Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Wed. Jan. 29 - 10:18 am
Wed. 01/29/20
Oregon employers, workers invited to take a 'Safety Break' May 13 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/29/20 9:49 AM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1073/131075/thumb_DCBS_Logo_-_RGB.jpg

Salem – Employers and workers across the state are invited to take part in Safety Break for Oregon, a time to pause and reflect on the importance of protecting people from hazards and harm while on the job.

Will you take the Wednesday, May 13, stand-down as an opportunity to refresh your knowledge and training? Will you gather your team for a clear-eyed examination of potential new hazards and how to tackle them? Or will you celebrate past successes and recognize emerging safety leaders?

The choice of activity is yours.

Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers to team up to celebrate on-the-job health and safety during the 17th annual Safety Break. When managers and employees work together to recognize and address safety and health concerns, the results include fewer injuries and reduced workers’ compensation costs.

“This stand-down provides an opportunity for employers and workers to remember the high value they should place on preventing injury and illness in the workplace,” said Michael Wood, administrator of Oregon OSHA. “At its best, it is not merely symbolic, but also an opportunity for a focused discussion about the best ways to make safety a reality in the workplace by identifying and eliminating hazards.”

Companies that participate will be entered to win one of three $100 checks, to be used for a luncheon of their choice, when they sign up online by Friday, May 8. The prizes will go to participating companies as part of a random drawing. The Oregon SHARP Alliance is sponsoring the contest. The nonprofit group promotes safety and health management by encouraging teamwork and cooperation among people, employers, and organizations to improve workplace health and safety for Oregon workers.

During Safety Break, companies are encouraged to share their activities on social media by tagging @OregonOSHA on Facebook and using #SafetyBreak on Twitter.

For more information, ideas on how to host an event, or to download graphics, visit the Safety Break for Oregon website.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health.

The division’s technical staff members can answer questions about rules and how to apply them:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Email: tech.web@oregon.gov

Online contact form: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/Contact-Technical.aspx

Contact Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services for help with safety and health programs:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Field office locations and phone numbers: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/maps.aspx

Email: consult.web@oregon.gov

Visit the division’s A-to-Z topic page, which includes links to guides, fact sheets, rules, and related information: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/az-index.aspx

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo , SBFO logo

Tue. 01/28/20
State Land Board to meet Feb. 4 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 01/28/20 5:08 PM

SALEM, Ore. – An annual report on Oregon’s unclaimed property will be presented to the State Land Board during its Feb. 4 meeting in Salem. 

Nearly $70 million was reported to the state as unclaimed property by banks, utilities and other businesses between July 2018 and June 2019. The state’s Unclaimed Property Program helps rightful owners claim funds with an easy-to-search website at www.oregon.gov/DSL/money. More than 124,000 assets were claimed between July 2018 and June 2019. Until claimed, funds are held in trust in the Common School Fund, earning interest and benefitting Oregon’s K-12 public schools.  

Other agenda items include a summary of the annual Common School Fund audit; an overview of Department of State Lands Aquatic Resource Management Program fees; and an annual report from the Oregon Department of Forestry on Common School forest lands.  

The Board will also consider selling the subsurface mineral and geothermal rights for 34 acres in Tillamook County to the North Coast Land Conservancy. The surface property is currently being purchased by the conservancy. 

The meeting will be held:

Tuesday, Feb. 4  
10 a.m. 
Department of State Lands
Land Board Room
775 Summer St. NE, Salem

The full meeting agenda and materials are available here: https://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Board/Pages/SLBmeetings.aspx

To live stream the meeting, go to the State Lands YouTube channel: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQA7FHTWwl-gjJkQeYPJ1IA

This meeting will be held in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities. If you need assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting. 

Visitors are not permitted to bring backpacks, bags, or large purses into the Department of State Lands building prior to, during, or following Land Board meetings. Purses, medical bags, and diaper bags are permitted, but may be subject to inspection by the Oregon State Police. 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit. 


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 3
Oregon Health Authority - 01/28/20 4:22 PM

January 28, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Build relationship and trust; review and celebrate successful funding application; plan next steps and moving forward.

When: February 3, 2:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12-to-24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2RWX7Rz

 


2020 Oregon Women Veterans Conference Registration Now Open (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 01/28/20 3:30 PM
2020-01/1082/131064/Themed_2020_WVC_Logo_Horizontal.jpg
2020-01/1082/131064/Themed_2020_WVC_Logo_Horizontal.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1082/131064/thumb_Themed_2020_WVC_Logo_Horizontal.jpg

Registration is now open for the 2020 Oregon Women Veterans Conference! This free biennial event, organized by the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, is the largest gathering of women veterans in the state.

Women veterans from every branch of military service, era and background are invited to attend this free conference being held on May 30-31 at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes in Bend. The conference hosts educational workshops, keynote speakers, networking opportunities, and celebrates the service and contribution of women who served in the military throughout history.

“Oregon is a leader in recognizing and honoring the unique contribution of women who have served their country.  At this year’s conference, we are emphasizing the strength of the Oregon women veteran community,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “Attendees will learn about accessing their earned veteran benefits, hear from several dynamic women veteran speakers during general sessions, and have many opportunities to connect with other like-minded women veterans from across the state.”

The theme selected for this year’s conference is “Stronger Together.” 

“The Oregon Women Veterans Conference began over 20 years ago as a small gathering of women veterans who wanted to reach out and support one another,” said ODVA Women Veterans Coordinator Liz Estabrooks. “It is phenomenal to see how the conference has evolved, but also how it has remained true to its original intent: to be a place where women veterans can meet other women veterans from across the state, learn about the veteran benefits they are entitled to, and celebrate the historical contribution that women have made to the nation while serving in the military.”

Today, more than 25,000 women veterans make up nearly 9% of the Oregon veteran population and that number is expected to continue to increase as military occupation specialties traditionally reserved for male service members have expanded to explicitly allow women to serve in all roles.

Conference attendance is free for women veterans and registration is required.  Space is limited so early registration is encouraged. Opportunities for community sponsorship and vendor tables are also still available. 

More information can be found online at wvc.oregondva.com.

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1082/131064/Themed_2020_WVC_Logo_Horizontal.jpg

Commun"IT"y Day Brings 100 Middle and High School Students to Microsoft to Learn To Code
Yakima Sch. Dist. - 01/28/20 3:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

On January 31st, approximately 100 LatinX students (from Yakima School District and Newport High School, Bellevue), will attend the ISACA CommunITy Day at Microsoft to learn to code. This event is part of the Yakima Bilingual and Innovation Education Program led by Trevor Greene, Superintendent of the Yakima School District, and Mr. Luis Fernando Esteban, Honorary Consulate of Spain for Washington and Oregon, based in Seattle.

Following are the details for the ISACA event, held in partnership with the Yakima Bilingual and Innovation Education Program:

Date: Jan 31, 2020.

Location:  Microsoft Campus, Redmond, WA.

Cohort size: About 100 students (High-School or Middle-School) that are interested in learning Computer Science concepts.

Equipment: Each student will have a computer/laptop and internet access.

Activities: Python coding workshop: Nuevo Foundation Instructors will teach the Python coding language with a turtle. Students will get to know a bee named Alex, who is living in a turtle world, in which it is trying to learn the language of the turtles – Python. The students will learn about variables, functions, for loops, and more during the workshop. They will also hear from Microsoft Latinx leaders.

Meal: Pizza and assorted beverages, provided by Microsoft.

Uniform: T-shirts provided to students and volunteers by ISACA.

Gifts: Water bottles provided by ISACA Puget Sound Chapter

  • Agenda
    • 10:00 am - students arrive.
    • 10:15-11:45 am coding workshop.
    • 11:45- 12 pm coding activity/hands-on.
    • 12:00-12:45pm lunch.
    • 12:45 - 1:15pm role model panel.
    • 1:30 pm students to go back to their school.

The curriculum for the workshop is provided by the Nuevo Foundation, a not-for-profit organization based in Greater Seattle. The Nuevo Foundation is made up of software engineers from Microsoft and other tech companies in the region. Nuevo offers coding workshops for students of a variety of ages and backgrounds. Nuevo’s ultimate goal is to use its curricula and hands-on activities to show different aspects of STEM, making coding fun, engaging, and accessible. They believe everyone can learn to code!

About ISACA: The  ISACA Puget Sound Chapter is a local part of ISACA,  which is a global membership association of IT audit, risk, governance, and security professionals (see attached Fact Sheet). ISACA and the Honorary Consulate of Spain in Seattle are leading the planning and execution of CommunITy Day. It is an annual day of service where ISACA chapters and members are encouraged to give back to their local communities.

 


Marine Board's Cycle Two Boating Facility Grant Applications Being Accepted (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 01/28/20 2:49 PM
The recently completed and award-winning boat launch at Rainbow Plaza on the Umpqua River in Reedsport, OR.
The recently completed and award-winning boat launch at Rainbow Plaza on the Umpqua River in Reedsport, OR.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4139/131061/thumb_ReedsportBoatRamp.jpg

Grant applications are being accepted beginning February 1, through February 28, 2020, for the 2019-2021 Cycle Two Boating Facilities funding from the Marine Board.  Grants are available to public bodies such as cities, counties, and state and federal agencies that own and operate boating access facilities, used by recreational boaters, who are seeking financial assistance to improve access to Oregon’s waterways. 

The Marine Board awards more than $5 million biennially for boating facility improvements.  Since 2001, the agency has awarded $44 million in facility grants throughout Oregon.  These grants are funded from motorboat title and registration fees and marine fuel tax revenue. 

Boating facility grant applications are awarded three times during a two-year biennium based on available funding.  The Cycle Two funding allocates 20% of the available boating facilities resources and focuses on projects that can be completed within 18 months remaining in the biennium.  This includes property acquisition, construction within the in-water windows, and permitting for replacing boat ramps, boarding docks, repaving or redesigning parking lots or sanitation renovations.  The Marine Board’s Boating Facility staff provide technical assistance to grant applicants through every step of the project concept, design/engineering, permitting, surveying, and inspections of any given project, often times saving time and money for the facility provider. Cycle Two grants are intended for multi-faceted boating facility improvements with a medium to a high level of complexity. 

Cycle Three allocates 10% of the available funding to factor in previously-awarded grants with unexpected cost increases, or emergency situations.  This funding cycle is dependent upon the successful completion of other projects and available revenue. 

Prospective applicants are encouraged to download an application and review resources online, including the Boating Facilities Grant Procedure Guide.  Visit http://bit.ly/2SlJURJ for more information.

###




Attached Media Files: The recently completed and award-winning boat launch at Rainbow Plaza on the Umpqua River in Reedsport, OR.

Supreme Court allows the public charge rule to take effect
Oregon Health Authority - 01/28/20 2:11 PM

January 28, 2020

The Supreme Court on Monday issued a ruling that lifted the injunction on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s public charge rule – a rule that makes it more difficult for immigrants to get green cards. Federal appeals courts had previously issued injunctions blocking the rule. Monday's ruling means the policy can go into effect in Oregon and every state, except for Illinois which is covered by a separate injunction. The lawsuits are not over, but the Supreme Court’s decision allows the rule to go into effect during the litigation.

The new public charge rule expands the list of benefits that the federal government may consider when determining whether someone is a public charge, which would make it more difficult for them to get a green card. These benefits include:

  • Non-emergency Oregon Health Plan (i.e., Medicaid) coverage for non-pregnant adults 21 and older.
  • Medicaid-funded long-term care.
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or food stamps.
  • Federal, state or local cash assistance programs. This includes:
    • Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and
    • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).
  • Section 8 rental assistance (i.e., housing choice vouchers).
  • Project-based Section 8 housing and subsidized housing.

The public charge rule does not apply to many federal and state programs, including but not limited to:

  • Oregon Health Plan coverage for youth younger than 21 (i.e., Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP).
  • Oregon Health Plan coverage for people who are pregnant including 60 days after giving birth (i.e., Medicaid, Citizen-Alien Waived Emergent Medical (CAWEM) Plus, etc.).
  • Oregon MothersCare (OMC) program.
  • Emergency Oregon Health Plan coverage for people of all ages (i.e., CAWEM).
  • Oregon’s Cover All Kids program.
  • Special education services funded by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that Medicaid covers.
  • Early Head Start and Head Start/Oregon PreKindergarten.
  • Employment Related Day-Care child-care reimbursement.
  • School based health services for school-aged children.
  • Free and reduced School Lunch Program (exception: the new rule would consider this if there was a referral to this program through SNAP).
  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program.
  • Commercial health insurance premium subsidies through Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace.
  • Oregon Food Bank programs and services.
  • Older Americans Act (OAA) programs.
  • State-funded programs to aid older adults and people with disabilities (e.g., Oregon Project Independence).
  • Medicare Part D Low-Income Subsidy (LIS).
  • Many other health and social services programs not listed here.

The Oregon Health Authority is the state agency responsible for protecting the health of all 4 million people living in Oregon. In a previous statement issued after the original federal rule was announced, the Oregon Health Authority said, "This rule is in direct conflict with our agency’s mission which is to help people and communities achieve optimum physical, mental and social well-being and improve access to quality, affordable health care."

OHA encourages anyone who has questions or concerns about how public charge may affect them or members of their family to seek counsel from a qualified immigration attorney.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2S0uDGH


New Scholarship Explores the History of White Supremacy and Resistance in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 01/28/20 12:05 PM
Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"
Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/2861/131053/thumb_Winter_2019.jpg

A special issue of the Oregon Historical Society’s Oregon Historical Quarterly is dedicated to discussing the painful impacts of White supremacy in Oregon, as well as highlighting those who have led resistance efforts throughout history.

Copies can be mailed by request - please contact rachel.randles@ohs.org if you would like to receive a print copy of the issue.

Portland, OR – “
We are not responsible for the past, but we are responsible for our relationship to the past.” These words spoken by Portland State University Professor Emeritus Dr. Darrell Millner helped shape the Oregon Historical Society’s most recent issue of its Oregon Historical Quarterly journal: a special issue dedicated to discussing the history of White supremacy and resistance in Oregon.

Over the course of two and a half years, the Quarterly’s editorial staff and the issue’s guest editors Dr. Millner and Portland State University visiting professor Dr. Carmen Thompson worked with dozens of authors and community members — who drew on lifetimes of scholarship — to produce a nuanced investigation of this complex and uncomfortable aspect of our state’s history.

While the content of the issue is grounded in the past, it was inspired by current events. In June 2017, two weeks after the murders on the light-rail train, the Oregon Historical Quarterly’s Editorial Advisory Board decided to respond to the increase in public displays of White supremacy by doing what our journal does best — publishing authoritative scholarship about our state’s history. The hope is that this special issue will help readers understand how White supremacy, both spoken and unspoken, has presented itself in Oregon’s past and also informs our present.

“I think my whole career, in one way or another, was just a prologue to being a guest editor on this project,” said Darrell Millner. “To offer an alternative to the traditional, misleading narrative of Oregon and American history is a daunting challenge. I feel fortunate in this regard to have had a teammate like the Oregon Historical Society and the Quarterly staff in this effort.”

Focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the special issue includes new and newly considered scholarship and primary sources that help illuminate a complex aspect of Oregon’s history. Fifteen authors, supported by over twenty peer reviewers, explore themes such as settler colonialism, labor organizing, and the global color line.

“The Oregon Historical Society’s mission is to advance knowledge about all the people, places, and events that have shaped this state. Journals like the Oregon Historical Quarterly are vital vehicles for public education about the lesser known – and often painful – areas of our history,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk.

“I hope readers get a sense that White supremacy is part of American DNA and that it operates and has operated at every level of American life since settlement,” said Carmen Thompson in an interview for the Oregon Historical Society blog, Dear Oregon. “The phenomenon of White supremacy is not accidental or coincidental; our governments and institutions have planned and proliferated it from the beginning. I also want readers to understand the concept of Whiteness — ongoing, daily expectations of privilege — and how its associated effects can be overcome, or at least mitigated, through open dialogue and acknowledgment of the cost and consequences of our nation's hierarchical racial system.”

The Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on “White Supremacy and Resistance” is now available for purchase in the Oregon Historical Society’s Museum Store for $10, and a subscription to OHQ is a benefit of Oregon Historical Society membership. Copies of the special issue can also be ordered by calling the OHS Museum Store at 503.306.5230. Abstracts for the articles featured in this special issue are available online.
 



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Cover of the Winter 2019 special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly on "White Supremacy and Resistance"

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Synthetic ID Theft (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/28/20 9:00 AM
TT - Synthetic ID Theft - GRAPHIC
TT - Synthetic ID Theft - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3585/130744/thumb_TT_-_Synthetic_ID_Fraud_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against synthetic ID theft. 

Earlier this month the FBI issued a warning against this particular kind of ID theft – a fraud that is difficult to identify but easy to stop, if you do a little work ahead of time. 

Synthetic identity theft differs from traditional ID theft in that criminals don’t steal a single person’s identity—they create one using a combination of real and fake information. 

When they use that identity to apply for credit, the credit reporting agencies generate a new credit file as though for a new person.  

How do the fraudsters get started? The easiest way is to steal and use Social Security numbers for people who don’t already have credit files: our children. They then combine those clean Social Security numbers with information such as fake names and birth dates. 

That persona then starts applying for credit and keeps going until a bank or business opens an account. Using that fake credit file and the very real Social Security number, the imposter can also get a job, file for a fraudulent tax return, or even get medical benefits. Oftentimes, the lender is not aware of the fraud until the criminal maxes out the credit line and the account goes into default. 

Unfortunately for the child whose Social Security number got stolen, it may not be until he is applying for financial aid for college before he’s aware that a fraudster damaged his credit years prior. 

So how do you protect your kids? 

  • Check to see if your children have credit reports. They should not have reports, and if they do, that may be an indicator that someone has used their info. 

To do this, you will need to check with the three major credit reporting agencies: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Each has its own requirements, but, generally, you will need to provide the child’s legal name, address, birth date, a copy of the child’s birth certificate, and a copy of the child’s Social Security card. You will also need to provide proof about yourself such as a copy of your driver’s license and a copy of a current utility bill with your address. 

  • If you find that your child does have a credit report, check it for illegal activity and report any fraud to all of the credit agencies. 

  • If you find that your child does not have a credit report, you can ask that each of the three agencies create a profile.  

  • Whether your child already had a profile or you ask to have one created, you can put a freeze that credit file. Putting a freeze on a child’s account requires you to fill out a form or write a letter and provide all of the documentation we talked about previously. Check each credit bureau’s website for specifics as to what that particular bureau requires.  

Federal law requires credit agencies to allow parents and guardians to place these freezes for free for children 15 and under. Those who are 16 or 17 can do so for themselves. 

  • As an alternative to freezing, you can put your child on as an authorized user for one of your credit accounts. This will create a credit profile for that child and help establish the child as a legitimate owner of her Social Security number. If you go this route, make sure that you continue to run credit reports for your child, Each person is allowed one free credit report per year from each of the three agencies. 

  • Finally, watch for credit offers in the mail addressed to your child, unusual activity on medical insurance statements, and the appropriate reporting of income on annual Social Security statements. Anything out of the ordinary in these venues could indicate a problem. 

If you have been victimized by an online scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office. 

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Synthetic ID Theft - AUDIO , TT - Synthetic ID Theft - GRAPHIC

Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair "Prepare for the Future in a Highly Skilled Career" (attached image) (Photo)
Benton-Franklin Workforce Development Council - 01/28/20 8:59 AM
Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair Flyer
Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair Flyer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/6679/131046/thumb_Apprenticeship_101_Career_Fair_-_Flyer.jpg

Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair

Prepare for the Future in a Highly Skilled Career


Pasco, WA- Feb 19, 2020 —  Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair kicks off on Feb 19th from 2 pm – 4 pm at the Byron Gjerde Center at Columbia Basin Community College, 2600 N., 20th Ave, Pasco, WA. 

Did you know that nearly 90% of apprentices are employed after completing their apprenticeship and that their average starting salary is $60,000 a year? Workers benefit from Apprenticeships by receiving skills-based education that prepares them for good-paying jobs.  Join us for a brief presentation about the basics of Apprenticeship and learn about local opportunities with LiUNA Local 348, Northwest Laborers Training, IBEW NECA 112 Electrical Training Center, SE Washington NE Oregon Sheet Metal Training, Construction Industry Training Council of Washington (CITC), and WorkSource Columbia Basin among others.  

For more information on Registered Apprenticeship visit:

https://www.facebook.com/WorkSourceColumbiaBasin/

For more information on Registered Apprenticeship visit:

https://www.worksourcewa.com/microsite/Content.aspx?appid=MGSWAAPPREN&pageType=simple&seo=landingpage

 

###

For more information, press only:

Carya Bair

Business Services Specialist

WorkSource Columbia Basin

509-734-5894

air@esd.wa.gov">cbair@esd.wa.gov

 

Arturo Espinoza

Local Veteran Employment Representative CBEP

WorkSource Columbia Basin

509-734-5949

AEspinoza@ESD.WA.GOV




Attached Media Files: Apprenticeship 101 Career Fair Flyer

Office of State Fire Marshal Seeks Nominees for Annual Sparky Awards
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 01/28/20 8:00 AM

The Office of State Fire Marshal is accepting nominations for the 2020 Golden and Silver Sparky awards.

The Golden Sparky award recognizes a member of the fire service for outstanding achievement in fire prevention or public fire safety education. The Silver Sparky award recognizes a civilian for outstanding achievement in fire prevention or public fire safety education.

“The Sparky awards call attention to the critical role of public education in fire safety,” said Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “Each year, the Sparky award nomination and selection process helps inform the public of the importance of fire prevention and education. It also allows Oregonians, communities, and the fire services to acknowledge the leadership of their colleagues who are making a difference. We encourage all Oregonians to call out excellence among those helping others through fire prevention.”

Nomination forms are available online on the OSFM website at www.oregon.gov/osp/sfm or by calling Sally Cravinho at 503-934-8205 or emailing sally.cravinho@osp.oregon.gov.

You do not have to be a member of the fire service to nominate any person or agency. Nominations may also be submitted by members of the public.

The nomination deadline is April 1. Submit completed forms with an explanation and examples of your nominee’s achievements and contributions to preventing fires and fire losses in Oregon.

Nominations can be submitted by email or standard mail to sally.cravinho@osp.oregon.gov or Sally Cravinho, 3565 Trelstad Ave. SE, Salem, OR, 97317-9614.

Awards will be presented at the 2020 Oregon Fire Marshals Association conference, on May 13, at the Hallmark Resort in Newport.


Mon. 01/27/20
Oregon State Police Investigating Deceased Male Found Beside Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 01/27/20 8:33 PM

On Monday, January 27, 2020 at approximately 9:21 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers were dispatched to the report of a deceased person beside Hwy 101 near milepost 278 (Two Mile Lane). 

Preliminary investigation revealed the deceased male, identified as William Schippert (44) of Bandon, had been struck by a vehicle hours before his body was discovered.  

Investigators from the Oregon State Police, Bandon Police Department, Coos County Sheriff's Office and the Coos County District Attorney’s Office are continuing the investigation.

The operator of the vehicle has been identified and is currently cooperating with the investigation.

No more information is available for release at this time.


New Instructor Cadre Set to Deliver Certified Crisis Intervention Specialist Training Statewide
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/27/20 6:47 PM

Law enforcement officers and their behavioral health partners are helping residents in crisis on a regular basis.  In an ongoing effort to support these professionals with specialized training, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is partnering with other public safety organizations to begin offering the Certified Crisis Intervention Specialist (CCIS) course statewide in 2020.

The three-day CCIS course is intended as an advanced training opportunity for individuals that have completed the 40-hour Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) course already offered across the state.  The CCIS course focuses on high-level verbal skills for de-escalation when working with a person in crisis.  The course was developed by Growth Central Training, LLC and is certified by the National Anger Management Association (NAMA).  Attendees receive certification from NAMA in crisis intervention.

Over the past year, six individuals have undergone intensive, developmental coaching, from Growth Central Training to become certified to teach the CCIS course in Oregon.  The following facilitators will receive their credentials from Growth Central at the completion of their training on January 29, 2020 at DPSST.

  • Sgt. Liz Lawrence – City of Bend Police Department
  • Linda Maddy, LCSW – Department of Public Safety Standards and Training
  • Ridg Medford – Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc.
  • Sgt. Jason Ritter – Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office
  • Sgt. Diane Stockbridge – Port of Portland Police Department
  • Melissa Thompson, MA – Deschutes County Health Services

DPSST appreciates each of the organizations listed above for their partnership in supporting these facilitators and the delivery of the CCIS course throughout Oregon.

 

## Background information on Crisis Intervention Training in Oregon ##

With staffing and funds provided by the Oregon Legislative Assembly and Oregon Health Authority in 2016, the Department of Public Safety and Standards Training (DPSST) in collaboration with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) created Oregon's CIT Center of Excellence (CITCOE). CITCOE serves as a training resource clearinghouse which works with law enforcement and behavioral health agencies across the state to develop, implement and support CIT’s. Currently there are 26 CIT’s in Oregon and several more are being developed.  Since the creation of CITCOE, thousands of first-responders around Oregon have received valuable basic and advanced training on how to assist Oregonians in crisis.  For more information on CITCOE please go to http://www.ocbhji.org/citcoe/

 ## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Citizen-Member Patricia Patrick-Joling serves as the Chair of the Board. The Department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 41,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, OLCC regulatory specialists, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/27/20 1:12 PM
Olonzie Clemman, Jr.
Olonzie Clemman, Jr.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1070/131024/thumb_Clemman_O.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Olonzie Clemman, Jr., died the morning of January 25, 2020. Clemman was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Clemman entered DOC custody on January 12, 2013, from Marion County with an earliest release date of July 14, 2023. Clemman was 70 years old. Next of kin has been notified.                                                                    

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 individuals. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.
 

####

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Olonzie Clemman, Jr.

State encourages tax return filing to claim refundable credits on Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/27/20 11:48 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Human Services and the Department of Revenue are jointly encouraging all workers with income in 2019 to check if they may benefit from filing a return, even if they aren’t required to file. Taxpayers may be leaving money on the table if they qualify for refundable credits, but don’t file a return claiming them.

Workers may get a larger tax refund this year because of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). But many in Oregon don’t know about this tax credit.

January 31, 2020 marks the 14th anniversary of Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day, a nationwide effort to increase awareness about EITC and free tax preparation sites.

In Oregon, 245,000 people received more than $524 million with an average amount of $2,139 from the Earned Income Tax Credit in 2019. But, potentially, many more were eligible.

If you worked last year and had income of less than $55,952, check out your eligibility for EITC. The tax credit can mean up to a $6,557 refund when you file a return and have qualifying children. Workers without a qualifying child could be eligible for a smaller credit up to $529.

Basic qualifications include:

  • Filing with a status other than married filing separately.
  • You, your spouse, and any qualifying child must have a Social Security Number.
  • Your earned income in 2019 must be below certain limits based on your number of qualifying children.

The Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Revenue are working with other state agencies and community partners to encourage taxpayers to learn more about this credit and find out if they’re eligible.

Taxpayers can use the IRS’ EITC Assistant to further check their eligibility.

CASH Oregon provides free or low-cost, in-person tax preparation services throughout Oregon. To see their locations, visit www.cashoregon.org. People can also call 211 to find free tax return preparation sites.

For more information on the EITC, visit https://www.eitc.irs.gov/. For questions about Oregon taxes, call the Department of Revenue at 503-378-4988. For questions about the Department of Human Services call, 503-945-5600.

#####


Frontier Communications, Northwest Fiber Merger Gains Commission Approval
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 01/27/20 10:34 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) granted its approval for the transfer of all assets and control of Frontier Communication’s Northwest territories in Oregon to Northwest Fiber, a telecommunications service provider with a strong financial position based in Everett, Washington.

The PUC included 75 conditions to its approval to ensure Oregon customers are not harmed by the merger and that Frontier’s Oregon customers will continue to have the same services available, while potentially experiencing improvements in service quality. The conditions cover areas such as customer protections, reporting requirements, financial conditions, safety, service quality, financial reporting, expansion of broadband infrastructure, and assurances of proper handling of customer complaints.

Under the PUC’s conditions, Northwest Fiber has committed to spend a minimum of $50 million on the improvement and expansion of high-speed broadband infrastructure in Oregon, with at least $10 million to improve broadband service in more rural communities within Frontier Communication’s service territory.

“The approval of this merger helps ensure seamless and continued telecommunications services for Oregon’s Frontier customers,” said Megan Decker, Chair of the Public Utility Commission. “Northwest Fiber’s commitment to expanding access to high-speed internet service will benefit Frontier’s customers and help support Governor Brown’s initiative to promote the expansion of high speed internet in order to improve the economy and quality of life in Oregon.”

Northwest Fiber’s proposed purchase would transfer control of Frontier Communication’s entities in the states of Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Washington for $1.352 billion. The public utility commissions of Oregon, Washington and Montana as well as the Federal Communications Commission each need to approve for the merger to occur.

# # #


Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Welcomes New Executive Director (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/27/20 10:22 AM
Oregon Council on Problem Gambling logo
Oregon Council on Problem Gambling logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4939/131019/thumb_OCPG_logo.jpg

(PLEASE NOTE: THE OREGON LOTTERY IS SENDING THIS RELEASE ON BEHALF OF THE OREGON COUNCIL ON PROBLEM GAMBLING)

 

Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Welcomes New Executive Director
Julie Hynes brings 18 years of problem and responsible gambling experience to the organization

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is pleased to announce the appointment of its new Executive Director, Julie Hynes. Hynes was most recently the Director of Responsible Gambling with the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling.   Previously, Hynes spent 16 years in Oregon as administrator of Lane County’s nationally award-winning problem gambling prevention program, instructor at the University of Oregon, and as a research and education consultant. Hynes is currently Secretary of the National Council on Problem Gambling’s board of directors.

Council Chair Greta Coe said, “The Council is fortunate to have Ms. Hynes back in Oregon and in the Executive Director position with her wealth of knowledge and connections in the problem gambling and gaming industry.  Her leadership will be vital in moving the Council’s strategic plan forward with new energy, growth, and partnerships.” 

Hynes takes the reins from Dr. Thomas Moore, who was executive director from 2001 to his recent retirement. Moore worked with the Council since its founding in 1996 and was instrumental seeing the Council through periods of growth, overseeing workforce development contracts, research and evaluation studies, and several other key projects. He continues to provide research and evaluation consultation with Oregon Health Authority’s Problem Gambling Services.

The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling is a statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the health of Oregonians by supporting efforts to reduce gambling-related harm and is an affiliate of the National Council on Problem Gambling. The agency neither promotes nor opposes legalized gambling. The Oregon Council on Problem Gambling’s website is www.oregoncpg.org.

###

Help for gambling problems is free for Oregonians, and can be accessed via 24-hour helpline, 1-877-MY-LIMIT, or online at www.opgr.org.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Council on Problem Gambling logo

FBI Media On-Call until March 30, 2020
FBI - Oregon - 01/27/20 9:00 AM

From January 26th - March 30th, PIO Beth Anne Steele will be working on other assignments. During this time, other FBI PIO's will be covering media matters in Oregon. 

Going forward, media outlets are encourgaed to use the Media.Portland@fbi.gov email account to request assistance on FBI matters in the state. Also, please note that we are discontinuing use of the media pager/number. Thank you.


Fri. 01/24/20
DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/24/20 2:55 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 24, 2020

Contact:   Mona Riesterer  
                503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Fire Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. February 26, 2020.  The meeting will be held in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Standards & Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Meeting will be live streamed on the  DPSST Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approval of Minutes of August 28, 2019 Meeting

3.  Administrative Closures – Informational Only

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

4.  Bruckner, Wyatt L. DPSST #F37318; NFPA Operations Level Responder and NFPA Fire Fighter I – Lowell RFPD 

Presented by Kayla Ballrot 

5.  Faust, Damon H. DPSST #F35483; NFPA Operations Level Responder, Fire Fighter Type 2 (FFT2), Fire Fighter Type 1 (FFT1), NFPA Fire Fighter II, NFPA Fire Fighter II, NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator, Single Resource, Engine Boss (ENGB) - Idanha-Detroit Rural Fire Protection District (RFPD), Warm Springs Fire Safety, Estacada RFPD #69

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

6.  Flood, Andrew J. DPSST #F38423; NFPA Hazardous Materials Awareness, NFPA Hazardous Materials Operations, Fire Fighter Type 2 (FFT2), Fire Fighter Type 1 (FFT1), NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator (Driver) – Jefferson County Fire District #1

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

7.  Lloyd, David N. DPSST #F16832; NFPA Driver, NFPA Pumper Operator, NFPA Fire Fighter I, NFPA Fire Fighter II, NFPA Fire Instructor I – Portland Fire & Rescue

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

8.  McGahan, Trenton R. DPSST #F38189; Fire Fighter Type (FFT2) and NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator (Driver) – Charleston RFPD

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

9Peterson, Bjoin C. DPSST #F36309; Fire Fighter Type 2 – Hines Fire Department       

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

10.  Poore, James T. DPSST #F16053; NFPA Apparatus Equipped with Fire Pump, NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator, NFPA Apparatus Equipped with and Aerial Device, NFPA Fire Fighter I, NFPA Fire Fighter II, Wildland Interface Fire Fighter

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

11. Stanger, Nickolus V. DPSST #F36220; NFPA Hazardous Materials Awareness and NFPA Hazardous Materials Operations – Netarts-Oceanside RFPD

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

12. West, Jesse K. DPSST #F18744; NFPA Diver, NFPA Operations Level Responder, NFPA Hazardous Materials Incident Commander, NFPA Apparatus Equipped with Fire Pump, Wildland Interface Fire Fighter, NFPA Fire Fighter I, NFPA Fire Fighter II, NFPA Fire Instructor I, NFPA Fire Officer I – Lane Fire Authority

Presented By Kayla Ballrot

13. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-009-0062; Marine Based Fire Fighter for Land Based Fire Fighters

Presented by Kayla Ballrot 

14. Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0010: Criteria for Inclusion on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial Wall

Presented by Jennifer Howald   

15. Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial Wall Nomination – Eric Aarseth, Contract Wildland Fire Fighter

Presented by Julie Olsen

16. Next scheduled meeting – May 27, 2020 9:00 a.m.  

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Fire Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/24/20 2:46 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 24, 2020

Contact:   Mona Riesterer  
                503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Police Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 am on February 20, 2020. The meeting will be held in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Meeting will be live streamed on the  DPSST Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

 1.   Introductions

2.  Approve Meeting Minutes of the November 21, 2019

3.  Administrative Closures – Police

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Complaint: 2019-94CJ; Palmer, Glenn DPSST #18276 – Grant County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Johnson, Robert DPSST #50633; Basic and Intermediate Police Certifications – Medford Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Saulo, Caleb DPSST #59701; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification – Warm Springs Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Andrews, Dixon DPSST #14829; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, Management and Executive Police Certifications – Gold Beach Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Meza, Dezi DPSST #41232; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications – Albany Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Morberg, Matthew DPSST #40597; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications and Basic Corrections Certification – Eugene Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Shull, Geremy DPSST #43985; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory and Police Certifications – Sherman County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Taresh, Nicholas DPSST #55912; Basic Police Certifications – Oregon City Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Watson, Dustin DPSST #34225; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications – Newport Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

13. Five-Year Review of the Adoption of OAR 259-008-0078 – Informational Only

Presented by Jennifer Howald

14. Law Enforcement Memorial Wall Nomination; Constable Hansford “Harry” Greenfield – City of Silverton Police Department

Presented by Eriks Gabliks

15.  Department Update

16.  Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – May 21, 2020

 


DPSST Private Security/Investigators Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/24/20 2:21 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 24, 2020

Contact:     Mona Riesterer  
                  503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Private Security/Investigators Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. February 18, 2020.  The meeting will be held in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Standards & Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Meeting will be live streamed on the  DPSST Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.  Minutes – November 19, 2019

Approve the minutes of the November 19, 2019 Private Security/Private Investigations Policy Committee meeting.

3.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-060-0135: Clarifying Law Enforcement Experience Applicable to the Qualifications for Certification as a Private Security Instructor

Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR Chapter 259 Division 60: Updates to the Private Security Provider Moral Fitness and Denial/Revocation Standards

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.   Department Update

6.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – May 19, 2020 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Private Security/Investigators Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Salmonberry Trail meeting set for Feb. 7 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/24/20 1:00 PM

SALEM, Ore. - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet 10 a.m. - noon Feb. 7 in the Tillamook Room, Building C of the Oregon Department of Forestry Headquarters, 2600 State Street, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: finalizing Washington County’s STIA membership, updates on the Salmonberry Trail Foundation, and reports focused on the strategic plan, including the upcoming canyon and river segment master plan studies.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.

STIA was established to facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov.

Individuals who need special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance.


Bureau of Land Management Seeks Help Increasing Access to Public Lands
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/24/20 11:39 AM

As part of Dingell Act Implementation, BLM will publish priority list of land access issues, invite public review

As part of its efforts to implement the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public assistance in identifying lands managed by the agency on which the public is allowed to hunt, fish, or use the land for other recreational purposes, but to which  there is no legal public access or where access is significantly restricted. Recommendations from the public will aid the BLM in creating a report to Congress that provides options for reasonably providing access to such lands, such as by acquiring an easement, right-of-way or fee title from a willing owner.

The BLM plans to post its first priority list online at BLM’s ePlanning website by Thursday, March 12, 2020.  The BLM will update the priority list every two years for at least the next decade. The public nomination period to identify parcels for inclusion on the BLM’s priority list will open on January 31, 2020, and will close on Saturday, February 29, 2020. Subsequent updates on BLM’s efforts will be published prior to the release of future priority lists in order to seek additional information and suggestions from the public. 

“The BLM has worked tirelessly with other federal and state agencies, public and private partners to proactively identify and address public land access issues for many years. Our priority is to increase access to public lands wherever possible, and to increase public opportunities for hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation across the more than 245 million acres of lands we manage,” said William Perry Pendley, BLM Deputy Director for Programs and Policy. “The John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act will help us expand and improve these efforts, and we welcome information from the public that will help us pinpoint barriers to access.”

All lands nominated for inclusion on the BLM’s priority must be managed by the BLM, encompass at least 640 contiguous acres and have significantly restricted or have no public access. BLM must also consider the likelihood of resolving identified access issues when determining whether to include parcels on the list. When submitting nominations, the public must include the location of the nominated land or parcel, total acreage affected (if known), a description or narrative describing the lack of access, and any additional information the BLM should consider when determining if the land should be on BLM’s priority list. BLM will not include any personally identifying information concerning owners or ownership of any parcels in preparing the priority list or related congressional reports.  

Public nominations will be accepted via the BLM’s ePlanning website.

This effort advances a primary goal of the Dingell Act (S. 47), which was signed into law by President Trump in March 2019. Section 4105 of the Act directs the BLM to develop a priority list, which identifies the location and acreage of BLM-managed parcels over 640 acres open to hunting, fishing, or other recreational purposes, and which have no legal public access or where access is significantly restricted.   

The BLM is working to implement Dingell Act tasks assigned in Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Utah, Montana/Dakotas, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon/Washington, and the Eastern States Office (Louisiana and Minnesota).  Implementing the Dingell Act is a top priority for Secretary of the Interior, David Bernhardt.  Implementing the Dingell Act will continue the Department of the Interior’s work to strike proper balance for land and resources management, increase access for hunting, fishing, and recreation, and create economic prosperity while protecting and preserving America’s treasures.   

To learn more about the Dingell Act and how it affects your public lands, please visit https://www.blm.gov/about/laws-and-regulations/dingell-act


Marine Board Approves Rules, Other Items
Oregon Marine Board - 01/24/20 9:46 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board approved several administrative rules and opened rulemaking during their quarterly Board meeting, held on January 22, in Salem.

The Board adopted rules to allow the use of electric motors at slow-no wake speed on Gold Lake in Lane County after receiving a petition in August. The passage of HB 3168 grants authority to the Marine Board to allow boat operations by electric motors at slow-no wake speeds on named lakes at the discretion of the Board. Relating to this authority, the Marine Board received another petition to allow electric motors on North and South Twin Lakes in Deschutes County. The Board opened rulemaking and directed staff to explore designations and criteria used by other state regulatory agencies for handicapped or disabled persons and explore rule concepts that would allow the use of electric motors at slow-no wake speeds for physically challenged individuals.  

The Board also approved the following items:

  • Amending the personal watercraft operating rules to allow for youth competitions and sanctioned training;
  • Amending rules to remove public record fees from administrative rules and instead, refer to Department of Administrative Services (DAS) policy.

The Board initiated rulemaking for the following items:

  • Personal flotation device labeling rules for consistency with US Coast Guard labeling rules;
  • Amending rules to remove the requirement of written change notifications for First Aid/CPR certification expiration dates for registered Outfitters and Guides;
  • Amending rules to reflect changes in US Coast Guard fire extinguisher standards.

The Board also listened to public testimony from homeowners, environmental groups, wakesport enthusiasts, and other stakeholders regarding boating activities on the Willamette River from the Newberg Pool (RM 30-50) to downtown Portland. Agency staff updated the Board on Rule Advisory Committee discussions and the Towed Watersports Education requirement for boat owners/operators engaged in wakeboarding and wake surfing in the Newberg Pool. The Board gave staff direction to draft amended rules for the Newberg Pool and bring back rules for potential adoption at their April Board meeting.

The agency will solicit written public comment on draft rules and other approved items.

To view the meeting materials, visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

###


ESD 123 Welcomes New Board Member, Matthew Backlund (Photo)
ESD 123 - 01/24/20 8:44 AM
New board member, Matthew Backlund
New board member, Matthew Backlund
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1212/130966/thumb_Matthew_Backlund.jpg

PASCO, WA – During last night’s regular meeting, the board of directors at Educational Service District 123 welcomed their newest member, Mr. Matthew Backlund.  Mr. Backlund is serving Director District Number 6, which includes part of Kennewick. During the January board meeting, Mr. Backlund delivered his oath of office as he was sworn in by ESD Superintendent Mr. Darcy Weisner.

Managing teams in the Tri-Cities and Boise, Idaho, Mr. Backlund currently serves as Senior Vice President and Market Leader for Umpqua Bank.  He also serves on a number of community nonprofit boards and is actively involved as a Rotary member, local youth sports coach, and a Jr. Achievement classroom volunteer.

The ESD board of directors includes nine positions serving 23 school districts in seven counties.  For more information, visit the ESD website at www.esd123.org/about/board_of_directors or contact the ESD Superintendent’s Office at 509.544.5785.

###

Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Darcy Weisner and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 70,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.




Attached Media Files: New board member, Matthew Backlund , Matthew Backlund delivering his oath of office, sworn in by Superintendent Weisner

Free public forum on long-term care insurance
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/24/20 8:35 AM

Salem – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is hosting a public forum on long-term care insurance on Friday, Jan. 31, in Salem. The forum will provide Oregonians and insurance companies the opportunity to discuss long-term care insurance rates, claims handling, and consumer protections.

Consumers are encouraged to complete this short survey to share their questions and stories before the hearing.

What: Long-Term Care Insurance Forum

Friday, Jan. 31

2 to 6 p.m.

Attend in person:

Labor and Industries Building, Room 260

350 Winter St. NE

Salem, OR 97301 

Watch online:

Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services Live Video Stream

A recording will also be made available at a later date.  

                                                                                                 ###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


Jordan Cove withdraws removal-fill permit application
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 01/24/20 8:11 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Jordan Cove Energy Project has withdrawn its application for a removal-fill permit. 

The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) was notified of the withdrawal in a letter from Jordan Cove. Oregon’s removal-fill permit rules allow applicants to withdraw an application at any time prior to the permit decision. DSL expected to make a decision Jan. 31 on Jordan Cove’s application, per the Department’s letter of Jan. 21

Removal-fill permits are required for projects that remove or fill more than 50 cubic yards of material in waters of the state or in wetlands. The application withdrawn by Jordan Cove included removal-fill activity related to construction of the proposed LNG terminal, slip and access channel, and pipeline.

When a removal-fill permit application is withdrawn, the application fee is forfeited and the application file is closed. A new application must be submitted for a project to receive any further consideration. Jordan Cove’s letter did not indicate whether submission of a new removal-fill permit application is planned. 


Grants available for historic properties and archaeology projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/24/20 7:41 AM

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects.

 

The Preserving Oregon Grants fund preservation of historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, plumbing, and electrical needs. Recently funded projects include preservation of the Odd Fellows Building in Astoria, Butte Creek Mill in Eagle Point, the Grand Ronde Depot Building, the Fort Stevens Guard House, the Carnegie Library in Gresham, the SP&S Locomotive in Portland, the Brunk House in Polk County, the Watts House in Scappoose, the Triangle Lake Round Barn in Lane County, the Long Branch Building in Weston, and the analysis of the Britt Gardens archaeological investigations by Southern Oregon University.

 

The Diamonds in the Rough Grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. These grants return buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national). Recent façade projects have taken place in Astoria, Harrisburg, Lebanon, Klamath Falls, Portland, and Sheridan.

 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free grant workshop specific to these grant programs and how to use the online grant application will be offered.

  • February 10, 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. for Diamonds in the Rough building façade projects.
  • February 10, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants historic property projects.
  • February 14, 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants archaeology projects.

 

They will be available in person or as a webinar. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

 

To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Thu. 01/23/20
CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets January 28
Oregon Health Authority - 01/23/20 3:39 PM

January 23, 2020

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets January 28

What: A public meeting of the SB 1041 CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group.

When: January 28, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, access code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome, (roll-call, agenda review, minutes review); OHA update; Q&A review, Exhibit L update and next steps; National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) timeline and reporting requirement; formal reporting guidance; form updates; redaction process and procedures; wrap-up and next steps.

For more information on the meeting, visit the group’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Historic cemeteries commission to meet February 7
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 3:16 PM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet by conference call at 1 p.m. on February 7. Its agenda includes discussion of the statewide historic cemetery clean-up day. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Survey results indicate district heading in the right direction (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 01/23/20 10:59 AM
2020-01/1288/130945/CEE_Logo.jpg
2020-01/1288/130945/CEE_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1288/130945/thumb_CEE_Logo.jpg

WALLA WALLA – Walla Walla Public Schools’ officials are celebrating results of the 2019-2020 school year parent, student, staff and community perception surveys which revealed strong support for the school district. This is the third consecutive year the district has conducted comprehensive stakeholder surveys as it seeks to gain feedback and monitor Strategic Plan progress.

“I couldn't be more proud of our results, growth, and hard work that reveal remarkable feedback from students, parents, and faculty alike,” said Superintendent Smith. “Results also revealed strong support from the community as we work in partnership to provide a first-class education for our students.”

Two survey mechanisms were used again this school year. The Educational Effectiveness survey was completed by staff, students and parents. This anonymous survey tool is administered to more than 1,000 schools across the nation allowing the district to compare its feedback against nationwide averages in addition to benchmarking performance against high performing schools considered “Schools of Distinction.” More than 3000 Walla Walla Public Schools students (grades 4-12), 90% of the K-12 building-level certificated and classified staff, and nearly 900 parents completed the survey.

Community members at-large participated in a statistically reliable telephone survey. A total of 300 randomly selected citizens participated in this survey to help school officials learn the public’s perceptions of the district.

“By conducting annual perception surveys with our stakeholders we can monitor long-term trends, look for areas of celebration, develop plans to shore up potential areas for improvement, and most importantly, monitor the critical areas of our strategic plan,” said Superintendent Dr. Wade Smith. “Strategic Plan areas we are especially tuned in to include measuring school culture indicators around staff collaboration, aligned and coherent systems, social emotional supports for students and student safety/belonging.”

District officials were elated that results from students, staff and parents not only exceeded nationwide averages, but in most cases outperformed nationwide Schools of Distinction. In addition, public feedback at large continued to reinforce that an overwhelming majority of the community holds Walla Walla Schools in high regard.

Below are the survey results at a glance. Visit the WWPS website and select the Strategic Plan tab to see a comprehensive report of all results.

Educational Effectiveness Survey Results Summary  

Staff Results:

  • “Collaboration and Communication” and ”Effective  Leadership” are both 13% above Schools of Distinction
  • “Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment” is 20% above Schools of Distinction
  • “Cultural Responsiveness” is nearly 30% above Schools of Distinction
  • “Districtwide/District Office Support” is 23% above Schools of Distinction

Student Results:

  • Student results are well above national averages and are at, or above, Schools of Distinction in almost every category
  • Student feedback on “Safety and Bullying” is above Schools of Distinction and 8% higher than nationwide schools
  • Student feedback on ”Diversity and Cultural Competency” is at Schools of Distinction levels

Parent Results:

  • Parent results met or exceeded Schools of Distinction in every single category
  • Most notably, WWPS parents relayed strong support for building leadership, noted that they felt engaged with their child's school (collaboration category) and felt informed about their child's progress and keeping up to date.  

Community Telephone Survey Results Summary:

Of survey respondents with an opinion,

  • 84% gave WWPS a positive performance rating (up 10% in three years)
  • 89% would recommend WWPS to others
  • 80% believe WWPS is on the right track
  • 76% believe WWPS uses tax dollars wisely
  • 81% believe WWPS is open/transparent

“Thank you again to our community, staff, parents and students for providing this feedback, a critical component necessary in helping WWPS realize its vision of Developing Washington’s Most Sought-After Graduates,” said Superintendent Smith.

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1288/130945/CEE_Logo.jpg , 2020-01/1288/130945/Wade_Smith.jpg

Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Cyber Intrusion of Former Employer
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/23/20 10:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On January 22, 2020, Kristopher Ives, 33, of Portland, was sentenced to 12 months and one day in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for illegally accessing the computer network and data of his former employer, Gearbox Studios, after being terminated.

According to court documents, in 2008, Ives began working as a computer programmer for Gearbox Studios, a Portland-based digital marketing agency. Ives eventually became Gearbox Studio’s lead programmer for server architecture and support, a position of trust with access to the computer networks and data of both the company and the company’s clients.

Between February and May 2015, after being terminated from his position, Ives illegally accessed Gearbox’s computers to steal and tamper with data. He used this data to attack Gearbox’s servers and various websites belonging to Gearbox customers. Ives deleted nearly 20,000 products from customer websites and changed prices for various items. Ives also stole names and credit card numbers from these Gearbox customer websites and threatened to release the information unless Gearbox made payment to a bitcoin address.

On October 18, 2019, Ives pleaded guilty to one count of fraud in connection with computers.

This case was investigated by the FBI’s Oregon Cyber Task Force and prosecuted by Quinn P. Harrington, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Any public or private entity suspecting a cyber intrusion or attack should contact the FBI through the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or by calling your nearest FBI office.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Cascadia Quake Anniversary Reminds Oregonians to be 2 Weeks Ready (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/23/20 10:04 AM
2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg
2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3986/130942/thumb_Cascadia_Graphic.jpg

Many people in the Pacific Northwest are aware of the dangers of the Cascadia Subduction Zone since wider attention has been drawn to the 600-mile fault that runs from northern California to British Columbia, about 70-100 miles off the Pacific coast. The last Cascadia earthquake and tsunami occurred in this fault on January 26, 1700, with an estimated 9.0 magnitude.

Although it’s been 320 years since the last Cascadia event, we know another one will happen and that it’s a good idea to be prepared. It’s not a matter of if, but rather when, the next Cascadia earthquake and tsunami will strike.

Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards program coordinator for Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management, says that knowing what to do, and how to be prepared for a large-scale earthquake, or any disaster, can help to calm fear and empower people to take action. That action, says Rizzo, includes putting together a family plan and emergency kits to be 2 Weeks Ready.

“Being prepared to be self-sufficient for two weeks is an achievable goal and you may be more prepared than you think,” says Rizzo. “See what you already have and you can get there over time.”

Leadership in Oregon is making it a priority to get better prepared for the next Cascadia event. On Monday January 27, Governor Kate Brown is scheduled to attend an event commemorating the anniversary of Cascadia, and a briefing on the seismic safety technology called ShakeAlert, where she will also officially proclaim January 26-February 1 as Cascadia Earthquake Preparedness Week.

“When the next large-scale Cascadia earthquake and tsunami strike the Pacific Northwest, Oregon will face the greatest challenge of our lifetimes,” said Governor Kate Brown. “To be ready to recover, we must be aware and prepared. In the aftermath of a large-scale natural disaster, Oregonians will have to count on each other in the community, in the workplace, and at home until first responders are able to reach them. I urge everyone to start conversations this week with their families, friends, and loved ones about how to be safe and as ready as possible, especially by having two weeks of ready supplies.”

Oregon Office of Emergency Management has many tools and resources to be prepared for a Cascadia quake and other disasters. Check out our website at www.oregon.gov/OEM. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/3986/130942/Cascadia_Graphic.jpg , 2020-01/3986/130942/2_Weeks_Ready.jpg

Win for Life win one of many life changes (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/23/20 10:00 AM
2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4939/130941/thumb_OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

January 23, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – It’s been a very busy 12 months for Todd Williams. The Portland man got married, a got a new car and purchased a home, and after all that, won the Oregon Lottery.

“Now I can pay for it all,” Williams said when he claimed the top Win for Life prize of $1,000 a week for life.

Earlier this month, five minutes before he had to leave for work, Williams realized he won the Oregon Lottery’s Win for Life game. Williams, a regular Win for Life player, noticed his tickets while getting ready for work, and used the Lottery’s mobile app to scan the tickets.

“I had three or four tickets and I saw the story of the guy who put his Megabucks ticket through the washing machine and decided to check my tickets before work,” Williams said. “When I saw the animations on the app that I had won, I just kept scanning.”

Williams said he wanted to see the animations the mobile app plays when you scan a winning ticket -- blue confetti, fireworks, balloons and many others. He also couldn’t believe he won.

“I was so shocked, I ended up calling work and telling them I would be late,” he said. “I worked my shift, but obviously I had other things on my mind.”

With all of his major life changes in the past year, all he could say was, “Great timing!”

Williams purchased the winning ticket at the Fred Meyer on NE Glisan, in Portland and officials with the company said they were excited to have sold the top prize and were proud to be an Oregon Lottery retailer.

Fred Meyer will receive a retailer selling bonus of $13,000 for producing the winning ticket.

During the 2018 fiscal year, more than $90.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, Outdoor School, Veterans services and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where Williams lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , 2020-01/4939/130941/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

Bandon man operating unlicensed investment business loses 90 percent of investors' funds in less than a year
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/23/20 9:13 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is warning people to avoid investing with Robert Lee Adams, also known as Bob Adams, and his business, SimTradePro Inc. The division issued a cease-and-desist order against Adams and his business for operating as a state investment adviser without a license, and he may still be soliciting Oregon consumers.

Adams, a Bandon resident, formed a related company, Winning Investments, LLC, in 2017 allegedly to pool investor funds and invest them in the foreign currency exchange market. Four investors who participated lost more than $279,000 in less than a year. An elderly victim lost most of her retirement savings.

Adams charged each investor a $3,000 origination fee, offered the group investment strategies he selected, and pooled the investors’ funds in a local bank account. Adams then allegedly invested their funds in foreign currency trading programs that operated offshore. Adams and SimTradePro have never been licensed with the division as an investment adviser or investment adviser representative.

“Investments in foreign currency trading programs are extremely risky, and they are not for everyone,” said Andrew Stolfi, division administrator. “Before investing money you cannot afford to lose, and certainly before parting with your life savings, learn as much as you can about the firms and individuals you are considering. Make sure your investment adviser is licensed by the division and works with registered, reputable industry professionals.”

The division encourages everyone to protect their money. Ask questions to learn about your adviser’s registration status, disciplinary record, and complaint history. The first step before making an investment is to carefully choose a financial professional by checking their licensing status and background.

Oregonians are also encouraged to contact the division’s advocates at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) with questions or concerns about a financial adviser or product. If you have information or questions specifically regarding Robert Lee Adams and his business activities, contact Investigator Rachel Royston at 503-947-7093.

                                                                                               ###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


Grants available for Oregon museum projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 8:18 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

 

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission.

 

“This program funds a variety of museum projects. We hope to see both creative and practical proposals,” said Oregon Heritage Commission coordinator Beth Dehn. Past projects include interpretation at the Gilliam County Historical Society, High Desert Museum, and Oregon Jewish Museum; collections projects by Benton County Historical Society, Gresham Historical Society, Lane County Historical Society, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Tillamook Forest Center, Oregon Electric Railway Historical Society, and Oregon State Hospital Museum of Mental Health; and facility projects by Eugene Debbs Potts Foundation, North Lincoln County Historical Society, and Oregon Daughters of the American Revolution.  

 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application will be offered February 13, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. It will be available in person or as a webinar. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


It's Time to Open Everyone's Eyes to Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 01/23/20 8:02 AM
Open Your Eyes Poster
Open Your Eyes Poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4992/130933/thumb_In-Branch_Poster_11_x_8.5.png

A campaign urging consumers to consider credit unions as the best financial partner has launched throughout the Northwest.

SeaTac, Washington (Jan. 23, 2020) — Not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions operate to serve the people and businesses of Main Street, not shareholders on Wall Street. Those who join credit unions become member-owners, which means they get to keep their money where it belongs – in their wallets.

Consumers across the nation are choosing credit unions as their financial partners because they see the difference in service and savings. But for many, there are misconceptions about credit union membership. Some believe they can’t join because they don’t meet a membership requirement. Others fear it’s difficult to access funds while traveling, or that mobile banking, for example, won’t be available to them. All of these misconceptions couldn’t be further from the truth.

The credit union consumer consideration campaign, Open Your Eyes to a Credit Union®, dispels these myths. Earlier this month, the cooperative campaign – funded by Northwest credit unions – launched in the Northwest, joining 18 other regions across the country.

“Consumers are ready for a change,” said Danielle Sittu, Northwest Credit Union Association SVP of Marketing and Communications. “They want a financial partner that makes them the number-one priority. Anyone can join a credit union. In the Northwest, the credit union industry is robust and growing stronger every day.”

Consumers across Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are now beginning to see the campaign’s bold, black-and-white digital ads on Facebook and Instagram telling them about the credit union difference. They’re also watching high-energy videos on YouTube that urge them to take their money to the next level. The ads guide consumers to YourMoneyFurther.com, a website that educates them on the benefits of membership and helps them locate a nearby credit union.

As of last month, 9.2 million people have seen the ads on social media and 28.2 million have watched videos on YouTube, with more than 426 million total impressions. And the buzz is only growing.

“The interaction we’re seeing from across the United States is impressive,” Sittu said. “We’re proud of our strong Credit Union Movement here in the Northwest, where cooperative values are held in high regard. And we are so excited to share, with consumers, why and how credit unions are the better financial services choice.”

To learn more about the Open Your Eyes to a Credit Union® campaign, visit YourMoneyFurther.com, and check it out on Twitter and Facebook.

                                                                                    <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the trade association representing more than 175 not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3  million consumer members. Those members are served by a professional workforce of 18,700 professionals. According to an independent analysis by economists at ECONorthwest, Northwest credit unions drove a positive economic impact of $7.8 billion last year. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit: https://yourmoneyfurther.com

 




Attached Media Files: News Release , Open Your Eyes Poster

Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee seeks to fill vacancies
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/23/20 7:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is calling for qualified candidates to apply for two vacant positions on the agency’s Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee.

The open positions are a county representative for counties east of the Cascade Mountains, and a citizen representative for the public at large.

The Local Government Grant Program is funded by the Oregon Lottery and awards about $6 million annually to community outdoor recreation projects throughout the state. The ten-member Advisory Committee meets annually in June to review project applications and recommend funding recipients to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Committee members typically serve four-year terms. Time commitment for committee members includes the annual June meeting, held over three days in Salem, and reviewing the several grant applications leading up to the meeting. 

Qualified candidates for the vacant positions will have a demonstrated interest in outdoor recreation. To apply, contact Mark Cowan, OPRD grant program coordinator, and request an interest form: k.cowan@oregon.gov">mark.cowan@oregon.gov or 503-986-0591.

Learn more about the Local Government Grant Program and the Advisory Committee online:  oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/pages/local.aspx


Partners in Science Celebrates 30 Years of Hands-On Training for High School Educators
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 01/23/20 6:30 AM

January 23, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Partners in Science Celebrates 30 Years of Hands-On Training for High School Educators

Program marks three decades of service, honors Salem-Keizer teacher

 

Vancouver, WA – The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust celebrated the 30th anniversary of Partners in Science this week at the professional development program’s annual conference.

 

Partners in Science is a unique opportunity for high school science educators from around the Pacific Northwest to work one-on-one with a mentor conducting cutting-edge science research in an academic lab, a lab associated with another nonprofit institution or a national lab. Participants spend two summers in this environment, bringing their experiences back to their classrooms during the school year to help facilitate hands-on research to inspire and engage students from all backgrounds.

 

“Our benefactor, Jack Murdock, believed strongly in the power of hands-on research to inspire learning and spark innovation, particularly in the areas of STEM subjects that are so critical in our modern world,” said Dr. Moses Lee, senior program director for scientific research and enrichment programs, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We hear from educators regularly that this type of professional development opportunity is incredibly valuable in helping grow and enrich their teaching experience. We are grateful to play a small role in supporting educators in all communities across the Pacific Northwest.”

 

Partners in Science

Since it was founded in 1990, nearly 600 teachers from public and private high schools in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington have had the opportunity to grow their professional experience by collaborating on science research with researcher mentors through the Partners in Science program. Nearly 340 educators have returned for an additional session and continued mentorship.

 

Participation in the two-year program is funded entirely through a Murdock Trust grant. In addition to the two-year mentorship program, participants also attend an annual conference, where they have the opportunity to present their work to their peers. Following the original grant, partners can apply for a two-year supplemental grant to translate their research experiences back to their classroom; thus, directly transforming their habits of teaching and student learning.

 

“Science can’t just be taught with a text book and lecture notes. Teachers and students need to have an opportunity to see how the work comes to life in real-world scenarios,” said Kim Newman, program director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. Newman oversees the Partners in Science program and was a former participant when she was a biology and technology teacher at Camas High School. She notes that the impact of Partners in Science can be felt both by students and by the participants themselves.

 

“Many of our educators report feeling an increased confidence in their teaching after completing the program,” Newman added. “But we also see it in the classroom. Many Partners alumni transition from a ‘recipe’ style of lesson planning—where students are told to follow specific steps that will lead to a specific result—to an inquiry- based lesson plan, where students are given an opportunity to experiment with no defined path and the opportunity to hypothesize and discover the outcome themselves.”

 

Honoring Excellence

 

As part of the Partners in Science 30-year anniversary, the Murdock Trust introduced the new Murdock Exemplary Teacher-Researcher Award (META), honoring outstanding service by a Partners participant. This year’s winner, Dr. Jason Niedermeyer, is a biology teacher at South Salem High School and adjunct professor at Western Oregon University. 

 

“Dr. Niedermeyer is the definition of what the Partners in Science program is about as he is regularly praised by faculty and students for finding ways to bring science to life and get his students excited about research,” said Newman. “We are so pleased we can honor his outstanding work at this year’s conference and that we will be able to recognize more educators at future conferences.”

 

META includes an $8,000 cash award that is shared between the recipient and their school to support future, hands-on research opportunities.

 

For more information on the Partners in Science Program, please visit our website murdocktrust.org.

 

 

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,800 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and on our website.

###