current travel information available. Properly supplied and informed, we all can avoid becoming "highway luna(r)-tics" during the eclipse.

You should:

Expect traffic changes. ODOT does not plan to close any state highways. But as traffic volumes increase, ODOT may restrict some left turns to and from highways in order to keep traffic moving. Cities and counties may choose to do the same thing on their streets and roads.

Help keep roads clear. Staying off the roads helps make sure emergency service vehicles can get through. Take care of errands well before Aug. 21. Limit your trips to help keep the roads clear. Ride your bicycle!

Travel with friends. Joining friends and family for the trip to totality will reduce the number of cars on the road. Find carpool information at www.drivelessconnect.com.

Caution friends, family and other visitors: Tell them to #DriveHealthy: Arrive early, stay put during the eclipse and leave late afterwards. If everyone jumps on the highways all at once right after the eclipse, no one will go very far very fast. Remember, all travelers have a shared responsibility to stay safe.

Be prepared. Plan ahead for your basic needs such as food, water, gas for the car and bathroom breaks in case you're stuck in traffic. Plan to get to where you need to be before you need to go!

We're all in this together. Be prepared. Help your neighbors and other travelers to be prepared. And please enjoy Oregon!

For updates, visit www.Tripcheck.com.

Attachment: Map of path of totality in Oregon (courtesy NASA)


Attached Media Files: 2017-06/1200/105466/2017_eclipse_map_Oregon_NASA.jpg
Military
Oregon Military Department breaks ground for new headquarters building (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/16/17 1:41 PM
2017-06/962/105356/170616-Z-YP317-049.jpg
2017-06/962/105356/170616-Z-YP317-049.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/962/105356/thumb_170616-Z-YP317-049.jpg
The Oregon Military Department held a ground breaking ceremony for the new headquarters building,in Salem, Oregon on June 16.

The Speakers included Heidi Moawad, Public Safety Advisor to the Governor; Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, City of Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett; Oregon Representatives Paul Evans, John Huffman and Rick Lewis; Charles "Larry" Deibert, Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army, Oregon; as well as other community and military leaders.

The Oregon Military Department's purpose is to administer, house, equip and train the Oregon National Guard - a ready force to support the governor and a reserve force to the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Army. The Oregon National Guard has a long tradition and history dating back to 1843. The National Guard is found in both the U.S. Constitution and the Oregon Constitution. The tradition and history of the Oregon National Guard was grounded on the basis of its motto, "When we are needed, we are there." Nearly 8,000 Soldiers and Airmen currently serve in the Oregon National Guard throughout the state, ready to respond to any contingency, natural or man-made, at home or abroad.

The new 55,078 square-foot facility is scheduled to be completed in June 2018. Total cost of the project is estimated at approximately $25.48 million. The facility is designed to ensure operational flexibility, reduce operations and maintenance costs, and minimize the need for future remodels. In addition, the building will meet seismic Essential Facility requirements for immediate use in emergency response following a seismic event.

"The overall project is funded by both federal and state matching, and provides a positive impact for our Oregon economy," said Stephen Bomar, Director of Public Affairs for the Oregon Military Department.

Facility construction will address Green Energy requirements that will total 1.5 percent of the construction budget, and will meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold and State Energy Efficient Design (SEED) requirements.

The project is contracted by Fortis Construction Company and SERA Architects.




Photo Captions:

170616-Z-YP317-014
Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, delivers remarks at the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Joint Forces Headquarters building on June 16, in Salem, Oregon. The new 55,000 square foot building will be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certified and is being built near the Oregon office of Emergency Management. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170616-Z-YP317-039
Chuck Bennett, Mayor of Salem, Oregon, provides remarks on the long history and in-depth involvement of the Oregon National Guard with the Salem community, during a groundbreaking ceremony for the new Joint Forces Headquarters building on June 16, in Salem, Oregon. The new 55,000 square foot building will be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold certified and is being built near the Oregon office of Emergency Management. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

170616-Z-YP317-049
Dignitaries from the State Legislature, the Governor's Office, Oregon Military Department and the Design and construction teams break ground at the new Joint Forces Headquarters building on June 16, in Salem, Oregon. The new 55,000 square foot building will be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold certified and is being built near the Oregon office of Emergency Management. (Photo by Christopher L. Ingersoll, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2017-06/962/105356/170616-Z-YP317-049.jpg , 2017-06/962/105356/170616-Z-YP317-039.jpg , 2017-06/962/105356/170616-Z-YP317-014.jpg
State
Study shows Oregon's arts and culture industry generates $687 million in economic impact
Oregon Arts Commission - 06/20/17 2:10 PM
Salem, Oregon -- Oregon's arts and culture sector contributed $687 million and 22,299 jobs to Oregon's economy in fiscal year 2015, according to the latest Arts & Economic Prosperity study from Americans for the Arts. Released June 17 at the group's national conference in San Francisco, Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 includes first-time data from rural Oregon.

"Arts and culture play a key role in healthy, prosperous communities, particularly in rural Oregon," said Chris Harder, director of Business Oregon. "While this study highlights the significant impact of artists and cultural organizations on local economies, the resulting vibrant communities are places that are more attractive for overall business growth and investment."

The data reveals that arts and culture jobs across Oregon generated $469.5 million in household income to local residents and delivered $53 million in local and state government revenue. In addition, the 9,911,552 people who attended arts and culture events spent an average of $42.59 per event, excluding the cost of the admission ticket. Event spending, which totaled $322,956,808, includes meals, parking, souvenirs, babysitting and hotel stays.

"This is the most comprehensive data we've ever had on how vital arts and culture are to Oregon's statewide economic prosperity," said Brian Rogers, Oregon Arts Commission executive director. "Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 is evidence that the nonprofit arts and culture sector is a significant industry in the State of Oregon. It sends a strong signal that when we support the arts, we not only enhance our quality of life, but we also invest in the State of Oregon's economic well-being."

While previous studies have focused only on Portland and Eugene, a statewide consortium led by the Arts Commission enabled Baker, Clatsop, Crook, Deschutes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lincoln, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa and Yamhill counties as well as Ashland, Corvallis, Eugene and the Portland Metro area (Northeastern and Central Oregon did combined county studies) to participate.

Spending by arts and cultural organizations and audience members in the Portland Metro area was $330.4 million, up 30 percent since the last Arts & Economic Prosperity study in 2010. The spending outside of the Portland Metro area (Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties) totaled $357 million.

"We are so grateful to the Arts Commission for making it possible for us to participate," said Sharon Morgan, who was "stunned" to learn that arts and culture spending in Yamhill County totaled $45 million. Morgan, a member of the Yamhill County Cultural Coalition, organized the survey for her county.

Detailed reports for each of the Oregon regions and cities that participated are posted on the Arts Commission website.

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 Study was conducted by Americans for the Arts and supported by the Ruth Lilly Fund of the Americans for the Arts. Local, regional and statewide partners, such as the Oregon Arts Commission and its 11 survey partners, contributed time and financial support to the study. Financial information from partner organizations was collected in partnership with DataArts. A full list of the 341 communities who participated in the study is posted on the Americans for the Arts website.
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The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of the Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993 in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission's expertise in grant-making, arts and cultural information and community cultural development.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature, federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

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Oregon DHS Seeks Public Comment on Amended Statewide Transition Plan
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/16/17 3:38 PM
In 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new rules to define community and home-based services. Service providers have to adhere to these rules in order to become eligible for Medicaid payments from the state. In return, the state receives federal matching funds only if the service setting is in compliance with these regulations issued by CMS. Initially, CMS gave states up to five years to comply (2019 deadline) but recently extended the deadline to 2022.

This is important to the State of Oregon and the citizens who benefit from these services, because approximately 70 percent of payments for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are covered by those federal matching funds.

After receiving initial CMS approval, the Oregon Department of Human Services (Oregon DHS) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) drafted a revision to the transition plan outlining how the state will come into compliance with the federal rules within the new CMS timeframes. The state is seeking final CMS approval for Oregon's plan.

Oregon is considered a national leader in creating home and community-based care options. The state wants to maintain a high level of independence for citizens who currently receive HCBS or may require them in the future. Oregon DHS and OHA are looking for input from individuals receiving HCBS, family members, advocates, providers, delivery systems representatives and the broader community.

The new CMS rules require HCBS settings to be more home-like and less institutionalized.

The new rules require a better recognition and assurance of service recipient's rights and freedoms. This includes the right to have visitors at a time they choose, have access to their own food when they wish, or lock the door to their room, if they so choose. The existing HCBS settings may need to make adjustments. The purpose of the rules is to ensure that HCBS recipients can seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community, to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS.

All of Oregon's providers of HCBS have gone through an assessment to determine their compliance. Out of all these facilities, nineteen were identified as requiring heightened federal scrutiny. Heightened Scrutiny is a federal term that means that CMS will make the final determination of HCBS compliance as the setting presumably is institutional based on CMS criteria. Oregon believes these settings can overcome this presumption as detailed in the plan.

Oregon DHS is seeking public comment on the amended plan, which has been posted online at: http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/HCBS/Pages/Transition-Plan.aspx

Non-electronic versions of the Statewide Transition Plan are posted in local field offices and may also be viewed at the Human Services Building at 500 Summer Street NE in Salem.

Please submit comments in one of these methods: Send an email to hcbs.oregon@state.or.us.or send written comments addressed to HCBS Transition Plan Comments, 500 Summer Street NE E-09, Salem, OR 97301.

Deadline for comments is July 17, 2017. Mailed responses must be received by this date in order to be considered. The final amended Statewide Transition Plan is due to CMS by August 1, 2017.
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Ross Island Bridge contractor cited for multiple safety violations
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/19/17 10:00 AM
(Salem) -- The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has fined Abhe & Svoboda Inc. $189,000 for nine safety violations -- two of them willful -- that exposed employees to death or serious injury as they worked on a project to restore the Ross Island Bridge in Portland.

Oregon OSHA cited the violations as the result of an investigation of a Feb. 8, 2017, accident. Each violation, though different in detail, involved the same grave problem: a failure to protect workers from falls that would seriously hurt or kill them.

The accident happened underneath the bridge, where a suspended scaffolding system was installed. An employee was working on an upper deck, 37 feet above a lower platform. He fell through a ladder opening, landing on an employee who was working directly below on the lower platform. Both employees survived the accident, suffering multiple injuries.

The employee who fell was not protected by a fall protection system, per Oregon OSHA's rules. In fact, an estimated eight employees were exposed to this hazard when the accident occurred, according to the investigation.

The investigation also found:
The company failed to provide proper access to work areas, forcing employees to climb up or down the scaffolding and bridge structure, and to sidestep or step over holes ranging in size from three inches to 24 inches
The company failed to construct and install the scaffolding system according to the minimum bracing requirements, as outlined by professional specifications
Scaffolds and related components were not set up, dismantled, and moved under the direction of a competent person
Employees lacked rest platforms while climbing 37-foot ladders
The company failed to ensure that employees had a work platform that was at least 18 inches wide
Anchorages for fall protection equipment were not installed or used under the supervision of a competent person
Scaffolds were not inspected for visible defects before each work shift by a competent person
A makeshift device -- a wooden step stool -- was used on platforms to increase the working height of employees

During the investigation, the corporate safety manager for Minnesota-based Abhe & Svoboda spoke dismissively of Oregon's workplace safety rules, saying they change too much.

"Each and every year, falls are one of the major sources of serious injury and death in Oregon workplaces," said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. "There is never a good reason to ignore the need to protect workers from such hazards. Yet, this employer brushed off time-tested fall protection rules that are designed to prevent injuries or deaths."

Oregon OSHA cited two of the nine safety violations as willful: the failure to provide proper access to work areas, which forced employees to climb structures and step over holes, and the failure to follow bracing requirements for the scaffolding. Each willful violation carries the legal maximum penalty of $70,000. A willful violation occurs when an employer intentionally or knowingly allows a violation to occur.

Seven of the nine violations were cited as serious, each with the maximum penalty of $7,000.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.


Attached Media Files: Citation document
Hotter weather this weekend raises the risk of wildfire
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/22/17 7:57 AM
SALEM, Ore. -- While the southwest U.S. sizzles in a record-breaking heatwave, Oregon is also in store for elevated temperatures this weekend. Summer heat and dry landscapes increase the risk of wildfires. With some parts of the state already having declared fire season in effect, fire officials would like to remind all Oregonians to be aware of fire danger when working or recreating outdoors.

"Given the right conditions, a fire can start almost any time of year," says Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. "And while we've been blessed with cool conditions thus far, fire activity is beginning to pick up as we head into the first weekend of summer."

More than 125 fires have burned 170 acres of forest and grasslands under ODF's protection in 2017. The lion's share (57 fires and 67 acres) have resulted from debris burning while another 14 were caused by people recreating (campfires, fireworks and target shooting).

If you're planning a camping trip this weekend, take extra steps to prevent a catastrophe.
Keep your vehicle on good roads and don't idle over dry grass.
Campgrounds are best for campfires. If campfires are allowed outside campgrounds, choose a location in a clear area away from grass, brush and overhanging trees.
If campfires are allowed where you're heading, keep it contained and small by surrounding it with rocks. Have water and a shovel close by at all times. Put the fire completely out before leaving.

If instead, you're planning on cleaning up the property this weekend, think twice before burning yard debris. Chipping or taking to a recycling center may be safer options. Check with your local ODF/protective association office or fire department for current restrictions. If burning is allowed:
Refrain from burning on windy days.
Try to burn in the morning when conditions are moister.
Keep burn piles small and manageable, feeding from larger piles.
Scratch a wide fire trail down to mineral soil around the pile and have a shovel and charged garden hose at the ready.
Never leave the pile unattended and put the fire completely out when finished.
Finally, go back over the next several weeks and double check the pile for heat and smoke. Burn piles can retain heat for several weeks and rekindle under warm, windy conditions.

For more information on fire restrictions and closures in your area, visit www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/restrictions or call your local ODF office.
# # #
Field tours of South Fork, Browns Camp and Tillamook Forest Center highlight June 23 SFAC meeting
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/16/17 2:39 PM
A tour of the South Fork Forest Camp and the Tillamook Forest Center are the featured agenda items when the Oregon Department of Forestry's State Forests Advisory Committee meets in Forest Grove on Friday, June 23. The group will also visit Browns Camp, which provides Off-Highway Vehicle recreation facilities. The meeting will convene at 8 am at the Forest Grove office of the Oregon Department of Forestry, located at 801 Gales Creek Rd.

Other agenda items include a discussion of comments and responses to the Annual Operating Plan and issue updates from the ODF State Forests Division.

The State Forests Advisory Committee is comprised of timber, environmental and recreation group representatives. It serves as a forum to discuss issues and provide guidance to the Oregon Department of Forestry on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management plan. The plan covers the management of 616,000 acres of forestland within the Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam state forests through a balanced approach to generating economic, environmental and social benefits.

For more information on the Oregon Department of Forestry, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Pages/index.aspx.


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DOGAMI Governing Board to meet June 26 in Portland
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/19/17 5:36 PM
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, June 26 at DOGAMI's Portland offices, 800 NE Oregon St., Ste. 965.

The meeting agenda is available at www.OregonGeology.org

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 28 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/17 12:07 PM
June 22, 2017

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC)

Agenda: Outbreaks update 2017; infection control assessment and response (ICAR) update; annual Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report; annual Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) Program report; neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) collaborative update; multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) toolkit; discussion of themes and topics for future 2017 meetings.

When: Wednesday, June 28, 1-3 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:45 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1B, Portland. A conference call line is available at 877-873-8018, access code 7872333.

OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of healthcare-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI Program. The program convenes its advisory board on a quarterly basis. The purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities.

Program contact: Roza Tammer, 971-673-1074, roza.p.tammer@state.or.us

# # #
Medicaid Advisory Committee to meet June 28 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/17 11:47 AM
June 22, 2017

Contact: Amanda Peden, 503-208-1010, amanda.m.peden@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The regular monthly public meeting of the Medicaid Advisory Committee

When: Wednesday, June 28, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Oregon State Library, 250 Winter Street NE, Room 102, Salem. The meeting will also be available via webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1742663635510619908 or by conference call at 213-929-4212, access code 437-672-657. A recording of the meeting will be posted at the Medicaid Advisory Committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-MAC/Pages/index.aspx.

Agenda: The committee will hear an Oregon Health Plan member's story about their Medicaid experience. OHA staff will update the committee on various federal health policy proposals including per-capita caps. Lori Coyner, Oregon Health Authority Medicaid director, will give an overview of health-related services and applications in coordinated care organizations (CCOs), to inform future social determinants of health policy work.

After its regular business the committee will host a special public forum on the Medicaid 1115 Waiver Award, including an opportunity for public questions and comment.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2sYPoZ8
Metrics Technical Advisory Group to meet June 22 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/17 3:34 PM
June 20, 2017

Contact: Pamela Naylor, 503-559-2216, pamela.naylor@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The regular meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics Technical Advisory Group

When: Thursday, June 22, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Lincoln Building, 8th floor Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland

Attendees can also join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3481507190725738756 or by conference line at 888-848-7030, participant code 695-684.

Agenda: Updates on Metrics and Scoring Committee decisions about the 2018 measure set, and discussion of Technical Advisory Group recommendations for 2018 benchmarks

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2sNq7QM
Health advisory lifted June 20 for Upper Klamath Lake park
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/17 1:15 PM
June 20, 2017

Reduced blue-green algae and toxin levels confirmed; continued caution with pets advised

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory issued June 7 for water around Eagle Point County Park on Upper Klamath Lake. The park is located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of blue-green algae toxins are below guideline values for human exposure. However, the Oregon Health Authority recommends that people continue to be cautious with their pets in the lake because toxins in some areas such as Keno State Park are still above the very low exposure levels established for dogs.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in all Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

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Medicaid Advisory Committee seeks oral health care provider member
Oregon Health Authority - 06/19/17 1:48 PM
June 19, 2017

Oregon's Medicaid Advisory Committee (MAC) is looking for oral health care providers interested in helping improve the quality of care for Oregonians. The committee is seeking applicants for a two-year term beginning this fall.

Federal rules require the state to have a Medicaid Advisory Committee. The MAC advises the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Department of Human Services (DHS) on the Oregon Health Plan, Oregon's Medicaid program, from the perspective of members and communities. The committee also develops policy recommendations at the request of the Governor and OHA.

Members are appointed by the Governor and can serve two consecutive two-year terms.

The MAC is committed to ensuring that its members represent a diverse group of individuals and that its recommendations represent the populations they are intended to serve. People of color and individuals from all areas of the state are encouraged to apply.

The committee especially seeks individuals with the following qualifications or background:
-- Oral health care providers with current or recent clinical experience, including administrators (e.g., dental directors) with recent or current clinical experience;
-- Individuals who understand Oregon's Medicaid dental delivery system, including coordinated care organizations, dental managed care organizations, and the fee-for-service or open card system.

Members should be able to regularly attend committee meetings, contribute to policy-level discussions about the future of health care in Oregon, and spend one to two hours monthly preparing for meetings, which are held the fourth Wednesday of each month in Salem. Direct travel expenses are reimbursed. Members on occasion can attend via conference line and webinar.

Interested persons can request an application by contacting Amanda Peden at 503-208-1010 or amanda.m.peden@state.or.us. For more information, see the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-mac/pages/index.aspx.

# # #
Health advisory lifted June 16 for Detroit Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/16/17 4:27 PM
June 16, 2017

Reduced blue-green algae and toxin levels confirmed; continued caution with pets advised

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory issued June 2 for Detroit Lake, located 46 miles southeast of Salem in Marion County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of blue-green algae toxins are below guideline values for human exposure. However, the Oregon Health Authority recommends that people continue to be cautious with their pets in the lake because toxins are still above the very low exposure levels established for dogs.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in all Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #
Health advisory lifted June 16 for South Tenmile Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/16/17 4:21 PM
June 16, 2017

Blue-green algae toxins not found in water sample

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory issued June 12 for South Tenmile Lake, located 10 miles north of North Bend in Coos County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of blue-green algae toxins are below guideline values for human exposure, and that the water does not present a problem for pets.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in all Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #
Springfield Grandparents play Megabucks to support Oregon, win $7 million
Oregon Lottery - 06/20/17 1:21 PM
June 20, 2017 - Salem, Ore. -- A Saturday afternoon trip to the store to buy milk turned into a $7 million jackpot for a Springfield couple.

Michelle Sutherland, a retired U.S. Postal Service worker, went to the store to get groceries and stopped at a Dari-Mart in Springfield, to pick up an Oregon's Game Megabucks ticket.

"We play very casually, and usually I just buy the Megabucks tickets because it's Oregon's Game," Sutherland said. "Then, the next day, Sunday morning, we were reading the paper and checked the numbers and thought there was a mistake. All our numbers matched."

Sutherland checked the winning ticket on her phone, computer and even went and scanned the ticket at a local store. All indicators showed them winning the $7 million Oregon's Game Megabucks jackpot. Every time they play Lottery draw games, Michelle always had a number or two on her ticket," her husband Robert said. Now he's glad he didn't buy the ticket.

"When we figured out we'd won, we stayed home and contacted our financial advisor," Michelle said. "We didn't tell anyone."

The couple plan on "spoiling their grandkids" over the summer with the winnings from their "quick pick" ticket, and might travel this fall. The couple opted to take the lump-sum payment and after taxes took home $2.3 million.

Michelle Sutherland joins Robert Frost, Susan Gasperini and Chris Erion as 2017 Oregon's Game Megabucks winners this year. Sutherland purchased her ticket at the Dari-Mart on Mohawk Blvd. in Springfield. Dari-Mart will receive a 1-percent selling bonus of $70,000 for selling the winning ticket.

Proceeds from Oregon Lottery sales help fund public education, parks, economic development and watershed projects. Lane County school districts received more than $24 million in Oregon Lottery dollars in the 2013-15 biennium.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
Oregon State Historic Preservation Office is Going Digital
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/22/17 8:39 AM
Coming Fall 2017, the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) will offer a new digital review and compliance submittal service called Go Digital. Go Digital will streamline the submittal process and allow our office to assist a greater number of customers while maintaining response times. In response to requests from our customers, our Go Digital service will allow for an easier, quicker way to submit, receive, track, and consult on new and existing projects.

Go Digital Basics:

Go Digital submittals are heavily encouraged; however, hard-copy or paper submittals will still be accepted via standard mail.
If a project is submitted via hard-copy or paper, all future correspondence associated with the project must be submitted in the same format, including all updates and revisions.
Similarly, if a project is submitted via Go Digital, no hard-copy materials associated with the project will be accepted later in the consultation process.
Archaeological reports and site forms submitted via Go Digital will no longer require a hard-copy or CD.
Go Digital submittals will not be accepted unless they are sent to the ORSHPO.Clearance@oregon.gov email following the Go Digital Submittal Guidelines.
Go Digital Submittal Guidelines will be available prior to roll out.

For questions regarding Go Digital, contact Matt Diederich at (503) 986-0577 or matt.diederich@oregon.gov.

The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Other Oregon Heritage programs include the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, the Oregon Heritage Commission, and the Oregon Main Street Program. Learn more about Oregon Heritage by visiting www.oregonheritage.org.
Four hazardous trees being removed from Hat Rock State Park (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/21/17 9:00 AM
Example of dead cottonwood tree slated for removal at Hat Rock State Park
Example of dead cottonwood tree slated for removal at Hat Rock State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/1303/105457/thumb_hat-rock-dead-tree.jpg
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // June 21, 2017

Media Contact:
Iris Benson, Park Manager, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Desk: 541-983-2277, ext. 23

Four hazardous trees being removed from Hat Rock State Park

Hermiston OR -- A contractor is removing four mature hazardous cottonwood trees from Hat Rock State Park nine miles east of Umatilla. The trees are dead or dying, and are in a location frequented by many of the park's 300,000 annual visitors. The 720-acre park on the Columbia River is managed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

The contractor, Kelsy Garton Tree Service of Pendleton, Oregon, expects to remove the decaying trees by the end of the week, June 23. Some of the smaller wood will be chipped, but most of it will allowed to continue to decay naturally on the grounds. Portions of the park will be cordoned off for safety during the work, and visitors are reminded to respect any safety barriers and directions from park staff or contractors. Tree removal and other work on park vegetation will cost an estimated $8,500. Oregon's State Parks are funded by a combination of Oregon Lottery funds, a share of the recreation vehicle registration fee, and revenue from park visitors.

Hat Rock State Park (http://bit.ly/HatRockStatePark), rests on the south shore of Lake Wallula behind McNary Dam on the Columbia River. Hat Rock was the first distinctive landmark passed by the Lewis and Clark Expedition on their journey down the Columbia in 1805, and is one of the few remaining such sites not underwater. The park features short trails, picnic areas, fishing, and a boat ramp.

# # #


Attached Media Files: Example of dead cottonwood tree slated for removal at Hat Rock State Park
Grants awarded for historic cemetery projects throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/20/17 10:12 AM
Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 21 grants totaling $70,265 for projects across the state that support preservation of historic cemeteries. Projects range from monument repair to information kiosks and awards range from $390-$8,000.

Funded projects include:
Monument repair.
Placing markers on unmarked graves.
Fence repair.
Install kiosks with maps and historical information.
Tree trimming and felling.
Road repair.

Projects were awarded to Butteville Pioneer Cemetery, City of Canby, Coquille Indian Tribe, Crooked Finger Cemetery, Deadwood Pioneer Cemetery, Eugene Pioneer Cemetery, Gillespie Cemetery, Inc., Greenwood Hills Cemetery Maintenance Association, Kings Valley Cemetery Association, City of Klamath Falls, Lacomb Cemetery Association, Maple Grove Cemetery, Nehalem Valley Historical Society, Phoenix Pioneer Cemetery Association, City of Salem, St. Johns Lodge #17 Masonic Cemetery Association, Kirsten Straus, City of Ukiah, Wagner Creek Cemetery Association, Weston Cemetery Maintenance District #2, Willamette Valley Jewish Community Burial Society.
This competitive grant program is for projects that support the preservation of historic cemeteries. The state designation of a historic cemetery is one that includes the burial of at least one person who died before February 14, 1909. It is a project of the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries which is comprised of seven citizens and is empowered by the Legislature to develop and maintain a listing of all pioneer and historic cemeteries in Oregon; make recommendations for funding, obtain grants funding, seek legislative appropriations for historic cemeteries, and assist in the coordination of restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant or the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.



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Attached Media Files: List of Cemetery Grant Awards
Grants awarded for museums throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/20/17 10:10 AM
Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 8 grants totaling $55,140 to museums across the state for collections, tourism or education related. Projects range from exhibits to collections housing and awards range from $4,000-$10,000.

Funded projects include:
Baker Heritage Museum, in Baker City, for a Paint Your Wagon exhibit.
Deschutes County Historical Society for exhibit lighting and window treatments at the Deschutes County Historical Museum in Bend.
Douglas County Historical Society for a new HVAC system at the Floed-Lane House in Roseburg.
High Desert Museum, near Bend, for the "Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo" exhibit and programming.
Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, in Joseph, for an interactive interpretive kiosk.
Oregon Historical Society to update the educational traveling trunks and develop new curriculum.
Oregon State Hospital Museum of Mental Health, in Salem, for research into and care of 97 pieces of art, some produced by patients.
Sheridan Museum of History for the installation of exhibits in the new museum.
This competitive grant program is for qualifying museums, and is offered annually in the spring. It is a program of the Oregon Heritage Commission, comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Museum Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.



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Attached Media Files: List of museum grant awards
Cities
Attention Crafters and Artisans (Photo)
City of Richland - 06/20/17 4:25 PM
2017-06/5957/105448/artisan_market_fb-01.jpg
2017-06/5957/105448/artisan_market_fb-01.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/5957/105448/thumb_artisan_market_fb-01.jpg
Are you interested in showing your wares at a weekly artisan fair at John Dam Plaza in Richland? The event is set to begin on Friday, June 30, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., and continue nearly every Friday through September 8 (excluding July 7 and 21. This outdoor event will complement the nearby and hugely popular, Market in the Parkway.

If you would like to participate, the deadline to apply has been extended. Visit Artisan Fair on www.ci.richland.wa.us/parkvendors or contact Sherry at sgartside@ci.richland.wa.us or 942-7462.


Attached Media Files: 2017-06/5957/105448/artisan_market_fb-01.jpg
Richland Hosting Business Opportunities on Wednesday
City of Richland - 06/20/17 10:05 AM
-Group or one-on-one counseling assistance available


Richland's Business and Economic Development Office is offering businesses the opportunity to talk to a staff member or professional business coach during several events on Wednesday, June 21.

From 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., Christine Buckley from the Washington Center of Women in Business.is available to meet with current or future business owners for a one-on-one session. To make an appointment, send an email to cbuckley@thurstonedc.com or call 360-464-6049.

From 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Economic Development staff members, along with Buckley, will be at Barracuda Coffee Company for June's Ask Richland Business. This mobile office hours is an opportunity for anyone in need of business support to receive free assistance in a relaxed, informal setting. No appointment is necessary.

For more information, contact Miles Thomas, Richland Redevelopment Project Manager at 942-7595 or visit www.ci.richland.wa.us/business/ask-richland-business
Local Utilities Warn Customers of Telephone Scam
City of Richland - 06/19/17 2:09 PM
Local utilities -- Benton PUD, Franklin PUD and Richland Energy Services -- urge customers to be aware of unusual and unlawful requests by phone.

Both local residents and businesses have received calls in which they were told the caller is collecting on a past due account and demanding they pay immediately or they will be disconnected that day. Do not provide your personal information. Hang up and call your Utility. More information here:
http://bit.ly/2rx3koV
Tri-Cities-area School Districts
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:49 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:48 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:48 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:48 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:48 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Prosser School District to Hold Community Meetings to Review Placement Options for Buildings for New Prosser High School
Prosser Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 8:48 AM
The Prosser School District will hold two (2)community information meetings to present concepts for placement of buildings for the new Prosser High School. The two community meetings will both be held at Keene-Riverview Elementary School on June 27th and June 29th from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Community input will be appreciated to assist the school board in making the final decision of where buildings will be placed on the site. The District's architect and Project Management team will be on hand to assist with any questions or suggestions from the community.
Local Law Enforcement leaders provide Campus Safety and Security Recommendations to Community Facilities Task Force
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 06/21/17 10:25 AM
WALLA WALLA - Superintendent Wade Smith briefed school board members on highlights of a recent district-wide safety and security review conducted by Sheriff John Turner and Chief of Police Scott Bieber. The study was commissioned by the Community Facilities Task Force, chaired by local businessman and Graduate of Distinction recipient Paul Schneidmiller. This local review supports a comprehensive safety audit the district conducted last spring. Sheriff Turner and Chief Bieber offered practical solutions to safety concerns including better signage, standardized visitor check-in systems, cameras, tinted glass, improved communications systems and staff training. Superintendent Smith said the report will be helpful as the Task Force proceeds.

"These recommendations include physical and non-physical improvements based on current open campus designs," said Smith. "The Facilities Task Force and its site-based committees are heeding this local guidance as they consider pragmatic physical improvements to campuses to ensure student, staff and visitor safety as they work towards capital recommendations for board and community input and feedback starting in late fall of 2017 in preparation for a potential November 2018 bond measure."

Task Force members will continue their work in July by studying bond financing options and continuing to look at design solutions.

Safety and Security Recommendations at a glance:
(complete report online: http://www.wwps.org/fp/facilities-planning-overview)
- Improved signage
- Ability for teachers to communicate quickly with office and support staff in case of an emergency
- Enhanced cameras
- Install tinted ("one way") safety glass when replacing aged Wa-Hi windows
- Establish district-wide visitor check in procedures
- Additional training for staff and students on prevention and detection
- Vestibule entrances when remodel or capital improvements are being considered

Task Force Membership
Paul Schneidmiller (Chair)
Tony Cabasco
Jim Dumont
Roger Esparza
Darcy Fugman-Small
Chris Garratt
Don Holbrook
Dean Lodmell
Linda Newcomb
Jim Peterson
Phil Shivell
Craig Sievertsen
Casey Waddell
Jerry Zahl
Keith Swanson
John Kiefel
Peter Swant
Randy Glaeser
Dick Moeller
Kara Schulke

Non-Voting Members
Derek Sarley, School Board
Ruth Ladderud, School Board
Wade Smith Superintendent
Mark Higgins, Communications Director
Yakima-area School Districts
Grandview elementary school keeps library open over the summer
Grandview Sch. Dist. - 06/19/17 4:27 PM
The library at Arthur H. Smith Elementary School will be open from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. every Wednesday, from June 21 through Aug. 2, so students can take advantage of the summer reading challenge.

Every year Smith students are challenged to read one million words during the school year, and the summer reading challenge gives them a chance to get a head start. Words read over the summer count toward their spring word total.

The library being open over the summer also gives students free access to high-quality books, magazines and helps students avoid the summer reading lapse. So please come down and visit us. Students are invited to enter the library through the courtyard.
Organizations & Associations
Oregon Hospitals Oppose Senate Health Care Reform Bill
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/22/17 1:42 PM
June 22, 2017 -- After Senate Republicans unveiled their Better Care Reconciliation Act this morning, Andy Davidson, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems issued the following statement:

"Oregon's community hospitals have evaluated federal health care reform efforts based on a set of patient- and community-centered principles that focus on preserving the gains in access and affordability that we've made over the past decade.

"Unfortunately, the draft Better Care Reconciliation Act released today by Senate Republicans does not meet our principles. In fact, it moves our health care system in the opposite direction. The proposed changes to Medicaid, both the end of the expansion funding as well as deep cuts to the non-expansion problem would pose severe problems for Oregon. The changes to the provider tax reimbursement rate in the early part of the next decade would add an additional layer of budgetary stress to our state, and by extension the patients we serve.

"We join with our counterparts in the national hospital community alongside patient advocates, doctors, politicians and others in urging the Senate to revise this legislation so that it focuses on improving access to affordable care and helps states achieve that goal on behalf of their citizens."
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Attached Media Files: 2017-06/1635/105509/OAHHS_BCRA_statement.pdf
Press Conference Today: New Oregon Business Alliance for Climate to Launch (Photo)
Oregon Business Alliance for Climate - 06/22/17 6:30 AM
Alliance logo
Alliance logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-06/6137/105491/thumb_Logo_ORBIZ_square.png
LEADING ON CLIMATE: OREGON PRIVATE SECTOR LEADERS
LAUNCH NEW ALLIANCE TODAY

Portland, Oregon, June 22, 2017-- With climate change already impacting Oregon industry, private sector leaders from across the state are joining forces to ensure business has a strong role in solutions-based, economically viable climate policy. Led by Alliance chair Tom Kelly of Neil Kelly Company, the new Oregon Business Alliance for Climate (the Alliance) will officially launch today.

Kelly, along with Jim Bernau and Steve Clem, representing founding members Willamette Valley Vineyards and Skanska USA, respectively, will present remarks at the event.

"The Business Alliance for Climate is specifically focused on Oregon's clean energy economy, including carbon pricing options, that will make the most sense for statewide business interests," Kelly said. "A well-planned carbon pricing system in Oregon will reduce the cost of doing business through fuel and energy savings while resulting in more good paying clean energy jobs, including much needed rural jobs, and cleaner air."

WHAT: Press conference to announce the launch of new Oregon Business Alliance for Climate
When: Thursday, June 22, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Where: Umpqua Bank, South Waterfront Location, 3606 SW Bond Ave., Portland.

# # #

Our Mission: Oregon business and industry leaders supporting collaborative policy and business engagements aimed at promoting investment, job creation and competitiveness by leveraging carbon pricing to invest in the state's clean energy economy.


Attached Media Files: Media Release , Alliance logo
Media Alert: June 22 Press Conference/LAUNCH OF NEW STATEWIDE BUSINESS ALLIANCE FOR CLIMATE
Oregon Business Alliance for Climate - 06/20/17 2:28 PM
OREGON BUSINESS LEADERS ANNOUNCE LAUNCH OF NEW STATEWIDE BUSINESS ALLIANCE FOR CLIMATE

A well-planned carbon pricing system in Oregon will reduce the cost of doing business through fuel and energy savings while resulting in more good paying clean energy jobs,
including much needed rural jobs, and cleaner air.

With climate change already impacting Oregon industry, the lack of federal leadership and action presents Oregon businesses across the state with an opportune and critical moment to lead and act with a united voice.

Led by chair Tom Kelly of Neil Kelly company, founding members of the newly formed Oregon Business Alliance for Climate (the Alliance), will host a press conference Thursday, June 22, 2017 to formally announce the Alliance Launch.

"The Business Alliance for Climate is specifically focused on Oregon's clean energy economy, including carbon pricing options, that will make the most sense for statewide business interests," Kelly said.

WHAT: Press conference to announce the launch of new Oregon Business Alliance for Climate
When: Thursday, June 22, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Where: Umpqua Bank, South Waterfront Location, 3606 SW Bond Ave., Portland.

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Our Mission: Oregon business and industry leaders supporting collaborative policy and business engagements aimed at promoting investment, job creation and competitiveness by leveraging carbon pricing to invest in the state's clean energy economy.

Our Focus: Supporting statewide climate policy and helping the state develop a carbon pricing policy that works for Oregon, provides critical investment into Oregon's clean energy in rural and urban parts of the state, and increases the resiliency of our local communities