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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Sat. Dec. 5 - 1:10 am
Fri. 12/04/20
Oregon reports 2,176 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 30 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/04/20 2:05 PM

Dec. 4, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,176 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 30 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 30 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,003, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

“Today, Oregon marked a tragic milestone in the COIVID-19 pandemic,” said Gov. Kate Brown. “The Oregon Health Authority reported 30 deaths today, a record, and the number pushed us past the 1,000th death since the start of this crisis. This disease has touched every Oregonian. It has taken a devastating toll on our families, our communities, our businesses and our physical and mental wellbeing.

“On this somber day, our hearts go out to all the families and friends who have lost a loved one and to all Oregonians who have suffered and sacrificed during this pandemic.”

Oregon Health Authority also reported a daily record number of new confirmed and presumptive cases, 2,176, as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 81,437.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (15), Benton (25), Clackamas (176), Clatsop (15), Columbia (8), Coos (30), Crook (20), Curry (6), Deschutes (129), Douglas (28), Gilliam (1), Grant (3), Harney (3), Hood River (27), Jackson (172), Jefferson (33), Josephine (37), Klamath (97), Lane (127), Lincoln (11), Linn (65), Malheur (37), Marion (188), Morrow (18), Multnomah (388), Polk (43), Sherman (1), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (74), Union (20), Wasco (21), Washington (319), Yamhill (35).

Oregon’s 974th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Dec. 1 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 975th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Nov. 28 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 976th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Dec. 2 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 977th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 23 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 978th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died at her residence. Date of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 979th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died at her residence. Date of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 980th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 981st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died on Dec. 1 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 982nd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 983rd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 29 and died on Dec. 3 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 984th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Dec. 2 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 985th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Dec. 3 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 986th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died on Nov. 29 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center-Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 987th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Dec. 2 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 988th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Dec. 2 at Portland VA Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 989th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Dec. 2 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 990th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 26 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 991st COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Dec. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 992nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Dec. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 993rd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Oct. 9 and died on Dec. 2 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 994th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on Oct. 9 and died on Nov. 28 at St. Charles Medical Center-Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 995th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 996th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 997th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 28 and died on Dec. 2 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 998th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Nov. 1 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 999th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 25 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1000th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 23 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1001st COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Nov. 25 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1002nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 30 and died on Dec. 3 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1003rd COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 24. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon decreased to 557, 2 fewer than yesterday. There are 115 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, six more than yesterday. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. Numbers do not reflect admissions per day nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here


COVID-19 latest projections

Today, Oregon Health Authority released its latest modeling, which shows a projected increase in COVID-19 cases and that more Oregonians are staying home and physically distancing.

According to the model, the effective reproduction rate – the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates – was estimated to be 1.25, as of Nov. 19, one day after the statewide freeze was enacted.

The current level of transmission could generate “exponential” growth, resulting in approximately 2,000 new daily cases and 75 additional daily hospitalizations by Dec. 24.

If the spread of COVID-19 reached the levels from mid-October, new daily cases could reach 2,700 and patients needing hospitalization would increase to 110 per day.

The model does consider the time period during Thanksgiving.

The model also shows that Oregonians are practicing physical distancing at the highest levels since the beginning of the summer and that a majority of Oregonians are wearing face coverings when outside, or indoors where six feet of distance cannot be maintained.

The projections on spread of the virus emphasize the importance of continuing to practice preventive measures to slow the spread of the disease:

  • Minimize close contact with others.
  • Keep gatherings small.
  • Wear a face covering.
  • Wash hands frequently.

Mental and emotional resources for difficult times:

  • Mental and emotional health resources are available on OHA’s Safe + Strong website.
  • Or call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 800-923-4357 (800-923-HELP). The line offers free, 24-7 emotional support and resource referral to anyone who needs it – not only those experiencing a mental health crisis.

SEATech construction students make desks for local elementary students (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/04/20 1:48 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1288/140577/thumb_SEATech_Instructor_Eric_Matson.jpg

WALLA WALLA - SEATech instructor Eric Matson and students in his Construction Technology program have teamed with Builders First Source and Jackson Contractor Group to make desks to support students in distance learning. Later this month 25 desks will be delivered to the homes of district elementary students who don’t have adequate study areas.

Builders First Source and Jackson Contractor Group donated all the materials for the lightweight, 30”x3’ wood desks which feature a shelf and area to plug in a Chromebook device. Local artist Brad Rude has also partnered on the project to help students come up with creative ideas for painting the desks.

“Sharpstein Principal Maria Garcia reached out to our program this fall to see if we could build desks for students who don’t have them in their homes,” said Matson. “We are so excited to see this project come together to help students have a place to study while our campuses are closed due to the pandemic.”

Matson is using his technology skills to keep the project going as local COVID rates continue to spike keeping all students off campus. Matson has live ZOOM sessions with his students as he constructs the desks in the SEATech construction shop. Students interact with Matson during the ZOOM sessions to ensure they understand how they are being constructed. Rude is also using ZOOM sessions to teach the students how to paint the desks and come up with fun design ideas to make them more interesting. Next week students will pick up a desk to take home and paint before they are delivered to students Dec. 16. Matson and his students plan to build another 20 desks for students after winter break.

“It’s critical for our students to learn the importance of giving back,” said Matson. “I’m so proud of our students for using the skills they are learning at SEATech to help our youngest learners in the school district.” 

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Attached Media Files: 2020-12/1288/140577/SEATech_Instructor_Eric_Matson.jpg

Oregon Lottery Holiday Reminder: Lottery Tickets are not for Children (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 12/04/20 11:09 AM
Holiday billboard
Holiday billboard
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/4939/140572/thumb_Holiday_Billboard.JPG

 

Dec. 4, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – The message is simple – Oregon Lottery tickets, no matter what time of year, are for adults.

Each holiday season, Oregon Lottery ticket sales experience a spike as people buy tickets as stocking stuffers, gift tags and easy-to-give gifts. The holiday gift-giving season provides an opportune time for the Lottery to share the message that if the gift is a Lottery ticket, be sure the gift’s recipient is at least 18 years old.

“A key element of our message is that lottery tickets are not for children,” said Oregon Lottery Senior Marketing Product Manager Stacy Shaw, also a board member of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling. “While we put added emphasis on this during the holidays, it is simply part of how we promote our games year-round. We believe that responsible gaming is for all customers, all the time.”

This marks the 14th year that the National Council on Problem Gambling and the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors at Canada’s McGill University have partnered with lotteries around the world, including the Oregon Lottery, to promote giving lottery tickets responsibly.

Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, nearly $100 million in Lottery dollars has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment in Oregon.

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(PLEASE NOTE: LINK TO :30 TV SPOT WITH "FOR THE GROWNUPS ON YOUR LIST" MESSAGE: https://youtu.be/9h5Oc2DKnjk)




Attached Media Files: Holiday billboard , Social media message to remind players that Lottery tickets are for grownups.

Over 19,000 businesses have signed up for CAT in first year of registration
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/04/20 9:44 AM

Salem, OR—Registrations for Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax have topped more than 19,000 in its first year. Through Thursday, 19,043 businesses had registered for the CAT, which was created by the Oregon Legislature in 2019 to raise funding for education.

The Department of Revenue opened registration through Revenue Online one year ago today, December 4, 2019, four weeks before the tax went into effect January 1, 2020.

The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon. It applies to all types of business entities including those located inside and outside of Oregon.

The CAT is measured on a business’s commercial activity, the total amount a business realizes from transactions and activity in Oregon.

Once a business reaches $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity for the calendar year, it has 30 days in which to register for the CAT. Businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million will have Corporate Activity Tax to pay. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

The CAT is a calendar year tax. Taxpayers expecting to owe $10,000 or more for 2020 must make estimated payments. Estimated payments for the fourth quarter will be due February 1. Returns are due April 15.

Training aids to assist with registration and making payments can be found on the CAT page of the agency’s website.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.
 


State Search & Rescue Coordinator has a message for Winter Travelers: Know Before You Go (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 12/04/20 8:08 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/3986/140565/thumb_State_Search__and__Rescue_Coordinator_has_a_message_for_Winter_Travelers_Know_Before_You_Go.jpg

Winter weather is here, and Oregon Office of Emergency Management State Search Rescue Coordinator Scott Lucas says Oregon is seeing uptick in lost or stranded travelers on foot and in vehicles.  He is reminding Oregonians and visitors of ways to stay safe.

Lucas says the search and rescue community in Oregon stands ready to respond when needed, but that being safe and prepared should always be the priority. That means being having food, water, maps and other items needed for comfort and safety in the event you get lost or stranded. Also, knowing your route and weather conditions before you go is important, said Lucas.

“Technology should not replace sound planning when using GPS in your car, or for an adventure on foot like going out into the woods with your family this holiday season to look for a tree. Careless planning can result in discomfort, injury – or worse yet – loss  of life,” Lucas reminds us. “It is a good idea to have an emergency kit in your car, and extra supplies when you travel on foot.”

Lucas recommends not relying on GPS alone and using resources for Oregon travel like tripcheck.com or calling 511 for road conditions.

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management Search and Rescue program supports a broad spectrum of search and rescue operations in Oregon. That mission includes coordinating activities of state and federal agencies involved in search and rescue, liaising with the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association and other organizations, and providing on-scene search and rescue coordination when requested.

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

The U.S. Coast Guard conducts a Search and Rescue mission coordinated by State Search and Rescue Coordinator Scott Lucas to rescue a man stranded in a vehicle during a 2019 winter storm in Lane County. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard)

A vehicle was stranded and the driver needed to be rescued after GPS led the driver astray on a dangerous route in Linn County this year, 2020. (Photo courtest of Corvallis Mountain Rescue)




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/3986/140565/State_Search__and__Rescue_Coordinator_has_a_message_for_Winter_Travelers_Know_Before_You_Go.jpg , 2020-12/3986/140565/IMG954042.jpg

Thu. 12/03/20
Bend Resident Sentenced for Conspiracy to Manufacture and Distribute Marijuana
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/03/20 4:14 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Bend, Oregon resident was sentenced to 36 months’ imprisonment today for running an illicit Butane Honey Oil (BHO) extraction lab on rural Bend property, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Sean Paul Wyrsch, 32 years old, was sentenced to 3 years in federal prison and 3 years’ supervised release. This sentencing follows the sentencing of his brother and co-defendant Jacob Genaro Robe, on October 27, 2020, who also received a sentence of three years imprisonment.

According to court documents, Wyrsch and his brother created a vertical operation growing marijuana, manufacturing BHO and distributing it in other states for significant profit. On March 27, 2018, an Oregon State Police trooper stopped Jacob Robe for a traffic violation near Klamath Falls, Oregon.  The officer recognized signs of drug trafficking and eventually located more than $20,000 in cash, BHO, and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team had previously received information regarding defendant and his brothers having a BHO lab and selling BHO in other states, and detectives served a search warrant on the brothers’ rural property in Bend, Oregon.  Also found were freezers with marijuana, drying racks with sheets of BHO and jars with their logo “THE BHOys.”

In an unattached two-story structure approximately 179 large, mature, marijuana plants were located along with around 280 starter plants.  Law enforcement located an indoor marijuana grow with hundreds of plants, a closed-loop BHO lab, 18 pounds of BHO, 200 pounds of marijuana and thirteen firearms..

On November 25, 2019 Wyrsch was charged by information, and on January 29, 2020 pleaded guilty to conspiracy to manufacture and distribute marijuana.

            The Drug Enforcement Administration, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team and Oregon State Police investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Jeffrey S. Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office.




Attached Media Files: Bend Resident Sentenced for Conspiracy to Manufacture and Distribute Marijuana

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Dec. 3, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 12/03/20 3:51 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/3986/140550/thumb_2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407_(2).jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Dec. 3, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTION:

Lincoln City, Ore. - Oct. 3, 2020 - Ilham Mackie, a Red Cross volunteer, works on arranging the food distribution the Red Cross is providing for residents living in motels in Lincoln City after they were forced to flee when the Echo Canyon fire destroyed their homes. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File: 2020-03-10_4562_LincolnCityRedCross_PL_01.jpg

Phoenix, Ore. - Oct. 9, 2020 - Construction crews begin cleaning up the damage from the Almeda wildfire. Photo by David Yost/FEMA
File: 2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/3986/140550/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407_(2).jpg , 2020-12/3986/140550/2020-03-10_4562_LincolnCityRedCross_PL_01.jpg

Winter Wonderland in Richland's John Dam Plaza Begins (Photo)
City of Richland - 12/03/20 3:31 PM
2020-12/5957/140556/WW2020_Print_8.5x11.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/5957/140556/thumb_WW2020_Print_8.5x11.jpg

The City of Richland and HAPO Community Credit Union partner once again to bring joy to our community this holiday season. The 2020 Winter Wonderland Festival of Lights in John Dam Plaza and on the HAPO Community Stage features thousands of dancing lights set to holiday music. In addition, seasonal displays will line the sidewalks to bring joy, excitement, and happiness to all who visit the park.

“HAPO is proud to partner with the City of Richland this holiday season and we hope these bright lights will help bring some holiday cheer,” said Crystal Contreras, Community Relations Director for HAPO Community Credit Union.
 
Seasonal displays include:

  • Santa’s house featuring a mailbox for children of all ages to drop “Letters to the North Pole” – don’t forget to include a return address!
  • The Richland Alphabet Home Village including replicas of A, B, and D scale-model houses decorated with holiday cheer.
  • Three “Mega” trees displayed on the HAPO Community Stage.
  • A musical playlist of 14 holiday favorites projecting throughout the park.

There will be no organized celebrations, concessions, or warming fires this year to avoid overcrowding. Those who gather are asked to wear masks and maintain 6-foot social distancing.
 
The lights will be dancing to music every evening throughout the holiday season from 4:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Those who remain in their vehicles can tune their FM dial to 104.5 FM.
 
In addition to the Winter Wonderland Festival of Lights, the Richland Parks and Recreation team will be spreading more holiday cheer by distributing holiday gift bags full of treats and Richland souvenirs. To reserve your household’s “Holiday in a Bag”, register online starting Friday, December 4th.  Supplies are limited to one gift bag per household in order to spread as much joy and kindness as possible.  The goal is to promote family togetherness and gratitude during this holiday season.
 
The Richland Parks & Recreation team will be sharing additional winter and holiday-themed activities and stories on their website and through social media.  Go to www.ci.richland.wa.us/winterwonderland and follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/richlandparksandrecreation for the most up to date information. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/5957/140556/WW2020_Print_8.5x11.jpg

$42 Million in Emergency Solutions Grants Available to Prevent and Respond to COVID-19
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 12/03/20 3:16 PM

$42 Million in Emergency Solutions Grants Available to Prevent and Respond to COVID-19

Oregon Housing and Community Services is administering funds to help Oregonians experiencing homelessness and prevent housing instability.

 

SALEM, OR – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is accepting applications for Emergency Solution Grants-Coronavirus (ESG-CV). The ESG-CV funds are part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) and are being used to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the Coronavirus pandemic among individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness or at risk of falling into homelessness. The funds are allocated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

“The public health epidemic has further laid to bare both the housing supply shortage and safe sheltering options,” said Andrea Bell, OHCS Director of Housing Stabilization. “Now, with winter coming and Oregon’s COVID-19 cases rising, this assistance provides a lifeline to families without shelter and those at risk of becoming homeless.”

For the first time in state history, OHCS will allocate homeless response and prevention resources through a competitive process. Given the magnitude of the ESG-CV resources and the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic, OHCS sought and received flexibility from the Oregon Legislature to allocate $42 million of ESG-CV to providers who had not previously been eligible. HB 4304 (2nd Special Session) provided OHCS the ability to competitively allocated ESG-CV resources to culturally specific organizations, non-profits, public housing authorities and local government to expand the reach and scope of services to communities most disproportionately impacted by both COVID-19 and housing instability. Earlier this year, OHCS allocated $13.7 million in ESG-CV funds to regional Community Action Agencies.

“Ensuring we have equity in the distribution of funds is critical,” Director Bell said. “I’m excited about additional opportunities to partner with providers bringing diverse strategies and expertise across the state to increase services that Oregonians need. These resources and new partnerships will advance Oregon’s Statewide Housing Plan and move Oregon closer to a system in which everyone has a safe and stable place to call home.”

Over the past year, OHCS’ Housing Stabilization Division has distributed record levels of funding to local communities to provide housing stabilization and emergency shelter to Oregonians. This competitive allocation of ESG-CV will address homelessness though street outreach, emergency shelter, rapid rehousing, and prevention for families in danger of slipping into homelessness. These additional resources will include addressing the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on communities of color and other at-risk populations.

Organizations already providing services such as safe shelter, rehousing or homelessness prevention assistance to households at risk of becoming homeless may be eligible. The application closes on December 27th at 3 pm (PST). Applicants must meet the federal funding definitions or comply with the ESG Federal Grant Requirements to receive funding. To read more about the funding criteria and access the application process, visit the Oregon Housing and Community Services website.  

 

 

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$42 Millones en Subvenciones de Soluciones de Emergencia Disponibles para Evitar y Responder a COVID-19
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 12/03/20 3:14 PM

$42 Millones en Subvenciones de Soluciones de Emergencia Disponibles para Evitar y Responder a COVID-19

Oregon Housing and Community Services (Servicios de Comunidad y Vivienda de Oregon) esta administrando fondos para ayudar a la gente de Oregon que esta pasando por carencia de hogar  y para evitar la instabilidad de vivienda.

 

SALEM, OR – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) está aceptando aplicaciones para Subvenciones de Soluciones de Emergencia-Coronavirus (ESG-CV). Los fondos de ESG-CV son parte del Acto de Ayuda, Alivio, y Seguridad Economica de Coronavirus (CARES Act)  y están usadas para evitar, preparar y responder a la pandemia de Coronavirus para las personas o familias pasando por carencia de hogar o estan en riesgo de pasar por carencia de hogar. Los fondos están asignados por el Departmento de Los Estados Unidos de Vivienda y Desarollo Urbano.

“La epidemia de la salud publica ha mostrado la falta de opciones para refugio seguro y de suminstros de vivienda,” dijo Andrea Bell, OHCS Directora de Estabilización de Vivienda.”

“Ahora que viene el invierno y los casos de COVID-19 estan creciendo, esta asistencia proporciona ayuda a las familias sin refugio o que estan en riesgo de pasar por carencia de hogar.”

Por la primera vez en la historia del estado, OHCS va a asignarár recursos de prevención y respuesta a la carencia de hogar sobre un proceso competitivo. Con la magnitud de los recursos de ESG-CV y las demandas de la pandemia de COVID-19, OHCS busco y recibio flexibilidad de la legislatura de Oregon para asignár $42 millones de ESG-CV para los proveedores que antes no eran eligible. HB 4304 (Segunda Sesión Especial) proporciona OHCS la abilidad de competitivamente asignár los recursos de ESG-CV a organizaciones que son culturamente especificos, organizaciones sin animo de lucro, autoridades de vivienda publica y el govierno local para expander el alcance de los servicios a las comunidades mas desporpocionadamente afectados por COVID-19 y la instabilidad de vivienda. En el principio de este año, OHCS asigno $13.7 millones en fondos de ESG-CV para las Agencias de Acción de Comunidades regionales.

“Asegurando que tenemos equidad en la distribución de fondos es crítico,” dice Directora Bell. “Estoy emocionada por las oportunidades adicionales de asociar con los proveedores que estan trayendo estrategias diversas y pericia sobre todo el estado para incrementar servicios que la gente de Oregon necesita. Estos recursos y nuevas asociacones van a avanzar el Plan de Vivienda para el Estado de Oregon y va a mover a Oregon mas cerca de hacer una sistema en que todos tengan un lugar seguro y estabil que pueden llamar un hogar.”

Sobre el pasado año, la División de Estabilización de Vivienda de OHCS ha distribuido niveles récord de fondos a comunidades locales para proporcionar estabilización de vivienda y refugio de emergencia a la gente de Oregon. Esta asignación competitiva de ESG-CV abordará la carencia de hogar con refugio de emergencias, conectando con la comunidad, realojamiento rapida, y prevencion para familias en riesgo de pasar por carencia de hogar. Estos recursos adicionales van a incluir abordar los impactos disporcionados de COVID-19 en las comunidades de color y otras populaciones en riesgo.

Organizaciones que ya están proporcionado servicios de regufio seguro, realojamiento o asistencia de prevencion de carencia de hogar a hogares en riesgo de pasar por carencia de hogar podrían estar eligible. La aplicación cierra a las 3 pm (PST) en Diciembre 27. Solicitantes tienen que cumplir con las definiciones del financiamiento federal o con los requisitos de la Subvención Federal de ESG para recibir fondos.  Para leer mas sobre la criteria de financiamiento y acesso a el proceso de la aplicación, puedes visitar el sitio de Oregon Housing and Community Services.

 

 

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Oregon reports 1,151 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/20 2:47 PM

Dec. 3, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,151 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 21 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 973, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,151 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 79,293.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (10), Benton (10), Clackamas (111), Clatsop (9), Columbia (5), Coos (6), Crook (4), Curry (7), Deschutes (42), Douglas (17), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (11), Jefferson (4), Josephine (1), Klamath (21), Lake (2), Lane (80), Lincoln (9), Linn (42), Malheur (13), Marion (113), Morrow (4), Multnomah (292), Polk (12), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (36), Union (6), Wasco (11), Washington (245), and Yamhill (21).

NOTE: Oregon’s 923rd and 947th COVID-19 deaths, reported on Dec. 1 and Dec. 2, are the same person. The numbers have been adjusted accordingly. OHA regrets this error. Oregon’s 858th COVID-19 death, reported on Nov. 25, was incorrectly listed as a resident of Multnomah County. He was a resident of Hood River County. OHA regrets this error.

Oregon’s 953rd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 14 and died on Nov. 26 at Tuality Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 954th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 955th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Nov. 22 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 956th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Nov. 24 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 957th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 23 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 958th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 25 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 959th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Dec. 1 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 960th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Nov. 27 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 961st COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Nov. 25 at Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 962nd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Dec. 2. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 963rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died on Dec. 1 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 964th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Nov. 30 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 965th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 28 and died on Dec. 1 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 966th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Dec. 1 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 967th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died on Dec. 2 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 968th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 17 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 969th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 28 and died on Dec. 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 970th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 30 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 971st COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Nov. 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 972nd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Dec. 1 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 973rd COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 25 at Grande Ronde Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Daily COVID-19 hospitalizations increase

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 559, 10 more than yesterday. There are 109 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds. That is four more than yesterday.


OHA monitoring weekly indicators of COVID-19 disease spread

In addition to county COVID-19 risk levels, OHA is monitoring weekly indicators of COVID-19 disease spread in Oregon and our public health response.

  • Indicators of COVID-19 Disease Spread
    • Percentage of emergency department visits for COVID-19-like Illness (CLI): Oregon has updated the ESSENCE query to increase sensitivity and specificity, and align with national reporting. The new query has also been applied to the emergency department visit counts on the Daily Update.
    • Number of COVID-19 cases admitted to a hospital each week: Presenting weekly public health indicator data allows OHA to present county-level trends and improves readability of trends over time.
    • Number of congregate living facilities with active outbreaks: These data may be found in the Weekly Outbreak Report
  • Indicators of Public Health Response
    • Percent of cases in last with follow-up within 24 hours: Weekly county-level data have been added.
    • Percent of cases traced to a known source: Weekly county-level data have been added.

OHA corrects total case count

Wednesday’s reported daily case count did not reflect the total number of cases due to a processing glitch where cases were created without a case date.

This resulted in a difference of 262 cases between daily case count and the total number of cases. The total daily case count is 78,160 and this figure is accurately reflected in the Tableau dashboards.


Lab reporting change provides additional benefit

As Oregon Health Authority adapts how it reports COVID test results to align with Governor Kate Brown’s new framework effective today, OHA anticipates an additional benefit. The change will eliminate some of the recent issues processing laboratory test reports because OHA will need only to process positive test results in the database. Negative results will be counted in the Electronic Lab Results (ELRs) totals.

The Oregon communicable disease reporting system was designed to collect information for reportable diseases (i.e. cases), with information reported by laboratories and collected by case investigators during the course of a case interview.

The system allows OHA to collect demographic and risk information, establish epidemiologic links between cases, identify cases who need additional wraparound services, and collect information on close contacts.

Because all COVID-19 results are reportable in Oregon, OHA has strained the database capabilities by using it for an additional purpose – keeping track of how many people tested negative for COVID-19. The volume of records slowed down the system.

OHA is reestablishing the database for its intended purpose—to only track cases. Test results will remain in the system, but OHA will only create cases for those who test positive. This allows OHA to alleviate the performance issues, track cases and calculate a test-based percent positivity.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Bend Resident Sentenced To Seven Years In Federal Prison For Child Pornography
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/03/20 12:52 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Bend, Oregon resident was sentenced to federal prison today for possessing and distributing child pornography, chatting online about having sex with minors, and engaging in a campaign of online harassment and threats, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Pierce Matthew Morrow, 25, was sentenced to 87 months in federal prison and ten years’ supervised release.

“The pursuit of individuals who post sexual images of children online is one of our highest priorities”, said U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams. “There was significant emotional harm inflicted by this defendant on the people he pursued, harassed and impersonated and the children whose images he posted online.”

"This case is disturbing. Morrow's relentless, aggressive, and threatening behavior toward his victims - locally and in other parts of the country - shows the depths to which he would go to hurt others," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "If you are a victim of a sexual predator or sextortion scheme, please reach out to us. We want to help you and protect other potential victims."

            According to court documents, during the period of July 2017 to January 2018, Morrow participated in the “Kid Porn Trade” Kik group, whose members posted images, videos and links containing child pornography. Morrow started Kik and Grindr chats by sharing an image of a 12-16 year old nude boy – who Morrow sometimes pretended to be in order to bait the other person.  Using his knowledge of his peers from growing up in Bend, Morrow harassed multiple people online, sometimes managing to acquire nude images of them and making threats to obtain more.

            Morrow openly assumed the identity of another person in making online threats, resulting in a victim believing that person, not Morrow, was harassing them. Morrow’s victims made reports and complaints to the police and to social media providers about the continuous threatening messages. Morrow skillfully inflicted harm on others, preying on young men’s fears and vulnerabilities, embarrassing them, threatening them, exposing and hurting them.

            In a January 2018 chat between Morrow and a young adult male, Morrow sent unsolicited images of child pornography and encouraged the other man to consider sex with children. Morrow mixed child pornography with online stalking, solicitation and enticement of others with similar interests.

On July 1, 2020 Morrow was charged by criminal information with distributing child pornography, and on September 2, 2020 Morrow pleaded guilty to the charge.

            The FBI investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Jeff Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: Sentence-Morrow-Final

Umpqua Bank: Fight Fraud by Knowing What Your Bank Won't Ask You
Umpqua Bank - 12/03/20 11:50 AM

According to recent Federal Trade Commission reporting, Americans lost nearly $667 million to imposter scams and $1.9 billion overall to fraud in 2019 (a 28% increase from 2018)—and early reports indicate those numbers will be much higher for 2020. Unfortunately, whether businesses or consumers, no one is fully immune to criminal imposters or other attempted fraud (e.g., email phishingscams targeting elderly adults). This is primarily because fraudsters are adept at getting people to provide them with sensitive information about their consumer or business accounts.  

According to Kathryn Albright, Umpqua Bank’s head of global payments & deposits, “Two of the most important ways to avoid becoming a victim of fraud are knowing the red flags of being targeted and understanding the kinds of information your bank will never call and ask you to provide.” 

Around the world, criminals actively target customers at all income levels to access and drain financial accounts. One of the easiest ways for them to get that access from you is by posing as your bank or an employee at your bank and exploiting the trust between both parties.  

Specifically, fraudsters are increasingly posing as bankers with a seemingly legitimate, often urgent, reason for reaching out to customers and requesting sensitive information. When successful, these scams often result in identity theft, business disruptions, and monetary losses for victims.  

The following are examples of things fraudsters want but a bank will never ask you to provide unexpectedly via email, text message, or phone call:  

  • Online banking login credentials  
  • Account numbers 
  • Payment card details (e.g., full card number, PIN) 
  • Contact information (e.g., phone numbers, home addresses, email addresses)
  • Personally identifiable information (e.g., Social Security number, driver's license number) 
  • Secure access codes (one-time passcode) 

Fraudsters continue to refine their tactics to increase their success rates and to avoid detection. After all, getting ahold of sensitive information could lead to a virtual gold mine. But in each attempt, they’ll do their best to make you think it’s actually your bank contacting you. 

Here’s an example of a common process fraudsters follow when impersonating your bank:  

Step 1: The fraudster posing as a bank employee contacts you via email, text message, or phone call, claiming it’s an urgent situation (e.g., your account is unexpectedly locked, there’s an IT issue with your account). 

Step 2: The fraudster urgently requests that you reply with sensitive information to verify your account so that the situation can be resolved. 

Step 3: The fraudster then uses that information to withdraw funds from your now-compromised account(s). (Never, ever give this type of information to a person claiming to be from your bank who is unexpectedly contacting you.) 

“If you receive what you believe is a suspicious email, text message, or phone call from somebody claiming to be with your bank and who requests sensitive information, don’t respond,” said Albright“Instead, contact your bank directly using known, trusted contact information and alert your banker of the situation.” 

 

  


Social Determinants of Health Measurement Workgroup meets December 8
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/20 11:25 AM

December 3, 2020

Contact: Adrienne Mullock, 971-673-3384, ienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us">adrienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Social Determinants of Health Measurement Workgroup.

When: December 8, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Where: By call-in and Zoom only. The public may join remotely through Zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4311711742 and listen-only conference line at 669-900-9128, meeting ID 431 171 1742.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions, agenda; presentation: Measure Concepts Evaluation Survey results; public comment period (11:40-11:50 a.m.); vote on measure concept; break (12:20-12:35 p.m.); discussion: final report; discussion: other opportunities to advance social needs screening in the broader context; next steps; opportunities for workgroup members to stay engaged; closing activity (1:30-2 p.m.).

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/sdoh-measure.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Adrienne Mullock at 971-673-3384, or ienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us">adrienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Walla Walla Public Schools teams with Gesa on new branded debit card to support local students (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/03/20 10:33 AM
2020-12/1288/140532/Wade_Smith.jpg
2020-12/1288/140532/Wade_Smith.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1288/140532/thumb_Wade_Smith.jpg

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools has partnered with Gesa Credit Union on a co-branded Walla Walla High School debit card paving the way for Gesa members to earn funds to support local student programs and activities. Visit any Gesa Credit Union branch to get a Wa-Hi Visa Debit Card.

Every swipe of a Blue Devil branded debit card generates proceeds to be used to expand the district's Adopt-a-Blue Devil Program. This program ensures all district students, from transitional kindergarten to 12th grade, regardless of income or family circumstances, have the resources to fully participate in school-sponsored programs, activities or academic experiences. Examples of how the Adopt-a-Blue Devil Program can be used includes providing musical instrument supplies for students in need, purchasing cleats for soccer if a family can’t afford them, covering the cost of Advanced Placement exams for students who qualify for free and/or reduced lunch, and eliminating fees associated with industry certifications for families in need. 

“We continue to seek ways to remove barriers for students to participate and engage in all of our school programs and activities,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “Our strategic plan challenges the school district to support the social and emotional needs of all students in a safe and engaging manner and this partnership with Gesa directly aligns with this initiative.”

Visit the district’s website to learn more about the Adopt-a-Blue Devil Program:
•     https://www.wwps.org/programs/adopt-a-blue-devil-scholarship-program

The new Wa-Hi Visa Debit Card joins Gesa’s suite of 18 other high school co-branded affinity debit cards across Washington State. Last year Gesa members earned more than $227,000 for its partner school districts through branded debit cards, increasing the program’s cumulative donation total to more than $500,000.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-12/1288/140532/Wade_Smith.jpg , 2020-12/1288/140532/GESA_Blue_Devil_Debit_Card.jpg

Richland Arts Commission Seeks Feedback on Public Art (Photo)
City of Richland - 12/03/20 9:30 AM
2020-12/5957/140527/Copy_of_Copy_of_Public_Arts_Survey_Flyer.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/5957/140527/thumb_Copy_of_Copy_of_Public_Arts_Survey_Flyer.jpg

The City of Richland Arts Commission seeks to update the Public Arts Strategic Plan, which is one of the priorities in the City Council’s Strategic Leadership Plan

The Commission asks for the community’s feedback regarding murals, sculptures, roundabout art, benches, historic markers, performing arts, and more.
 
“We look forward to reviewing the input from our community,” states Commission Chair, Jeff Kissel. “Our commission is committed to considering all recommendations as we plan for the future of art in Richland.”
 
Citizens can take the survey by visiting www.ci.richland.wa.us/artscommission. Hard copies can also be obtained and turned in at the Richland Public Library. The survey is open now until midnight on January 15, 2020.
 
The Richland Arts Commission supports City Council in encouraging and supporting art within Richland to improve the quality of life, strengthen economic development, and revitalize the community. It is an advisory body to City Council and staff to provide expertise on visual and performing arts to enrich the cultural life of the community.




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/5957/140527/Copy_of_Copy_of_Public_Arts_Survey_Flyer.jpg

Video Lottery reopens in 11 Oregon counties
Oregon Lottery - 12/03/20 9:28 AM

Dec. 3, 2020 - Salem, Ore. As Oregon’s two-week COVID freeze transitioned into a new – four tier – monitoring structure today, Video Lottery terminals came back online in the 11 counties not identified as extreme risk.

Along with indoor dining, Video Lottery retailers in lower, moderate and higher risk counties may now open access to lottery terminals with the following safety requirements:

  • Video Lottery terminals must be at least six feet apart.
  • Lottery-approved barriers may substitute for physical spacing.
  • Only one player is allowed at a terminal.
  • Masks are required while playing Video Lottery terminals, unless actively eating or drinking.
  • Retailers must clean terminals between play sessions.

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M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Distributes Nearly $700,000 in Wildfire Relief Funding
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 12/03/20 8:51 AM

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Distributes Nearly $700,000 in Wildfire Relief Funding

 

Contributions made to nonprofits supporting individuals and families during community recovery

 

(Vancouver, WA) – The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust will contribute $680,000 to 12 nonprofits in Oregon and Washington serving individuals and families impacted by the deadly wildfires that swept through the region earlier this year. The funding decision was made at the nonprofit foundation’s most recent board meeting, and recipients were told of the contributions in the days leading up to the Thanksgiving holiday.

 

“We all know that 2020 has been an exceptionally hard year for so many in our region. To then see entire communities that we love be ravaged by once-in-a-century fires is heartbreaking,” said Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We also know that a years-long rebuilding process is just now getting underway. We are grateful to play a small role in supporting the organizations on the ground in these communities as they seek to help individuals and families begin anew.”

 

According to reports, the 2020 wildfire season was one of the most destructive in history throughout the Western United States. In total, 11 people were killed in Oregon as flames destroyed more than one million acres of land and thousands of homes and buildings. Similarly, the state of Washington saw more individual fires in one season than ever before as more than 713,000 acres burned, taking one life.

 

As rebuilding efforts begin, nonprofit organizations are working tirelessly to help address the needs of families and communities as they seek to navigate a season made all the more challenging against the complex backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. To support those serving this critical need, Emergency Fire Relief and Rebuilding Support contributions will be made by the Trust to the following organizations:

 

  • Salvation Army, Cascade Division                                                  
  • Catholic Charities of Oregon                                                         
  • American Red Cross of Northwest Oregon                                              
  • Northwest Division of Salvation Army                                          
  • Catholic Charities of Eastern Washington                                   
  • American Red Cross Northwest Region                                        
  • Community Foundation of North Central Washington              
  • United Way of Jackson County                                                      
  • Greater Douglas United Way (Douglas County)                                                  
  • Klamath Community Foundation                                                   
  • Teresa McCormick Center, Medford                                             
  • Northwest Relief Fund of the National Christian Foundation                                                                           

These donations are the second collection of emergency contributions made by the Murdock Trust this year. In addition to the Murdock Trust’s ongoing Strategic Project and Initiative Grants programs, which are awarded quarterly and have proceeded as planned through the year, the foundation has also awarded more than $15 million in emergency grants to nonprofits serving community needs in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

“We are so grateful for all of the organizations, agencies, business partners, school districts, faith communities and individual volunteers who sprang into action to serve the immediate needs of those affected, first by the COVID-19 pandemic and then by these fires,” said Moore. “We are grateful to play a small role in supporting these groups in these first moments of recovery, and we stand ready to continue to help strengthen and build the capacity of these groups and other nonprofits serving the diverse needs of our region during these unprecedented times.”

 

Due to capacity, distributions through this program are made by invitation only. Nonprofits that serve the Pacific Northwest community and are interested in pursuing a grant with the Murdock Trust are encouraged to review and consider a Strategic Project or Initative Grant. For more information and funding criteria, please visit our website: murdocktrust.org/grant-opportunities.

 

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 7,000 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

 

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Oregon State Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/03/20 8:51 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died November 30, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 80 and 90 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the eighteenth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,100 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Face coverings have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu-like symptoms, CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Oregon Cannabis Commission Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets December 10
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/20 8:00 AM

December 3, 2020

What: A public Zoom meeting of the Research and Leadership Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, Dec. 10, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom meeting call line: 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 973 4402.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Medicare open enrollment ends Monday, Dec. 7 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/03/20 7:30 AM
Oregon SHIBA
Oregon SHIBA
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(Salem) – Time is running our for people with Medicare to make changes to their health plans and prescription drug coverage for 2021. Medicare’s open enrollment period for 2021 benefits ends Monday, Dec. 7.

There are several things to take note of for the 2021 plan year. They are:

  • 29 prescription drug plans
  • A variety of Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, including a new Medicare Medical Savings Account MA option, are available in all Oregon counties (only two MA plan options are available in Baker, Gilliam, Harney, Lake, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, and Wallowa counties) 
  • Part D senior savings model for diabetic supplies
  • Acupuncture, telehealth, and other virtual services
  • End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans for 2021

Visit Medicare.gov/Plan-Compare to find 2021 health and drug plans, compare coverage options, or estimate Medicare costs. For more details, check out Medicare.gov or the 2021 Oregon Guide to Medicare Insurance Plans viewed online at dcbspage.org/2021guide.

The Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program is available to help beneficiaries understand their options. To find free, local Medicare counseling help, go to dcbspage.org/SHIBALOCAL or call 800-722-4134 (toll-free) to speak to a state-certified Medicare counselor.

SHIBA counselors can help Oregonians navigate the Medicare.gov Plan Finder tool to enter prescriptions and compare the cost and benefits of individual drug plans, provide enrollment guidance, and answer any other questions related to Medicare benefits. All of these services are available remotely statewide to ensure the safety of both clients and counselors.

Find local help by calling 800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting SHIBA.Oregon.gov. Follow SHIBA on Facebook and Twitter.

###

Oregon SHIBA is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.




Attached Media Files: Oregon SHIBA

Wed. 12/02/20
Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/02/20 5:08 PM
Donald W. Osborne
Donald W. Osborne
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/thumb_2020-12/1070/140514/Osborne_D.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Donald Wayne Osborne, died the afternoon of December 2, 2020. Osborne was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Osborne entered DOC custody on September 6, 2001, from Malheur County with an earliest release date of March 2, 2027. Osborne was 75 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 13,100 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Donald W. Osborne

Weekly cases, hospitalizations set new pandemic highs
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/20 4:36 PM

December 2, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly cases, hospitalizations set new pandemic highs

OHA’s COVID-19 weekly report released today, set new weekly highs for COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations for the second consecutive week.

OHA reported 9,100 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Nov. 23 through Sunday, Nov. 29, a 5% increase over the previous week.

Weekly hospitalizations associated with COVID-19 rose to 398, a 9% increase, a significant slowing from the previous week, yet still the highest weekly total reported during the pandemic.

There were 86 reported COVID-19 reported deaths, up from 61 the previous week.

People aged 20 to 49 have accounted for 55% of the cases, while people 70 and older have accounted for 74% of the deaths.

During the week of Nov. 22 to Nov. 28,141,356 COVID-19 tests were administered. The percentage of positive tests was 8.6%.


OHA announces changes to the Weekly report format.

Today marked the introduction of major new changes to the weekly report format. The most significant change is a separate report listing all active and resolved outbreaks in Oregon. This will be an ongoing format.

The second change centers around the reporting of COVID-19 cases by ZIP code. This will no longer be contained in the COVID-19 weekly report but will be available elsewhere online.


Oregon Cannabis Commission Health Equity Subcommittee meets December 9
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/20 4:27 PM

December 2, 2020

What: A public Zoom meeting of the Health Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Wednesday, Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom meeting call line: 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 207 3224.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets December 9
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/20 3:30 PM

December 2, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board is holding a brief public meeting to discuss the Acuity Interpretive Guidance.

Agenda:

  • Review and vote on draft Acuity Interpretive Guidance.
  • Summarize action items and upcoming board meetings.
  • Public comment.

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2-2:30 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 006 1771, passcode 095689.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-803-0914, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


State Land Board to Consider Elliott State Research Forest Proposal
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/02/20 3:25 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon State University will present an Elliott State Research Forest proposal to the State Land Board on Tuesday, Dec. 8.  

The State Land Board in December 2018 asked the Department of State Lands and OSU to explore transforming the Elliott State Forest into a publicly owned research forest. The research forest proposal was drafted over the next two years, with input from advisory committees, Tribes, state and local governments, stakeholders, and the public.

A successful proposal will be consistent with the Land Board’s vision for the forest, which includes keeping the forest publicly owned with public access; decoupling the forest from the Common School Fund and compensating the fund for the forest; continuing habitat conservation planning to protect species and allow for harvest; and providing for multiple forest benefits, including recreation, education and working forest research.

The State Land Board video meeting begins at 10 a.m. and will be livestreamed to the DSL YouTube channel.

The meeting agenda and materials, including the final research forest proposal and a summary of comments received, are available here. The public may submit written testimony or sign up to provide spoken testimony during the meeting. The deadline to sign up to testify is 10 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 7. Testimony information is also available here.

If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.


Oregon reports 1,244 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 18 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/20 2:37 PM

December 2, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,244 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 18 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 18 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 953, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,244 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 78,160.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (28), Clackamas (128), Clatsop (5), Columbia (13), Coos (10), Crook (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (30), Douglas (12), Grant (1), Harney (2), Hood River (16), Jackson (65), Jefferson (12), Josephine (11), Klamath (16), Lake (5), Lane (69), Lincoln (19), Linn (29), Malheur (26), Marion (122), Morrow (7), Multnomah (282), Polk (26), Tillamook (7), Umatilla (61), Union (12), Wallowa (1), Wasco (4), Washington (184), Wheeler (1) and Yamhill (28).

NOTE: Oregon’s 882nd and 883rd COVID-19 deaths, reported on Nov. 26 and Nov. 27, are the same person. The numbers have been adjusted accordingly. OHA regrets this error.

Oregon’s 936th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 29 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 937th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 29. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 938th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Dec. 1. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 939th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 7 and died on Nov. 14. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 940th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 16. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 941st COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Hood River County who tested positive on Oct. 20 and died on Nov. 18. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 942nd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 28. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 943rd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died on Nov. 30. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 944th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 21. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 945th COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 26. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 946th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 7 and died on Nov. 20. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 947th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 29. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 948th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Dec. 1. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 949th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on Nov. 22 and died on Nov. 27 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 950th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 26 and died on Nov. 26 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 951st COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died on Nov. 28. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 952nd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on Nov. 28 and died on Nov. 30 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 953rd COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died on Nov. 27 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.


Daily COVID-19 hospitalizations dropped

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon dropped to 549, 28 fewer than yesterday. There are 105 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds. That is six fewer than yesterday.

OHA email survey

Oregon Health Authority is sending a group of Oregonians who had COVID-19 an email survey to determine what services public health and local community-based organizations can provide to help those in isolation and quarantine. The responses are important because they will help OHA better assist Oregonians during their COVID-19 illness. All responses are confidential.

OHA to change COVID-19 test reporting

OHA is revising its process for reporting test results to align with the new statewide framework announced last week by Governor Kate Brown. The change will take effect tomorrow, Dec. 3.

This new health and safety framework is based on four risk levels for counties level of COVID-19 spread: extreme, high, moderate and low risk.

One of the key new metrics in determining the spread of the virus is the percentage of positive COVID-19 tests. To determine that, OHA will no longer count the people tested and will instead count test results. This change will provide a more complete picture of the spread of the disease in a community.

To support this change, and to maintain transparency in reporting on COVID-19, OHA is changing its public dashboards. That transition is expected to be complete in about two weeks. During that time, OHA will continue to update its Tableau dashboards on weekdays.

OHA has developed an interim dashboard that will report test results at the state and county levels until the new revised dashboard is deployed.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/02/20 1:39 PM
Michael A. Murray
Michael A. Murray
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1070/140500/thumb_Murray_M.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Michael Alvie Murray, died the morning of December 2, 2020. Murray was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed in the infirmary. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Murray entered DOC custody on August 8, 2013, from Jackson County with an earliest release date of April 20, 2021. Murray was 73 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 13,100 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Michael A. Murray

Oregonians are taking action; don't miss your chance for health coverage (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/02/20 11:43 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1073/140492/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.jpg

(Salem) – More than 38,000 Oregonians have enrolled in health coverage through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace for 2021 so far. Seventy-seven percent of those enrolled will receive tax credits averaging $510 per month in savings on monthly premiums. You still have time to enroll to get health coverage for 2021: The deadline is Tuesday, Dec. 15.

“Many Oregonians are taking advantage of big savings through HealthCare.gov for 2021 health coverage,” says Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Don’t assume you make too much to qualify. The only way to know how much you can save is to apply and select a plan by the Dec. 15 deadline.”

Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare can go to HealthCare.gov to see if they may qualify for help paying for 2021 coverage. Even if people are temporarily uninsured, they can sign up for help. The deadline to sign up to get health insurance for next year is Tuesday, Dec. 15.

Individuals making up to $51,040 per year and families of four making up to $104,800 may get help paying for coverage. In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. These savings lowered the average premium to just $145 per month.

Oregonians who would like help from an insurance agent or community partner organization that can help them complete the application and enroll should visit OregonHealthCare.gov/GetHelp. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Tue. 12/01/20
Public comment period opens for proposal to update rules affecting reservations for Oregon State Parks
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/01/20 5:45 PM

CLARIFICATION: The current reservation window is 30 days, a response to the uncertainties surrounding COVID-19. This is a temporary change from the typical nine month reservation window that is detailed in the administrative rule.

------------------------

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on a proposed change to the Oregon Administrative Rule guiding reservations for Oregon State Parks. The proposed changes would affect transaction fees and the reservation window.

The unprecedented process of closing all parks and canceling reservations in response to COVID-19 exposed a need for increased flexibility in reservation rules to enable the agency to respond nimbly to changing conditions. OPRD closed all parks March 23, 2020, and reopened in phases, with many campgrounds reopening June 9, 2020.

The proposed change to OAR 736-015-0015 includes implementing a flexible range of $0-$15 for transaction fees to make, change or cancel a reservation. Currently, customers are charged an $8 transaction fee for each reservation.

The proposal would also add flexibility to the reservation window, allowing the agency to vary the window from same-day reservations up to 18 months in advance. Not all sites would be open during the entire window, and neither the maximum nor the minimum ends of the range would necessarily be made available at any given time. Currently the rule sets the window from one day to nine months in advance across the system; however, a temporary 30-day window is in place due to COVID-19.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Jan. 15, 2021. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

The full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PRP-rulemaking. After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2021 business meeting.

 


(Corrected Link) ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick to Host Virtual LGBTQ Veteran Town Hall This Week
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 12/01/20 3:53 PM

Update: An earlier version of this release had a non-functioning link. It has been corrected.

Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) Director Kelly Fitzpatrick will host a live virtual town hall this week to discuss LGBTQ veterans’ services, answer questions and hear challenges experienced by LGBTQ veterans in Oregon.

Trained and federally accredited Veteran Service Officers and other benefits experts will also be on hand to provide direct assistance to participants and help connect them to disability compensation, LGBTQ-specific health care, behavioral health services, discharge upgrades and other earned benefits.

“Four years ago, Oregon made history as the first state to create an office dedicated to serving the unique needs of LGBTQ veterans,” said Fitzpatrick, who is the first woman and first lesbian to lead the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs. “We are proud of the strength and diversity of our Oregon veteran community, but we know our work is not done until every veteran has access to the benefits and resources they have earned through their service.”

“At ODVA, our mission is to serve and advocate for all Oregon veterans. We hope many LGBTQ veterans will be able to join in this safe, inclusive conversation, so we can provide direct support to them as well as deepen our own understanding of the challenges they and their families face in these unprecedented times,” Fitzpatrick said.

The event is part of a continuing series of virtual town halls the agency is holding to connect with the statewide veteran community, which began with the first-ever Virtual Women Veterans Town Hall that Fitzpatrick hosted in November.

The Virtual LGBTQ Veterans Town Hall will be held at noon (PST) Friday, Dec. 4, via Zoom. You may register online at oregon.gov/odva/Connect/Pages/Townhalls.aspx. Submit questions for Director Fitzpatrick in advance by pre-registering or emailing vetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us">orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us.

Registration is recommended but not required. Callers and questions will be welcomed on a “first come, first served” basis. To call in for the meeting without registering, dial 888-788-0099, and use meeting ID 869 9140 1428. The passcode is 717322.

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Seahawks invite Melito Ramirez to raise 12th Man Flag (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 12/01/20 3:16 PM
2020-12/1288/140478/Melito_Ramirez.jpg
2020-12/1288/140478/Melito_Ramirez.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1288/140478/thumb_Melito_Ramirez.jpg

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla High School Intervention Specialist Melito Ramirez, who was recently named the 2020 Washington Classified School Employee of the Year, has been invited by the Seattle Seahawks to virtually raise the “12th Man Flag” for Sunday’s game against the New York Giants.

Ramirez will raise the flag Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 10 a.m. in front of Walla Walla High School. Staff from the
school’s 21st Century Afterschool program will be filming drone and close-up shots of Ramirez as he raises the flag. All of the raw video footage will be sent to the Seattle Seahawks’ video team for production.

Ramirez has dedicated the past four decades working professionally to support students and families in the Walla Walla valley and the past 12 years as an Intervention Specialist for Walla Walla Public Schools. Ramirez will continue on to the national competition being the first Washington Classified School Employee of the Year to compete for the Recognizing Inspirational School Employees (RISE) award, administered by the U.S. Department of Education.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-12/1288/140478/Melito_Ramirez.jpg

Oregon Hospitals Decry Governor's Proposed Budget Cuts
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 12/01/20 1:14 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Michael Cox, (916) 799-6784, mcox@oahhs.org

Oregon Hospitals Decry Governor’s Proposed Budget Cuts

Direct cuts to hospitals will force hospitals to reduce services to Oregonians during a pandemic.

Lake Oswego, Ore. – December 1, 2020 – Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, released the following statement on hospital cuts proposed by the Governor Kate Brown.

“The Governor’s budget reflects her priorities and choices. She has chosen to propose direct cuts to hospitals in the midst of the biggest public health crisis in a century. Cuts of this magnitude could force hospitals to reduce services to Oregonians during a pandemic. These cuts cannot be justified. Hospitals led the effort to secure new revenue for the Oregon Health Plan through the passage of M108, which secured $100 million in new revenue for this budget and $300 million for the next biennium.

“Throughout her budget, she specifically targets hospitals at a time when COVID-19 hospitalizations are rising, hospitals are reducing elective procedures, and Oregonians are counting on local hospitals to care for them and their family members. We should be coming together as a community to respond to this pandemic to serve all Oregonians, but this budget does not reflect that spirit of collaboration.

“In addition to addressing COVID-19, hospitals across Oregon have been affected this year by historic fires (which led to the evacuation of five hospitals) and global cyberattacks (which forced at least one hospital to operate on paper for weeks). Over the first six months of 2020, net patient revenue fell about 21% compared to the beginning of the year and stands at its lowest since 2016. As CARES Act funds are depleted (or may be needed to be returned based on latest Provider Relief Reporting guidelines), without additional emergency funds or a steep increase in net patient revenue, the financial situation of community hospitals in Oregon may become more precarious in the months ahead.

“If enacted, the Governor’s budget will exacerbate an already uncertain financial situation for many hospitals. Reductions of this magnitude are likely to cause hospitals to cut services, impacting access to care for vulnerable Oregonians.” 

                                                                                           ###

About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.


Oregon reports 1,233 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 24 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/01/20 1:12 PM

December 1, 2020

Oregon reports 1,233 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 24 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 24 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 936, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Today’s reported deaths are the highest for a single day since the pandemic. OHA extends its condolences to all who have lost a loved one to COVID-19. Today’s grim milestone is another reminder of the severity and spread of the disease and the importance for all Oregonians wear masks, keep physical distance and to keep gatherings small.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,233 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 76,654.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (19), Clackamas (148), Clatsop (7), Columbia (6), Coos (14), Crook (4), Curry (6), Deschutes (60), Douglas (8), Grant (3), Harney (2), Hood River (12), Jackson (72), Jefferson (19), Josephine (11), Klamath (37), Lake (5), Lane (75), Lincoln (21), Linn (27), Malheur (11), Marion (146), Morrow (5), Multnomah (270), Polk (24), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (23), Union (9), Wasco (6), Washington (158), Wheeler (2), and Yamhill (14).

Oregon’s 913th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Baker County who tested positive on Nov. 26 and died Nov. 26. His place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 914th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 20 and died Oct. 28, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 915th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 23 and died Nov. 21, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 916th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died Nov. 23, at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 917th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Nov. 29, at Portland Adventist Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 918th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died Nov.17, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 919th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Multnomah County who died Nov. 17, in her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 920th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died Nov. 29, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 921st COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died Nov. 29, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 922nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Multnomah County who died Nov. 25 in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. The presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 923rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Multnomah County who died Nov. 20 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. The presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 924th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died Nov. 27, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 925th COVID-19 death an 87-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Nov. 21 and died Nov. 26, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 926th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died Nov. 4. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 927th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died Nov. 19, in her residence. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 928th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who became symptomatic on Nov.16, after contact with a confirmed case and died Nov. 26 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 929th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Nov. 27 and died Nov. 28, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 930th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died Nov. 25, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 931st COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died Nov. 29, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 932nd COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 29, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 933rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died Nov. 29, at Asante Rogue Valley Medical Center in Medford. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 934th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 28, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 935th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died Nov. 29, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 936th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died Nov. 18, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Note: The number of people who test negative for COVID-19 reported yesterday and today is unusually low because a technical issue has created a backlog of unprocessed test results.

The processing issue also has created an artificially high positivity rate today. OHA is working through the backlog of unprocessed test results.

Daily COVID-19 hospitalizations dropped slightly

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon dropped to 577, seven fewer than yesterday. There are 111 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds. That is six fewer than yesterday.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Bonneville Power Administration announces proposed 2022-23 rates
Bonneville Power Administration - 12/01/20 12:42 PM

BPA proposes debt reduction measures to augment cost containment

Power rates expected to stay relatively flat – Transmission rates expected to rise

Portland, Oregon – The Bonneville Power Administration is maintaining its commitment to keeping its wholesale rates low as possible consistent with sound business principles, striking a balance between cost containment, long-term financial health and spending to meet the needs of its customers.

BPA’s proposed rates are expected to lay the foundation for a decrease in debt service costs over time, which in turn will help to keep power and transmission rates low in the future.

“Fiscal discipline and customer satisfaction are the foundation for a prosperous future for BPA and the entities we serve,” said BPA Acting Administrator John Hairston. “Sticking to the principles laid out in our agency strategy has allowed us to bolster our financial health. Today’s proposal should make us even stronger.”

The proposal officially kicks off BPA’s BP-22 Rate Case and TC-22 Tariff Proceeding. The rate process culminates in July 2021 with a final proposal that, if approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, becomes effective Oct. 1, 2021 for rates through Sept. 30, 2023.

Power rates

For the BP-22 rate period, BPA is proposing to keep its power rates flat. For several years, BPA has cut expenses to ward off market and operational factors that created upward rate pressure. The commitment to cost-containment has paid off.

BPA’s proposed flat wholesale power rate is a blended average; individual rate impacts may vary based on specific customer-utility factors as will the corresponding retail rates set by BPA’s utility customers.

Even with no power rate increase, BPA is able to take measurable steps towards meeting its long-term strategic objectives.   BPA will be proposing to pay in current rates a portion of its capital program rather than borrow for these projects.  This practice, referred to as “revenue financing,” will dampen the impact rising debt would have on future power rates and preserve BPA’s valuable borrowing authority. 

Under current projections, BPA is able to propose up to $190 million of revenue finance in the BP-22 power rates without incurring any additional rate pressure. 

“Our commitment to being a provider of choice for our customers beyond 2028 starts with us having a competitive product, said Hairston. “The more debt we can avoid now pays off with lower costs in the future. Using some of the money we anticipate making instead of borrowing relieves that potential future pressure. It also preserves low-cost federal funds available to us into the future, which is essential to BPA’s operations.

The proposal to revenue finance contains safeguards to preserve BPA’s proposal to hold power rates  flat, including rate provisions that effectively redeploy the additional funding to preserve rate stability if BPA’s financial position changes.    

Transmission rates

For BP-22, BPA is proposing a weighted average increase of approximately 11.6% relative to current rates.  This reflects an increase at or below the rate of inflation for personnel and IT costs. It also includes the expiration of the use of financial reserves for the rates in the BP-20 settlement, and BPA beginning to revenue finance part of the Transmission capital program. 

In the BP-20 proceeding, BPA and customers agreed to a settlement of transmission rates for the FY 2020-2021 rate period, and current transmission rates levels reflect the use of financial reserves.  The proposed rate levels for BP-22 reflect the expiration of the use of financial reserves at the end of FY 2021.

In addition, the BP-22 proposal also begins to revenue finance a small part of the Transmission capital program.  Historical Transmission rates have reflected a 100% financing approach for transmission capital needs as well as paying back less than borrowed on an annual basis.  This has resulted in a growing percentage of the revenues devoted to debt service over time as well as significantly depleting the agency’s access to borrowing authority. 

Without significant changes in capital spending and capital funding, like the revenue financing proposed, BPA expects it will drop below a healthy amount of remaining borrowing authority by 2024 and would completely exhaust its federal U.S. Treasury borrowing authority by 2032. The measures included in today’s proposal help to start addressing the access to capital challenge and allows us time to have conversations with our customers to develop a long term strategy.   

Even with the proposed increases, BPA’s transmission rates would still be on par with or lower than other Northwest transmission owners.

BPA tariff proceeding

BPA’s tariff sets the terms and conditions for using BPA transmission.  This initial proposal reflects the extensive discussions BPA has conducted with the region since October 2019.  The tariff changes BPA is proposing would clarify and reflect customer obligations, improve customer service through study and planning processes and would prepare BPA for possible participation in other markets.  In addition, some of the tariff proposals move us closer in alignment with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s pro forma tariff or industry standards, consistent with the agency’s strategic direction.

BPA will also offer proposed tariff language for participation in the Western Energy Imbalance Market. While there is no pro forma EIM tariff language, FERC has approved EIM tariff language for several Northwest entities. BPA has modeled its language after that used by Portland General Electric, which is the most recent Northwest company to get its EIM tariff language approved.


About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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Roseburg contractor fined $42,000 for continued job safety violations (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/01/20 12:20 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1073/140468/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has fined a Roseburg contractor for the second time in as many months as the company continues to fumble basic workplace safety standards that protect workers from falls that could kill them.

In fact, Mid Oregon Builders LLC has a history of failure when it comes to following a straightforward and reliable requirement: Implementing adequate fall protection systems where workers are exposed to falling six feet or more to a lower level.

“There is absolutely no good reason for an employer to neglect fall protection requirements that are proven to protect workers,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “To repeatedly choose to disregard them is inexcusable. It serves only to leave preventable hazards unaddressed and people’s lives at increased risk.”

The most recent citation – issued in November and carrying a penalty of $42,000 – resulted from an inspection that found the company had exposed an employee to a potential fall of about 20 feet. The employee, who was doing a roofing job on a new house in Sutherlin, was not connected to a fall protection lifeline.

The citation is on top of another issued in September. In that case, Oregon OSHA fined the company $38,390. That citation involved other workplace safety violations. But the bulk of it – $36,000 – stemmed from Mid Oregon Builders’ repeated failure to heed the same six-foot trigger-height requirements for fall protection.

The gravity of the situation cannot be overstated: Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Yet, Mid Oregon Builders has violated the same fall protection rule five times since July 2018.

In one case, the company provided no fall protection systems to four employees working on a framing job. They were working more than nine feet above a lower level.

In another case – also a framing job – the company provide no type of protection, exposing two employees to a potential fall of about 10 feet to lower levels. In yet another case, Mid-Oregon Builders left two employees unconnected to their fall protection lifelines. The workers were two stories up on a roof, exposed to a potential fall of 21 feet to the ground.

From just its history of violating the six-foot trigger-height requirements, Mid-Oregon Builders has incurred penalties totaling more than $120,000. Under Oregon OSHA’s rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division’s Fall Protection Suite of online video training and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protection.

Learn more about help provided by Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, technical staff, and additional education and training services.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 12/01/20 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing, Focus Adjudication and more on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Dec. 2. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/930/140448/12.02.20_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Klamath Falls logging firm is named Eastern Oregon Operator of the Year for 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 12/01/20 11:37 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Three Oregon loggers representing eastern, southwest and northwest Oregon have been chosen as 2020 Operators of the Year. The Oregon Board of Forestry will honor the recipients virtually at its Jan. 6 meeting in Salem. The awardees are:

  • Eastern Oregon – Darrell Jacobs Trucking, Inc. of Klamath Falls
  • Southwest Oregon – D & H Logging Company of Coos Bay
  • Northwest Oregon – C & C Logging, LLC of Kelso, Wash.

Regional Forest Practices committees select the forest operators of the year and merit award recipients from among nominees sent in by landowners, Oregon Department of Forestry staff and others. The award recognizes forest operators who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. The awards honor operators who consistently meet or exceed Forest Practices Act regulations. Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year can be viewed on the ODF website at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Private Forests Division Chief Kyle Abraham said, “Oregonians and people nationwide are counting on forest operators to provide the wood products we all need and use in our daily lives. We also count on them while harvesting to protect the soil and water in those forests as well as habitat for threatened and endangered species. These operators have shown an outstanding ability to do both while meeting landowner objectives. We’re pleased to recognize the leadership they show in exercising extraordinary care and diligence during even the most challenging harvest operations.”

Eastern Oregon

Klamath Falls-based Darrell Jacobs Trucking, Inc., earned the Operator of the Year for Eastern Oregon award for decades of consistently applying best management practices to safeguard forest resources. In particular, the company was recognized for working with multiple small woodland owners on a forest health improvement and fuels reduction project. The project was in the Copperfield Draw area of Klamath County. While conducting the operation to thin overcrowded forests, the operator protected the wet and riparian areas, was thoughtful in the operational layout to protect soils, reduced smoke emissions through biomass utilization, enhanced mule deer habitat through forage manipulation, and went above and beyond to engage with landowners, respect their wishes and keep them informed.

Southwest Oregon

D & H Logging Company of Coos Bay was recognized as Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon. Run by three siblings who inherited the company from their parents, this firm successfully harvested a unit using a difficult downhill logging method because steep rocky bluffs made the more traditional uphill yarding method too dangerous. Crews did an excellent job minimizing disruption to traffic on the road below the harvest site, and of protecting trees bordering a nearby salmon-bearing stream. They also worked to finish logging before the start of spring nesting season for three different important bird species in the area. The award also recognizes D & H Logging for a history of consistently applying best management practices to safeguard forest resources, even under challenging circumstances.

Recognized with Merit Awards by the Southwest Regional Forest Practices Committee were two other logging firms:

  • Weber Logging & Construction, Inc. of Roseburg
  • Rocky Wardle Excavating of Rogue River

Northwest Oregon

The Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon is C & C Logging, LLC of Kelso, Wash. The family-owned firm was honored for continually advancing logging by developing, testing and adopting new logging technologies. Examples include using camera-guided carriage grappler systems for bringing logs to landing sites, eliminating the need for on-the-ground personnel to do the dangerous job of hooking cables to the logs. C & C was an early adopter of drones to carry cables to anchor points, eliminating one of the more hazardous and time-consuming tasks loggers have to perform. The firm also protects special environmental sites, such as wetlands, stream buffers and nesting areas of protected species by having its heavy equipment operators employ precise GIS maps on phones or tablets in their cab so they can identify and maneuver around those locations.

The Northwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee also issued Merit Awards to:

  • J.M. Browning Logging, Inc., of Astoria
  • Greg Johnson Logging of Blodgett
  • Greenup Enterprises, Inc. of Estacada
  • Wayne Stone Logging, Inc. of Sandy

Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

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Bend Resident Sentenced To Federal Prison For Phoning In A Hoax Threat Of A Bomb In The Deschutes County Courthouse (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/01/20 11:26 AM
Photo of Hoax Bomb- Cameron
Photo of Hoax Bomb- Cameron
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/6325/140460/thumb_Cameron_Hoax_Bomb.jpg

EUGENE, Ore.—A Bend, Oregon resident was sentenced to federal prison today for crafting a hoax bomb and phoning in a threat to blow up the Deschutes County Courthouse on July 29, 2019, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Kellie Kent Cameron, 32 was sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release. As part of his sentence, Cameron was also ordered to pay $43,620.18 in restitution to the Deschutes County Circuit Court, Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, First Interstate Bank in Bend, and Bend Fire & Rescue.

“Constructing a hoax bomb and threatening to blow up a courthouse to interfere with a judicial proceeding, is beyond reprehensible” said U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Courthouses are the very symbol of justice, safety and fairness in a functioning society, and this unconscionable act not only caused fear, panic and disruption in this community, it jeopardized their sense of safety.”

"Hoax devices cause real-world damage. They cost money for first responders and businesses, and they create fear for those who live and work in the area. The device that Cameron built - and the 911 calls he made - did both. If you become aware of a potential threat, we encourage you to contact the FBI or local law enforcement right away," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

            According to court documents, on or about July 28 to July 29, 2019, Cameron and co-defendant Jonathon Tyler Allen, also of Bend, conspired with one another to shut down the Deschutes County Courthouse in Bend by planting a fake bomb and calling in a bomb threat. Around the same time, Cameron constructed a realistic looking fake bomb using batteries, wiring, a circuit board, and a fuel filter, among other materials.

 

Early on the morning of July 29, 2019, Cameron and Allen drove to the courthouse and placed the hoax device on a ramp near the building. Cameron used a cell phone to call 911 and told the operator, “I just want to let you know that there are two bombs, one’s in the courthouse and good luck finding the other one.”  Less than an hour later, Cameron called 911 and repeated his threat using more urgent and profanity-laden language. As a result of defendant’s threat, the Deschutes County Courthouse, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s office, a bank, and other nearby businesses were shut down and evacuated while first responders rushed to the scene and investigated the threat. When the device was discovered, a bomb squad, used disabling techniques to prevent an explosion. The device was later dismantled and found to be a hoax.

On August 7, 2019, Cameron and Allen were charged by criminal complaint with conspiring to make a threat to damage property and conveying false information and hoaxes. Cameron plead guilty in federal court on August 21, 2020 to using a telephone to make a threat to damage a building by means of an explosive.

            This case was investigated by the FBI, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, and the Bend Police Department, and was prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik and William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

For more information on what to do if you become aware of a potential threat, check out the FBI's webpage on hoax threats.  (https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/hoax-threats-awareness-100518) Those wishing to report a tip to the FBI can do so by calling the nearest office or submitting information online at tips.fbi.gov

 

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Attached Media Files: Sentencing-Cameron , Photo of Hoax Bomb- Cameron

Health Care Workforce Committee meets December 3
Oregon Health Authority - 12/01/20 9:26 AM

December 1, 2020

Contact: Jaime Taylor, 503-689-7926, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee.

When: December 3, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom or teleconference. The public can join via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601441888?pwd=K2NnWGxMRk9NeTRGVTlwSS9ZK0kxdz09 or by mobile device at +16692545252,,1601441888#,,,,,,0#,,299180#

Agenda: Presentation, discussion and feedback on the Health Care Workforce Needs Assessment; other items; public comment 1:25-1:30 p.m.

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions).
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503-689-7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Two insurance companies fined for COVID-19 emergency order violations
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/01/20 9:10 AM

Salem – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services issued civil penalties against Allstate Insurance Company and Root Insurance Company for violating the department’s COVID-19 emergency orders. The department’s Division of Financial Regulation handled the enforcement of the emergency orders.

Both insurers violated the state’s insurance emergency orders by either canceling or nonrenewing policies held by Oregonians while the emergency orders were in effect.

“We issued the COVID-19 emergency orders to provide Oregonians some financial relief and peace of mind during the early stages of the pandemic,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner and director of DCBS. “Violations of our emergency orders are taken seriously and we were pleased to see both insurers take steps to reinstate their customers.”   

The emergency orders were in effect from March 25 to Sept. 20, 2020. They required insurance companies to provide grace periods for paying premiums and prevented companies from canceling or nonrenewing Oregonians’ policies.

Allstate was fined $50,000 for issuing cancellations or nonrenewals for nonpayment of premium on 84 Oregon insurance policies. Root Insurance was fined $10,000 after its computer system automatically sent notices of nonrenewal to 100 people after their driving frequencies decreased. Both companies made efforts to reinstate the policies.

Several COVID-19 resources remain in effect for Oregonians. For details on COVID-19 rules and resources on health insurance and financial services, such as mortgages, visit the division’s COVID-19 consumer page or call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) for more information.

The department is also managing the State of Oregon COVID-19 Temporary Paid Leave Program. The program is available to people who need to quarantine or isolate because of COVID-19 exposure or are experiencing symptoms and need a medical diagnosis, but do not qualify for COVID-19-related paid sick leave. Visit the COVID-19 Temporary Paid Leave Program page or call 833-685-0850 (toll-free) for more information.

For more information on the division’s insurance and financial services enforcement actions, check out its quarterly summaries page – Taking Action.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense on Giving Tuesday (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 12/01/20 9:00 AM
TT - Giving Tuesday - GRAPHIC - December 1, 2020
TT - Giving Tuesday - GRAPHIC - December 1, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3585/140398/thumb_TT_-_Giving_Tuesday_-_GRAPHIC_-_December_1_2020.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against charity fraud. 

You made it through a COVID Thanksgiving, Black Friday, Cyber Monday and now – today – is Giving Tuesday. This movement – started eight years ago to honor generosity in a season that is all too often marked by commercialization  – is designed to encourage people to do good deeds. The day inspires some to physically help in their community while others mark the day with donations to charities.   

This year, in particular, our neighbors and communities can use help like never before. Even in a normal year, the AARP says one-third of all charitable giving happens in December, which makes the next few weeks a prime target for fraudsters. If you choose to donate money there are a few precautions you should take to ensure your funds are going where you intended. 

  • Donate to charities you know and trust.

  • Never click on links or open attachments in unsolicited emails, texts, or social media posts.

  • Verify the legitimacy of any solicitation by contacting the organization directly through a trusted contact number.

  • Do your research. Use the Federal Trade Commission's resources (https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/how-donate-wisely-and-avoid-charity-scams) to examine the track record of a charity.

  • Beware of organizations with copycat names similar to, but not exactly the same as, those of reputable charities.

  • Avoid charities that ask for you to pay by cash, gift card, virtual currency, or wire transfer.

  • Pay by credit card or write a check directly to the charity. Do not make checks payable to individuals.

  • Know that most legitimate charity websites end in .org rather than .com.

  • Make contributions directly, rather than relying on others to make a contribution on your behalf. 

With those tips in mind, you can safely bring a little bit of joy to those in need this holiday season. 

If you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Giving Tuesday - AUDIO - December 1, 2020 , TT - Giving Tuesday - GRAPHIC - December 1, 2020

Oregon State Police is Requesting the Public's Assistance with the Waste of a Bull Elk - Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/01/20 8:53 AM
2020-12/1002/140445/20201128_144624.jpg
2020-12/1002/140445/20201128_144624.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-12/1002/140445/thumb_20201128_144624.jpg

On November 28, 2020 an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded to the report of a bull elk that had been shot and left to waste. 

The elk was located on BLM land in the Pine Creek Unit near Halfway, OR.

Troopers believe that the elk was killed sometime between daylight and 1:30 P.M. on November 28, 2020.

If you have any information regarding this case please contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 and leave information for Sgt. Isaac Cyr. 

If you wish to remain anonymous you can also make contact through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888,  OSP (mobile) or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-12/1002/140445/20201128_144624.jpg

Mon. 11/30/20
Fatal Crash on Hwy 18 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 11/30/20 7:00 PM

On Monday, November 30, 2020, at approximately 11:40 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a multi-vehicle crash on Hwy 18 near milepost 33.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Mustang, operated by Clayton Gruber (26) of Dallas, was eastbound when it lost control, crossed into the westbound lane, and struck a Volkswagen Jetta operated by Keith Bacchetti (50) of Grand Ronde. 

The Mustang continued and struck a Toyota Rav 4 operated by Stanley Michelson (69) of Otis.

Bacchetti sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The passenger in the Volkswagen, Tawnya Bacchetti (52) of Grand Ronde, was transported to the hospital with injuries.

Michelson and his passenger, Kristen Michelson (61) of Otis, were not transported for injuries.

Gruber was transported to the hospital with injuries. 

Hwy 18 eastbound lanes were closed for approximately 4 hours following the crash with traffic detoured onto Hwy18B.

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, McMinnville Police Department, and Sheridan Fire Department.


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Nov. 30, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/30/20 6:36 PM
2020-11/3986/140440/2020-19-10_4562_MentalhealthMolalla_PL_01.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3986/140440/thumb_2020-19-10_4562_MentalhealthMolalla_PL_01.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has released the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 30, 2020. The pdf is attached. 

The next update will be distributed on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. 

PHOTO CAPTION:

Medford, Ore. - Nov. 24, 2020 - Manufactured housing units (MHU) and travel trailers line a staging site in Southern Oregon, waiting to be issued to people displaced by historic wildfires that destroyed homes throughout the state. FEMA supplies these temporary housing solutions to specific authorized counties after a major disaster. Photo by David Yost/FEMA

File: DLY_2560.jpg

Molalla, Ore. - October 20, 2020 - Jeffery Decker and his dog, Big Bear, provide mental health services to Clackamas County residents affected by the recent fires. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File: 2020-19-10_4562_MentalhealthMolalla_PL_01.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140440/Wildfire_Recovery_Update_11.30.2020.pdf , 2020-11/3986/140440/2020-19-10_4562_MentalhealthMolalla_PL_01.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140440/DLY_2560.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 31 - Lake County
Oregon State Police - 11/30/20 6:30 PM

On Monday, November 30, 2020 at approximately 7:15 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 31 near milepost 92.

Preliminary investigation revealed that in the evening of Sunday November 29, 2020 a Chevrolet Silverado, operated by Scott Brasher (37) of Bend, was southbound when it left the roadway, rolled, and struck a power pole.

Brasher sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by ODOT and the Paisley Disaster Unit.


Willow Creek Reservoir recreational use health advisory lifted
Oregon Health Authority - 11/30/20 4:57 PM

Nov. 30, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Willow Creek Reservoir recreational use health advisory lifted

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir in Morrow County. The OHA issued the advisory on September 3, 2020.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins in Willow Creek Reservoir are below recreational guideline values for people. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacteria blooms. This is because blooms can develop and disappear on any water body at any time when bloom conditions are favorable. Only a fraction of waterbodies in Oregon are monitored for blooms and toxins.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

Cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. When a bloom dies toxins released may reach into clear water around the bloom. Blooms can be pushed into other areas, leaving behind the toxins released. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


OHA accepting applications for Psilocybin Advisory Board
Oregon Health Authority - 11/30/20 4:20 PM

November 30, 2020

OHA accepting applications for Psilocybin Advisory Board

The Office of Governor Brown is seeking applicants for the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

OHA invites applications from people who meet the following criteria:

  • Local health officer.
  • Representative of a federally recognized Indian tribe.
  • Member of the OHA Addictions and Mental Health Planning and Advisory Council.
  • Member of the OHA Health Equity Policy Committee.
  • Member of the OHA Palliative Care and Quality of Life Interdisciplinary Advisory Council.
  • Individual who represents individuals who provide public health services.
  • Psychologist licensed under ORS chapter 675 who has professional experience engaging in the diagnosis or treatment of a mental, emotional, or behavioral condition.
  • Physician licensed under ORS chapter 677 who holds a degree of Doctor of Medicine.
  • Naturopathic physician licensed under ORS chapter 685.
  • Expert in the field of public health who has a background in academia.
  • Person who has professional experience conducting scientific research regarding the use of psychedelic compounds in clinical therapy.
  • Person who has experience in the field of mycology.
  • Person who has experience in the field of ethnobotany.
  • Person who has experience in the field of psychopharmacology.
  • Person who has experience in the field of psilocybin harm reduction.
  • Person representing the Oregon Liquor Control Commission who has experience working with the system developed and maintained by the commission under ORS 475B.177 for tracking the transfer of marijuana items.
  • Person representing the Oregon Department of Justice.
  • Member of the public.

To apply, submit the following documentation to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Jan. 1, 2021:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, which is available on the Governor’s office website at http://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

For more information, email in@dhsoha.state.or.us">oha.psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us or contact André Ourso, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-0404.

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Oregon reports 1,314 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 11/30/20 3:26 PM
2020-11/3687/140429/Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png
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Nov. 30, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,314 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 912, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,314 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 75,431.

“COVID-19 is spreading faster in all parts of Oregon. It took six months before 25,000 Oregonians became sick with COVID-19 and two months more until we reached 50,000 total COVID-19 infections in Oregon. Most recently, it took three weeks to go from 50,000 cases to 75,000 and this weekend we crossed 900 total deaths,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen.

“We can keep more people from getting sick and dying, if we stay true to science-based mask-wearing and social distancing. With the bright promise of vaccines coming on the horizon, we can’t give up.”

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (9), Clackamas (228), Clatsop (1), Columbia (14), Coos (4), Crook (4), Curry (2), Deschutes (54), Douglas (33), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (54), Jefferson (9), Josephine (20), Klamath (1), Lake (1), Lane (62), Lincoln (3), Linn (16), Malheur (2), Marion (167), Morrow (1), Multnomah (320), Polk (26), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (40), Union (6), Wasco (2), Washington (202), Yamhill (27)

Oregon’s 906th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died on Nov. 28 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 907th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died on Nov. 27 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 908th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Nov. 28 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 909th COVID-19 death is a 48-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 22 and died on Nov. 25 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 910th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 25 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 911th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 5 and died on Nov. 19 at Adventist Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 912th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 31 and died on Nov. 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 584, 45 more than yesterday.

There are 117 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, 10 more than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3687/140429/Hospitalized_COVID-19_positive_patients_by_date.png

Umpqua Bank Named Best U.S. Community Bank By Capital Finance International
Umpqua Bank - 11/30/20 3:22 PM

Company’s Human Digital Banking Strategy Recognized as Global Leader in Customer Experience Innovation for Consumers and Businesses

PORTLAND, Ore., (November 18, 2020) – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), has been named the Best Community Bank, U.S. 2020, by Capital Finance International for its Human Digital Banking strategy and support of consumer and businesses during the unprecedented disruptions of 2020. Launched in 2017, Umpqua’s Human Digital Banking strategy continues to earn global attention for the way it leverages technology to empower deeper customer relationships and deliver solutions more efficiently and at scale.

“The pandemic has brought into sharp focus the fact that human connection in the banking relationship is still needed and vital to the financial wellbeing of people, businesses and communities,” said Tory Nixon, Umpqua Bank president. “In the last few years, Umpqua’s commitment to elevating the power of that connection has inspired us to look at technology differently and to organize our company around the personal delivery of solutions customers truly need from bankers they know and trust. As a result, Umpqua was uniquely prepared to help people and businesses navigate the initial economic shock of the pandemic, and why we’re positioned to continue supporting them in the years ahead.”

Capital Finance International noted that Umpqua’s Go-To app, the industry’s first Human Digital Banking platform, has proven to be a uniquely powerful tool during the pandemic as consumer and small business customers continue to face uncertainty and disruption. Through Umpqua Go-To, customers can choose a banker devoted to their financial needs and engage with them in a secure chat environment to ask questions, troubleshoot accounts, and receive personal and small business advice for their specific financial situation. Umpqua Go-To enrollment and usage has increased nearly 40% in recent months. 

Umpqua also quickly mobilized operations and implemented Human Banking Digital solutions to become one of the first banks in the country ready to provide financial relief to struggling businesses through the federal Paycheck Protection Program. Banking teams and hundreds of associates worked around the clock to help thousands of businesses qualify for more than $2 billion in financial relief that helped West Coast companies save more than 250,000 jobs.

According to Capital Financial International:

In these troubled times, when a visit to the local branch is no longer a breeze or indeed risk-free, Umpqua Go-To…has proven to be an immensely powerful tool. So has the company’s investment in business and corporate bankers who – powered by smart digital solutions and Umpqua’s culture of service – helped roughly 17,000 West Coast businesses save more than 250,000 jobs as the pandemic hit. (Read more…)

Capital Finance International (CFI.co) is an international thought leader on global trends in business, economics, finance, and the leaders and companies driving change. Its award program seeks to identify and reward excellence and best practices from around the world to inspire others to improve their own performance. To learn more, visit https://cfi.co.  

About Umpqua Bank

Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the fifteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to small businesses.

 

 

 


WWPS Continues Graduation Success: Highest on-time Four and Five-year rates in recent history (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 11/30/20 1:46 PM
2020-11/1288/140421/Wade_Smith.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1288/140421/thumb_Wade_Smith.jpg

NOTE CORRECTION: The district's Hispanic/Latino Graduation Rate is 88%, not 87% as was noted in the previous release. Thank you for your attention to this correction. 

WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools’ on-time four year graduation rate reached an all-time high, jumping to 91.7% for the graduating Class of 2020. This is up 16.6% since the implementation of the district’s new strategic plan in 2016-17. According to data released from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Walla Public Schools’ five-year graduation rate also achieved its highest mark ever at 93.9 percent for the Class of 2019, up 8.1% since 2016-17.

“I’m so proud of our recent graduates and staff for staying engaged and focused on learning despite the many challenges COVID brought to our school system last spring,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “When the 2017-2022 Strategic Plan was established, school board members set a lofty target of reaching an 85% on-time graduation rate by 2022. We surpassed this benchmark three years early and continue to make annual improvement.”

The district has also closed the gap between student ethnic populations as the Hispanic/Latino graduate rate nears 88%, up almost 18% since the 2016-17 school year.

"Our strategic plan commits us to prioritizing equity and access for students and their families,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “These focused efforts continue to pay dividends in student success and outcomes as we close racial achievement gaps across our district."

Superintendent Smith credits the district's strategic plan, dedicated staff and deliberate efforts in keeping students connected and engaged in school for this historic data. “This is one of many indicators that take us one step closer to our vision of ‘Developing Washington’s Most Sought-after graduates’,” noted Smith.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1288/140421/Wade_Smith.jpg , 2020-11/1288/140421/Wade_Smith_98.jpg

Oregon State Police is Requesting the Public's Assistance in Identifying the Person(s) Responsible for the Unlawful Take and Waste of a Cow Elk -- Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/30/20 1:36 PM
2020-11/1002/140422/Elk_Pic_2.jpg
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On November 23, 2020 an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded to a report of a cow elk that had been killed and left to waste on Weyerhaeuser property.  The area is located off NW Flora Mainline Rd. near Steinberg Ridge in Yamhill County. 

It is believed the elk was killed and left to waste sometime on November 22, 2020.

The Oregon State Police is requesting that any person with information about this incident to contact the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 and leave information for Trooper Rod Thomas.

Individuals wishing to remain anonymous may also contact the Oregon State Police through the Turn in Poachers line at;

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us

(Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1002/140422/Elk_Pic_2.jpg , 2020-11/1002/140422/ELK_Pic_1.jpg

Supplemental Food Assistance Benefits to be Issued December 11
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/30/20 11:47 AM

The Oregon Department of Human Service will issue emergency supplemental allotments to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients on December 11.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these additional benefits as they will be placed directly on their Oregon EBT cards. Households receiving SNAP benefits will see the additional supplement to their benefits based on a maximum allotment scale. For example, if there are four individuals in a household and that household is currently receiving $500 in benefits, the supplement will raise their benefits to the maximum allowed for households of four, which is $680 per month – or an increase of $180. Total benefits will be different based on each household’s regular monthly allotment for the month of December. Households already at the maximum allotment will not receive an additional benefit supplement.

Household Size

Maximum Monthly Benefit Amount

1

$204

2

$374

3

$535

4

$680

5

$807

6

$969

7

$1,071

8

$1,224

Each additional person

$153


A second release of emergency supplemental allotments will take place on December 31 for anyone who began receiving SNAP benefits after December 11. Households only receive one allotment.

For more information about emergency supplemental allotments or to review frequently asked questions, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Oregonians who receive SNAP can contact their local Self-Sufficiency Programs, Aging and People with Disabilities, or Area Agency on Aging office for more information. Find a local office at oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx or call 2-1-1.

This is the eighth month Oregon has issued emergency supplemental allotments. Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance, and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


UPDATE -- Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Missing child Lydia Jazmin has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/30/20 10:46 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Lydia Jazmin.

Lydia Jazmin, age 16, is a foster child who went missing from Medford, Ore. on Nov. 11, 2020. They were found on Nov. 23, 2020.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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UPDATE -- Missing child Kyla Blackmore found by Oregon Department of Human Services
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/30/20 10:42 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Kyla Blackmore.

Kyla Blackmore, age 14, is a foster child who went missing from Medford, Ore. on Nov. 11, 2020. She was found on Nov. 20, 2020.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Oregon State Parks annual parking permit $5 off in December
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/30/20 10:05 AM

SALEM, Oregon Give the gift of unlimited access to Oregon's state parks with an annual day-use parking permit. Holiday shoppers can buy annual parking permits for only $25 each--that's $5 off the regular price of $30, Dec. 1-31.

“This is the only time we discount the annual pass,” said Lisa Sumption, director of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). “Celebrate the holidays with family and friends by giving a gift that opens the doors to Oregon’s special places.”

Purchasing passes is easy–buy them online at store.oregonstateparks.org. Parking permits are also sold at some state park friends' group stores and selected local businesses throughout the state. For a complete list of vendors, visit stateparks.oregon.gov.

Parking costs $5 a day at 25 Oregon state parks unless you have a 12- or 24-month parking permit or a same-day camping receipt. The 24-month pass is $50 and are also available at store.oregonstateparks.org. The permits are transferable from vehicle to vehicle.

The Oregon State Park system is funded by camping and day-use fees, the Oregon Lottery, and a portion of state recreational vehicle registrations. Our revenues have fallen during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you would like to donate along with your permit purchase, look for the Donate button at the top of store.oregonstateparks.org.

# # #


Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - December 4, 2020
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 11/30/20 9:45 AM

November 30, 2020

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, December 4, 2020.  The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uowii8KdRFyNz5LTR9jucQ

 

AGENDA:
9:00  Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 
9:05  Public Comment 
9:15  Meeting Minutes for Review –November 6, 2020
9:25  Homeownership Division Updates

  • Oregon Bond Loan Approval

9:35  Affordable Rental Housing Division Updates 

  • MF Housing Transactions
  • 2021 Amended Funding Calendar
  • Loan Guarantee Program

11:15  Report of the Director

  • Legislative and Governor’s Budget Update
  • Wildfire Response and Recovery Update
  • Coronavirus Relief Fund Spend Down

12:00  Report of the Chair
12:15  Meeting Adjourned
 

Please click here to access the meeting materials packet.


Joint construction safety task force continues to see low numbers of COVID-19 cases on construction jobsites around the state
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/30/20 8:16 AM

Nov. 30, 2020

(Portland) – Cases of COVID-19 continue to remain low on construction jobsites in Oregon, thanks to the industry’s commitment to best practices outlined by the Joint COVID-19 Construction Safety Task Force.

That commitment continues in other ways, according to the industry, including support of the Temporary Rule Addressing COVID-19 Workplace Risks that Oregon OSHA recently adopted.

The task force continues to see a low number of outbreaks at construction jobsites, despite the fact that construction activity has not shut down during the pandemic.  

“The Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council is pleased to be working in partnership with industry to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by following best practices and supporting Oregon OSHA’s new temporary requirements,” said Robert Camarillo, executive secretary for the trades council.

The construction industry is accustomed to carrying out best practices to increase worker safety. It has seen a strong commitment from leaders in the industry to ensure workers are safe and healthy at work.

“At Hoffman and across the construction industry, the safety of our workers is our first priority,” said Tony Howard, safety director at Hoffman Construction Company. “The COVID-19 task force has been vital to our ability to continue to do the essential work we do and keep our workers safe through the pandemic. It shows what is possible when we bring labor, management, industry organizations, and regulatory agencies together with a common goal. We are very proud to have contributed to this effort.”

 

Additional resources:
Oregon OSHA’s Temporary Rule Addressing COVID-19 Workplace Risks

Oregon OSHA’s infectious disease rulemaking web page, including resources for employers

Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 Weekly Report

Oregon COVID-19 Temporary Paid Leave Program

COVID-19 testing sites in Oregon  Results may be sent to your physician
 

Task force members:

  • Associated General Contractors-Oregon Columbia Chapter
  • Central Oregon Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Columbia-Pacific Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Hoffman Construction Company
  • JE Dunn Construction
  • Lane, Coos, Curry, Douglas Building & Construction Trades Council
  • O’Neill Construction Group
  • Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, OHSU, Oregon Healthy Workforce Center
  • Oregon Home Builders Association
  • Oregon OSHA
  • Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Oregon Tradeswomen
  • Pacific NW Regional Council of Carpenters
  • Plumbing and Mechanical Contractors Association
  • SafeBuild Alliance
  • Salem Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Southern Oregon Building and Construction Trades Council
  • University of Oregon Labor Education and Resource Center, LERC
  • Worksystems

 
For general questions about the construction task force, contact Mary Ann Naylor at Oregon Tradeswomen, MaryAnn@tradeswomen.net

 

Task force contacts:

Robert Camarillo, executive secretary, Oregon State Building Trades Council: Robert@oregonbuildingtrades.com

Mike Salsgiver, executive director, Associated General Contractors – Oregon Columbia Chapter: mikes@agc-oregon.org

Mark Long, chief executive officer, Oregon Home Builders Association: k@oregonhba.com">mark@oregonhba.com

Mary Ann Naylor, Communications & Marketing Director, Oregon Tradeswomen: MaryAnn@oregontradeswomen.net

Aaron Corvin, public information officer, Oregon OSHA: on.corvin@oregon.gov">Aaron.corvin@oregon.gov


Sun. 11/29/20
Oregon reports 1,599 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/29/20 12:12 PM

November 29, 2020

Oregon reports 1,599 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed nine more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 905, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

As we hit this somber milestone of 900 deaths in Oregon, we want to express our deepest sympathies to all the families that have lost a loved one to this virus. We must honor them by redoubling our efforts to protect one another: Wear a mask, limit social gatherings, keep 6 feet between you and other people who don’t live in your home, and wash hands often.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,599 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 74,120.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (7), Clackamas (136), Clatsop (1), Columbia (18), Coos (4), Crook (9), Curry (2), Deschutes (78), Douglas (9), Hood River (5), Jackson (57), Jefferson (21), Josephine (14), Klamath (28), Lake (8), Lane (59), Lincoln (6), Linn (30), Malheur (20), Marion (126), Morrow (4), Multnomah (648), Polk (35), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (17), Union (3), Wasco (6), Washington (206), Yamhill (34).

Oregon’s 897th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died Nov. 24 at Ashland Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 898th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 30 and died Nov. 26 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 899th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died Nov. 27 at St. Alphonsus, Nampa, Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 900th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 28 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 901st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 23 and died Nov. 28 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 902nd COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died Nov. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 903rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died Nov. 26 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 904th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 25 and died Nov. 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 905th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 21 and died Nov. 25 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 539, 10 more than yesterday.

There are 107 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, one more than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

281

3

2893

Benton

791

7

22432

Clackamas

6160

77

92502

Clatsop

360

0

8187

Columbia

506

3

10331

Coos

425

3

11055

Crook

229

6

4013

Curry

135

2

2737

Deschutes

2368

15

47817

Douglas

930

18

18625

Gilliam

23

0

448

Grant

134

1

1541

Harney

99

1

1333

Hood River

401

1

6967

Jackson

3825

31

50099

Jefferson

834

11

7046

Josephine

537

4

17717

Klamath

872

4

13804

Lake

132

1

1422

Lane

4309

42

95440

Lincoln

622

15

11944

Linn

1424

23

24785

Malheur

2406

44

8198

Marion

9207

140

74652

Morrow

658

7

2536

Multnomah

17242

236

214309

Polk

1250

16

15288

Sherman

23

0

457

Tillamook

131

0

4236

Umatilla

4343

49

18104

Union

782

6

6194

Wallowa

71

3

1560

Wasco

530

19

7038

Washington

10347

101

136042

Wheeler

3

0

514

Yamhill

1729

16

26420

Total

74120

905

968686

 

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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