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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Fri. Sep. 20 - 12:37 am
Police & Fire
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Student Loan Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/19 9:00 AM
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127645/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against student loan scams.

Oregon and Washington college kids are packing up and heading back to class in the next couple weeks. That means more tuition, more books, and more bills. For many folks, the only way to get that education is to take out big loans, either through the federal government or private lenders.

When you get to the point where you have to start paying off those loans, our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have a warning about fraudsters who say they are only too happy to help.

The catch? You either have to pay an upfront fee or a monthly fee. They might claim that your fee will go towards your debt, but if you end up doing business with a scam artist, he will just take your money for himself. He will do nothing at all to help you with your loan – or give you minimal services that you could have gotten for free.

Here are some tips from the FTC on how avoid student loan repayment scams:

  • There is nothing that a company can offer that you cannot do for yourself for free.
  • Avoid any offer that promises quick loan forgiveness, especially if the person contacting you really has no idea as to the specifics of your debt situation. Many scammers will promise to get rid of your debt fast, but in reality, they can’t help you.
  • Never pay an upfront fee. In this situation, the FTC says it is illegal for companies to charge you a fee for a service in advance.
  • Neither a logo nor an official-looking website means that the company is real or trustworthy. Many scammers will use lookalike logos or even use a real Department of Education seal to make their companies look more legitimate.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Student Loan Scams - AUDIO - September 17, 2019 , TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019

Two vehicle fatal crash on US 97 - Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/19/19 5:02 PM
2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG
2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127807/thumb_IMG_1796.JPG

Correction Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

On Thursday, September 19, 2019 at approximately 10:00 A.M.Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a motor vehicle collision on US 97 near milepost 169.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a Chevrolet Silverado Pickup, operated by Steven Hanner (35) of Lapine, was eastbound on Jackpine Loop Road.  Hanner failed to stop at the stop sign entering US 97 and turned into the path of a Commercial Motor Vehicle operated by Jeff Every (40) of Terrebonne.

Hanner sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Every was not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, LaPine Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG

Two people die in two vehicle crash on Hwy 20 - Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/19/19 9:15 AM
2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg
2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127784/thumb_20190918_143108.jpg

On Wednesday, September 18, 2019 at approximately 12:06 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near mile post 219.  

Preliminary Investigation reveals that a 2006 Gulfstream Motorhome towing a Suzuki Samurai, operated by Richard Kozol (78) of Medford, was eastbound on Hwy 20 when for unknown reasons crossed into the westbound lanes on on a curve. He collided with a westbound 2011 Ford F-250 towing a 30 ft travel trailer operated by John Haynes (72) of Palo Cedro, CA.   

Kozol and Haynes sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

The passenger in the Gulfstream, Barbara Kozol (73) of Medford, OR, was transported to St. Alphonsus in Boise.

The passenger in the Ford F-250, Debra Townsend (67) of Palo Cedro, CA, was transported to St. Alphonsus in Ontario.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 20 was closed for approximately 4 hours.

OSP was assisted by the Malheur County Sheriff's Office, Vale Fire and Ambulance, Treasure Valley Paramedics, Ontario Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143058.jpg

Newport Woman Dies on US Hwy 20 near Newport (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/19 6:12 PM
2019-09/1002/127706/hwy_20.4.jpeg
2019-09/1002/127706/hwy_20.4.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127706/thumb_hwy_20.4.jpeg

On September 17, 2019 at approximately 12:00 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a report of a three vehicle crash on US Hwy 20 near milepost (MP) 4. Once on scene, it was determined the driver of the one of the vehicles, Linda C. Dodson, age 68, from Newport had been pronounced deceased at the scene.

The preliminary investigation revealed Dodson was driving a 1999 Nissan Pathfinder East on US Hwy 20 four mile east of Newport. A witness reported seeing the Pathfinder start to swerve and then it veered off the road on the south side of the shoulder. The Pathfinder went down an embankment, struck a tree, and rolled onto the passenger side of the vehicle.

Dodson was pronounced deceased at the scene. Dodson was traveling with her dog “Lucy” and Lucy was transported to the Lincoln County Animal Shelter. Lucy was transported to a local veterinarian where she was evaluated and released. Friends of Dodson retrieved Lucy to care for her.

During the course of the investigation, a separate non-injury crash occurred near the crash site and was considered a secondary crash. The second crash occurred when vehicles were slowing down for the fatal crash and one vehicle rear-ended another vehicle.  

Toledo Fire Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Toledo Police Department, and the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department assisted OSP. The highway was blocked or partially blocked for seven hours.  

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127706/hwy_20.4.jpeg

Bus Crash in Manzanita loaded with Army National Guard Members (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/19 10:06 AM
2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127675/thumb_rilea.jpg

 On September 16, 2019 at approximately 7:00 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a non-injury bus crash on US Hwy 101 in Manzanita. The bus was occupied by 46 Army National Guard members from the HHC 1-186 IN from Medford. The Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office will review the case for charges of Driving under the Influence and 46 counts of Reckless Endangering against the driver.

The preliminary investigation revealed the bus had departed from Camp Rilea and was en route to Portland. The driver, Kenneth Alexander, age 44, from Vancouver, Washington missed the turn onto US Hwy 26 outside of Seaside. The driver assured the passengers he knew the route to Portland and continued southbound on US Hwy 101. The passengers grew concerned over the driver using his cell phone and showing signs of impairment and at the same time the driver lost control of the bus and crashed into the sidewalk.

The driver was transported to local hospital for evaluation. No other injuries were reported. OSP was assisted by Manzanita Police Department, and the Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office. The City of Manzanita opened City Hall to the members of the National Guard until another bus arrived.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.2.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 09/16/19 4:24 PM

On Monday, September 16, 2019 at approximately 10:10 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a two vehicle serious injury crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 241. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue Saab, operated by Rena Clemons (56) of Coos Bay, was northbound on Hwy 101 when she lost control of the vehicle and crossed the center line as she was negotiating a curve in the roadway.   She collided with a southbound green Ford Taurus operated by Michael Puschel (68) of Coos Bay.

Clemons sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Puschel and his passenger, Toni Puschel (67) of Coos Bay, were transported to Bay Area Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Millington Fire Department, Sumner Fire Department, Green Acres Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT


Wrong way driver on Interstate 84 results in two fatalities - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 5:15 PM
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127625/thumb_20190915_074132.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 5:44 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on I-84 near mile post 119.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by Josue Amando Lopez-Munoz (29) of Prosser, WA. was traveling westbound in the eastbound lanes.  He struck a eastbound PT Cruiser operated by Anita Dugger (33) of Salem, OR.

Lopez-Munoz sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Dugger sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A 13 year old male in the PT Cruiser was transported by air ambulance to The Dalles and later by ground to OHSU in Portland.

OSP was assisted by North Gilliam Fire Department, North Gilliam Medics, Life flight, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Gilliam County DA, Gilliam County ME, Benton County (WA) Sheriff's Office and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074124.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 228 - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 1:00 PM
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127623/thumb_20190915_043752.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 2:44 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 228 near mile post 4.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a 2011 Chevy Silverado, operated by Cody Sanders (33) of Shedd OR, was traveling westbound when he crossed into the eastbound lane and struck a 2002 Honda Civic operated by Jessie Kater (F)(25) of Brownsville, OR. 

Kater sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Sanders and his two juvenile passengers were not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Brownsville Fire Department, Lebanon Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 214 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 9:20 AM
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2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127622/thumb_20190914_180216.jpg

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at approximately 4:46 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 214 near mile post 41.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Travis Corter (50) of Hillsboro, was eastbound in the westbound lanes passing a car.  He collided with a westbound Chevrolet Volt operated by Massoud Jourabchi (64) of Beaverton.

Corter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Three of the five occupants of the Chevrolet Volt were transported to Salem Hospital for minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Mt. Angel Fire Department, Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg

Utilities
Limited-time credit ends for Pacific Power's Washington customers
Pacific Power - 09/18/19 9:44 AM

Pacific Power media line                                                                                       FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

800-570-5838

 

Limited-time credit ends for Pacific Power’s Washington customers

 

OLYMPIA, Wash.—Sept. 18, 2019—A limited-time credit that lowered electric bills for 132,000 Pacific Power customers in Washington for 12 months is now ending. The company made filings Sept. 17 acknowledging the expiration and resuming normal charges Nov. 1, if approved by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission.

 

“We know that as heating season begins in the Northwest, people begin to focus on how to manage their energy usage and costs,” said Bill Clemens, regional business manager. “The credit that began Nov. 1, 2018 was a way to pass on savings we achieved by meeting our customers’ energy needs with lower-than-forecasted energy costs. We always want to pass on savings whether it is through limited-time credits or operational improvements such as increasing the efficiency of our wind turbines or forging new partnerships with other regional power companies to better utilize low cost renewable power. Last year, we were pleased to pass through federal tax savings to customers as well.”

 

The expiration of the limited-time credit means bills will go up about 5 percent starting Nov. 1. The average residential customer using 1,200 kilowatt hours per month will see a bill impact of $5.88 per month.

 

“As customers step into the heating season, we want to remind them of the resources we have to help them manage their energy usage and budget,” added Clemens. “We offer programs to help our customers’ average out their bills so it is easier to budget. Some customers may seek help insulating their homes or otherwise reducing their energy use. And customers may also seek direct assistance.”

 

When the credit went into effect, Pacific Power and the commission communicated its limited-time nature. The credit came about as part of the company’s long term commitment to meet the energy needs of our Washington customers, which requires Pacific Power to predict energy demand and buy power to meet those needs while also protecting customers from energy price fluctuations that can happen on a daily basis.

 

In Washington, Pacific Power and state regulators work together to track energy fuel costs and make sure that customers get the benefit of the most cost-effective energy. This is called the PCAM which stands for Power Cost Adjustment Mechanism.

 

The mechanism tracks Pacific Power’s actual power costs, which include fuel costs and purchase power cost. The actual costs are compared to projected costs that customers pay for power. Each year, actual and estimated costs are trued up and the differences are shared between the

company and customers. 

 

If customers have any questions about their energy bill and how they can make it more manageable, they can contact our customer service team toll free 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-888-221-7070.


Limited-time credit ends for Pacific Power's Washington customers
Pacific Power - 09/18/19 9:37 AM

Media Contact:                                                                                                                              Sept. 18, 2019

Pacific Power media line                                                                                       FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

800-570-5838

 

Limited-time credit ends for Pacific Power’s Washington customers

 

OLYMPIA, Wash.—Sept. 18, 2019—A limited-time credit that lowered electric bills for 132,000 Pacific Power customers in Washington for 12 months is now ending. The company made filings today acknowledging the expiration and resuming normal charges Nov. 1, if approved by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission.

 

“We know that as heating season begins in the Northwest, people begin to focus on how to manage their energy usage and costs,” said Lori Froehlich, regional business manager. “The credit that began Nov. 1, 2018 was a way to pass on savings we achieved by meeting our customers’ energy needs with lower-than-forecasted energy costs. We always want to pass on savings whether it is through limited-time credits or operational improvements such as increasing the efficiency of our wind turbines or forging new partnerships with other regional power companies to better utilize low cost renewable power. Last year, we were pleased to pass through federal tax savings to customers as well.”

 

The expiration of the limited-time credit means bills will go up about 5 percent starting Nov. 1. The average residential customer using 1,200 kilowatt hours per month will see a bill impact of $5.88 per month.

 

“As customers step into the heating season, we want to remind them of the resources we have to help them manage their energy usage and budget,” added Froehlich. “We offer programs to help our customers’ average out their bills so it is easier to budget. Some customers may seek help insulating their homes or otherwise reducing their energy use. And customers may also seek direct assistance.”

 

When the credit went into effect, Pacific Power and the commission communicated its limited-time nature. The credit came about as part of the company’s long term commitment to meet the energy needs of our Washington customers, which requires Pacific Power to predict energy demand and buy power to meet those needs while also protecting customers from energy price fluctuations that can happen on a daily basis.

 

In Washington, Pacific Power and state regulators work together to track energy fuel costs and make sure that customers get the benefit of the most cost-effective energy. This is called the PCAM which stands for Power Cost Adjustment Mechanism.

 

The mechanism tracks Pacific Power’s actual power costs, which include fuel costs and purchase power cost. The actual costs are compared to projected costs that customers pay for power. Each year, actual and estimated costs are trued up and the differences are shared between the

company and customers. 

 

If customers have any questions about their energy bill and how they can make it more manageable, they can contact our customer service team toll free 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-888-221-7070.


Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Pacific Power - 09/17/19 1:39 PM

Contact:

Tom Gauntt

503-813-7291

Tom.Gauntt@pacificorp.com

 


Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Blue Sky is a top 5 utility green power program for 17th straight year

 

PORTLAND, Ore.—Pacific Power’s Blue Sky customers are among the nation’s most devoted promoters of renewable energy as the program has once again received national recognition for its leadership and impact. For the 17th year, the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory ranked Blue Sky—which includes Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power customers—in the top five utility green power programs in the entire country.

 

For 2019, Blue Sky ranks second for total number of participating customers and third for total renewable energy sales through a voluntary program. For full report go to: nrel.gov/analysis/green-power.html.

 

The Blue Sky program provides a convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy. More than 73,700 customers in Oregon, Washington and California participate in the program, which has generated more than 8 million megawatt-hours of renewable energy from wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal projects, reducing their emissions footprint by nearly 6 million tons of CO2 through our six states. Pacific Power Blue Sky customers have also supported more than 120 community-based renewable energy projects.

 

 “Our Blue Sky customers are living examples of a virtuous cycle” said Berit Kling, program manager. “Customers enthusiastically support the continued growth of renewable energy and by doing so help fund green projects in local communities. But it all starts with customers and their own green power goals. We are happy to help them achieve those goals through Blue Sky, which combines all those personal aspirations and makes a big difference both locally and globally.”

 

Local renewable projects include a micro-hydro project at Wallowa Lake State Park, a large solar array at a Portland community center and solar panels at the Glide Fire Dept. in Douglas County.

 

The Blue Sky program provides an easy and convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy in the region beyond the company’s cost-effective renewable resource investments to serve all customers. Blue Sky is Green-e Energy certified by the non-profit Center for Resource Solutions and customers can participate in the program for as little as $1.95 each month. For more information or to sign up, visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll free at 800-769-3717.


Military
Oregon Guard to dedicate streets honoring WWII veterans (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/19/19 9:00 AM
2019-09/962/127721/162nd_headed_to_Biak.jpg
2019-09/962/127721/162nd_headed_to_Biak.jpg
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CLACKAMAS, Ore. – The Oregon Military Department will dedicated eight roadways on Camp Withycombe on Saturday, September 21, honoring WWII veterans of the 41st Infantry Division. The roadways will proudly bear the names of:

 

• 1st Lt. Sammy E. Radow

• 1st Lt. Melvin C. Monroe

• 1st Lt. Rodney W. Orange

• Staff Sgt. Jordan W. Davis

• Staff Sgt. Frank R. Gehrman

• Staff Sgt. Leland S. “Bud” Lewis

• Sgt. Leonard C. DeWitt

• Cpl. Herbert Foster

 

Soldiers names were selected from veterans that are currently highlighted in displays within the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Readiness Center (41st AFRC) building. The new street signs will designate the main entrance road, road to 41st AFRC, the main north/south axis road and connecting streets.

 

The Adjutant General, Oregon, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, and Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees are scheduled to participate in the ceremony alongside Mr. Dan Sokol, the current president of the 41st Infantry Division Association. Sokol believes that “the accomplishments of these eight men who’ve been designated, extends to all men and women who have served in and with units of the 41st Infantry Division throughout history.”

The public is welcome to attend the dedication ceremony at the Oregon Military Museum, 15300 Minuteman Way, Clackamas, Ore. 97015 on Camp Withycombe. The program scheduled for Saturday, September 21, and will begin at 1:30 p.m. Members of the community interested in attending will need to have a current photo identification in their possession for entry onto Camp Withycombe.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/962/127721/162nd_headed_to_Biak.jpg , 2019-09/962/127721/186th_battle_for_Palawan.jpg , 2019-09/962/127721/163rd_battle_for_Jolo.jpg

State
Public workshop on draft measurable outcomes in revised Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan set for September 25
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/19 3:35 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry is hosting a public workshop from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Salem to receive input on draft measurable outcomes as part of the Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan revision.

The plan revision area covers lands owned by the Board of Forestry west of the Cascade Mountains, including the Tillamook, Clatsop, and Santiam state forests. Forest management plans lay out a vision and strategies to achieve stated goals. Measurable outcomes represent quantifiable results of strategies used to assess progress towards achieving goals, and helps evaluate alternatives and tradeoffs. To learn more about the plan revision and RSVP for this event, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/FMP-revision.aspx

The workshop provides an opportunity for the public to learn about how ODF intends to measure progress towards forest management goals and strategies, ask questions, and provide input for the agency to consider when preparing the draft Forest Management Plan.

The workshop will be held at Broadway Commons (Mexico Room), 1300 Broadway St. NE, Salem 97301. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.


Committee for Family Forestlands meets Sept. 19 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/16/19 4:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, Sept. 19 from 10 a.m. to noon in Salem. The meeting will be in the Sun Pass Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • Private Forest Division
  • Wildfire
  • Process for committee recommendations and charter review
  • 2019-2020 work plan

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

                                                                         # # #


Department of Revenue seeks input on Corporate Activity Tax rules
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/16/19 9:49 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue (DOR) will host a series of meetings across the state over the next three weeks to seek input from business taxpayers and tax preparers about the administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax.

Traveling across Oregon, rule writers will sit down to hear the concerns, questions and suggestions of those affected by the rules.

The first of those meetings is planned for 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 17, at the Newport Recreation Center in Newport. The full meeting schedule includes stops in Corvallis, Beaverton, Medford, Grants Pass, Eugene, Bend, Redmond, Hermiston, Boardman, Portland and Salem.

“We believe business taxpayers and tax preparers can provide valuable input as we move through the rule-making process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “By touring the state, we hope more of the business community will be able to join the conversation.”

House Bill 3427 created Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax and grants DOR the responsibility of writing rules to implement it.

The Corporate Activity Tax imposes a $250 tax on the first $1 million of gross receipts after subtractions and 0.57% tax on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions, beginning January 1. It is expected to generate $1 billion a year to boost funding for public schools.

Throughout each meeting on the tour, department representatives will ensure two-way conversations and do their best to answer questions from attendees. They’ll also seek input from attendees to help guide the rule-making process.

Issues expected to be discussed at the series of meetings include:Who must register.

  • When and how businesses register.
  • Who must file and who must pay the tax.
  • Annual returns based on calendar year activity.
  • How commercial activity is defined.
  • Exemptions for charitable organizations.
  • Exclusions for groceries, subcontractors, wholesalers and others.
  • What counts toward the 35% subtraction.
  • How estimated payments will be calculated.
  • When estimated payments are due.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax, including a list of frequently asked questions, is available on the Department of Revenue’s website.

Those who are unable to attend but want to provide input may email questions or comments to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


DSL director approves extension of Jordan Cove permit approval
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/17/19 12:55 PM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 17, 2019

DSL extends Jordan Cove Removal-Fill permit decision date after request from applicant

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Department of State Lands Director Vicki Walker last week approved extending the deadline for the Removal-Fill permit decision on the Jordan Cove LNG application to Jan. 31, 2020, based on a Sept. 13 letter from the applicant requesting the extension. The agency had been scheduled to decide on the permit on Sept. 20, 2019.

Jordan Cove LNG also agreed to submit by Oct. 20 a second set of responses to questions surrounding substantive and technical issues that are not yet resolved. On Sept. 4, DSL received and is reviewing the applicant’s first set of responses. This request represents the second extension given by DSL on this application (File 60697-RF), the first being given on March 5.

For more information on the Jordan Cove Energy Project, visit the DSL Jordan Cove web site.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The agency administers diverse natural and fiscal resources, many of which generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. DSL also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


DSL hosting public meeting on Elliott in Portland Sept. 24
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/16/19 8:31 AM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 16, 2019

DSL to host evening public meeting on the Elliott State Research Forest in Portland on Sept. 24

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of State Lands will host a public informational meeting in Portland on Tuesday, Sept. 24 for discussions surrounding a possible proposal by Oregon State University to establish a research forest on the Elliott. Oregon State University will join DSL  to share  information about the project.

In December 2018, the State Land Board directed the agency to work collaboratively with Oregon State University’s College of Forestry as it develops a plan for transforming the Elliott State Forest into a world-class research forest. The Land Board anticipates hearing the OSU proposal at its regular meeting in December (Salem).

Meeting date/location:

Tuesday, Sept. 24

5:30 – 7 p.m.

OSU Portland Center, classroom 2047

Located in the Meier & Frank Building (second floor)

555 SW Morrison St., Portland

(Parking nearby in Alder Street Parking Garage)

The meeting will kick off with brief presentations by DSL and by OSU on topics including the history of the Elliott, what a research forest might look like, and the status of the current  planning process. It will also include an opportunity for the public to speak with DSL and OSU representatives.

Click here for the DSL Elliott State Forest web page

Click here for the OSU Elliott State Research Forest web page

Join the Elliott State Research Forest email list! DSL will provide regular updates throughout the planning process to those who sign up for our ESRF mailing list. You must sign up for the ESRF email list separately from other DSL email lists

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon August 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Remains at 4.0 Percent in August  

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in August, the same as in June and July. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.7 percent during each of the most recent three months of June, July, and August.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for 34 consecutive months dating back to November 2016. This sustained stretch of low unemployment is unprecedented in comparable records dating back to 1976. In the 40 years prior to 2016, Oregon’s unemployment rate was never below 4.7 percent.

In August, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment added 900 jobs, following a gain of 2,400 jobs in July. Monthly gains for August were strongest in leisure and hospitality (+1,600 jobs) and professional and business services (+1,100). These gains were offset by job losses in several industries: wholesale trade (-900 jobs); other services (-900); retail trade (-700); and health care and social assistance (-600).

Recent employment growth has slowed from the rapid expansion over the prior several years. In the first eight months of 2019, total nonfarm employment gains averaged 1,000 jobs per month. This was a marked slowdown from the average gain of 3,000 jobs per month in 2018. So far in 2019, several industries have cut jobs, with information down the most in percentage terms (-2,000 jobs, or -5.7%). Several other major industries shed jobs in that time: finance and insurance ( 1,200 jobs, or  2.1%); leisure and hospitality (-2,600 jobs, or -1.2%); and retail trade (-2,200 jobs, or  1.0%). These losses were offset by job growth over the past eight months in education and health services (6,400 jobs, or 2.2%); professional and business services (4,200 jobs, or 1.7%); and manufacturing (3,100 jobs, or 1.6%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the August county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, September 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for September on Tuesday, October 15th.

Notes: 
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources. 

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February and March 2019 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/930/127674/employment_in_Oregon_--_August_2019_--_press_release.pdf

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon's state health officer
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/19 1:00 PM

September 19, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon’s state health officer

Former deputy health officer at San Diego County will be based at Oregon Public Health Division in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Dean Sidelinger, M.D., former deputy health officer at the San Diego County (Calif.) Health and Human Services Agency, is Oregon’s new state health officer.

Sidelinger takes over from Katrina Hedberg, M.D., who has served as acting state health officer since retiring May 31 after nearly 30 years of state service. He began the position, based at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division in Portland, on Monday, Sept. 16.

As Oregon’s state health officer, Sidelinger says he looks forward to "continuing to work upstream -- on policies, systems, and environmental changes, as well as programs -- that can have a long-standing impact on improving people’s health.

"Working on the social influencers on health -- from education, economic opportunities, health equity, and other areas -- will allow public health to positively influence health in a multitude of ways," he says. "The state health officer has the privilege to help ensure that Oregonians are the healthiest that they can be. I will look at what is impacting the health of residents, and work with partners to implement policies and programs to support wellness."

As San Diego County deputy public health officer, Sidelinger fulfilled the duties of the vacant public health officer position and oversaw the county’s six Public Health Services branches, including California Children’s Services; Epidemiology and Immunization Services; HIV, STD, and Hepatitis; Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services; Public Health Preparedness and Response; and Tuberculosis and Refugee Health. He also was deputy health officer for San Diego County Health and Human Services from 2007 to 2011.

Since 2012 Sidelinger has been San Diego County’s child health medical officer, providing strategic direction for agency programs affecting children and families as part of implementation of the county’s Live Well San Diego vision to build a healthy, safe and thriving community. Additionally, he spent a year, starting in January 2013, as interim Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services chief. He also has experience in academia -- he was an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, from 2003 to 2007.

Sidelinger earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and his medical degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He has a master’s degree in education from the University of Southern California as well.

Sidelinger believes his education and training in pediatrics and public health help him take a broad view of health and incorporate the influences of family, community, and the broader region on health.

"I have spent over a decade working in a large health and social services agency, which required partnerships across government agencies and many partners throughout the community," he says. "This basis in collaboration will help me to best serve Oregonians in my new role."

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Video link: https://youtu.be/asCdJmeoEy8


Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/19 10:42 AM

Sept. 19, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Mill Beach in Curry County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Mill Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources


Health advisory issued September 18 at Hubbard Creek Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:31 PM

Sept. 18, 2019

Health advisory issued September 18 at Hubbard Creek Beach

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Hubbard Creek Beach in Curry County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Hubbard Creek Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm. Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us


Health advisory issued September 18 at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:29 PM

Sept. 18, 2019

Health advisory issued September 18 at Sunset Bay State Park Beach

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach in Coos County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us


Nye Beach health advisory issued September 17
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 4:04 PM

September 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Nye Beach health advisory issued September 17

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Nye Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Nye Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Check out our beach water advisory audio and video resources


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 23
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 3:29 PM

September 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 23

What: The quarterly meeting of the Dental Pilot Project Advisory. The meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Presentation by Donald Chi, DDS, PhD; update by project sponsor; OHA evaluation and monitoring activities; scoring methodology.

When: Sept. 23, 1-4 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 900, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-636-3807, access code 793800.

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy of teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 20
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 3:20 PM

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 20

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: September 20, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building Suite 775, Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; review letter from Oregon Health Policy Board to Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee; public testimony; Transformation Quality strategy; finalize 2020 benchmarks; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-887, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/19 3:30 PM

September 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

When: Monday, September 23, 2019, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, Oregon

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Lottery to celebrate Bend's Ashley's Cafe with free ticket giveaway (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 09/19/19 8:37 AM
Oregon Lottery Logo
Oregon Lottery Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/4939/127778/thumb_OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

The Bend store sold the winning $4.6 million ticket

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: Noon, Friday, September 20, 2019

WHERE: Ashley’s Café #2, 1910 NE 3rd St., Bend

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized display check to representatives of Ashley’s Cafe for selling the winning Oregon’s Game Megabucks $4.6 million jackpot ticket. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free promotional Scratch-it tickets at the event.

BACKGROUND: Stu MacDonald of Bend, a two-time cancer survivor, purchases Oregon’s Game Megabucks tickets every week. Each week his wife, Claudia, tells him to purchase the winning ticket. The week of Sept. 7, she forgot to say it, and he won $4.6 million. MacDonald purchased the ticket at the Ashley’s Café #2 in Bend, and the couple said the only thing they were going to do with the prize was having a nice overnight stay in Portland before heading home to Bend.

MacDonald said he is working with a financial planner on how to invest the jackpot. He opted to take the one-time payment and, after taxes, took home $1.56 million.

During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $28.9 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Deschutes County, where MacDonald lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an oversized ceremonial check to representatives of the Bend Ashley’s Café and will also distribute a limited amount of free promotional Scratch-it tickets to store patrons.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: Oregon Lottery Logo

Consider Youth Preparedness this Third Week of National Preparedness Month
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/19 9:22 AM

September is National Preparedness Month. In this third week (Sept. 16-22), FEMA focuses on youth preparedness. In partnership with OEM, FEMA Region X has ideas and tips on how to prepare youth, families, and educators for when a disaster occurs in Oregon.

What:   Information from FEMA Region X on different ways youth can be prepared for disasters

Why:    To increase family and community planning for disasters

Who:    Oregon Office of Emergency Management; FEMA Region X

When:   Sept. 16 -22, 2019

 On camera or in person interviews can be scheduled in Salem, OR. To schedule or for more information, contact David L. Yost at 425-487-4610 or by email at 10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov">fema-r10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov.

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Historic cemetery and marker repair workshop in Corvallis
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/19/19 9:23 AM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will offer a historic cemetery assessment and marker cleaning and repair workshop October 12.

 

The free workshop will be from 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. at the Corvallis IOOF Pioneer Cemetery, 434 NW Witham Hill Drive. It will address marker assessment, cleaning, leveling and repair. The workshop is FREE, but registration is required.  Register online at the Oregon State Parks Store. https://store.oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_item&itemId=162&eventId=167

 

Participants should bring their lunch, snacks, water to drink, a stool or folding chair to sit on, gloves to wear, a hat, sunscreen, appropriate clothing as this is a hands on workshop, comfortable shoes, a pen and note pad and camera if they want to take photos during the workshop. The workshop will take place rain or shine.

 

The workshop is presented by Dave Pinyerd and Bernadette Niederer of Historic Preservation Northwest. The cemetery is providing the site and a portion of the materials.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. State law established the seven-member commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn about the workshop or to get more information on historic cemeteries visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets Oct. 2 in Roseburg
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/18/19 1:00 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 1 - 4 p.m. Oct. 2 at the Roseburg Public Library, Deer Creek Room, 1409 NE Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes program updates and recommendations to appoint new and returning members to the Council.

View a PDF of the full agenda online.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members: one representative from each of the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit the council's website

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend should contact Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.


Courts/District Attorneys
Oregon Man Sentenced to 14 Months in Federal Prison for Instagram Threats Against Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 3:50 PM
Instagram post
Instagram post
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6325/127753/thumb_SENTENCING-Poulson-Photo_1.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore.—Kermit Tyler Poulson, 40, was sentenced today to 14 months in federal prison and one year of supervised release for transmitting threatening communications with the intent to extort Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

“Using social media to threaten violence against any person regardless of that person’s position in our community is wrong. The Portland JTTF actively investigates all threats of violence,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “Federal law enforcement will continue working with our state and local partners to respond quickly to threats. These partnerships prevent many horrific acts of violence from occurring.”

“True threats victimize individuals and undermine the foundations that make our country a place where we can disagree, debate and find common ground,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “The FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force and our partners remain committed to keeping our shared community free of violence and intimidation.”

According to court documents, on October 9, 2018, Poulson posted multiple threatening comments on Mayor Wheeler’s personal Instagram account. Poulson threatened to firebomb the mayor’s home and office if he did not immediately fire Portland police officers recently involved in an on-duty shooting. Investigators tracked the IP address associated with the comments to a Portland residence where Poulson was staying. Poulson was present when investigators searched the property and after initially making a number of misleading statements, admitted that he alone was responsible for the comments.

On July 3, 2019, Poulson pleaded guilty to one count of transmitting threatening communications with the intent to extort Mayor Wheeler.

This case was investigated by the Portland FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) and the Portland Police Bureau (PPB). The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Instagram post

Salem Man Charged with Transmitting Threatening Communications (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 3:07 PM
Facebook Post
Facebook Post
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6325/127742/thumb_COMPLAINT-Carlsen-Photo_1.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal criminal complaint was unsealed today charging a Salem, Oregon man with threatening Social Security Administration (SSA) officials after being denied Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

Erick Carlsen, 45, is charged with transmitting threatening communications in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 875(c).

According to the complaint, on July 24, 2019, Carlsen allegedly engaged in threatening behavior at an SSA benefits review hearing in Salem. At the hearing, Carlsen yelled at the Administrative Law Judge and threatened future physical violence. Salem police officers responded and Carlsen left without further incident. Carlsen livestreamed his actions on Facebook and later posted additional threats.

On September 11, 2019, Carlsen left a voicemail for an SSA Office of Inspector General Agent in which he said, “I’m going to go to this hearing and people are going to [expletive] pay. Do you understand? You guys are going to [expletive] pay.” The same day, Carlsen posted another threat on Facebook entitled “Why do People Go on Shooting Sprees.” In the post, Carlsen claimed that he would “…make the front page and air on every TV station” and “…make sure the whole country stands up and takes notice…”

The next day, investigators from the Federal Protective Service (FPS) interviewed Carlsen at his home in Salem. During the conversation, Carlsen was visually agitated and appeared to be preparing for a fight. Carlsen told the investigators he suffered from mental health issues that cause anger and that he does not leave his property because he is never sure what he will do. When they discussed his upcoming SSA hearing, Carlsen said that he would not bring weapons, but that he could not promise he wouldn’t hurt anyone.

A concerned citizen notified law enforcement of Carlsen’s Facebook posts and later told investigators, “I really feel like he has the potential to follow through.” On September 17, 2019, Carlsen was arrested by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office without incident.

Carlsen made his first appearance in federal court today in Portland. He will be arraigned on October 16, 2019.

This case was investigated by the SSA Office of Inspector General, FPS, FBI, Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Salem Police Department and is being prosecuted by Rachel Sowray, Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Anyone who has information about real or perceived threats of violence should call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov. For immediate threats to life and safety, please call 9-1-1.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Facebook Post

Milton-Freewater Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Federal Prison for Trafficking Heroin in Eastern Oregon (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 2:09 PM
Items seized from defendant and his residence
Items seized from defendant and his residence
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6325/127738/thumb_SENTENCING-Torres-Nieves-Photo_2.PNG

PORTLAND, Ore.—Adan Torres-Nieves, 45, of Milton-Freewater, Oregon, was sentenced today to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for possessing with the intent to distribute nearly four pounds of heroin in Eastern Oregon.

According to court documents, in early 2017, investigators from the Blue Mountain Narcotics Enforcement Team (BENT) began investigating Torres-Nieves who appeared to be supplying a low-level drug dealer named Carlos Cisneros-Razo. Investigators established probable cause to arrest Torres-Nieves and execute search warrants on both of his and Cisneros-Razo’s residences.

During the search of Torres-Nieves’s residence in Milton-Freewater, investigators found approximately four pounds of heroin, a pound of methamphetamine, and five pounds of cocaine; $21,046 in cash; digital scales; a stolen revolver and a camouflage ballistic vest. A second revolver was found in Torres-Nieves’ bedroom.

On May 6, 2019, Torres-Nieves pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute heroin. During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon ordered Torres-Nieves to forfeit two firearms seized from his residence and the $26,166 seized from his person and residence.

On October 1, 2018, Cisneros-Razo was sentenced to 60 months in prison for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

This case was investigated by BENT and the FBI and prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Items seized from defendant and his residence , Firearm found in vehicle

Portland Man Sentenced to 100 Months in Federal Prison for Illegally Importing Fentanyl from China
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 12:35 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—John William Schantz, 28, of Portland, was sentenced today to 100 months in federal prison and four years’ supervised release for illegally importing fentanyl from China for the purpose of making and selling counterfeit prescription pills.

According to court documents, in November 2017, a U.S. Postal Inspection Service inspector discovered a suspicious package addressed to Schantz’s girlfriend at the U.S. Postal Service Portland Air Cargo Center. The inspector noted that the package was listed as containing a “pants zipper,” but felt like it contained a powdery substance. Agents from Homeland Security Investigations and officers from the Portland Police Bureau’s Drugs and Vice Division were called to investigate.

After finding that the package contained a white powdery substance, investigators transported it to the Oregon State Police Laboratory for further examination in a safe environment. The lab later determined the package contained approximately 102 grams of para-fluoroisobutryl fentanyl, a powerful opioid and Schedule I controlled substance. Investigators soon learned that between August and November 2017, there were 16 additional parcels shipped to Schantz’s residence. Of those, at least four were associated with known sources of controlled substances and pill manufacturing equipment.

On November 29, 2019, investigators conducted a controlled delivery of the package, now containing an inert substance, to Schantz’s residence. Investigators searched Schantz’s residence and seized two pill presses, a Ruger semi-automatic .22 caliber handgun, 245 rounds of .22 caliber ammunition, approximately 800 assorted counterfeit oxycodone and valium pills, various binding agents, die casts, digital scales and $1,142 in cash. When interviewed, Schantz admitted ordering fentanyl on the internet and having it shipped to his residence in his girlfriend’s name to avoid detection.

On July 16, 2019, Schantz pleaded guilty to one count of unlawfully importing a controlled substance.

This case was investigated by the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Interdiction Taskforce, Homeland Security Investigations, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Portland Police Bureau Drugs and Vice Division. It was prosecuted by Scott M. Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The Oregon HIDTA program was established by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in June of 1999. In 2015 the program expanded into Idaho and was renamed the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA. The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA consists of 14 counties and the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Counties in the HIDTA include Oregon’s Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Umatilla and Washington counties, and Idaho’s Ada, Bannock and Canyon counties.

Opioid abuse affects communities across the nation. The CDC reports that in 2017, there were 70,237 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. Opioids and synthetic opioids were alone responsible for 47,600 overdose deaths or nearly 68% of all overdoses. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury or death in the United States.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 80 to 100 times more powerful than morphine and 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin. A 3-milligram dose of fentanyl—a few grains of the substance—is enough to kill an average adult male.

If you or someone you know suffers from addiction, please call the Lines for Life substance abuse helpline at 1-800-923-4357 or visit www.linesforlife.org. Phone support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also text “RecoveryNow” to 839863 between 8am and 11pm Pacific Time daily.

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Madras Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Federal Prison for Role in Meth Distribution Conspiracy, Bank Robbery
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 5:08 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Tyler Wayne Fuller, 30, of Madras, Oregon, was sentenced today to 10 years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for his role in a Central Oregon methamphetamine distribution conspiracy and for robbing a Madras bank.

According to court documents, Fuller is the son of career criminal and known drug dealer Ronald Wayne Thrasher, 49, also of Madras. By age 28, Fuller had his own extensive criminal history and had spent the majority of his adulthood incarcerated. In December 2016, after Fuller was released from federal prison, Thrasher began giving his son methamphetamine to sell. Within a month, Thrasher was supplying and Fuller was distributing quarter and half-pound quantities of methamphetamine throughout Central Oregon.

In February 2017, Fuller’s volatile relationship with his father led to a confrontation. Armed with a pistol, Fuller unsuccessfully attempted to rob his father of his methamphetamine supply. The resulting estrangement left Fuller without a supplier and illicit income. Now homeless, he continued selling drugs obtained from his father’s customers. In August 2017, Fuller robbed a U.S. Bank in Madras, collecting $517 in cash.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Fuller to pay $517 in restitution to U.S. Bank and forfeit any property or proceeds derived from his drug trafficking activities.

On April 25, 2018, Fuller pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute fifty or more grams of methamphetamine and bank robbery.

Thrasher was convicted at trial in August 2019 for purchasing and transporting methamphetamine for distribution and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He will be sentenced on February 4, 2020.

Fuller is the first of 11 defendants to be sentenced for their involvement in his father’s drug trafficking conspiracy. One defendant, Russell Marvin Jones, 53, of Gresham, Oregon, was convicted at trial alongside his father. Nine others pleaded guilty. All are scheduled to be sentenced in the next six months before Judge McShane.

This case was investigated by Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) and the Oregon State Police. It was prosecuted Frank R. Papagni Jr. and Judi Harper, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, with the assistance of the Jefferson, Crook and Deschutes County District Attorney’s Offices.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Lincoln County Felon Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison for Dealing Drugs and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 4:57 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Jon Michael Walsh, 46, of Neskowin, Oregon, was sentenced today to 20 years in federal prison and 10 years’ supervised release for possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine and heroin and illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Walsh was on post-prison supervision for a 2015 federal firearms conviction, when probation officers conducted a routine search of his vehicle outside a community center and found a stolen loaded pistol and concealed packages of methamphetamine and heroin.

During a subsequent search of Walsh’s Neskowin residence, officers found additional distribution quantities of methamphetamine and heroin. Walsh later admitted to buying and selling methamphetamine and heroin in Lincoln and surrounding coastal counties to support his own methamphetamine addiction.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane also ordered Walsh to forfeit the stolen pistol and any property derived from his drug trafficking activities.

On March 8, 2019, Walsh pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, possession with intent to distribute heroin and felon in possession of a firearm. Walsh admitted to dealing methamphetamine and heroin while possessing the loaded pistol to protect himself and drug supplies.

Walsh previously served nine years in federal prison for distributing methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm after being sentenced in June 1998.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Oregon State Police, Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office and the Lincoln City Police Department. It was prosecuted by Frank R. Papagni, Jr., Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Michelle Branam, Lincoln County District Attorney.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Klamath County Man Sentenced to 15 Months in Federal Prison for Stealing Missing Mother's Social Security Benefits
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 4:03 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—On Friday, September 13, 2019, Theodore Martin Kirk, 64, of Klamath County, Oregon, was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for stealing more than $30,000 in Social Security benefits dispersed in the name of his elderly mother, Nadine Kirk. Ms. Kirk has been missing since March 2010 and is presumed to be deceased.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane announced his intent to sentence Kirk to 15 months in federal prison at a sentencing hearing on September 6, 2019, but held off on entering the judgement to allow Kirk one week to give the location of his mother’s remains to investigators. Kirk failed to produce this information and was formally sentenced on September 13, 2019.

According to court documents and information shared during trial, in July 2015, a concerned community member contacted the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office regarding the whereabouts of Ms. Kirk as she had not been seen for multiple years. At the time of this call, Ms. Kirk would have been 98 years old. Shortly thereafter, a sheriff deputy visited the residence shared by Ms. Kirk and her son in Bonanza, Oregon. Kirk claimed his mother had left with friends to travel to California two months prior, but would not permit the deputy to enter his property to confirm his mother was not there.

In an August 2015 interview with a detective, Kirk again told law enforcement he believed his mother was in California with friends. He added that it had been "quite some time" since his mother had seen a doctor despite having suffered from multiple strokes. Kirk claimed to be suspicious of his mother’s medications and reported previously removing her from them. Further, he acknowledged that he shared a joint checking account with his mother, into which her monthly Social Security payments were deposited.

Later in August, the Social Security Administration suspended payments to the Kirk’s joint checking account based on Ms. Kirk’s unknown whereabouts. A Social Security investigator reviewed Ms. Kirk’s bank records and found that the last transaction bearing her signature was dated January 2010. From January 2010 until August 2015, over $1,000 in benefits were deposited monthly into the joint checking account and nearly every month, Theodore Kirk would withdraw the entire amount in cash. All of the withdrawals from the account occurred in Oregon, not in California where Ms. Kirk was purported to be.

In August 2017, investigators conducted a search of the Kirk property and recovered a detailed calendar kept by Theodore Kirk. Prior to 2010, the calendar included activities for both Kirk and his mother. The calendar revealed a series of strokes experienced by Ms. Kirk beginning in 2004 and continuing into the beginning of 2010, where the calendar showed she experienced two strokes in three days. Following the multiple strokes, there were no additional calendar entries for Ms. Kirk’s activities.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Kirk to pay $30,868 in restitution to the Social Security Administration.

On March 13, 2019, Kirk was convicted at trial by a federal jury in Medford on one count of theft of government funds.

This case was investigated by the Social Security Administration, Office of Inspector General with the assistance of the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office and prosecuted by Adam E. Delph and Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Cities
Free Hands-Only CPR Class (Photo)
City of Richland - 09/17/19 3:30 PM
2019-09/5957/127698/Heart_Safe_at_RCC_Flyer.jpg
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The City of Richland Fire and Emergency Services has openings in two separate community Hands-Only CPR classes in September on Friday, September 20 and Monday, September 23, both at 3:00 p.m. in the Richland Community Center, 500 Amon Park Drive.

This 30-minute class has a limit of 50 attendees for each session. It is the hope that teaching Hands-Only CPR and AED (Automated External Defibrillator) use to 10% of our population annually, will build stronger relationships with community members and the local partners in emergency medicine. Richland Fire is also working with community sponsors to purchase public accessible defibrillators and strategically place them throughout Richland.  

“Your time is valuable. In as little as 30-minutes, we will provide you with the most recent data and hands-on skills required to save a life,” says Richland Firefighter and Heart Safe Program Manager Josh Smith.

Richland Fire & Emergency Services will continue to offer community classes and recruit local Home Owner Associations (HOA), businesses, churches, athletic facilities, etc. to host classes and become part of our Heart Safe Community. 

To reserve a seat for Friday or Monday's class, call the Richland Community Center at 942-7529. 

For more information, to be a sponsor or to schedule a class, please call (509) 942-7703, or visit www.heartsaferichland.org.   




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5957/127698/Heart_Safe_at_RCC_Flyer.jpg

Tri-Cities-area School Districts
TC Futures Center Grand Opening: New opportunities for disengaged youth and young adults (Photo)
ESD 123 - 09/18/19 5:32 PM
ESD 123
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KENNEWICK, WA – A collaborative venture between Educational Service District 123 (ESD 123) and the Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council (BFWDC) has resulted in a new re-engagement center for local youth and young adults.  We are proud to announce the grand opening of the TC Futures Center.

Both agencies are longtime service providers dedicated to connecting youth and young adults with access to resources and opportunities in order to find success as they transition out of the school system. Now, thanks to this new partnership, youth and young adults ages 16-24 will find a welcoming environment where they can work on finishing their education and connect with incredible employment opportunities. TC Futures offers GED completion, career counseling, employment opportunities, on-the-job training, internships, apprenticeships, and other employment related services.

The community is invited to attend the grand opening celebration of the TC Futures Center at 11 AM on Friday, September 27th, at 6917 W. Grandridge Blvd Suite C-110 in Kennewick, WA.

“Opening our doors is just the beginning," says Tiffany Scott, BFWDC CEO.  "We have codified our partnership with ESD123 and stood up TC Futures as an important access point to re-engage youth and young adults into education and employment. Together we will continue to grow with community stakeholders and offer young adults a brighter future by obtaining the skills they need to make a livable wage.” 

Both ESD 123 and BFWDC look forward to the grand opening event beginning at 11 AM on September 27.  For more information on the grand opening event or to RSVP, contact the BFWDC Office Manager Becky Smith at 734-5996, or TC Futures Center Director Mark Wheaton at 537-1706.

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BFWDC is based in Kennewick, WA and has been designated by the Governor as a local workforce area for Benton and Franklin counties, based on population, size, prior education, training performance, and fiscal integrity. The BFWDC is responsible for coordinating the local workforce development programs, coordinating local employment and training activities, establishing a youth committee, negotiating local performance standards, and developing a local Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) plan. For more information about BFWDC, please visit www.bentonfranklinwdc.com.

ESD 123 is based in Pasco, WA, and is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please visit www.esd123.org.




Attached Media Files: ESD 123 , BF Workforce , TC Futures

ESD 123 Offers Mental Health First Aid Training in Tri Cities
ESD 123 - 09/15/19 8:51 PM

Local Area Part of National Initiative to Increase Mental Health Literacy

PASCO, WA - A young person you know could be experiencing a mental health challenge or crisis. You can help them!  On Wednesday, September 25, Educational Service District will offer Mental Health First Aid training. This eight-hour training course gives people the tools to identify when someone might be struggling with a mental health or substance use problem and connect them with appropriate support and resources when necessary. (See attached flyer.)

One in five Americans has a mental illness, but many are reluctant to seek help, or might not know where to turn for care. Unlike physical conditions, symptoms of mental health and substance use problems can be difficult to detect. For friends and family members, it can be hard to know when and how to step in. As a result, those in need of mental health services often do not get them until it is too late.

Just as CPR helps even those without clinical training assist an individual having a heart attack, Mental Health First Aid prepares participants to interact with a person experiencing a mental health crisis. Mental Health First Aid participants learn a 5-step action plan that guides them through the process of reaching out and offering appropriate support. 

“Through this program, we hope to take the fear and hesitation out of starting conversations about mental health and substance use problems,” says Linda Rosenberg President and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health, which helped bring Mental Health First Aid to the U.S. in 2008. “When more people are equipped with the tools they need to start a dialogue, more people can get the help they may need.”

Those interested in attending the training should register online at www.esd123.org/learn.  For more information, contact ESD Student Support Director, Dana Camarena, at 509.544.5762.

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To learn more about Mental Health First Aid USA, visit www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org. The National Council for Behavioral Health was instrumental in bringing Mental Health First Aid to the USA and more than 1 million individuals have been trained.




Attached Media Files: Youth Mental Health Training Flyer

Yakima-area School Districts
UPDATE: Wapato Middle School Modified Lockdown Medical Incident
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 09/19/19 4:34 PM

Good afternoon all,

Attached is an informational release with an update regarding the situation at Wapato Middle School yesterday resulting in some students being sent to the hospital as a precaution.




Attached Media Files: UPDATE: Wapato Middle School Medical Incident

Dr. Sean McGeeney, Executive Director of P-12 Programming for the Yakima School District, named ASCD Emerging Leader (Photo)
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 09/18/19 9:18 AM
Dr. Sean McGeeney
Dr. Sean McGeeney
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Dr. Sean McGeeney, Executive Director of P-12 Programming for the Yakima School District, named ASCD Emerging Leader

Contact: Alexa Epitropoulos, 703-575-5784

ALEXANDRIA, VA — ASCD, a mission-driven nonprofit dedicated to empowering educators to achieve excellence in learning, teaching, and leading, is pleased to announce it has selected Sean McGeeney, Executive Director of P-12 Programming at Yakima School District, as a 2019 Emerging Leader. The Emerging Leaders program recognizes and prepares young, promising educators to influence education programs, policy, and practice on both the local and national levels.

“Sean joins a powerful community of educators who are leading the field of education," said Ronn Nozoe, ASCD Interim CEO and Executive Director. "ASCD's Emerging Leader program provides a powerful stepping stone for greater leadership opportunities and influence in schools across the country and around the world."

Sean was selected as a 2019 Emerging Leader alongside 24 fellow administrators, faculty members, teachers, instructional coaches, and learning specialists. Those selected for the Emerging Leaders program have been in the education profession for 5–15 years; demonstrate a passion for learning, teaching, and leading; come from a diverse range of positions, locations, cultural backgrounds, and perspectives; hold promise as leaders; and are committed to ASCD's beliefs and to pursuing leadership opportunities.

Following the nomination process, this year's leaders were chosen by an advisory panel composed of ASCD staff, education thought leaders and Emerging Leader alumni.

All Emerging Leaders are enrolled in the program for two years and help shape education policy, advocate for the whole child, and explore multiple ASCD leadership pathways. Some alumni from the program—including Steven Anderson, Starr Sackstein, Tony Frontier, and Pete Hall—have become ASCD authors, while others have become ASCD Faculty members and ASCD Board members. While in the program, educators can take advantage of numerous opportunities, such as

• Attending the invitation-only Leader to Leader Conference in November, where leaders of various ASCD constituent groups convene to learn, share, and lay the groundwork for further collaboration.

• Presenting at ASCD conferences and events.

• Writing for ASCD publications, including the Inservice blog, and contributing written pieces to other outlets.

• Hosting episodes of ASCD Learn Teach Lead Radio, a weekly program produced in partnership with BAM! Radio Network.

The complete list of the past Emerging Leaders is available in our Emerging Leaders Directory. For more information on ASCD's Emerging Leaders program, visit www.ascd.org/emergingleaders. To learn more about ASCD's other programs, products, services, and memberships, visit www.ascd.org.

Alexa Epitropoulos · Media and author relations specialist 
1703 North Beauregard Street · Alexandria, VA 22311
P (703) 575-5784 · www.ascd.org




Attached Media Files: Dr. Sean McGeeney

Organizations & Associations
SAIF returns more than $4 million to Umatilla and Union County economies
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:15 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Umatilla County will receive more than $2.9 million; Union County policyholders will recieve more than $1.1 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.