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Columbia (Tri-Cities/Yakima/Pendleton) News Releases for Fri. Nov. 21 - 9:31 am
11/20/14
Public Notice and Request for Comment on DHS Proposed Amendment to the Reimbursement Rates for Developmental Disabilities In-Home Services
OR Department of Human Services - 11/20/14
An In-Home Expenditure Guidelines Version 2 was published November 3, 2014 listing rates for services that will be effective January 1, 2015. The rates apply to services delivered through the following Developmental Disabilities programs: Support Services for Adults, Comprehensive In-Home Supports for Adults and In-Home Support for Children. Leading up to January 1, 2015, the rates for services in those programs are found in separate Rate Range Guidelines specific to the program.

The three current Rate Range Guidelines do not have the same rates across programs for the same services. In order to come into compliance with 42 CFR 447.200 the Department will align all rates for the same service across programs. When provided by a licensed or certified provider agency, the affected services are: One on One Attendant Care, Relief Care, and Skills Training. The rate for an independent contractor delivering skills training is also affected. The rate for providers Family Training is also affected. The rates for some of these services will rise, others will be lowered.

The rates being amended can be viewed under Rate Guidelines at: http://www.dhs.state.or.us/spd/tools/dd/cm/

The new rates can be viewed in the Home Expenditure Guidelines at:
http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/DD/adults/ss_exp_guide.pdf

COMMENTS DUE: December 15, 2014

EFFECTIVE DATE: 1/1/15

HOW TO COMMENT: Send written comments by fax, mail or email to:

Mike Parr, Policy Analyst
Office of Developmental Disabilities Services
500 Summer Street NE
Salem, Oregon 97301
Fax: 503-947-1119
Email: mike.r.parr@state.or.us

NEXT STEPS: ODDS will consider all comments received.
Commercial Truck and Double Trailer Roll-Over Crash on I-84 at Milepost 145 (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/20/14
2014-11/1002/79774/UPS_Truck_2.jpg
2014-11/1002/79774/UPS_Truck_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1002/79774/thumb_UPS_Truck_2.jpg
Troopers are continuing the investigation into Thursday morning's commercial motor vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near milepost 145 (EB) involving a semi truck pulling a set of double trailers.

Senior Trooper Mike Holloran of The Dalles said the truck's driver, identified as ODELL THOMAS,55, of Vancouver WA, was travelling too fast for conditions on an icy freeway as he approached traffic slowing ahead; losing control, going off the road into the median and rolling over. Sr. Trooper Holloran said the driver was transported by ambulance to Good Shepherd Community Hospital in Hermiston for treatment of minor injuries.

Due to the icy conditions and location of the overturned truck troopers believe it will take several hours if not days to off-load the trailers by hand and then remove the truck. Drivers are asked to be mindful of crews working in the area to clear the crash and to reduce distractions and increase your following distances.

With icy weather motorists are urged to Know Before You Go and consult www.TripCheck.com for travel details. Drive Safe!


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1002/79774/UPS_Truck_2.jpg , 2014-11/1002/79774/UPS_Truck_1.jpg
The state fire marshal wants you to keep fire safety on your holiday menu
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 11/20/14
With Thanksgiving a week away, State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is reminding Oregonians to keep fire safety front and center when cooking and preparing holiday meals.

"When friends and family gather at this festive time of year, it shouldn't be marred by tragedy," says Walker. "By following simple fire safety steps you can keep yourself and loved ones safe."

From 2009 through 2013, there were more than 3,750 cooking-related fires in Oregon causing five deaths, 222 civilian injuries, and more than $32 million in property loss.

Cooking safety tips:
* Keep a close eye on your cooking; never leave cooking food unattended. If you leave the kitchen, turn off the stove or set a timer.
* Keep your cooking area clean, including stovetop, burners, oven, and exhaust fan.
* Keep anything that can catch fire - oven mitts, wooden utensils, dishtowels, and food packaging away from your stovetop.
* Wear clothing that will not dangle onto stove burners and catch fire.
* Keep pot and pan handles turned inward on the stove to avoid bumping them and spilling hot foods.
* Heat cooking oil slowly and never leave it unattended.
* Have a "kid-free zone" of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot foods or drinks are prepared or carried.

If you have a cooking fire:
* Always keep a lid nearby to smother small grease fires. Smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner and don't move the pan until it is completely cool.
* Never pour water on a grease fire; it can splatter the grease and spread the fire.
* In the event of a fire in your oven or microwave, turn off the oven and keep the door closed.
* When in doubt, get out! Call 9-1-1 after you leave.

Make sure you have smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Test smoke alarms monthly and replace them if they are 10 years old or older.

Turkey fryer safety:
The OSFM agrees with the National Fire Protection Association in discouraging the use of outdoor gas-fueled turkey fryers that cook the turkey in hot oil. The use of deep fat turkey fryers can lead to devastating burns, other injuries, and the destruction of property.

However, we also recognize some families choose this method to prepare their turkey. If you use a fryer, the OSFM urges you to use extreme caution.

"If you're cooking your turkey in a deep fat fryer, always do it outdoors a safe distance from buildings, deck railings, and any other flammable material, and never leave it unattended," advises State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "Hot oil is extremely dangerous, so never use turkey fryers on a wooden deck or in your garage."

Always follow the manufacturer's instructions in using your hot oil fryer. Place the fryer on a flat, stable, nonflammable surface and don't overfill it with cooking oil. Once the oil is up to temperature, turn off the burner and only insert turkeys that are completely thawed; otherwise hot oil will splatter and may boil over the sides of the fryer. Never use water to cool hot oil or extinguish a cooking oil fire. Keep children away from the fryer, and use thermometers to gauge oil and food temperatures. After cooking, make sure the oil is completely cool before removing it from the fryer.

More turkey fryer safety tips:
* Lower and raise food slowly to reduce splatter and prevent burns.
* Cover bare skin when adding or removing food from the fryer.
* Make sure to have at least two feet of space between the propane tank and the fryer burner.
* If the oil begins to smoke, immediately turn the fryer gas supply off and leave the pot uncovered to cool.

For more information on cooking safety, visit: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/Pages/kitchensafety.aspx

For more information on general home fire safety, visit: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/pages/commed_firesafety_program.aspx

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*** I-84 Closures *** Know Before You Go! with TripCheck.com (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/20/14
2014-11/1002/79760/Freezing_Rain__OSP_Crash.jpg
2014-11/1002/79760/Freezing_Rain__OSP_Crash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1002/79760/thumb_Freezing_Rain__OSP_Crash.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers and the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) are advising of hazardous conditions on Interstate 84 at multiple locations in the Pendleton Area.

Freezing Rain is the culprit in this photo when an OSP patrol car was hit while unoccupied. Motorists should avoid the area and monitor www.tripcheck.com for details on when the roadways will be open. Know Before You Go.


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1002/79760/Freezing_Rain__OSP_Crash.jpg
Alernate Bus Routes
East Valley Sch. Dist. - 11/20/14
East Valley School District will start at regular time but be using alternate bus routes due to slick roads.
11/18/14
Health advisory lifted November 18 for Willow Creek Reservoir
Oregon Health Authority - 11/18/14
November 18, 2014

Reduced blue-green algae levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted a health advisory issued October 10 for Willow Creek Reservoir, located just east of the town of Heppner in Morrow County.

Water monitoring has confirmed reduced levels of blue-green algae and their toxins. These reduced levels are not likely to be harmful to humans and animals.

Oregon health officials advise people who use Oregon water bodies for recreation to always be alert to signs of harmful algae blooms. People and their pets should avoid contact if the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red in color, or if the water has a thick mat of algae with an unpleasant odor.

For local information about water quality or blue-green algae sampling, contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at 541-676-9009. For drinking water information, contact your local drinking water treatment facility.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Bloom website at www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oregon October 2014 Statewide Unemployment Rate Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 11/18/14
Oregon adds 9,900 jobs in October

Payroll employment shot up by 9,900 in October. Most major industries added jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis, with three showing solid strength: professional and business services (+2,700 jobs); manufacturing (+2,200); and health care and social assistance (+2,000).

The gain of 9,900 was the largest monthly increase in nearly 20 years. The last time Oregon's economy added at least this many jobs was in August 1995 when 10,400 were added.

Payroll employment rose by 800 in September. This was a revision from the originally reported decline of 300 jobs.

Professional and business services accelerated its hiring trend in recent months. Its 2,700-job gain in October was the largest of the major industries. Over the past 12 months it added 12,600 jobs, which is more than one-quarter of all of Oregon's over-the-year payroll employment gains.

The companies in this broad industry include services firms such as legal, engineering, computer systems design, corporate offices, employment services, business support, and building services.

Two industries within professional and business services grew at especially fast rates over the past year. Employment services, which includes employee leasing and temporary help supply, added 3,700 jobs or 9.9 percent. Services to buildings and dwellings added 1,300 jobs or 6.4 percent.

Manufacturing also performed better than expected in October. Normally, manufacturing would shed 3,600 jobs at this time of year as food manufacturing firms scale back their workforce following the heavy summer harvest season. But in October, manufacturing only shed 1,400 jobs. This translated into a seasonally adjusted gain of 2,200.

Food manufacturing employed 27,700 in October, a drop of 1,200 from September, but a gain of 200 from October 2013. Many other manufacturing industries were relatively flat, when each would typically see a modest October job decline.

Over the longer term, a few manufacturing industries have grown at a faster rate than the overall economy. In the past 12 months transportation equipment manufacturing added 700 jobs, or 6.5 percent, while wood
product manufacturing also added 700 jobs, or 3.3 percent.

Private-sector health care and social assistance added 2,000 jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis. Its social assistance component has been growing the fastest over the course of the year, adding 1,800 jobs or 5.3 percent since October 2013.

Oregon's unemployment rate was unchanged at 7.0 percent in October. Despite October's strong job growth, the unemployment rate didn't fall because more and more Oregonians are entering the labor force and looking for work.

The September unemployment rate was also 7.0 percent, revised from the originally reported 7.1 percent.

Oregon's unemployment rate has remained in a tight range between 6.8 percent and 7.1 percent since December 2013.

Another sign of an improving labor market is declining long-term unemployment. The number of Oregonians unemployed for more than 27 weeks declined steadily over the past four years. In October, approximately 33,000 Oregonians had been unemployed for 27 weeks or more. This is down from more than 100,000 during much of 2010.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the October county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Monday, November 24th and the statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for November on Tuesday, December 16th.

The Oregon Employment Department is responsible for releasing Oregon's monthly payroll employment and labor force data. The data are prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The BLS estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other inputs.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this official Oregon series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the April, May and June 2014 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS and are revised annually.

For the complete pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, visit www.QualityInfo.org/press-release, then within the Press Release Documents list, select Oregon Monthly Employment Situation. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. If you want the press release as a Word document, please phone the contact person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/930/79702/Oregon_unemployment_rate_press_release_11-18-2014.pdf
Marine Board Employee Recognized with Prestigious Regional Award (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 11/18/14
Janine Belleque being presented the Robert F. Rittenhouse Award by Director of Government Affairs, Peter Schrappen.
Janine Belleque being presented the Robert F. Rittenhouse Award by Director of Government Affairs, Peter Schrappen.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/4139/79700/thumb_JanineNMMAAwd2014Web.jpg
The NW Marine Trade Association recently recognized the efforts of the Marine Board's Janine Belleque, with the Robert F. Rittenhouse Award during their annual meeting in Seattle on November 12, 2014. This regional award is given to a person or group from Oregon in the boating industry who has made a significant contribution during the past year.

For nearly two decades, Belleque has worked tirelessly for Oregon boaters, helping provide grant funding to waterway managers for boating access, parking, land-side and floating restrooms, and other amenities that serve recreational boating. Belleque has become fluent in speaking engineering and contracting language and is well-versed in the issues relating to shrinking access in many other parts of the country. Belleque is currently serving in her second term as the States Organization for Boating Access (SOBA) President and filling the role of Interim Boating Facilities Section Manager until a replacement has been found, in addition to her primary role as the Marine Board's Grants/Contracts Coordinator. Belleque also serves on a multitude of Marine Board advisory committees to help with future agency initiatives that integrate all boating user groups.

Background: Robert F. Rittenhouse was appointed Marine Director to the Oregon State Marine Board when the board was first formed in 1959. Rittenhouse served for 27 years with the U.S. Coast Guard, which gave him a knowledge of boating matters that appealed to the state as it began interviewing candidates. The Oregon State Marine Board was founded and is to this day supported by Oregon State recreational boaters for the purpose of overseeing boating safety programs and developing boating access. Rittenhouse served as Director from August, 1959 until he died on September 2, 1973.

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Attached Media Files: Janine Belleque being presented the Robert F. Rittenhouse Award by Director of Government Affairs, Peter Schrappen.
Media Advisory : Oregon Statewide Unemployment Rate to be Released
Oregon Employment Dept. - 11/18/14
The Oregon statewide unemployment rate will be released today at 10:00 a.m.

There will be a pre-recorded video presentation by state employment economist Nick Beleiciks available at that time on the Employment Department's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ORGovEmployment, and on the official website of the department's Research Section, www.qualityinfo.org.

In addition, downloadable audio clips will be available on the department's website: http://www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/COMM/Pages/audio_production.aspx.
11/17/14
Public Meeting Announcement - Oregon Business Development Commission
Business Oregon (Ore. Business Development Dept.) - 11/17/14
The Oregon Business Development Commission will hold a regular meeting Friday, November 21, 2014.

Details:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Department of State Lands, Land Board Room
775 Summer Street NE, First Floor
Salem, OR 97301

Agenda can be located here:
http://www.oregon4biz.com/Business-Development-Commission/2014meetings.php

Unanticipated agenda items may or may not be included. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to: Suzy Miller at (503) 986-0106.
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet by phone November 20
Oregon Health Authority - 11/17/14
Contact: Alissa Robbins, 503-490-6590 (media inquiries)
Milena Malone, 971-673-3392 (meeting information or accommodations)

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet by phone November 20

What: The Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee will meet by phone this Thursday, November 20. The primary focus of the meeting will be to select a benchmark for the 2015 incentive measure "Effective contraceptive use among women at risk of unintended pregnancy" and to select 2015 challenge pool measures. Public testimony will be heard at 11:40 a.m.

When: Thursday, November 20, 10 a.m. to noon

Where: This meeting will be held by conference call only. Interested persons can join through a listen-only conference line at 1-877-810-9415, participant code 1773452. Lines will be unmuted no earlier than 11:40 for public testimony.

Agenda:
* Select benchmark for effective contraceptive use
* Select 2015 challenge pool measures
* Committee meeting schedule
* Public testimony

For more information, please visit the committee's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/metrix.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Committee for Family Forestlands meets Thursday, November 20 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/17/14
Forested property in West Lane County, Oregon
Forested property in West Lane County, Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1072/79680/thumb_WLane.Stewardship.Shiappaet_001.jpg
The Committee for Family Forestlands is meeting from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm this Thursday, November 20 at the Oregon Department of Forestry, Clatsop Room Building C, 2600 State Street, Salem.

The committee will invest its morning previewing legislative concepts, including those stemming from the 2014 fire season.

Agenda
Members will also learn more about the Department's communication internally and externally, including with other state agencies. The Committee will round out the day receiving updates from these sub-committees:

* Eastside Private Forest Collaborative
* Forestland Tax Symposium
* Nominations

The Committee welcomes public input at its meetings on all issues related to its work.

About the Committee for Family Forestlands
The Committee researches policies impacting family forestland viability, resource protection, and forestry benefits. Based on its findings the Committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and State Forester.

The thirteen member committee includes seven voting and six non-voting members. Voting members include family forest owners, an environmental community representative, a forest products industry representative, and a citizen-at-large public representative. Non-voting ex-officio members may include representatives from the Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State University, Oregon small forestland groups, forestry-related industry associations, and the Oregon Forest Resources Institute representatives.

Public invited
Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. For additional information about attending the meeting, accessibility, or special accommodations, please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502. The Committee website can be found at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/board/cff/cff.aspx.

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Attached Media Files: Forested property in West Lane County, Oregon
Oregon's rate of unneeded antibiotics use remains nation's lowest
Oregon Health Authority - 11/17/14
November 17, 2014

Oregon's rate of unneeded antibiotics use remains nation's lowest

Dangerous resistance still a problem due to continued misuse

Oregon public health officials are seeing less resistance in bacteria most responsible for serious respiratory infections such as pneumococcus, thanks to the state's low antibiotic prescribing rates, they say.

But people continue to misuse antibiotics, and that can lead to dangerous and potentially deadly drug resistance, says Ann Thomas, M.D., a public health physician in the Oregon Health Authority's Public Health Division, and medical director of its Alliance Working for Antibiotic Resistance Education (AWARE) program.

"While Oregon is doing well compared with other states, we're still seeing antibiotics being used to treat bronchitis and the cold, which is not appropriate," Thomas says. "Such misuse promotes the development of antibiotic resistance to common respiratory infections, which can turn them into difficult-to-treat infections."

In a 2013 report, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that each year in the U.S., resistant pneumococcus causes 1.2 million infections, about 19,000 hospitalizations and 7,000 deaths.

Oregon health care providers are doing their part to reduce excessive antibiotic prescriptions and keep levels of resistance low in Oregon. In 2012, only 1 percent of serious pneumococcal infections in the Portland area were resistant to penicillin, Thomas says. Clinicians can continue to help keep Oregon's rates low by taking time to educate patients about antibiotic resistance and the possibility of serious side effects, including allergic reactions that result in a rash and anaphylaxis, that send thousands of patients to the emergency room every year.

However, Thomas is concerned about continued misuse of antibiotics for certain common infections. Oregon's medical and pharmacy claims database shows that broad-spectrum antibiotics - drugs that can be used to treat a wide variety of different bacterial infections - were used on 55 percent of upper respiratory infections in 2011. They also were used in a majority of cases of bronchitis and the common cold - 90 percent and 66 percent, respectively - although those conditions rarely require treatment.

And the older you get, the more likely you are to be inappropriately prescribed these types of antibiotics. Only 34 percent of children 5 and younger in Oregon received broad-spectrum antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections, compared to 40 percent of kids ages 5 to 17, and 72 percent of people aged 18 to 64.

As part of its ongoing effort to urge consumers to help reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics, AWARE, with CDC funding, is taking part in "Get Smart About Antibiotics Week" this week - November 17-21. AWARE is partnering with the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy to offer educational information and activities promoting appropriate antibiotic use and hand hygiene during a free public event called "AWARE on the Square," set for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, November 21, at Pioneer Courthouse Square, 701 SW 6th Avenue in downtown Portland. They also are providing free flu vaccinations for uninsured adults from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Antibiotics are ineffective for treating viruses such as colds and the flu. Taking them when they're not needed or not as prescribed increases a person's risk for later antibiotic-resistant infections, which are more difficult to treat. These infections also require stronger antibiotics that may cause serious side effects.

Consumers also should avoid pressuring their providers to prescribe antibiotics for colds and the flu. Those who are appropriately prescribed antibiotics for bacterial infections, however, should take every dose, even if symptoms improve, since not doing so contributes to drug resistance. And they should not share antibiotics with others; someone who takes antibiotics not prescribed to them can experience adverse reactions.

To learn more about Oregon AWARE and Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, call 971-673-1111 or visit the AWARE website at www.healthoregon.org/antibiotics. The CDC website at www.cdc.gov/getsmart has more information about the national "Get Smart" campaign.

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11/16/14
Red Cross helps five people, four dogs affected by Irrigon fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 11/16/14
Red Cross disaster action team members responded to a single-family fire at about 4:30 p.m. Sunday on the 300 block of Southeast Greenwood Street in Irrigon, Ore.

The fire affected two adults, three children and four dogs. Red Cross provided comfort kits, food, and information about health and mental health services.
11/14/14
Insurance Division: Insurers must pay for treatment of autism, mental health conditions
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/14/14
Salem - The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, Insurance Division today issued two bulletins that require insurers to cover treatment of autism and other mental health conditions, just as insurers cover treatment for physical health conditions.

The bulletins take effect retroactively to Aug. 8, 2014, the same day the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon ruled that Providence must pay for Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy as a treatment for autism. Many Oregon families seeking autism treatment have had challenges getting coverage for ABA in recent years.

"Recent court decisions have made it clear that ABA should be a covered service when it's appropriate for the patient," said Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali. "We expect insurers to stop applying blanket exclusions in their policies and claims practices that effectively deny access to medically necessary treatment for mental health conditions."

For any health condition, insurers can make coverage decisions based on whether the treatment is deemed medically necessary for an individual patient. The bulletins clarify that insurers' policies cannot include categorical exclusions that result in broad denials of mental health treatments. And, specifically, they cannot deny treatment for ABA therapy on the basis that it is experimental or investigational.

Consumers can appeal medical necessity denials to the company - and ultimately through the Insurance Division - via an independent review organization.

The Insurance Division has the authority to issue bulletins to clarify requirements of insurance companies under the Oregon Insurance Code and other state and federal laws. The division developed the bulletins through a public process and received feedback from consumers, advocates, insurers, and other interested parties.

Consumers with outstanding claims should contact their insurance company. They also can call the Insurance Division Consumer Advocacy Unit at 1-888-877-4894 (toll-free) or email cp.ins@state.or.us.

You can find the bulletins and more information on the Insurance Division's website at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/insurance/legal/bulletins/Pages/proposed-bulletin-review.aspx.

The Insurance Division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.insurance.oregon.gov.
Unemployment Tax Rates for Oregon Employers to Decrease in 2015
Oregon Employment Dept. - 11/14/14
Unemployment tax rates for most Oregon employers will decline January 1, 2015. Employers that pay into the system will move from Schedule 6 to Schedule 5, saving the average Oregon employer about $63 per employee annually.

Tax Schedule 5 includes an average rate of 2.53% for the first $35,700 paid to each employee. The specific rate each employer will pay under the new schedule depends on how much they have used the unemployment insurance system.

During the recession, 36 states depleted their trust funds to the point of needing to borrow money to cover unemployment insurance benefit payments. Businesses in many of those states face tax surcharges or reductions in federal tax credits. Due to Oregon's self-balancing formula, the state's trust fund has maintained an adequate level despite record unemployment insurance payments.

Oregon law requires the Employment Department to use a statutory formula to determine employer payroll tax rates for the upcoming year. These taxes go into the unemployment insurance trust fund used to pay unemployment benefits. At its lowest point, the trust fund had a balance of $700 million, but as of November 1, 2014, the balance stood at just over $2.2 billion.

Movement between the eight schedules of tax rates is one of the self-balancing aspects of Oregon's unemployment insurance trust fund law. Each September a formula contained in statute determines how much should be collected during the next year to maintain a solvent fund. Each schedule has a range of tax rates based on an employer's previous unemployment insurance experience. Employers with more unemployment insurance claims have a higher tax rate than those with fewer claims.
Walla Walla School District: School Board Meeting - November 18, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 11/14/14
Walla Walla School District: School Board Meeting - November 18, 2014
As per the attached agenda.
Supporting documents are available at the following link:
http://www.wwps.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2705&Itemid=1028&jsmallfib=1&dir=JSROOT/2014


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1288/79628/11.18.14_SB_00_AGENDA.pdf
Guide to 2015 health insurance coverage for Oregonians: Understanding what you will pay for care
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/14/14
As open enrollment for 2015 health insurance plans approaches, the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Insurance Division, is providing information to consumers about how to choose the plan that best meets their health and financial needs. This guide focuses on your cost of health care.

When comparing health plans during open enrollment, it is important to find the plan that best meets your financial and health needs. That means taking a close look at what services you expect you will need during 2015 and how much they will cost.

Although you pay the insurance company a monthly premium for coverage, you will also pay a portion of the costs for many of the health care services you receive. Generally, if you pay a lower monthly premium, your share of the costs for services may be higher. If you choose a plan with a higher monthly premium, you may pay less when you visit a doctor, fill a prescription, or use other medical services. Here are the key terms to look for when comparing plans:

Deductible: The annual amount you pay for care before your plan begins to pay. For example, if your deductible is $1,000, your plan will not pay anything until you have paid $1,000 worth of care. Keep in mind that not all payments apply toward your deductible. For example, your costs for out-of-network services or a flat dollar co-payment may not count toward your deductible.

Out-of-pocket maximum: The most you pay during a policy period (usually one year) before your plan begins to pay 100 percent for covered benefits. This maximum never includes your premium, and some plans do not count all of your co-payments, deductibles, co-insurance payments, out-of-network payments, or other expenses toward this limit.

Co-insurance: Your share of the costs for care that is covered. It is a percent (for example, 20 percent) of the "allowed amount," which is the amount the insurance company has negotiated to pay for a service. For example, if the health insurance or plan's allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and you have met your deductible, your co-insurance payment of 20 percent would be $20. The health insurance or plan pays the rest of the allowed amount, or $80.

Co-payment: A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for covered care, usually when you receive the service. The amount can vary. For example, it might be $15 for a regular doctor visit and $30 for a specialist visit. Your prescription drug co-payment could vary depending on the type of prescription drugs.

If you qualify, you may be able to get tax credits to help pay for your premium as well as cost-sharing reductions. This financial help is available only through the federal Health Insurance Marketplace at healthcare.gov.

The open enrollment period for people who buy their own health insurance runs from Nov. 15, 2014, through Feb. 15, 2015. This is the one time during the year when you can change plans, change insurance companies, or choose to stay with the plan you have. You can shop and access financial help during open enrollment by visiting the federal Health Insurance Marketplace at healthcare.gov. Consumers can also enroll directly with an insurance company or agent. Agents and community partners can help you sort through the many cost-sharing and premium options to decide which plans might be the best fit for you. To find an agent or community partner to help you enroll in a Marketplace plan, visit CoverOregon.com.

For more information:
The Insurance Division has information about health insurance posted online at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/insurance/gethelp/health/Pages/health.aspx and has consumer advocates available to answer questions at 1-888-877-4894 (toll-free).

The Insurance Division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit http://www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board to meet November 20 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 11/14/14
November 14, 2014

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, November 20, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Callan Conference Room, Kirkbride Building, third floor, Oregon State Hospital, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem

Details: Board members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For more information, see the board's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/amh/osh/pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #
11/13/14
Fatal Traffic Crash on Highway 26 - 6 Miles east of Prineville in Crook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/13/14
2014-11/1002/79592/Fatal_TC_MP_25_on_26_2.jpg
2014-11/1002/79592/Fatal_TC_MP_25_on_26_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1002/79592/thumb_Fatal_TC_MP_25_on_26_2.jpg
November 13, 2014

Lieutenant Josh Brooks
Public Information Officer
(503) 934-1261

osppio@state.or.us
www.twitter.com/ORStatePolice

Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are continuing the investigation into Thursday afternoon's fatal traffic crash on Highway 26 at milepost 25, east of Prineville in Crook County.

On November 13, at approximately 12:44 p.m., OSP troopers were dispatched to a report of a single vehicle crash down a steep embankment on Highway 26 near milepost 25. Upon arrival, troopers located a tan, 2000 Chevrolet Silverado pickup, off the roadway down a steep embankment. The pickup struck a Juniper tree in the drivers' side door causing significant damage. The pickups operator, identified as ROBERT L. AKINS, 91, of Bend, was deceased at the scene. No other passengers were riding with him.

Witnesses at the scene told OSP AKINS was travelling with two other vehicles in a caravan; the said AKINS and another vehicle began to lose traction on the packed snow and ice at the location. The second slipping vehicle was able to recover safely.

OSP was assisted at the scene by the Crook County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Fire and Rescue, the Crook County District Attorney's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Senior Trooper Andrea Vaughn is the lead investigator on this crash. Next of kin notification has been made.



### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1002/79592/Fatal_TC_MP_25_on_26_2.jpg
11/12/14
Forestry Board panel on federal forests to meet November 18 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/12/14
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Distribution: Major Media
November 12, 2018

Contact: Tony Andersen
503-945-7427
tony.andersen@oregon.gov


The Oregon Board of Forestry's Subcommittee on Federal Forests will meet November 18 in Salem to work on implementing actions in the subcommittee's federal forests work plan. The Federal Forests Subcommittee Work Plan was recently approved by the full Board on July 25, 2014.

The meeting will be held from 1:30- 3:00 p.m. in the Tillamook Room - Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Salem Headquarters, 2600 State Street. Members of the subcommittee may attend by conference call; the public is invited to attend in person.

Meeting materials are available at
www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/BOF_Subc_Fed_Forests.aspx.

Oregon has 30 million acres of forestland, of which more than 18 million acres are federally owned. The subcommittee was formed in January 2013 to explore means of ongoing board engagement in federal forest management issues, in concert with Gov. John Kitzhaber and other public policy leaders.

About the board
The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information about the board is available at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx.

###
KBSD BOARD WORKSHOP SCHEDULED FOR 11/14/14 FROM 8 am-12 pm IN THE BOARD ROOM
Kiona-Benton City Sch. Dist. - 11/12/14
The Ki-Be School Board will meet for a workshop to discuss strategic planning in the board room.
Public Notice and Request for Comment on Medically Involved Children's Waiver (0565)
OR Department of Human Services - 11/12/14
The Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority are seeking public comment on the submission of the Medically Involved Children's Waiver (0565).

42 CFR ß441.304 (f) (1-4) requires that the agency establish and use a public input process. The process must include meaningful opportunities for input for individuals served. The following is a summary of substantive changes to being proposed for the three Children's Model Waivers-
* New services added- Environmental Safety Modifications, Specialized Medical Supplies, Individual Directed Goods and Services and Vehicle Modifications
* Services Removed- Translation, Counseling as a component of Family Training
* Revision of the State's Quality Improvement Strategy
* Revision of Level of Care criteria
* Removed the following provider types from providers of Family Training and Counseling Services - Licensed Psychologists, Mental Health Professional: Counselor and Social Worker

The proposed waiver application can be reviewed here:
http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/dhsnews/Pages/news-releases.aspx

Comments can be sent to odds.info@state.or.us and should be received no later than December 15, 2014.
Wapato High School Student Selected as Top Music Student
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 11/12/14
Good morning everyone,


Attached is a release regarding one of our high school students being selected as one of the top musical students in the State.

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact me.


Thanks and remember "EVERY School Day Counts"


Attached Media Files: WMEA Music Student
"The Promise of Oregon" schools campaign debuts Friday
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 11/12/14
A public education support campaign celebrating the achievements and aspirations of Oregon students will debut Friday, Nov. 14, with a new website, videos, photographs, social media channels and more.

The campaign, called "The Promise of Oregon," is based on two defining principles: Today's students are Oregon's greatest natural resource. Accordingly, we as Oregonians must invest in our public schools so the next generation can reach its potential.

The new website can be found at www.promiseoregon.org. An abbreviated version of the website, with a short video, is live now, with the full website going live on Nov. 14.

Already, 20 local boards have passed resolutions supporting the campaign.

The "Promise" campaign, which is being run by the Oregon School Boards Association (OSBA), aims to create a groundswell of public support for K-14 education, in hopes of meeting Oregon's 40-40-20 goals and lifting student achievement and graduation rates. As the campaign moves into the 2015 legislative session, it will advocate for funding levels necessary for all of Oregon's students to compete in the 21st century world economy.

"This is the beginning of a movement that will restore the energy and investment needed to ensure that this generation will reach its maximum potential," said Betsy Miller-Jones, OSBA's executive director.

OSBA is a member services organization for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges. It also provides services to charter schools and their boards.
11/11/14
Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash on State Route 3 in Wallowa County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/11/14
2014-11/1002/79528/LaGrande_1.JPG
2014-11/1002/79528/LaGrande_1.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1002/79528/thumb_LaGrande_1.JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation of a single vehicle crash down a steep embankment off State Route 3 north in Wallowa County.

At approximately 3:54 p.m. on Nov. 10, OSP was notified of a single vehicle fatal traffic crash on State Route 3 near milepost .7. Preliminary investigation indicates that, at approximately 3:30 p.m., SONJA LOUISE JOHNSON, 23, of Asotin, Wash., was traveling northbound when her vehicle, a 2002 Oldsmobile Alero, crossed the southbound lane and continued off the shoulder and down into the canyon. The vehicle rolled approximately 500 feet before coming to rest near the bottom. First-responders on-scene discovered Ms. Johnson deceased in the vehicle. She was wearing her safety belt at the time of the crash.

OSP was assisted by Wallowa County Sheriff's Office, Wallowa County Search and Rescue, Enterprise Fire Department and Joseph Fire Department. Next of kin notification was made by Asotin County Sheriff's Office in Washington. Senior Trooper Jed Stone is the lead investigator in this crash.


### Oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice

Lieutenant Josh Brooks
Public Information Officer
Oregon State Police

Sergeant Kyle Hove
LaGrande Area Command
Oregon State Police
(Contributing)


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1002/79528/LaGrande_1.JPG , 2014-11/1002/79528/LaGrande_2.JPG
PHOTOS: Oregon National Guard celebrates Veterans Day (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 11/11/14
2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-182.JPG
2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-182.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/962/79527/thumb_141111-Z-OT568-182.JPG
Photo Captions:
141111-Z-PL993-045: Brig. Gen. Todd Plimpton, commander of the Oregon Army National Guard, speaks to an audience of more than 100 fellow Veterans from all eras, family members and guests at an event hosted by the Beaverton American Legion Post 124 in Beaverton, Ore., Nov. 11. The Oregon National Guard participated in more than 20 separate Veterans Day events throughout the state this year. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

141111-Z-OT568-182:
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the "Governor's Own" Bravo Battery, 2-218 Field Artillery Battalion, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, perform a Howitzer Salute during the annual Veterans Day Memorial Service at Timber Linn Memorial Park, Nov. 11, in Albany, Ore. The Oregon National Guard participated in more than 20 separate Veterans Day events throughout the state this year. (Photo by Staff Sgt. April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

141111-Z-OT568-324:
A member of the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team, wearing a chemical protective suit, greets children along the parade route during the annual Albany Veterans Day Parade, Nov. 11, in Albany, Ore. The Oregon National Guard participated in more than 20 separate Veterans Day events throughout the state this year. (Photo by Staff Sgt. April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

141111-Z-OT568-340:
Members of the Oregon Air National Guard's 125th Special Tactics Squadron, and their sleeping passenger, cruise along the parade route in a tactical vehicle during the annual Albany Veterans Day Parade, Nov. 11, in Albany, Ore. The Oregon National Guard participated in more than 20 separate Veterans Day events throughout the state this year. (Photo by Staff Sgt. April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

141111-Z-OT568-436:
Maj. Gen. Daniel Hokanson, Adjutant General, Oregon, shakes hands to thank World War II Veterans during the annual Albany Veterans Day Parade, Nov. 11, in Albany, Ore. The WWII Veterans were grand marshals of the parade this year to honor their service as the "Greatest Generation." (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-182.JPG , 2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-PL993-045.jpg , 2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-436.JPG , 2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-324.JPG , 2014-11/962/79527/141111-Z-OT568-340.JPG
Be prepared: Winds may trigger power outages
Pacific Power - 11/11/14
Contact: Pacific Power media hotline FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
1-800-570-5838 Nov. 11, 2014

Be prepared: Winds may trigger power outages
Avoid downed lines, charge mobile devices, call 1-877-508-5088 to report outages

PORTLAND, Ore. - With cold windy weather blowing into parts of the Northwest, Pacific Power reminds its customers and the public to take precautions to stay safe and comfortable.

"We work hard to avoid outages, but when bad weather strikes -- outages happen, and we work just as hard to get your power back on quickly and safely," said Doug Butler, vice president, operations. "Based on experience, we've anticipated and prepared, and we're ready to assist customers should major outages occur. Just as our crews are prepared to respond, we ask our customers to be prepared as well so we can work together to keep safety the No. 1 priority."

Every home should have an emergency kit that includes the following:

* Flashlight
* Battery-operated radio and clock
* Extra batteries
* Non-perishable foods
* Manual can opener
* Bottled water
* Blankets

If a power outage occurs, Pacific Power encourages customers to first check fuses and circuit breakers. If the power failure is not caused inside the home or business, the customer should report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

* Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous.
* Call and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.

(More)

Storm-2-2-2


* Candles should never be left unattended or used for extended periods. Use a flashlight or other battery-powered lighting source.
* Use a fireplace or wood stove to keep warm. Pay careful attention to fire hazards.
* Never use kerosene or propane heaters inside without proper ventilation. They create dangerous fumes. Also, don't use charcoal in your house or garage.
* Never use a barbecue grill indoors. Cook over sterno cans.
* Don't drive over downed power lines.
* Turn on your porch light switch. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if lights are on.
* As much as possible, do not open refrigerators and freezers--they will keep food and perishables inside cold for some time if not opened.
* Preserve body heat by wearing multiple layers of clothing. Add a hat and blanket to stay warm. Blankets and towels around windows and doors help keep the heat in.
* Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
* Protect your pipes during freezing weather by wrapping them with insulation. Also, leave faucets dripping so water won't freeze and crack the pipes.
* Generators should be outside or in a well ventilated unoccupied space.
* Make sure generators are properly wired for your home or business, and don't connect a generator directly to your home's main fuse box or circuit panel. This can create a dangerous back feed hazard for line crews.

Pacific Power also thanks customers in advance for being patient during power outages, confident that crews make every effort to keep outage durations to a minimum and to restore power safely and quickly.

This season, customers and media representatives can also track larger scale outages online. Outages affecting more than 500 customers will be posted on the Pacific Power website as soon as information is available. Updates will be made as new information becomes available. Go to: pacificpower.net/outage
and then select the state where the outage is located.

-30-
11/10/14
FBI Releases 2013 Crime Statistics for Oregon and Washington
FBI - Oregon - 11/10/14
Today, the FBI released its annual Crime in the United States report for American cities.

Nationally, the estimated number of violent crimes decreased 4.4 percent in 2013 when compared with 2012 data. Property crimes decreased 4.1 percent, marking the 11th straight year the collective estimates for property crime offenses declined.

The FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program collects data on specific violent crimes (murder and non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) and specific property crimes (burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft.) Nationally in 2013, every crime category saw decreases. More than 18,400 city, county, state, federal, college/university, and tribal law enforcement agencies voluntarily contribute data to this annual report.

*Northwest Highlights*
Some highlights from cities with populations of more than 100,000 people in the Pacific Northwest include:

?---? In Portland, the number of violent and property crimes declined in almost every category, except for the number of rapes, which was virtually unchanged.
?---? In Eugene, there were decreases in the number of robberies, aggravated assaults, and larceny-thefts. There were increases in the numbers of burglaries and motor vehicle thefts. There were no murders/non-negligent manslaughters in either 2012 or 2013. The number of rapes is not comparable from 2012 to 2013 due to a change in definition and reporting.
?---? In Gresham, the number of murders/non-negligent manslaughters increased from four (in 2012) to five (in 2013). Other categories -- including rapes, robberies, aggravated assaults, and burglaries -- saw increases as well. There were decreases in the numbers of larceny-thefts and motor vehicle thefts.
?---? In Salem, the number of murders/non-negligent manslaughters (seven) and robberies (138) were unchanged from 2012 to 2013. There were decreases in the number of aggravated assaults, burglaries and motor vehicle thefts. The only category with an increase was larceny-theft. The number of rapes is not comparable from 2012 to 2013 due to a change in definition and reporting.
?---? In Vancouver, there were decreases in the numbers of murders and non-negligent manslaughter cases (from five in 2012 to two in 2013), robberies, burglaries, larceny-thefts and motor vehicle thefts. There was an increase in the number of aggravated assaults. The number of rapes is not comparable from 2012 to 2013 due to a change in definition and reporting.

The breakdown for these cities of populations of 100,000 and more is:

Portland
Crime 2012 2013
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 20 14
Forcible Rape 231 234
Robbery 950 917
Aggravated assault 1,892 1,776
Burglary 4,471 4,128
Larceny-theft 22,398 22,216
Motor vehicle theft 3,585 3,289
?
Eugene
Crime 2012 2013
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 0 0
Rape 72 68 (not comparable)*
Robbery 196 195
Aggravated assault 162 139
Burglary 1,515 1,539
Larceny-theft 6,054 5,773
Motor vehicle theft 435 608
?
Gresham
Crime 2012 2013
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 4 5
Forcible rape 33 52
Robbery 207 275
Aggravated assault 243 279
Burglary 886 920
Larceny-theft 3,230 3,123
Motor vehicle theft 742 510
?
Salem
Crime 2012 2013
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 7 7
Rape 40 47 (not comparable)*
Robbery 138 138
Aggravated assault 379 328
Burglary 1,043 983
Larceny-theft 4,958 5,143
Motor vehicle theft 730 656

?Vancouver
Crime 2012 2013
Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 5 2
Rape 72 74 (not comparable)*
Robbery 172 146
Aggravated assault 343 371
Burglary 1,044 1,007
Larceny-theft 4,343 3,950
Motor vehicle theft 1,091 976

*Analysis*
The FBI simply compiles the information as it is provided from local jurisdictions. Media should contact those local jurisdictions for any analysis of the numbers listed above. Also note that the report features a prominent message cautioning against using the statistics to rank cities or counties. Such rankings can lead to simplistic or incomplete analyses, overlooking the many variables impacting crime and how the cities report it.

The FBI has been producing the Uniform Crime Report since 1930.

View the entire report: Crime in the United States, 2013 (http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/crime-in-the-u.s.-2013)

*NOTE: In many cases, the reader should not compare the number of rapes in 2012 to those in 2013. The FBI changed the definition of rape and, thus, the reporting from one year to the next is not comparable for cities that used the legacy definition for 2012 and the new definition for 2013.


Attached Media Files: Stats for WA Cities 2013 , Crime Stats for OR Cities 2013 , Crime Stats by State in 2013
Forestry Stakeholders Gather in Lacey
Society of American Foresters - 11/10/14
Lacey, WA- Stakeholders in Washington's forests will gather in Lacey on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, to address the topic of "Working Forests for the 21st Century." The meeting will be held at the Norman Worthington Conference Center at Saint Martin's University from 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Presented by the Washington State Society of American Foresters, the conference will focus on balancing social, ecological, and economic products and values from Working Forests.

Eleven speakers will examine topics on forest science for the future, climate change adaptation, forest infrastructure and markets, innovations in wood architecture, early successional habitat, carbon sequestration, and examples of managing Tribal, community, and family working forests.
Speakers include Tom DeLuca, director of the University of Washington School Environmental and Forest Sciences; Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark; Brad St. Clair, a research geneticist with the Forestry Sciences Laboratory in Corvallis, Ore.; and more. To view the full program, visit http://www.forestry.org/washington/workingforests/.

About SAF: The Society of American Foresters (SAF) is the national scientific and educational organization representing the forestry profession in the United States. Founded in 1900 by Gifford Pinchot, it is the largest professional society of foresters in the world. Members of the Washington State SAF include over 500 field foresters, forest managers and engineers, administrators, researchers, and educators who manage and study the 22.9 million acres of public, private, and Tribal forests throughout Washington.
Health advisory lifted November 10 for Wickiup Reservoir
Oregon Health Authority - 11/10/14
November 10, 2014

Reduced blue-green algae levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted a health advisory issued September 19 for Wickiup Reservoir, located off South Century Drive in Deschutes County, about 40 miles southwest of the city of Bend.

Water monitoring has confirmed reduced levels of blue-green algae and their toxins. These reduced levels are not likely to be harmful to humans and animals.

Oregon health officials advise people who use Oregon water bodies for recreation to always be alert to signs of harmful algae blooms. People and their pets should avoid contact if the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red in color, or if the water has a thick mat of algae with an unpleasant odor.

For local information about water quality or blue-green algae sampling, contact the U.S. Forest Service Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District at 541-383-4000. For drinking water information, contact your local drinking water treatment facility.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, call the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Bloom website at www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #
Bus accident at Cottonwood - no students involved
West Valley Sch. Dist. - 11/10/14
After school had started this morning at Cottonwood Elementary, a school bus with no students on board was struck by a vehicle at the intersection of the school parking lot and 96th Ave. No students were involved in the accident. Authorities are responding to the accident at this time.
11/09/14
Commercial Motor Vehicle Crash on I-84 Westbound - Milepost 275 in LaGrande (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/09/14
2014-11/1002/79466/FritoLay_2.jpg
2014-11/1002/79466/FritoLay_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1002/79466/thumb_FritoLay_2.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers are continuing the investigation into a commercial motor vehicle crash on I-84 at milepost 275 near LaGrande at 11:14 a.m. on Sunday. The involved vehicle was a Frito-Lay tractor-trailer out of Vancouver, Wash., which was pulling two loaded trailers. The crash, which blocked the right lane of travel for 3 hours, was caused by a strong wind gust that forced the vehicle onto the highway shoulder. The truck's driver, 53-year-old WILLIAM ANDERSON, attempted to recover from the swerve and maneuvered back and forth across the highway until the second trailer tipped over. He was not injured, and no citations were issued.

OSP was assisted at the scene by the Oregon Department of Transportation. The trailer was removed by Fenn's Towing.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: ORStatePolice


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1002/79466/FritoLay_2.jpg
11/07/14
Aircraft Landing on Highway 20E at Milepost 11 (East of Bend) Blocking One Lane of Travel
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/07/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) and the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) are on the scene of an aircraft landing on US Highway 20E near Milepost 11 - East of Bend. Details are limited but one lane of travel is currently blocked. The involved aircraft is a Piper Cherokee which landed safety on the highway for unknown reasons. No occupants were injured during the landing. Updates will be provided when more information becomes available.

### www.Oregon.gov/OSP ###

Twitter @ORStatePolice
Former Rose Bowl quarterback to meet with Garrison Middle School AVID students
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 11/07/14
WALLA WALLA - Former Washington State University Rose Bowl quarterback and current WSU radio broadcaster Jason Gesser is planning to speak with Garrison Middle School students Thursday, November 13 at 11 a.m. Students in Conor Fish's AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) classes will hear from the former Heisman Trophy candidate.

Gesser played quarterback for Washington State Cougars under head coach Mike Price, and played in the 2003 Rose Bowl. As a professional, Gesser played for the Utah Blaze of the Arena Football League, the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League, and the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. He has also coached at Eastside Catholic High School, the University of Idaho and the University of Wyoming. Gesser is the grandson of Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame member Joseph "Red" Dunn.

AVID's mission is to close the achievement gap by preparing all students for college readiness and success in a global society. AVID, Advancement Via Individual Determination, accelerates student learning, uses research-based methods of effective instruction, provides meaningful and motivational professional development, and acts as a catalyst for systemic reform and change.

What differentiates AVID from other educational reform programs is its astounding success rate. Since 1990, more than 85,500 AVID students have graduated from high school and planned to attend college.

Of the 22,210 AVID seniors from 2010 who reported their plans: 91.3% intended to attend a postsecondary institution, 58.3% a four-year university and 33% a two-year college.

###
11/06/14
Hikers urged to take precautions when foraging for mushrooms
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/06/14
Oregon is known for its bounty of fall mushrooms, but foraging for them can become dangerous if you're not prepared. Every fall, hikers get lost hunting for mushrooms.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department advises fall hikers to take the following precautions:

*Use a map to plan your trip and familiarize yourself with the area in advance.
*Inform someone of where you're going and when you plan to return.
*Hike with a companion.
*Carry and drink plenty of water.
*Wind and rain storms are common in the fall and winter. Dress in layers, avoid cotton and carry quality rain gear. Don't go hiking if a storm is forecasted, and turn back in bad weather.
*Carry a map and compass, and know how to use them.
*Also carry with you these essential items: flashlight, matches, first aid kit, whistle, plastic garbage bag and pocket knife.
*Consider joining a guided mushroom hike. Fort Stevens State Park is hosting two this month: Nov. 10 and 30 at 1 p.m., led by Park Ranger Dane Osis. Information: 503-861-3170 or email dane.osis@oregon.gov.
Pulp, paper, and forest products industry safety conference coming to Portland
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/06/14
(Salem) - Employees, managers, and contractors in the Northwest pulp and paper industry are invited to attend a conference Dec. 2-5, 2014, that is designed to highlight the latest workplace safety and health best practices.

The Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) is one of several partners presenting the Western Pulp, Paper, and Forest Products Safety and Health Conference at the Jantzen Beach Red Lion Hotel in Portland.

Keynote speaker Joe Estey, who has worked with more than 110 different companies in industries including government and manufacturing, will present "Myths and Realities of an Ever-Changing Workforce" on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014.

"I will explore the specific principles and practices from organizations who have abandoned the traditional 'tried-and-tired' ways of improving safety by creating their own destiny, rather than allowing others to create it for them," said Estey. "Many of these principles and tools start with our view of the six generations working together in today's organizations and understanding the way they generationally manage risk and perform work."

Twenty-eight workshops and several roundtable discussions are scheduled during the four-day conference. Training on workplace issues that affect pulp, paper, and forest product workers are part of the program. Workshops include:

* Hazard assessment and solutions
* Lockout/tagout and machine guarding
* Safety leadership
* Logging and sawmill safety

The registration fee is $260 to attend all conference sessions. The fee for a single day is $85. For more information or to register, go to www.orosha.org/conferences.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org or follow us at www.facebook.com/oregonosha.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will meet November 18-19 in Astoria
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/06/14
News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // Nov. 6, 2014

Media Contact:
Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Desk: 503-986-0722 // Cell: 503-931-2590

Astoria OR - The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will hold its final meeting of the year November 18-19 in Astoria, OR and address a proposed beach smoking rule and other topics.

On November 18, Commissioners will tour area state parks and the Columbia River Maritime Museum starting at 8 a.m., then attend workshops starting at 2 p.m. at the Loft at the Red Building, 20 Basin Street Suite F, Astoria, OR 97103.

On November 19, Commissioners will convene an 8 a.m. executive session at the Loft at the Red Building to discuss real estate and legal issues. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A public business meeting will begin at 9:15 a.m. at the same location. The agenda includes requests for action on state park contracts, grants to Oregon communities for recreation trails, a proposed beach smoking restriction, and state scenic waterway candidates.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department staff will ask the Commission to sideline a proposed rule restricting smoking on Oregon's 362 mile public ocean shore. Instead, staff will ask the Commission to direct the department to spend two years focusing on education and a broader campaign to reduce beach litter. The public comment period for the proposed rule closed in August, and a summary is online at http://tinyurl.com/oregonbeachsmoke.

The Commission will also receive three studies on rivers that are candidates for designation under the state scenic waterway program. Department staff studied short sections of the Grande Ronde in Union County, Molalla in Clackamas County, and Chetco in Curry County. After visiting the rivers and holding public meetings, staff will recommend dropping the Grande Ronde segment from consideration. For the portions of the Chetco and Molalla Rivers included in the study, staff will ask the Commission to accept the reports, but wait to make a recommendation for up to a year. The time will be used to allow local proponents to organize and develop management plans that address waterway and adjacent landowner needs. Commission scenic waterway recommendations are made to the governor jointly with the Oregon Water Resources Department, who will also be asked to concur with the reports. More information about the ongoing review of scenic waterways is online at http://tinyurl.com/scenicwaterwaysreview.

The full November meeting agenda is available online at www.oregon.gov/oprd/Pages/commission.aspx, and the meeting packet with information on each agenda item will be posted online by 3 p.m. Friday, November 7. People who plan to present testimony are requested to provide 12 copies of their statement to Commission Assistant Sarah Emery at sarah.emery@oregon.gov for distribution to the Commissioners before the meeting. Those needing special accommodations to attend should contact OPRD at 503-986-0719 to make arrangements at least three days in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission (www.oregon.gov/oprd/Pages/commission.aspx) promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.
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Boat Oregon Advisory Teams Meeting in Salem
Oregon Marine Board - 11/06/14
The Oregon State Marine Board is holding kickoff meetings for their new, Boat Oregon Advisory Teams (BOATs) during the week of November 10 at the Marine Board office, 435 Commercial St. NE, in Salem. The meetings are scheduled from 10 am to 2 pm with a working lunch.

Each team will meet on a different day during the week of November 10:
* Monday, November 10 -Watersports
* Thursday, November 13 -Outdoor Sportsmen
* Friday, November 14 -Cruising

During the agency's 2011-2016 strategic plan outreach public meetings, participants suggested the agency should develop committees to look at specific boating issues. Following this suggestion, the agency recruited recreational boaters to form three Boat Oregon Advisory Teams (Watersports, Outdoor Sportsmen, and Cruising).

Each meeting is accessible for persons with disabilities. For a communication aid request or agenda questions, please contact Ashley Massey, Public Information Officer, at 503-378-2623 by Friday, November 7. The agency will accept public comment during the designated period at the end of the meeting.

For more information about the Boat Oregon Advisory Teams, membership, and the Marine Board's Strategic Plan, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/pages/admin/strategicplan.aspx#NEW!_Boat_Oregon_Advisory_Teams_(BOATs)_.
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MEDIA ALERT - Patriotic "I Pledge Challenge" In Finley Tomorrow
Finley Sch. Dist. - 11/06/14
FINLEY, WA - As part of their school's Veterans' Day assembly, students at River View High School in Finley, WA will participate in the "I Pledge Challenge" (http://ipledgechallenge.org) on Friday, November 7 at 2:00 PM. The pledge, initiated by community leaders in the Tri-Cities, is intended to "show our support of our troops, our thanks to our veterans, and our love of the United States of America."

Similar to the recent ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, the I Pledge Challenge asks participants to videotape themselves reciting the pledge of allegiance, share the video on social media, then challenge three others to do the same. The entire student body of RVHS in Finley is eager to take this challenge and show their patriotism at the November 7 Veterans Day assembly.

Rebekah Duty, RVHS Counselor, stated, "I believe that this challenge is important to show students that they can do seemingly small things that make a huge impact on others."

The Veterans' Day assembly begins at 2:00 PM on Friday, November 7 at River View High School, located at 36509 S. Lemon Drive in Finley. For more information, contact RVHS Counselor, Rebekah Duty, at 509.582.2158 or rduty@finleysd.org.

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11/05/14
Oregon One of Only Five States to Earn an 'A' on Premature Birth Report Card
March of Dimes - 11/05/14
Oregon is one of only five states to receive an "A" on the March of Dimes 2014 Premature Birth Report Card, released today. Oregon's preterm birth rate was 9.3 percent in 2013, below the March of Dimes goal of 9.6 percent. Other states meeting or beating the March of Dimes goal and getting an "A" are California, Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

The national preterm birth rate fell to 11.4 percent in 2013 - the lowest in 17 years -- meeting the federal Healthy People 2020 goal seven years early. Despite this progress, the nation still received a "C" on the annual report card and still has one of the highest rates of preterm birth of any high resource country. March of Dimes is investing in a network of prematurity research centers, to find solutions to this still too-common, costly, and serious problem.

"In Oregon and SW Washington, to help women have full-term pregnancies and healthy babies, March of Dimes is supporting group prenatal programs like Centering Pregnancy and others that have shown promising results in reducing preterm births;" said Joanne Rogovoy, State Director of Program Services and Government Affairs for March of Dimes Greater Oregon Chapter, "as well as continuing with hospital efforts to end early elective deliveries prior to 39 weeks gestation."

Did you know:
* Since 2006 (when the preterm birth rate in the US was at its highest), March of Dimes estimates 231,000 fewer babies have been born too soon because of sustained interventions put in place by states, saving about $11.9 billion in healthcare and other costs.

* March of Dimes is recommending a new goal for the nation - lowering the preterm birth rate to 5.5 percent by 2030, which could bring us from the bottom 10 percent to the top 10 percent compared to other high resource countries.

* There are steps every woman can take to help give her baby a healthy start in life. Women can:
* Get a preconception check-up before getting pregnant.
* Go to all prenatal care appointments, even when they're feeling fine.
* Remember a full-term healthy pregnancy of at least 39 weeks is best for the baby, so if a pregnancy is healthy don't schedule an early delivery.
* Talk to their doctor about preterm labor warning signs and their family risk of premature birth.
* Take care of themselves by eating healthy, not smoking, and staying active.

In Oregon, the rate of women smoking is 18.2 percent and the rate of uninsured women is 20.1 percent. These factors contribute to infant health. Oregon earned a star on the report card for:
* Reducing the percent of uninsured women of child-bearing age;
* Reducing the percentage of women of childbearing age who smoke.

These improvements mean not just healthier babies, but also a potential savings in health care and economic costs to society.

March of Dimes attributed the improved rates to an expansion of successful programs and interventions, including actions by obstetrics providers, hospitals and state health officials here and every other state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

"We're working together to improve access to health care, help women quit smoking and, through our Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait consumer education campaign, encourage women and health care providers to avoid scheduling a delivery before 39 weeks of pregnancy unless medically necessary," added Rogovoy.

Grades are based on comparing each state's and the nation's 2013 preliminary preterm birth rates with the March of Dimes 2020 goal of 9.6 percent of all live births. The U.S. preterm birth rate is 11.4 percent, a decline of 11 percent from the peak of 12.8 percent in 2006.

The Report Card information for the U.S. and states will be available online at: marchofdimes.org/reportcard.

Premature birth, birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy, is a serious health problem that costs the United States more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine. It is the leading cause of newborn death, and babies who survive an early birth often face the risk of lifetime health challenges, such as breathing problems, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and others. Even babies born just a few weeks early have higher rates of hospitalization and illness than full-term infants. At least 39 weeks of pregnancy are important to a baby's health because many important organs, including the brain and lungs, are not completely developed until then.

On November 17th, March of Dimes and organizations from around the world will mark the fourth World Prematurity Day. The World Prematurity Network, (WPN), a global coalition of consumer and parent groups working together to raise awareness and prevent premature birth in their countries, is calling for action to prevent preterm birth and improve care for babies born too soon. An estimated 15 million babies are born premature and of those more than a million die as a result of their early birth.

Learn more about Prematurity Awareness Month and World Prematurity Day by visiting http://www.facebook.com/worldprematurityday and share stories and videos about babies born too soon. The page features an interactive world map showing the home place for each story told.

Prematurity Awareness events are happening throughout November. Here in Oregon and SW Washington, March of Dimes is partnering with local hospitals in Portland, Vancouver, Salem and Bend to raise awareness on November 17th by giving out cookies and information in Legacy Emanuel, Legacy Salmon Creek, Salem Hospital and St. Charles Medical Center.

March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. Find out how you can help raise funds to prevent premature birth and birth defects by walking in March for Babies at marchforbabies.org. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org. For free access to national, state, county and city-level maternal and infant health data, visit PeriStats, at marchofdimes.org/PeriStats.


Attached Media Files: Oregon Report Card , US Report Card , 2006 vs 2013 map
Beware of phone scam targeting utility customers
Pacific Power - 11/05/14
Contact: Pacific Power media hotline, Nov. 5, 2014
1-800-570-5838 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Beware of phone scam targeting utility customers
Pacific Power urges customers to verify any phone calls about their account by calling
1-888-221-7070
PORTLAND, Ore. - Pacific Power is warning its customers and the public of a phone scam targeting utility customers in the Northwest where criminals posing as utility customer service agents are trying to get money and steal personal information.
The fraud is occurring nationwide, but recent days have seen an upsurge in the Northwest. The thieves are using sophisticated deceptive tactics that make it appear to Caller ID systems that the scam call is coming from the utility when it is not. If customers receive such a call, hang up and instead call 1-888-221-7070 to verify the call's origins.
Pacific Power call center agents can be reached any time day or night, toll free at 1-888-221-7070. That is the only number to call for any customer service you need or if you suspect a call may not actually be from Pacific Power.
"So far, this has affected a relatively small number of customers, but any customer being taken advantage of in this way is one too many," said Blaine Andreasen, vice president of customer service.
"We have taken a number of additional significant steps to address this latest scam and protect customers from fraud attempts," Andreasen added. "We are working with law enforcement at all levels and have also increased security on our automated phone service system as a precaution to further assure that customer information is not at risk. For their own protection, customers calling about their account will need to provide their account number to gain access to account details."
In order to help customers recognize the fraudulent calls, in general, the scam goes like this:
Scammers call residential or business customers demanding payment for overdue bills. Sometimes, the caller tells the intended victim that they owe a specific amount of money. The thief advises the customer to make a payment in one of two ways: either immediately on the phone via credit card, or by going to a local store to purchase a pre-paid card and calling back a special toll-free number, made to resemble Pacific Power's phone response system, and provide the pre-paid card's code to the phony "agent."
Pacific Power wants customers to be aware that this is a scam and not a legitimate request. Pacific Power does not use these methods. If such a call is received, hang up and call 1-888-221-7070 to inquire about the call with Pacific Power.
When Pacific Power contacts a customer, the representative will always already have the customer's account number. Even then, if you are contacted by phone and have any concerns about the validity of the call, it is always appropriate to let the caller know you prefer to call them back at the utility's published customer service number--1-888-221-7070.
Pacific Power cautions that customers should never provide unsolicited callers or visitors with credit card numbers or any other information that may compromise their financial security.
Anyone receiving such calls or other contact regarding their utility account or bill is encouraged to pay close attention to any information - such as the phone number they are asked to call, a number that appears on caller ID, an address where they're told to send money- and then call 1-888-221-7070 to report the incident to local police and Pacific Power.
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About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.
Media Advisory: Contact Information for Next Oregon State Police Public Information Officer
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 11/05/14
Effective Thursday, November 6, 2014, Lieutenant Josh Brooks will take over full-time Public Information Officer (PIO) duties for the Oregon State Police. Lieutenant Brooks is assigned at General Headquarters in Salem and may be reached at:

Office: (503) 934-1261
Email: osppio@state.or.us (will go to Lieutenant Brooks' cellphone)

Brooks, age 36, has worked for OSP for nearly 13 years and most recently was assigned as the Area Commander at the OSP Salem office. Since joining OSP in December 2001, Brooks has worked in assignments within the Patrol, Fish & Wildlife, and Criminal Investigations divisions, and the Office of Professional Standards. Previous OSP assignments included working at offices in John Day, Florence, Springfield, and Salem.

Following a 36-year OSP career, Lieutenant Gregg Hastings, OSP Public Information Officer, is retiring effective December 1, 2014. Hastings served as the Department's PIO from 1996 - 2001 and 2004 - 2014.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
E-Government Portal Advisory Board Will Meet
State of Oregon - 11/05/14
Salem, Oregon-The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, November 12. The meeting will take place in the Tillamook Room of the Department of Forestry, 2600 State St Bldg. C, Salem, Oregon. The meeting is open to the public. The board meeting may also be attended by the public over the Internet. For instructions, virtual meeting links and teleconference number, please see the document linked below:
http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Documents/EPAB_Internet_Public_Attendee_Instructions.pdf.

The Legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 182.126-132. The board will advise the Department of Administrative Services on key decisions and strategic choices about how DAS manages and operates the state's Web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the Internet. "Web portal services" means providing the hosting, content management, electronic commerce, public collaboration and application development needed to operate and maintain Oregon.gov, online services and make payments over the Web. The board provides oversight to specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the DAS E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board's advice, DAS wants to make the Oregon Web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for citizens' to interact with state government.

The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory board's website, seven days prior to meeting: http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/agenda_minutes_handouts.aspx.

What: Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board
When: Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, between 9 am - 11 am
Where: Department of Forestry
Tillamook Conference Room
2600 State St., Bldg. C
Salem, Oregon 97310
Who: Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board

Contact:
Public Affairs Specialist, DAS
503-378-3118
Stewardship Coordinating Committee to meet Nov. 13, in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/05/14
Oregon's Stewardship Coordinating Committee, whose primary purpose is advising the State Forester on incentive programs for family forestland owners, is meeting Thursday, November 13, in Salem.

The committee - comprised of state and federal natural resource agency representatives, private forest landowners, consulting foresters and members of forest industry and conservation organizations - meets 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Tillamook meeting room at Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) headquarters in Salem.

ON THE AGENDA
The committee will be discussing and evaluating Forest Legacy project applications received for fiscal year 2016 funding. Applications will be ranked so that recommendations on which applications to forward to the Forest Legacy National Review panel can be made to the State Forester. The committee's decision space is to recommend to the State Forester up to 3 proposals, not to exceed more than $10 million in Forest Legacy program funding. The National Review Panel will evaluate and rank all proposals in January, 2015.

In the afternoon, the committee will turn their attention to quality control of Oregon's Forest Management Planning System and also hear from Joe Holmberg, Chair of the Oregon Tree Farm System. Holmberg will share information with the committee about the American Tree Farm System standards review and proposed American Forest Foundation 2015-2020 Sustainability Standards.

ABOUT THE COMMITTEE
The Stewardship Coordinating committee advises the State Forester about policies and procedures for delivering private forest landowner assistance programs, including the U.S. Forest Service Legacy and Forest Stewardship programs. In addition to advising the State Forester on incentive programs for family forestland owners, the committee also serves as forestry subcommittee to Oregon's Technical Advisory Committee, advising both the USDA Farm Services Agency and USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service on federal farm and forestry assistance programs.

PUBLIC INVITED
Members of the public are invited to attend and participate. Questions about the meeting can be directed to Jim Cathcart or Cynthia Orlando at the contact numbers listed.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to Susan Dominique, Oregon Department of Forestry, at 503-945-7502.

More information about the Stewardship Coordinating Committee:
www.oregon.gov/odf/privateforests/pages/stewardshipcoordinatingcommittee.aspx
Federal surplus bolsters So. Sherman Fire & Rescue's wildfire capability (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/05/14
An 85-foot ladder fire truck is a valuable tool for fighting fires in tall structures, including the many grain elevators that dot the landscape in Sherman County.
An 85-foot ladder fire truck is a valuable tool for fighting fires in tall structures, including the many grain elevators that dot the landscape in Sherman County.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1072/79370/thumb_Ladder_truck_elevator-So._Sherman_F_and_R_20214_0972.JPG
Deep canyons and rolling hills, scenic rivers and lots of sunshine make Sherman County a draw for anyone seeking the Oregon outdoor lifestyle. Some of those natural attributes, though, make the area susceptible to frequent and challenging wildfires.

Despite its small size (24 volunteer firefighters), South Sherman Fire & Rescue has a track record of responding aggressively to both wildland and structural fires. But recent expansions of the department's jurisdiction to a sprawling 910 square miles challenged Fire Chief Glenn Fluhr. The number and types of rigs in his fleet were insufficient to attack fires across such a large and diverse landscape. And with a total department annual budget of just $47,000, it seemed there was no way to add enough equipment to cover the expanded service area. So, he turned to the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) for help.

Mike McKeen coordinates the distribution of surplus federal equipment to rural fire departments for ODF. He met with Fluhr and then went to work matching surplus gear on the Fire Fighter Property (FFP) and Federal Excess Personal Property (FEPP) nationwide inventories to South Sherman's want list.

"Since Glenn submitted his application, we have been able to provide South Sherman with several rigs and equipment, ranging from a fire engine, to a ladder truck, to a bulldozer that they have integrated into their fleet," McKeen said. Some of the surplus equipment acquired by the fire department includes:

- A Freightliner tractor-trailer - converted by Fire & Rescue to a 3,000-gallon tender that will supply water onsite to fire engines and hand crews.
- A five-ton cargo truck - being outfitted as a Type 3 fire engine.
- Four Humvees - modified to serve as Type 6 brush engines.
- D7 bulldozer - entered service as-is to construct fire containment lines.
- Firefighting ladder truck - entered service as-is to fight structural fires.

Fire & Rescue has realized additional savings by performing its own modifications to the vehicles.

"We formed a little assembly line - a paint shop, radio installation, plumbing, lights," he said. "It was kind of the joke around here that we were the South Sherman Auto Body Shop."

The fire department has invested just $650 each to convert the Humvees to fire engines. The fire chief said he went to a fire equipment show earlier this year and saw a commercially modified Hummer priced at $15,000.

He described the Humvee as the ultimate off-road vehicle, able to go places no other vehicle can reach - a desirable feature in an area with considerable steep, rocky terrain.

The usefulness of an 85-foot ladder truck to a rural fire department might seem questionable, since high-rise buildings are noticeably absent from the Sherman County skyline. But tall structures do exist there in the form of grain elevators. Across the U.S., a number of severe fires have occurred in these towering structures.

Last winter, not long after acquiring the ladder truck, Fire & Rescue put it to work on a motel fire, where it played a key role in suppressing the blaze while keeping firefighters out of harm's way.

McKeen's focus with the Department of Forestry is on procuring surplus vehicles and other equipment designed for, or adaptable to, wildland firefighting. But the ladder truck became available during the period when South Sherman submitted its application, and it filled a special need.

All of the FFP and FEPP rigs came along at an opportune time, with summer 2014 turning out to be one of the worst wildfire seasons in South Sherman's history.

"We had three fires this summer that burned 40,000 acres and three structures," Fluhr said. "Without this surplus property, we would have lost much more."

While the used equipment transfers to the small rural department have been larger than typical, McKeen cited two contributing factors.

"South Sherman Fire & Rescue demonstrated in its application that the expanded service area had created a strong need," he said. "Also, they followed the process very well."

Small and with a limited budget, South Sherman is exactly the type of department the FFP and FEPP programs are designed to help, he said.

Fluhr said he used to shy away from the federal surplus programs, since the equipment offered was often in poor condition and cost a lot to bring up to specifications for firefighting use. But that has changed with ODF's careful screening.

The 6x6 [ATV] we got had only 9,000 miles on it, and the Hummers ranged from just 8,000 miles up to 28,000 miles," he said. "Everything we've gotten has run well, and they even came with good tires."

Under the FFP program, most of the equipment is on loan to South Sherman for a year, and then the department can take permanent ownership if it chooses. The FFP Humvees are an exception, since they fall under a military equipment classification. They will remain vested in the U.S. government and Department of Defense, even though Fire & Rescue can keep them through the end of their service life.

In contrast, all equipment provided through the FEPP program remains the property of the U.S. Forest Service in perpetuity. But as long as Fire & Rescue complies with the terms of the agreement, it can retain the FEPP equipment indefinitely.

McKeen encourages other Oregon rural fire departments in need of good, serviceable equipment to contact him at the Oregon Department of Forestry's headquarters office in Salem: 503-945-7325, mckeen@odf.state.or.us.


Attached Media Files: An 85-foot ladder fire truck is a valuable tool for fighting fires in tall structures, including the many grain elevators that dot the landscape in Sherman County. , South Sherman Fire & Rescue realizes substantial cost savings by performing conversion work on surplus federal equipment in-house. , Military Humvees modified to serve as fire engines capable of traversing rugged terrain.
Schools and community colleges largely successful with bond elections
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 11/05/14
News release
Oregon School Boards Association
Nov. 5, 2014
For immediate release

School bond and local option levies were mostly successful statewide Tuesday, reversing trends from a year ago.

Six of nine K-12 school districts passed bonds, including Colton, Dallas, Klamath Falls City Schools, La Grande, Springfield and West Linn-Wilsonville. Bonds failed passage in Corbett, Silver Falls and Sisters. All three community college bonds passed: Clackamas CC, Clatsop CC and Linn-Benton CC.

All six local option levies on the ballot passed easily, in Crow-Applegate, Eugene, Falls City, Portland, Tigard-Tualatin and West Linn-Wilsonville.

In November 2013, only three of 13 districts statewide were able to pass school bonds; one of two local option levies passed.

Betsy Miller-Jones, executive director of the Oregon School Boards Association (OSBA), thanked local voters for investing in their schools, and said OSBA plans to focus legislative efforts in 2015 on finding statewide solutions for replacing and upgrading outdated school buildings.

A full listing of school election results can be found at http://www.osba.org/Resources/Article/Budget_and_Finance/Election-Recent_Bond-Local_Option_Election_Results.aspx?d=11/4/2014

OSBA is a member services organization for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges. It also provides services to charter schools and their boards.
State Seeks Participants for Oregon Project Independence (OPI) Program Pilot to Expand Services
OR Department of Human Services - 11/05/14
The Oregon Project Independence (OPI) Program was created in 1975 to assist individuals over the age of 60, regardless of income, with in-home services to help them stay in their own homes and delay or prevent the need for more costly services. OPI services are modest and typically provide 20-30 hours of service per month. To qualify, a person must need in-home assistance based on an assessment and not be receiving benefits through Medicaid, such as the Oregon Health Plan.

In 2014, the Legislature provided funding to expand Oregon Project Independence to serve adults with disabilities, ages 19-59, in certain areas of the state. This is a one-year pilot ending on June 30, 2015 which will study the need and cost of providing the OPI program to younger adults on a permanent basis.

The State of Oregon is seeking additional individuals to participate in the OPI pilot. Participants must be ages 19-59, need in-home services based on an assessment, not be receiving full medical coverage through Medicaid such as the Oregon Health Plan and reside in the following counties: Benton, Clatsop, Jackson, Josephine, Lane, Linn, Lincoln, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Umatilla and Washington.

The OPI pilot is currently serving nearly 70 individual and has resources to serve several hundred more people. If you are in need, or know someone who is in need, and live in one of these counties, please contact Oregon's Aging and Disability Resource Connection -- Call toll-free at 1-855-673-2372 to be connected to the Area Agency on Aging serving your community by entering your zip code when prompted.

You can also visit the ADRC website at www.adrcoforegon.org and click on the "Connect" button to locate the contact information for the agency serving your county.
11/04/14
Open enrollment guide: What are provider networks?
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/04/14
Note: As open enrollment for 2015 health insurance plans approaches, the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Insurance Division, is providing information to consumers about how to choose the plan that best meets their health and financial needs. This guide focuses on provider networks.

Different plans, different networks

Most health insurance plans have networks of hospitals, doctors, specialists, pharmacies, and other health care providers. Networks include health care providers that the plan contracts with to take care of the plan's members. Depending on the type of policy you buy, care may be covered only when you get it from a network provider. In other types of plans, you may get some coverage for out-of-network care, but it will cost more. The basic types of plans include:

* Health Maintenance Organization (HMO): Usually limits coverage to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. It generally will not cover out-of-network care except in an emergency.

* Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO): A managed care plan where services are covered only if you go to doctors, specialists, or hospitals in the plan's network (except in an emergency).

* Preferred Provider Organization (PPO): A type of health plan that contracts with medical providers, such as hospitals and doctors, to create a network of participating providers. You pay less if you use providers that belong to the plan's network. You can use doctors, hospitals, and providers outside of the network for an additional cost.

* Point of Service (POS): A type of plan in which you pay less if you use doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that belong to the plan's network. POS plans also require you to get a referral from your primary care doctor in order to see a specialist.

How to keep your doctor or find a new one

If staying with your current doctors is important to you or if there is a new doctor you would like to see, there are several steps you should take before you choose a plan:

* Call the insurance company and the doctor's office to see if the provider is in the network. Make sure you have the name of the plan you are considering. You also can check the insurer's provider directory online, but since networks change frequently, you may also want to make a phone call.

* Find out whether the plan has a tiered provider network. In these plans, the networks have tiers or levels that determine the cost you pay the provider. Know the tier of the provider you are considering so you can better estimate your costs.

* If you want to see a new provider, call first to see if the provider is accepting new patients.

* In addition to your primary care doctor, take the above steps if you expect to seek care from a specialist.

The open enrollment period for people who buy their own health insurance runs from Nov. 15, 2014, through Feb. 15, 2015. This is the one time during the year when you can change plans, change insurance companies, or choose to stay with the plan you have. You can shop and access financial help during open enrollment by visiting the federal Health Insurance Marketplace at healthcare.gov. Consumers can also enroll directly with an insurance company or agent.

For more information: The Insurance Division has information about health insurance posted online at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/insurance/gethelp/health/Pages/health.aspx and has consumer advocates available to answer questions at 1-888-877-4894 (toll-free).

The Insurance Division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit http://www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
11 Oregon artists receive $41,645 in 2015 Career Opportunity Grants (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 11/04/14
2014-11/1418/79337/DE_May_51_miniature_cardboard_pieces_from_the_artistís_workroom._1980s_and_1990s_various_sizes_media.jpg
2014-11/1418/79337/DE_May_51_miniature_cardboard_pieces_from_the_artistís_workroom._1980s_and_1990s_various_sizes_media.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/1418/79337/thumb_DE_May_51_miniature_cardboard_pieces_from_the_artistís_workroom._1980s_and_1990s_various_sizes_media.jpg
In the first of three rounds of 2015 Career Opportunity Grants, the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation have awarded $41,645 to 11 artists for career development projects. The awards include $15,750 from the Oregon Arts Commission and $25,895 in supplemental funding for eight artists through a partnership with The Ford Family Foundation. Individual grants range from $800 to $8,990.

Career Opportunity Grants fund opportunities for artists to further their careers in areas that include artistic, business or professional development. The Ford Family Foundation Opportunity grants are available only to Oregon mid-career visual artists who are over 30 years of age and actively producing new work in the fields of fine art and contemporary craft.

Most of the grants support the artists' participation in residencies, exhibitions or performance opportunities that advance their careers.

"These grants are designed to accelerate an artist's development," said Avantika Bawa, the arts commissioner who chaired the review panel. "At a critical time in their careers, we want to provide the catalyst for them to move to the next level by supporting traditional and unique opportunities." A total of 26 applications were received for Commission funds; of those, 15 applications requested additional funds from The Ford Family Foundation.

"We are pleased to be able to invest in these artists at such pivotal moments in their careers," said Anne C. Kubisch, president of The Ford Family Foundation. "We expect these artists to make significant progress on regional, national and international stages."


FY15 Career Opportunity Grants were awarded to:

Ryan Burns (Ashland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,450
To support Ryan Burns' solo exhibition, "Biodiscourse: Climate Proxies," at The Gowanus Ballroom in Brooklyn, New York in the spring of 2015. "Biodiscourse" includes several recent rubbings, some older larger-scale ones and a small sculptural installation. The show will be the ballroom's first solo exhibit.

Damien Gilley (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $2,790
To support Damien Gilley's creation and production of an artist book that documents approximately 35 artist studios in Oregon through a unique photographic approach. The photographs capture linear laser lights emitted in private studios that have been light-sealed. The book will limited to 200 copies and will be released at False Front Studio in spring 2015 with an accompanying immersive installation.

Grant Hottle (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $1,500
To support painter Grant Hottle's exhibition of "Aftermath" with sculptor Paula Rebsom at the Galleries of Contemporary Art at UC Colorado Springs in March of 2015. "Aftermath" addresses the artists' shared interest in the aesthetics of natural disasters and their aftermath. The show will be an opportunity for Hottle to display his project-based work outside of the West Coast region.

Diane Jacobs (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $3,615
To support a solo exhibition at the Bush Barn Art Center in Salem in January of 2015. The exhibition, Jacobs' first in Salem, showcases 20 years of her socially engaged political artwork as a call to action to end violence against women and girls. It will include the work "$PEAK OUT," which includes 608 bills of real currency laser cut with statements/drawings reacting to the global crisis.

Patrick Kelly (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $800
To support the transport of Patrick Kelly's work for an exhibition at Eastern Oregon University in La Grande during October and November of 2014. Kelly was commissioned by the Oregon Arts Commission to create a unique piece for the university's library earlier this year; the exhibition is an opportunity for the university and community to become more acquainted with his work through the exhibition and an accompanying artist talk.

Anya Kivarkis (Eugene), OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $5,000
To support the production of work for Anya Kivarkis' winter 2015 exhibition at Sienna Patti Contemporary in Albany, New York. The exhibition continues work Kivarkis began on a recent sabbatical and will enable her practice to evolve and expand from jewelry objects to photography and the moving image.

D.E. May (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $7,490
To support the creation of a printed catalog documenting D.E. May's solo exhibition at LAXART in Los Angeles in the fall of 2014. Founded in 2005, LAXART is recognized as a leading independent, nonprofit contemporary art space. The production of a catalog provides May with a tool to extend the reach and impact of the exhibition beyond the immediate viewing audience.

Donald Morgan (Eugene), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $4,000
To support Donald Morgan's participation in a three-week artist residency at the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, one of the most prestigious and historic art colonies in the world. The residency will provide a highly concentrated, relatively uninterrupted time for Morgan to complete a series of works for his upcoming solo show Soo Visual Art Center in Minneapolis, Minn.

Travis Neel (Portland), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500
To support Travis Neel's participation in the British Council Cultural Exchange International Fellowship in Great Britain. Designed for emerging socially engaged artists, the fellowship will allow Neel to conduct research, participate in cultural exchange and network with organizations and artists who are developing unique and innovative programs. He will utilize the fellowship to develop professional networks for future exhibitions, projects and professional development opportunities.

Heidi Preuss Grew (Salem), Visual Arts, OAC $1,500
To support Heidi Preuss Grew's professional activities during a residency at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology from October 2014 to mid-January 2015. The residency will allow her to create new work and facilitate four scheduled regional exhibitions, including shows at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center and the Hallie Ford Museum.

Laura Vandenburgh (Springfield), OAC $1,500, The Ford Family Foundation $1,500
To support Laura Vandenburgh's creation of a site-specific work for an exhibition at Disjecta in January of 2015. A practicing artist for 20 years, Vandenburgh has also been a full-time professor for much of that time; she is now beginning a year-long sabbatical with goals to cultivate a new studio, new exhibitions and critical reception for her work.

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2014-11/1418/79337/DE_May_51_miniature_cardboard_pieces_from_the_artistís_workroom._1980s_and_1990s_various_sizes_media.jpg , 2014-11/1418/79337/Patrick_Kelly_commissioned_piece_installed_at_EOU_library.jpg , 2014-11/1418/79337/Diane_Jacobs_Prototype_of_laser_cut_currency_18_inch_by_18_inch_2014.jpg
Nominees Sought for Oregon Heritage Excellence Awards
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/04/14
Applications are now available to nominate individuals, organizations and projects that have made outstanding contributions to preserving Oregon's heritage for an Oregon Heritage Excellence Award. Nominations are encouraged for exceptional and commendable work with special consideration given to the development of new ideas, approaches and innovations in heritage-related activities. The awards are intended to draw public attention to important heritage efforts in Oregon and to raise the quality of heritage-oriented activities.

The deadline for nominations is January 16. Award information and the nomination application is available online at www.oregonheritage.org or by contacting Mike Gushard at (503) 986-0671 or mike.gushard@oregon.gov

The Oregon Heritage Excellence Awards will be presented in the spring at the 2015 Oregon Heritage Conference in Coos Bay. For more information about the awards, and to view a list of past award recipients, visit www.oregon.gov/OPRD/HCD/OHC/award_info.shtml.
345th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/04/14
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 345th Basic Police Class. The guest speaker will be Chief Marc Mills of the Sunriver Police Department

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, elder abuse, drug recognition, and many other subjects.

Date: Friday, November 7, 2014
Location: Oregon Public Safety Academy 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon
Time: 11:00 a.m. - Reception following ceremony

All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and city and county officials are welcome to attend.

Any questions please call Kristy Witherell at DPSST (503) 378-2386 or e-mail her at kristy.witherell@state.or.us

Graduation Roster Basic Police BP345

Officer Michael Adams - Salem Police Department
Deputy Nathan Ariel - Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
Officer Peter Bilden - Central Point Police Department
Officer Charlie Carnahan - Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety
Officer Keely Cashman - Sunriver Police Department
Deputy Eric Churchill - Lane County Sheriff's Office
Officer Jason Cross - Cottage Grove Police Department
Officer Jared Cutler - Ontario Police Department
Officer Jennifer Foster - Burns Paiute Tribal Police Department
Deputy Chase Fredrickson - Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
Deputy Justin Gabler - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Officer Casey Gibson - Monmouth Police Department
Officer G. Lee Gilliam - Gladstone Police Department
Officer Steven Heigh - Eugene Police Department
Deputy Shannon Howard - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Deputy Solomon Jacobsen - Sherman County Sheriff's Office
Officer Jayne Johnson - Lincoln City Police Department
Deputy Kyle Kalmbach - Deschutes County Sheriff's Office
Officer Joshua Kell - Phoenix Police Department
Officer Chas Koenig - Umatilla Tribal Police Department
Officer Eric LeRoy - University of Oregon Police Department
Officer Kyle Libra - Albany Police Department
Deputy Raymond May - Lane County Sheriff's Office
Officer Ryan McBride - Stanfield Police Department
Officer Kathryn Meier - Milwaukie Police Department
Deputy Eugene Mitchell - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Officer Evan Nafie - Fairview Police Department
Deputy Colt Parker - Lane County Sheriff's Office
Officer Daniel Poffenberger - Stanfield Police Department
Deputy Melinda Purvis - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Deputy Katie Robbins - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Officer Nicklus Rumsey - Independence Police Department
Officer Kao Saephan - Albany Police Department
Officer Bradley Schafer - Canby Police Department
Officer William Snell - Milwaukie Police Department
Officer Riley Studebaker - Hermiston Police Department
Officer Gary Thompson - Umatilla Tribal Police Department
Officer Daniel Unverferth - Independence Police Department
Deputy Michael Vargas - Washington County Sheriff's Office
Officer Joshua West - Eugene Police Department
Officer Derrick Williams - Umatilla Police Department

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. DPSST, recognized as one of the most innovative training academies in North America, implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Ten Contemporary Photographers Explore Oregon's Landscape in New Historical Society Exhibition "Place" (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 11/04/14
Jody Ake, Burn
Jody Ake, Burn
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-11/2861/79329/thumb_Jody_Ake_Burn.jpg
Portland, OR - Oregonians will be the first to say that there is something special about the Beaver state. From the lush and exotic Columbia Gorge to a picturesque sunset on the Oregon coast, the dramatic beauty of this region's landscapes has inspired generations of artists.

Beginning November 8, the Oregon Historical Society will explore the many aspects of this beauty in the original exhibition Place: Framing the Oregon Landscape. Featuring stirring works by ten contemporary landscape photographers, Place attempts to capture the innately human aspiration to depict the relationship between our own existence and nature's elegance.

Displayed alongside the artists' photographs will be artifacts from the Oregon Historical Society's museum and library collections. From antique cameras to vintage paperbacks, each artifact tells a story both about the artist and the region of Oregon their works capture. According to curator Laura Valenti, "The exhibit strives to highlight the many ways regional artists have shaped our understanding and appreciation of the Oregon landscape."

Visitors to the exhibit are encouraged to share their images of the Oregon landscape with exhibition curator Laura Valenti on Instagram by tagging them with #ohsplace. Many photos have already been posted, and selected images will be chosen by Valenti for inclusion in the exhibition.

Laura Valenti is the Outreach Director at Photolucida, a Portland-based nonprofit that works to build connections between photographers and the gallery and publishing worlds. The artists featured in the exhibition are Bobby Abrahamson, Jody Ake, Steven Beckly, Susan Bein, Chris Bennett, Joseph Glasgow, Thomas Homolya, Christina Laptuta, Stu Levy, and Raymond Meeks.

Place: Framing the Oregon Landscape will be on display at the Oregon Historical Society from November 8, 2014 through May 17, 2015. Museum hours are 10 AM - 5 PM Monday through Saturday and Noon - 5 PM on Sunday. Regular admission is $11, and is free every day to OHS members and Multnomah County residents. Plan your visit today at ohs.org.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

About the Oregon Historical Society
Since 1898, the Society has served as Oregon's primary research collection and museum about Oregon history. OHS has an extensive collection of historical pieces, including over 85,000 artifacts and 3 million photographs and films. It safeguards and presents Oregon's history through a museum, research library, academic journal, educational programs, and digital content.


Attached Media Files: Jody Ake, Burn , Thomas Homolya, Overlook, Portland , Steven Beckly , Christine Laptuta , Bobby Abrahamson, Looking Upstream from Hells Canyon Dam
11/03/14
Triple your impact: Pacific Power will match your contribution to HEAT Oregon 2-for-1
Pacific Power - 11/03/14
Media Contact: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power Nov. 3, 2014
503-813-7291

Joan Tower, HEAT Oregon
Executive Director
503- 612-6300

Triple your impact: Pacific Power will match your contribution to HEAT Oregon 2-for-1
Contribution envelopes coming with November mailing or help neighbors by arranging monthly donations online

PORTLAND, Ore - Helping your neighbors and their families stay warm just got easier. Pacific Power will match every dollar you donate to HEAT Oregon with two dollars more.

"This generous pledge by Pacific Power will greatly boost our efforts to help Oregonians facing hardships with urgent energy assistance," said Joan Towers, executive director of HEAT Oregon. "Pacific Power understands the impact of leveraging customer donations to help low-income households that are struggling. Nothing is more basic than heat and power. We thank Pacific Power and their customers who give what they can to keep their neighbors warm and safe."

Last year, Pacific Power's donations helped nearly 3,250 households in need throughout Oregon including 4,004 children, 1,127 seniors and 994 people with disabilities. This year, Pacific Power's 2-for-1 match will continue up to $144,000.

"We understand that the slowly recovering economy is still straining many individuals and families in many communities we serve. We are helping, thanks to our partners at HEAT Oregon," said Pat Reiten, president and CEO of Pacific Power. "The 2-for-1 match will help our neighbors in a simple and direct way. We're privileged to work together with HEAT Oregon, as we have since 1993, to help people as much as we can."

Pacific Power customers who receive their bills by mail will find it includes an HEAT Oregon contribution envelope. Those interested in donating can use the envelope to send their tax-deductible contribution. Customers who pay their bills electronically can send a check or enroll in the fixed donation program online. This program allows customers to donate any dollar amount, starting at $1 per month, which is then incorporated into their monthly bill. Fixed donations will also be matched 2-for-1 by Pacific Power. To enroll in the fixed donation program, whether you pay online or by mail, call Pacific Power toll-free at 1-888-221-7070.

All donations are tax-deductible and are forwarded to HEAT Oregon, which verifies eligibility and allocates funds to those in need. All funds donated are used to assist families in need from the same county in which the donor resides.

Customers who need bill assistance themselves can talk with Pacific Power representatives who can help with payment plans that work for their individual needs or direct them to agencies that may be able to help. Pacific Power's customer service number is 1-888-221-7070.

-30-

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power is headquartered in Portland, and provides electric service to more than 730,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. It is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, providing 1.7 million customers with value for their energy dollar and safe, reliable electricity. In 2010, Pacific Power celebrated 100 years serving customers and communities. For more information, visit pacificpower.net.

About HEAT Oregon
HEAT Oregon is an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1989 to help low-income Oregonians become more energy self-reliant. In partnership with 32 community agencies throughout the state, HEAT Oregon's primary objective is to prevent disconnection of utility service by providing bill payment assistance to low-income households in emergency situations. To donate to, or learn more about HEAT Oregon visit www.heatoregon.org, call 503-612-6300; or write to HEAT Oregon, P.O. Box 127, Tualatin, Ore. 97062.
Oregon OSHA announces changes to confined space rule
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/03/14
(Salem) - The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has adopted changes to the confined space rule to include the construction industry. The new rule replaces a 2012 version that was never enforced because of concerns raised by stakeholders after its adoption. With the new rule in place, construction employers will need to comply beginning March 1, 2015.

"It's important that workers in construction have the same protections from confined spaces that exist in general industry," said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. "Confined spaces are unforgiving. People aren't just injured in them; they are killed."

Confined spaces, such as tanks, wells, or tunnels, have limited means to exit, may contain potentially harmful material, and are not intended for human habitation. Workplace safety rules require employers to take proper precautions when their employees must work in such spaces. In Oregon, Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces those rules. The relatively minor changes to the general industry requirements take effect Jan. 1, 2015.

There are several exemptions in the rule, including the majority of excavation work. However, excavation work is not exempt when workers must enter a sewer space. The rule is similar to what was originally proposed in July 2014, with the only significant change being that employers must identify only their permit-required confined spaces, rather than all confined spaces.

For more information on the adopted confined space rule, go to http://www.orosha.org/pdf/notices/adopted2014/ao52014-div2J-ltr.pdf.

###

About Oregon OSHA:
Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
10/31/14
Oregon State Housing Council Meeting
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 10/31/14
MEETING AGENDA

Date: November 7, 2014
Time: 9:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m.
Location: Somerville Conference Room | 775 Court Street, Salem, OR 97301
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202; Room Number: 4978330

1. Call to Order and Roll Call
2. Public Comment

3. Draft Meeting Minutes for Approval
October 3, 2014

4. Residential Loan Program, Consent Calendar, Kim Freeman, OHCS
700 Silver Street Drive, Central Point, 97502

5. 2014 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA), Margaret Van Vliet, OHCS Director

1. Overview and Staff Presentation, Julie Cody, OHCS

a. HOME Projects
?,? Statewide

b. Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Projects by Region
?,? Metro
?,? Non-Metro
?,? Balance of State


2. Public Comment

6. Report of the Director

7. Report of the Chair


Adjourn State Housing Council Meeting
Walla Walla School District: Public Work Session & Regular Board Meeting - November 4, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/31/14
Walla Walla School District: Public Work Session & Regular Board Meeting - November 4, 2014

As per the attached agenda.
Supporting documents may be accessed at the WWSD website:

http://www.wwps.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2705&Itemid=1028&jsmallfib=1&dir=JSROOT/2014/2014-11-04+BOARD+MEETING


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1288/79277/11.04.14_SB_00_AGENDA.pdf
MEDIA AVAILABILITY TODAY: Person under monitoring for Ebola hospitalized
Oregon Health Authority - 10/31/14
October 31, 2014

MEDIA AVAILABILITY TODAY: Person under monitoring for Ebola hospitalized

What: Public health physicians will answer questions about an individual who has been under monitoring for Ebola virus. The individual has been isolated, and is no danger to the public.

When: TODAY, October 31, 3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1-E, 800 NE Oregon St.

Who:

Paul Lewis, M.D.
Tri-County Health Officer

Katrina Hedberg, M.D.
State Health Officer

Details: Information about Ebola, as well as links to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention pages about the disease, are available at healthoregon.gov/ebola.

# # #
America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes People of Oregon and Southwest Washington Encouraged to Start Living a Healthy Active Lifestyle This November During American Diabetes Month
American Diabetes Association - 10/31/14
Portland, OR (October 31) - Nearly 30 million Americans live with diabetes and another 86 million are at risk of developing diabetes. That translates to 350,000 in our area with diabetes and an additional 675,000 with prediabetes. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions and the American Diabetes Association is leading the way to turn this trend around. Join with us during American Diabetes Month to Stop Diabetes(R).

Tomorrow kicks off American Diabetes Month(R), a month-long effort to raise awareness of diabetes and provides simple steps people can take to manage diabetes and prevent type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association is continuing its efforts to Stop Diabetes(R) by challenging local residents to begin living a healthier lifestyle through the America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes campaign, presented by Sun Life Financial.

This initiative is designed to engage and empower the public to cook nutritious and delicious food and encourage them to be more active. Through social media and an interactive landing page on DiabetesForecast.org, the Association will share healthy cooking tips, diabetes and nutrition facts, recipes and more, as well as ideas on how to raise funds to help Stop Diabetes in communities across the country.

"Nearly one-third of Americans are living with diabetes or prediabetes, more than 1 million right here in Oregon and Southwest Washington" stated Andrea Bruno, Executive Director of American Diabetes Association, Oregon, Southwest Washington & Southern Idaho. "Cooking healthfully and staying active can be a challenge, but these are key components to managing diabetes and preventing type 2 diabetes. Our goal for American Diabetes Month and beyond is to show Americans that it's not too late to start living a healthy active lifestyle and you can even have fun while doing it."

In support of American Diabetes Month, the Association will host two events:

* Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes on Saturday, November 22 from 9-10 am at the Oregon Convention Center. Open to anyone, this event promotes walking for health while raising critical funds to support the mission the Association. To register and learn more visit www.diabetes.org/portlandstepout.

* American Diabetes Association EXPO, presented by the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at OHSU, Saturday, November 22 from 10 am - 4 pm at the Oregon Convention. The largest diabetes gathering in our region, this FREE event provides important diabetes management and prevention education, resources, cooking and exercise demonstrations, free health screenings and more. Special guests will include two-time Super Bowl Champion for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Kendall Simmons and Food Network Personality, Chef Curtis Aikens. For free registration and details visit www.diabetes.org/oregonexpo.

The America Gets Cooking to Stop Diabetes campaign, presented by Sun Life Financial will provide diabetes management and prevention information, healthy living tips, recipes and motivational stories all month long at www.diabetesforecast.org/adm, Facebook (facebook.com/AmericanDiabetesAssociation) or by calling 1-800-DIABETES.

American Diabetes Month Facts and Figures

Diabetes Prevalence
* Nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes.
* Another 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
* Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to Stop Diabetes.

The Toll on Health
* Two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke.
* Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure.
* Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults.
* The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for people without diabetes.
* About 60-70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nerve damage that could result in pain in the feet or hands, slowed digestion, sexual dysfunction and other nerve problems.

Cost of Diabetes
* The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $245 billion.
* Direct medical costs reach $176 billion and the average medical expenditure among people with diabetes is 2.3 times higher than those without the disease.
* Indirect costs amount to $69 billion (disability, work loss, premature mortality).
* One in 10 health care dollars is spent treating diabetes and its complications.
* One in five health care dollars is spent caring for people with diabetes.

About American Diabetes Month
November is American Diabetes Month, a time to communicate the seriousness of diabetes and the importance of diabetes prevention and control. For years, the American Diabetes Association has used this month as an opportunity to raise awareness of the disease and its serious complications.

About the Stop Diabetes(R) Movement
Stop Diabetes is the American Diabetes Association's movement to end the devastating toll that diabetes takes on the lives of millions of individuals across our nation. Its goal is to inspire and mobilize the general public, volunteers, donors, corporations and the scientific and medical communities to rally around our cause and our call to "share, act, learn and give." Through these actions, millions will have the chance to get involved and help raise awareness, promote healthy living and raise money to fund educational outreach, advocacy efforts and critical research that will ultimately stop diabetes once and for all.

About the American Diabetes Association
The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to Stop Diabetes and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.

###
Media Alert - Today: Senator Wyden Will Address National Summit on the Growing Crisis of Elder Financial Exploitation
OR Department of Human Services - 10/31/14
US Senator Ron Wyden Will Address National Summit on the Growing Crisis of Elder Financial Exploitation TODAY (Friday, October 31)

Senator Ron Wyden will speak at 11:15 AM on Friday, October 31, 2014 at the 5th ANNUAL SUMMIT ON ELDER FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION at the Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront.

His speech will be: SENIORS NEED STRONGER PROTECTION FROM TODAY'S FINANCIAL PREDATORS, SCAM AND CON ARTISTS.

Elder financial exploitation and investment fraud are a growing national crisis. Older adults lose billions a year to financial abuse, hurting not only themselves and their families but also financial institutions and taxpayers. Older people represent a tempting target for greedy family members, caregivers and scam artists, because many have assets, they are often very trusting, and some suffer from diminished capacity.

The National Financial Exploitation Advisory Board of the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) is hosting this 5th National, Annual Summit on Elder Financial Exploitation.

The one-day event on October 31, 2014, from 9 AM to 5 PM, will focus on emerging brain research as to why older adults may be more susceptible to financial abuse, and will feature both state and national programs designed to prevent financial exploitation and to protect its victims.

Additional key speakers include Dr. Jason Karlawish, University of Pennsylvania, who will address diminished capacity and decision-making in older adults, and Nora Dowd Eisenhower, Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Office of Older Americans. Expert panels will address other topics, including how banks and investment advisors are working to prevent financial exploitation, current scams targeting older adults, and using new technology to protect family members.

The full-day's agenda and a list of the Elder Financial Exploitation Advisory Board members are available at http://www.napsa-now.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Summit-Program-FINAL.pdf.

NAPSA is a national, not-for-profit membership association representing state and local Adult Protective Services (APS) throughout the country. The Summit immediately follows the 25th Annual NAPSA Conference at the same location on October 29 - 30, 2014. For more information: www.napsa-now.org.

CONTACT: Kathleen Quinn, NAPSA Director Tel: (202) 558-4850 (540) 623-8286 (cell) or kathleen.quinn@napsa-now.org

CONTACT: Betty Malks, NAPSA Advisory Board Chair Tel: (408) 489-1952 bettyf.malks@gmail.com
10/30/14
Oregon Health Policy Board/Early Learning Council joint subcommittee to meet November 4 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 10/30/14
October 30, 2014

Oregon Health Policy Board/Early Learning Council joint subcommittee to meet November 4 in Portland

What: The Oregon Health Policy Board/Early Learning Council joint subcommittee will meet Tuesday, November 4, in Portland. The primary focus of this meeting will be to review the subcommittee's work to date and identify the next priorities; to discuss the infant mental health/social emotional development endorsement and the child and family well-being screening tool; reflect on 2014; and set the agenda for 2015. Public testimony will not be heard during the meeting.

When: Tuesday, November 4, 1- 4 p.m.

Where: 800 NE Oregon Street, Room 1E, Portland

Agenda:

-- "Review and refresh" subcommittee work

-- Infant mental health: building a 0-3 policy agenda

-- Child and Family well-being screening tool

-- Reflections and 2015 agenda setting

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Oregon Health Policy Board to meet November 4 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 10/30/14
October 30, 2014

Oregon Health Policy Board to meet November 4 in Portland

The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting November 4 in Portland. The meeting will be held at its new location at the OHSU Center for Health and Healing on Portland's South Waterfront. The board will discuss strengthening and monitoring primary care system infrastructure and investment. It also will receive updates from the Office of Health Information Technology and the Sustainable Health Expenditures work group. The board will hear public testimony beginning at 11:45 a.m.

When: Tuesday, November 4, 8:30 a.m. to noon

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3033 SW Bond Ave., 3rd floor, Room 4. The meeting will also be available via live Web stream. A link to the live stream and a recording of the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page at www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2014-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

Agenda:

-- IT Transition Project update

-- Strengthening and monitoring primary care system infrastructure and investment

-- Update: electronic health information

-- Update: Sustainable Health Expenditures work group

-- Public testimony

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2014-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodation may request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations by calling the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
It's that time - state fire marshal urges you to test your smoke alarms when setting your clock
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/30/14
Sunday, November 2nd marks the end of Daylight Saving Time and serves as a good reminder for Oregonians to test their smoke alarms. The Office of State Fire Marshal is urging residents to test their smoke alarms before automatically changing the batteries.

"Smoke alarm technology has advanced and many now come with 10-year batteries and some are tamper-resistant," said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "So, I encourage residents to test their alarms before changing the battery."

Oregon law requires ionization-only smoke alarms that are solely battery powered to come equipped with a hush feature and a 10-year battery. Because of this technology, the national slogan "Change your clock, Change your battery" may not apply to Oregon residents who have these ionization-only smoke alarms.

Other types of alarms are also being sold with either a 10-year battery or a standard-life battery.

"Ensuring you have working smoke alarms in your home is the single most important step you can take to increase your family's safety from a home fire," adds Walker. "Also, be sure to replace any smoke alarm that is 10 years old or older."

To test your alarm properly we recommend you:
1) Push the test button to be sure the battery is working.
2) When replacing batteries, follow the manufacturer's instructions for the correct battery to use.
3) Always retest alarms after installing new batteries
4) Replace any alarm that fails to operate after installing a new battery.
5) Inspect your alarms to determine if they are 10 years old or older, and replace any smoke alarm 10 years old or older. Look for a date on the back of the alarm. If there is no date, your alarm is more than 10 years old and should be replaced.
6) Follow the manufacturer's instructions on regularly cleaning your alarms of dust and cobwebs.

Working smoke alarms provide a critical early warning to a fire, allowing you vital minutes to escape, which increase your chances of survival. Additional safety tips:
* Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, in each bedroom, and outside each sleeping area.
* Never disconnect or remove batteries from smoke alarms for other uses.
* Use the smoke alarm's hush feature to silence nuisance alarms.
* Make a home fire escape plan and practice it with family members.

For more smoke alarm and fire safety information, contact your local fire department or visit
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/Pages/CommEd_SA_Program.aspx#Information_for_the_Public

Follow the OSFM on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal and Twitter @OSFM.
Oregon Veterans Day Events listed, no names of the fallen to be added to ODVA Memorial (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Veterans' Affairs - 10/30/14
2014-10/1082/79224/2014_Vets_Day_poster_graphic.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1082/79224/thumb_2014_Vets_Day_poster_graphic.jpg
SALEM - Communities throughout Oregon will once again host ceremonies, parades, and special gatherings to honor America's military veterans and commemorate Veterans Day.

Veterans Day originated as "Armistice Day" on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of that war. A Congressional resolution in 1926 made Nov. 11th an annual observance and in 1938 it became a national holiday. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the name to Veterans Day so as to honor veterans who served in all American wars.

A ceremony will again be held in Salem at the Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial on the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs grounds, 700 Summer St. NE. The names of 142 Oregonians killed while serving in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, and those with Oregon military ties, will be read aloud.

This year's event will mark the first time since its dedication, on Nov. 11, 2006, that names of Oregon's fallen will not be inscribed on the memorial.

The guest speaker at the ceremony will be Joanne Krumberger, Director, VA Portland Health Care System. Military honors will be presented by North Salem High School's JROTC.

ODVA has compiled a list of other Veterans Day events occurring statewide that can be viewed online at: www.oregondva.com/blog/2014/10/22/2014-oregon-veterans-day-events.


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1082/79224/2014_Vets_Day_poster_graphic.jpg
10/29/14
Oregon Releases Comprehensive Report on Abuse in Community, Licensed Facilities for 2013 at National Conference in Portland
OR Department of Human Services - 10/29/14
Portland---The Oregon Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations (OAAPI), a shared service between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority, released today the 2013 comprehensive report on abuse related to seniors, adults with all types of disabilities and children in licensed treatment settings.

The report was released in Portland at the National Adult Protective Services Association Conference, attended by over 600 protective services professionals from 42 states, five tribal nations, England, Singapore and Canada.

Last year, DHS received over 35,000 reports of suspected abuse or neglect of vulnerable Oregonians. Financial exploitation was the most commonly substantiated abuse type, representing nearly 33% of all substantiated abuse. Neglect was a close second with 28%. Together, financial abuse and neglect accounted for over 60% of all substantiated abuse in Oregon for vulnerable adults in 2013.

"We produce this annual report to help us all better understand Oregon's abuse trends more clearly so we can target our prevention efforts to have the greatest impact," said Marie Cervantes OAAPI Director. "Clearly financial exploitation and neglect are areas where more education and outreach should be focused.

Cervantes added that recently the state partnered with the Oregon Bankers Association to produce a banker's toolkit with information on how to spot financial abuse. This kit was given to over 20,000 bank employees in the state.

"We hope our outreach efforts, such as with the banker's toolkit, will increase public awareness and understanding so people will report abuse to authorities if they suspect someone may be in danger or has been injured or exploited," she said.

Here are some key facts about abuse in Oregon for 2013:

* DHS received over 35,000 reports of possible abuse or neglect of vulnerable Oregonians;

* 3,273 people were determined to have been abused, some with multiple abuses or multiple incidents;

* 14,250 allegations of possible abuse were investigated for those over the age of 65 or who have a physical disability. Of those allegations, a total of 2,025 adults were determined to have been abused.

* 3,625 allegations for older adults and people with physical disabilities
residing in licensed facility settings were investigated. A total of 544 adults were determined to have been abused.

* 1,480 allegations of possible abuse were investigated for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. A total of 510 adults were determined to have been abused.

* 557 allegations of possible abuse for adults with mental illness were investigated. 150 adults were determined to have been abused.

* 212 allegations of possible abuse for children in licensed children's settings were investigated; 45 children were determined to have been abused.
* 2,609 assessments for possible self -neglect were investigated. Of those, 546 adults were determined to be self?neglecting.

Family members, intimate partners and/or trusted caregivers were the most common perpetrators across all settings in 2013.

The 2013 annual report is available online. To read the full report, go to: http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/spwpd/adult-abuse/Pages/data.aspx and select "2013 Annual Report"
Students to Create Experiment for NASA
Wapato Sch. Dist. - 10/29/14
Good afternoon all,

Attached is a release with information regarding Wapato High School being chosen to participate in the NASA HUNCH Program. Essentially is means high school students will be creating an experiment that could one day be sent to the International Space Station (ISS).

Check out the release for more info about the experiment the students will be developing.


Thanks and remember "EVERY School Day Counts"


Attached Media Files: WHS NASA HUNCH Program
CORRECTION: Deschutes County forestland Classification Process Begins
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/29/14
PLEASE NOTE: The earlier posting of this release contained a bad link. That has been corrected in this version.

A group of local landowners and agency representatives are studying the private and non-federal public lands within Deschutes County for the purpose of determining which of those lands are to be protected from wildfire by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). The Deschutes County Forestland Classification Committee was convened by the Board of County Commissioners at the request of Oregon's State Forester. The committee will hold its first meeting on Nov. 5, 2014, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Deschutes County Road Department building, 61150 SE 27th S., in Bend.

The Classification Committee is charged with determining which lands within Deschutes County meet the definition of forestland as described in Oregon law. Lands determined to be forestlands are assigned a classification based on their productivity. This information is used to determine where ODF is required to provide wildland fire protection services, and to determine which lands are subject to an annual forest patrol assessment. For private landowners, this assessment is included in their annual property tax statement.

"It has been over forty years since this work was last done," explained Kristin Dodd, Central Oregon Assistant District Forester for ODF. "The landscape has changed a fair amount in Deschutes County over that timeframe, and as a result where we fight fire should as well."

Committee membership is directed by state statute. The members appointed to the Deschutes County Forestland Classification Committee are Nicole Strong, OSU Extension; Kristin Dodd, Oregon Department of Forestry; Jeremy Ast, Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire District; Ed Keith, Deschutes County Forester; Bill Swarts, timber landowner representative for Cascade Timberlands; and Matt Cyrus, Grazing landowner representative for Keith Cyrus, owner.

The forestland classification process is intended to be open and transparent. All meetings of the Classification Committee are open to the public and time for public comment is included on each meeting agenda. The committee will hold meetings regularly and each meeting will be advertised in advance. Meeting agendas, minutes and other work products are being posted on the web at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/centraloregon/Pages/DeschutesFLC.aspx.

The classification process is anticipated to take about two years. During this time the Classification Committee will review aerial imagery of the county, site productivity data, and other information to make its preliminary classifications. Once this preliminary work is complete, a series of public information meetings will be held to provide the public and landowners opportunities to review the Forestland Classification Committee's preliminary findings and proposed maps and to ask questions regarding the forestland classification process. All affected landowners will receive a written invitation to these meetings. The committee may make changes to their initial findings based on landowner input received at these meetings.

"There will be potential impacts to landowners as a result of this process. However, we want the classification to be fair and equitable to those receiving and paying for fire protection within the District," Dodd said.

Before finalizing the forestland classifications, the Committee will also conduct a formal public hearing for the purpose of receiving oral or written testimony from affected landowners. This hearing will mark the start of a two-week public comment period. After the public comment period, the Committee will finalize its work, having taken comments into consideration and file a written order with the County Clerk. Once the order is filed, any person aggrieved by the classification process has 30 days in which to file an appeal with the county Circuit Court.

The agenda for the kickoff meeting will include a presentation on the history of fire protection in Oregon and locally, address the need for this effort and explain the process. It will then be followed by the Committee's first meeting in which they will elect officers, adopt their by-laws and establish subsequent meeting date(s).

More information may be obtained by calling Kristin Dodd at 541-447-5658 extension 229.
Deschutes County forestland classification process begins
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/29/14
A group of local landowners and agency representatives are studying the private and non-federal public lands within Deschutes County for the purpose of determining which of those lands are to be protected from wildfire by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). The Deschutes County Forestland Classification Committee was convened by the Board of County Commissioners at the request of Oregon's State Forester. The committee will hold its first meeting on Nov. 5, 2014, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Deschutes County Road Department building, 61150 SE 27th S., in Bend.

The Classification Committee is charged with determining which lands within Deschutes County meet the definition of forestland as described in Oregon law. Lands determined to be forestlands are assigned a classification based on their productivity. This information is used to determine where ODF is required to provide wildland fire protection services, and to determine which lands are subject to an annual forest patrol assessment. For private landowners, this assessment is included in their annual property tax statement.

"It has been over forty years since this work was last done," explained Kristin Dodd, Central Oregon Assistant District Forester for ODF. "The landscape has changed a fair amount in Deschutes County over that timeframe, and as a result where we fight fire should as well."

Committee membership is directed by state statute. The members appointed to the Deschutes County Forestland Classification Committee are Nicole Strong, OSU Extension; Kristin Dodd, Oregon Department of Forestry; Jeremy Ast, Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire District; Ed Keith, Deschutes County Forester; Bill Swarts, timber landowner representative for Cascade Timberlands; and Matt Cyrus, Grazing landowner representative for Keith Cyrus, owner.

The forestland classification process is intended to be open and transparent. All meetings of the Classification Committee are open to the public and time for public comment is included on each meeting agenda. The committee will hold meetings regularly and each meeting will be advertised in advance. Meeting agendas, minutes and other work products are being posted on the web at www.oregon.gov/odf.centraloregon/deschutesflc.

The classification process is anticipated to take about two years. During this time the Classification Committee will review aerial imagery of the county, site productivity data, and other information to make its preliminary classifications. Once this preliminary work is complete, a series of public information meetings will be held to provide the public and landowners opportunities to review the Forestland Classification Committee's preliminary findings and proposed maps and to ask questions regarding the forestland classification process. All affected landowners will receive a written invitation to these meetings. The committee may make changes to their initial findings based on landowner input received at these meetings.

"There will be potential impacts to landowners as a result of this process. However, we want the classification to be fair and equitable to those receiving and paying for fire protection within the District," Dodd said.

Before finalizing the forestland classifications, the Committee will also conduct a formal public hearing for the purpose of receiving oral or written testimony from affected landowners. This hearing will mark the start of a two-week public comment period. After the public comment period, the Committee will finalize its work, having taken comments into consideration and file a written order with the County Clerk. Once the order is filed, any person aggrieved by the classification process has 30 days in which to file an appeal with the county Circuit Court.

The agenda for the kickoff meeting will include a presentation on the history of fire protection in Oregon and locally, address the need for this effort and explain the process. It will then be followed by the Committee's first meeting in which they will elect officers, adopt their by-laws and establish subsequent meeting date(s).

More information may be obtained by calling Kristin Dodd at (541) 447-5658 extension 229.
10/28/14
Walla Walla High School student to represent school through state leadership program (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/28/14
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WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla High School Junior Christian Moreno was selected to serve on the Washington State Leaders in Education Ambassador Program (LEAP) in Olympia. As a LEAP Ambassador, Moreno will bring issues of interest to the group to discuss. They also help guide the conference and interact with our area's legislative team in the Capitol building. One issue Moreno wants to bring more attention to is getting more Latino students involved in high school athletics. Moreno participated in the LEAP conference last year. He is president of the Latino Club and an AVID student.

"It is extremely rare that an underclassmen, or any student from Eastern Washington for that matter, get this opportunity," said Intervention Specialist Melito Ramirez. "This is the first time a junior in high school as been selected to be an ambassador. It's a very strict selection process as most of the students are in college and live on the west-side of the state."

Moreno will commit to this program for one year and must satisfy the assigned requirements at his local high school and community.

###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1288/79186/Moreno.jpg
Carve Your Pumpkin? Pick Your Costume? Trick-or-Treat? Drink-or-Drive? Keep Halloween Fun, Not Tragic (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/28/14
2014-10/1002/79178/id-soc-08-hween-wine_smoke_lo_res-post-72-en-pr.jpg
2014-10/1002/79178/id-soc-08-hween-wine_smoke_lo_res-post-72-en-pr.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1002/79178/thumb_id-soc-08-hween-wine_smoke_lo_res-post-72-en-pr.jpg
The Oregon State Police (OSP) and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) join the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in reminding motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians to use extra caution on Halloween night. Nationwide, Halloween is a particularly deadly night due to the high number of drunk drivers on the roads and the increase in pedestrians during the evening hours.

According to NHTSA, almost half of all crash fatalities in 2012 on Halloween night involved a drunk driver. In Oregon, ODOT Fatality Analysis Reporting Section (FARS) reports a more frightening statistic with 90 percent of all fatalities (10) on Halloween night between 1998 and 2008 occurring in alcohol and/or drug-involved traffic crashes. During the last two years on Halloween night, ODOT FARS reports 3 Halloween night traffic fatalities.

Children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween as any other day of the year. With Halloween falling on a Friday night there is extra concern. ODOT, OSP and local law agencies urge everyone to 'See and Be Seen' and remember these friendly safety reminders:

Motorists

* Use caution while behind the wheel.
- Slow down and be alert in residential areas.
- Enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully.
- Eliminate distractions so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
- Expect bicyclists. Expect pedestrians.

* Drive sober or get pulled over.
- Before the Halloween parties begin, plan a way to get home safely at the end of the night.
- Always designate a sober driver, even if you only plan to "have a few". Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.
- Use your community's sober ride program or take a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation.

* Watch out for your family, friends, and neighbors.
- If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact local law enforcement.
- If you know someone who is about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make safe travel arrangements to where they are going.

Pedestrian & Bicyclists

* Don't assume a driver can see you. See and be seen.
* Walking or bicycling impaired can be just as dangerous as drunk driving.
* Designate a sober friend to walk or accompany you home.

* Keep kids safe.
- Children out at night should have adult supervision.
- Kids should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-or-treat in groups.
- Choose face paint when possible instead of masks, which can obstruct a child's vision.
- Decorate costumes with reflective tape and have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights.

* Important reminders for pedestrians.
- Walk on the shoulder of the road facing traffic, when sidewalks are not available.
- When walking, pay attention to traffic, not your cell phone.
- Always cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks.
- Look left, right and left again when crossing and keep looking as you cross.

Everyone is urged to play an important part in keeping our highways and city streets safe by immediately reporting aggressive, dangerous, and intoxicated drivers to the Oregon State Police at 1-800-24DRUNK (1-800-243-7865) or call 9-1-1.

Halloween image - NHTSA

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1002/79178/id-soc-08-hween-wine_smoke_lo_res-post-72-en-pr.jpg
Tri-Cities Youth and Justice Forum
ESD 123 - 10/28/14
PASCO, WA - Each year, over 200 area eighth through twelfth grade students, many from economically disadvantaged and historically underrepresented communities, attend the Tri-Cities Youth and Justice Forum. The 12th Annual Youth & Justice Forum will take place on Friday, November 7 from 8 AM to 2 PM at the Columbia Basin College Gjerde Center.

One of the principle missions of the forum is to promote racial and ethnic diversity in the justice system workforce that reflects the changing diversity of the communities it serves, by exposing students to career opportunities within the justice system and encouraging them to consider those opportunities. Additionally, the forum is designed to help students think about and better understand their legal rights and obligations as members of their communities. The Forum was initiated under the auspices of the Washington State Minority and Justice Commission, which co-sponsors the event with ESD 123, Columbia Basin College and other organizations.

Approximately 50 volunteer professionals from all components of the justice system make this event possible and provide an important component to the forum by lending their expertise and knowledge in a nonthreatening environment. This year's Youth & Justice keynote speaker is Judge Sal Mendoza.

The day is organized to provide optimum positive contacts and interaction between students and volunteer professionals through games, skits, work demonstrations, small breakout discussion groups, a brief mock trial, and during lunch and break periods. At the end of the busy day, the students leave with t-shirts, prizes, information packets, volunteer business cards and other contact information. More importantly, they leave with an improved understanding of their place in the community and a kindled interest in exciting and positive opportunities for them in the justice system.

This year's forum is co-sponsored and supported by The Washington State Minority and Justice Commission; Educational Service District 123; University of Washington School of Law; Latina/o Bar Association of Washington; Seattle University School of Law; Gonzaga School of Law; Dimke Angus LLC; United Cargo; Columbia Basin College; Bruchi's CheeseSteaks and Subs; and Microsoft.
For details regarding this event, contact Cynthia Delostrinos at Cynthia.Delostrinos@COURTS.WA.GOV.

###

About ESD 123: Educational Service District 123, based in Pasco, WA, is one of nine ESDs in Washington. Dedicated to delivering collaborative solutions that promote learning, ESD 123 serves 23 school districts in seven counties of Southeastern Washington. Under Superintendent Bruce Hawkins and its board of directors, this legislatively mandated, not-for-profit educational organization provides efficiency of educational systems and equity of learning opportunities for over 65,000 Washington students. For more information about ESD 123, please call 509-544-5700 or 888-547-8441 or visit www.esd123.org.
State agency committee to meet Nov. 7 on proposed gold mine in Malheur County
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries - 10/28/14
ALBANY, Ore. - The Water Resources Subcommittee of the Technical Review Team for the Calico Resources proposed gold mine in Malheur County will meet via conference call on Friday, November 7, 2014 from 10 a.m. to noon PST.

The public may listen to the meeting by phone, or listen to the call in person at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Portland offices at 800 NE Oregon St., Ste. 965. To listen by phone, contact the DOGAMI offices in Albany at 541-967-2040 for call-in instructions.

The meeting agenda is available here: http://bit.ly/caliconov7

The Technical Review Team (TRT) is an interdisciplinary team of state agencies that reviews the application and develops consolidated permit conditions that conform to Oregon regulations. The federal Bureau of Land Management serves on the Team in an ex-officio role. The TRT Water Resources Subcommittee focuses on water quality and water quantity issues related to the proposed project.

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TOMORROW: State to Release 2013 Report on Adult Abuse Following Gert Boyle Presentation at National Adult Protection Conference in Portland
OR Department of Human Services - 10/28/14
When: Tomorrow, October 29, 2014 2:30 p.m.
Where: Portland Waterfront Marriot Hotel, 1401 SW Naito Parkway, Portland
Salons E and F

What: Last year, Oregon DHS received over 35,000 reports of possible abuse of older or vulnerable Oregonians. At this conference, Oregon will release its 2013 statistics, which show an increase in both financial exploitation and neglect. Key facts about abuse in Oregon will be shared.
(There are over 600 people registered for this international conference, experts from 43 states, five tribal nations and three foreign countries will be participating).
Why: The issue of adult abuse continues to impact our state, our nation and our world. The fact that Oregon is hosting this major event speaks to the heightened awareness and concern over adult abuse.
Who: Highlighted speakers:
* Marie Cervantes, Director of Oregon's Office of Adult Abuse Prevention Investigations. She will present Oregon's 2013 stats.
* Kathleen Quinn, Executive Director of the National Adult Protective Services Association. She will give a national perspective.
* 12 year old Rayanna Blair of Lakeview, Oregon will be introduced. She will be receiving a special award at the conference for reporting the abuse of a 90 year old and ultimately saving her life. Everyone needs to take responsibility for protecting our elders. Here is a video about this brave youngster: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ikC54yRhRE&feature=youtu.be
The briefing will take place right after the keynote presentation by Gert Boyle. Mrs. Boyle is 90 years old, lives in "independent living," goes to work full time at Columbia Sportswear, where she is chairman of the board. When she was in her late 80's she was the victim of a brutal attack. She will give professionals advice on how to work with older victims.
Format: The presentation will be short. Following the briefing, presenters will be available for interviews. Workshops are open for the media. Conference program is attached.


Attached Media Files: NAPSA program
10/27/14
Driver Arrested After Alcohol-Involved Injury Crash - Highway 395 north of Hermiston (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/27/14
2014-10/1002/79152/Espain_Rafael.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1002/79152/thumb_Espain_Rafael.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) arrested a 20-year old Umatilla man Sunday night following a three-vehicle minor injury crash on Highway 395 north of Hermiston.

On October 26, 2014 at approximately 8:15 p.m., a Mazda RX8 driven by LORENSO ESPAIN RAFAEL, age 20, from Umatilla, was southbound on Highway 395 near Baggett Lane at a high rate of speed when it crashed into the back of a southbound Honda Accord driven by MARIA CRISPIN MATEO, age 68, from Irrigon. The impact forced the Honda across the northbound lanes, off the highway and through a chain link fence. The Mazda spun across the northbound lanes and also collided into the passenger side of a northbound Dodge Durango driven by ZACHARY WILSON, age 31, from Umatilla.

Subsequent investigation led OSP to arrest ESPAIN RAFAEL on the following charges:

* DUII - Alcohol
* Reckless Driving
* Recklessly Endangering Another Person (9 counts)
* Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance - Methamphetamine

He was also cited for No Operators License and Driving Uninsured. His vehicle was also occupied by and adult female and three children. One of the passengers was transported to Good Shepherd Community Hospital in Hermiston with minor injury.

In addition to the driver, the Honda had another adult female and two child passengers.

No scene photographs available for this release.

Espain Rafael Photograph - Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1002/79152/Espain_Rafael.jpg
Notice of Public Comment Period: Proposed 2015 Annual Action Plan
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 10/27/14
Notice of Public Comment Period

Subject: Notice of Public Comment Period: Proposed 2015 Annual Action Plan

The State of Oregon, through its agencies: Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS), Oregon Health Authority (OHA), and Business Oregon, is seeking public comments on the 2015 Proposed Annual Action Plan and the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Proposed 2015 Method of Distribution.

The 2015 Proposed Annual Action Plan covers U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funding for the Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME), Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG), and Housing Opportunities for Persons with HIV/AIDS (HOPWA). The 2015 Proposed Annual Action Plan can be viewed at http://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/pages/hrs_consolidated_plan_5yearplan.aspx.

The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Proposed 2015 Method of Distribution covers U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funding for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The CDBG Proposed 2015 Method of Distribution and can be viewed at: http://www.orinfrastructure.org/assets/docs/IFA/2015-proposed-MOD.pdf

All Oregon residents are invited to submit written or verbal comments beginning Monday, October 27, 2014.

Public Comment Period:

The 30-day public comment period for the 2015 Proposed Annual Action Plan and Proposed 2015 Method of Distribution concludes 5:00 pm on Friday, November 28, 2014.

Public Comments:
HOPWA comments should be directed to Annick Benson-Scott, HIV Community Services Manager, OHA, 800 NE Multnomah, Portland, Oregon 97232 or by e-mail at Annick.Benson@state.or.us.

HOME and ESG comments should be directed to Theresa Wingard, Operations and Policy Analyst, OHCS, 725 Summer Street NE, Suite B, Salem, Oregon 97301 or by e-mail at Theresa.Wingard@oregon.gov

CDBG comments should be directed to Loren Shultz, Regional Coordinator, Business Oregon, 775 Summer St NE, Suite 200, Salem, Oregon, 97301 or by e-mail at Loren.J.Shultz@oregon.gov.

Persons needing copies in other languages should contact the respective person listed above at their earliest convenience. Questions, concerns, complaints, or requests for information in alternative formats from individuals with disabilities must be submitted at least ten days before the end of the comment period. Deaf and hearing-impaired individuals may use a TTY by calling 503-986-2100.

The State of Oregon's programs are administered in a nondiscriminatory manner, consistent with Equal Opportunity Employment Opportunities, Affirmative Action, and Fair Housing requirements.
Oregon Hospitals, Nurses, Physicians, and Governor Kitzhaber Lay Out Updated Ebola Strategy
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 10/27/14
Portland, Ore. (October 27, 2014) - The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, together with the leaders of several Oregon health care systems, the Oregon Nurses Association and Oregon Medical Association, joined Governor John Kitzhaber today to announce that Oregon public health officials, hospital systems, and the major medical associations have agreed upon an updated and coordinated strategy for caring for potential Ebola patients. No cases of Ebola have been diagnosed in Oregon as of today.

Six Oregon health systems have agreed to serve as referral centers for patients positively diagnosed with Ebola, indicating they will have the capacity and the training to offer appropriate and safe treatment: OHSU, Legacy Health, PeaceHealth, Providence Health & Services, Samaritan Health Services, and Kaiser Permanente Northwest.

These six organizations are prepared to accept patients who have a confirmed case of the Ebola virus from other Oregon hospitals, clinics or EMS providers, if no federal facility is available. These systems will work with the CDC and other federal and state agencies to handle any circumstances that could arise during the course of treatment.

In the meantime, all hospitals and frontline health care workers in the state of Oregon are fine tuning their response plans, which focus on identifying and isolating a suspected Ebola case and making appropriate arrangements for transfer to one of these referral sites.

Governor John Kitzhaber said: "We've engaged partners across the state, from local health departments and hospitals to health care providers and first responders, so that providers and public health professionals have the support, tools and training they need to respond to Ebola should it come to Oregon. While the risk of Ebola in Oregon is low, we take preparedness and coordination seriously. My thanks to our hospital system and public health partners for their quick and thorough engagement on this matter."

Andy Davidson, president and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, said while readiness preparations and training are continuing in earnest, Oregon's hospitals are ready to meet any health emergency, including potential Ebola patients. "These six systems have shown their commitment to protecting Oregon's communities and families by stepping forward to care for those infected with Ebola. Hospitals are preparing, in partnership with their physician and nursing partners, and they will be ready on the very remote chance that Oregon discovers a patient with Ebola symptoms."

Dave Underriner, Chair of the OAHHS Board and CEO of Providence Health Services, said "On behalf of the board of OAHHS, I can say that our Association members stand ready to do their part in a robust emergency preparedness strategy, whatever the public health threat is. Most recently, of course, we are proud of the work we've done collectively to prepare statewide for any potential Ebola case."

Susan King, RN, FAAN, Executive Director of the Oregon Nurses Association, said "Nurses have a long history of caring for our patients with illnesses such as polio, HIV, H1N1, and now Ebola. The best way to protect our citizens and health care providers is by improving our knowledge and practice of the techniques we know will prevent the transmission of this disease. We are working with Oregon's officials and our partner organizations to identify opportunities to improve our preparedness. We encourage Oregonians to become vaccinated against other communicable diseases more likely to affect us, such as the flu and measles."

"Patients with Ebola type symptoms could present anywhere including the outpatient, private physician practice, so it's important for all physician offices and clinics in Oregon to plan ahead and understand the proper protocols for managing these patients, isolating them if necessary and working with local public health authorities to arrange for transport," said Sharon Meieran, MD, Board of Trustees Member, Oregon Medical Association. "It's also more critical than ever for the public to get vaccinated early for Influenza," added Meieran.

A consolidated approach to Ebola treatment offers several advantages:

* Nurses and doctors at consolidated locations, with the aid of intensive training, will develop greater proficiency in treating the unique needs of Ebola patients and in the intricate safety measures necessary to prevent exposure.

* Relying on fewer Ebola treatment sites ensures that the communication and operationalization of the latest information from state, federal, and international health agencies is streamlined.

* Caring for an Ebola patient requires many specially trained medical staff, complex waste management procedures, a significant quantity of personal protective equipment, and other resources; by consolidating care, Oregon's health care providers are better able to deploy personnel and resources.

Oregon hospitals and health officials have been focused on preparing to keep Oregon families safe from the Ebola virus. Many hospitals have worked with local public health officials to conduct tabletop exercises and drills in recent weeks to ensure coordinated responses. At the same time, Oregon hospitals have examined training and preparedness levels and adjusted to the new sets of CDC guidance on Ebola.

The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon's innovative health care community. - See more at: http://www.oahhs.org/

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) was founded in 1904 as the professional association for nurses in Oregon. It is a nonprofit association and a labor union representing registered nurses. ONA's mission is to advocate for nursing and quality health care. Learn more at http://www.oregonrn.org/

The Oregon Medical Association provides legislative and practice advocacy, regulatory review and educational opportunities to aid nearly 8,000 physicians, physicians assistants and student members in their efforts to improve the health of Oregonians. Additional information can be found at www.theOMA.org
###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1635/79150/ebola_strategy.docx
Oregon leaders in health and health care to provide briefing on Ebola preparedness
Oregon Health Authority - 10/27/14
October 27, 2014

Today the Oregon Health Authority will be joined by state and local leaders in public health and health care to discuss Ebola preparedness. While there have been no cases of Ebola in Oregon, preparedness work continues.

What: News briefing on Ebola preparedness. It will include an opportunity to view the incident command center before the news briefing, for those who call in advance. Please call 971-246-9139.

When: News briefing begins at 11:40 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 Oregon Street, Portland

For those who cannot attend in person, you may dial: 866-261-3182. Questions can be submitted to PHD.Communications@state.or.us.

# # #
10/25/14
Welfare Check Leads to Arrest of Wanted Person - Interstate 84 near Biggs Junction
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/25/14
An Oregon State Police trooper arrested a man wanted on numerous warrants early Saturday morning after checking on his welfare following a citizen's report along Interstate 84 near Biggs Junction.

On October 25, 2014 at approximately 1:04 a.m., an OSP trooper responded to Interstate 84 near milepost 104 following a citizen's report of a man lying next to a guardrail. Upon arriving at the scene the trooper found a man sleeping next to the guardrail and awoke him to check on his welfare.

The man was identified as BRUCE WARREN SAMPSON, age 32, from White Swan, Washington. SAMPSON was arrested after the trooper learned he was wanted on five Failure to Appear warrants out of Hood River County. SAMPSON was lodged at the Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility.

No photograph available for this release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
OSP Traffic Stop Leads to Arrest of Armed, Wanted Felon in Stolen Car - Milton-Freewater in Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/25/14
2014-10/1002/79117/Thorson.jpg
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An Oregon State Police (OSP) traffic stop Friday night in Milton-Freewater led to the arrest of an armed wanted felon in a stolen car.

On October 24, 2014 at approximately 11:42 p.m., an OSP trooper stopped a Honda Prelude for failure to display a vehicle license plate on SE 14th Avenue and S. Mill Street in Milton-Freewater. Upon contact with the driver, identified as ANDREW KENNETH THORSON, age 30, from Walla Walla, Washington, the trooper spotted a handgun in the driver side door storage compartment. Further investigation also led to the discovery a second handgun on the passenger seat.

THORSON was taken into custody and was determined to be wanted on two felony Probation Violation warrants out of Umatilla County. While searching THORSON, the trooper found a dagger concealed in one of his shoes.

When the trooper checked the vehicle's identification number he learned the car was reported stolen out of Pendleton.

THORSON was lodged in the Umatilla County Jail on the following charges:

* Probation Violation warrants
* Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle
* Felon in Possession of a Firearm (2 counts)
* Unlawful Possession of a Firearm
* Carrying a Concealed Weapon - Knife

Photograph - Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1002/79117/Thorson.jpg
10/24/14
WWSD Board of Directors Public Work Session: October 28, 2014
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/24/14
WWSD Board of Directors Public Work Session: October 28, 2014, as per the attached media memo.


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1288/79099/10.28.14_SB_00_Media_Memo.pdf
Williams to lead Special Education Department (Photo)
Walla Walla Sch. Dist. - 10/24/14
2014-10/1288/79098/Tracy_Williams.jpg
2014-10/1288/79098/Tracy_Williams.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1288/79098/thumb_Tracy_Williams.jpg
WALLA WALLA - Walla Walla Public Schools Board of Directors accepted the resignation of Dr. Karen Lehman, Director of Special Education. Lehman was hired in July 2011. Dr. Tracy Williams will succeed Lehman as the interim director for the 2014-15 school year.

"It has been a privilege to serve the students with identified disabilities and their families these past 3.5 years," said Lehman.

Williams has been in education for 32 years, including 20 years in various teaching and leadership positions for Walla Walla Public Schools. Williams spent six years as Director of Special Programs in the Department of Teaching and Learning in the Spokane Public School District, two years as Director of Curriculum for ESD 123 and four years as Assistant Professor and Department Chair for Curriculum and Instruction at Seattle Pacific University.

Williams earned her Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Washington State University, Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction from Northwest Nazarene College and Bachelor of Arts from Whitworth College.

Williams' current district project of developing an online clearinghouse for curriculum to support the new rigorous Common Core learning standards in Math and English/Language will continue under the leadership of Assistant Superintendent Dr. Linda Boggs, Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment and Technology Director Forrest Baker.

"We are fortunate to have a talented leader like Tracy Williams available to step in and guide this important department," said Superintendent Dr. Bill Jordan. "She has many connections in the district from her previous experience and has built her reputation based on trust through sound leadership."

###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1288/79098/Tracy_Williams.jpg
Marine Board Holds Quarterly Meeting
Oregon Marine Board - 10/24/14
The Oregon State Marine Board held its quarterly meeting on October 22 in Astoria, and approved boating facility grants and denied a petition for personal watercraft (PWC) restrictions on the Salmon River, in Lincoln County.

The Board approved the disbursement of $63,080 in state boater funds and $204,241 in federal Clean Vessel Act (CVA) funds to replace seven pumpout and dump stations. The new equipment will help capture thousands of gallons of boater-generated sewage from portable toilets and holding tanks. Together with in-kind contributions, total project expenditures equaled $300,841. The Port of Garibaldi, Boardman Park & Recreation District, Metro (Chinook Landing), City of Depoe Bay, Port of Astoria (West Basin), Port of Gold Beach and State Parks (Cove Palisades) were awarded grants.

In other business, the Marine Board voted 4:1, to not initiate rulemaking to amend OAR 250-021-0040, in response to a petition the agency received to prohibit the operation of personal watercraft (PWC's) in Lincoln County.

The Board also voted unanimously to adopt a new Marine Board logo. The logo was developed by an external advisory committee comprised of staff, community members and state boaters and aided by the design firm of bell + funk, from Eugene. Agency signage, publications, forms, and other documentation will incorporate the new logo as existing supplies are exhausted.

For more information about the Marine Board and the agency's programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.
###
Oregon Scenic Bikeway Committee Accepting Applications for New Routes
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/24/14
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's Scenic Bikeway Program will accept applications in the spring of 2015 for new bikeway designations.

Designated Scenic Bikeways are selected from locally proposed routes and represent the "best of the best" road bicycle riding in Oregon. Currently, there are 12 designated bikeways totaling nearly 800 miles. Oregon is the only state with an official Scenic Bikeway program.

Completed applications consist of a proposed scenic route, a local proponent group, and letters of support from all governing bodies of road jurisdictions. The applications must be submitted from March 17-31, 2015 to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

Bikeway proponent groups consist of local volunteers, cyclists and tourism professionals. If the purposed route submitted via that application is officially recommended for designation by the Oregon Bikeway Committee, the proponent group must then complete a comprehensive Bikeway Plan including a series of goals, sign locations, promotions and future engagement.

The Oregon Scenic Bikeway Committee evaluates proposed routes using criteria which examine human made, natural scenic and sensory values and road conditions on the route.

In the past, only half of the applications scored high enough on the criteria to be recommended for designation.

Applications, a list of important features for a bikeway and the criteria are available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BIKE/Pages/info.aspx

For more information on the application process or the Bikeway Program contact Alex Phillips at 503-986-0631 or alex.phillips@oregon.gov .


Attached Media Files: News release
PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE: Oregon Growth Board
Business Oregon (Ore. Business Development Dept.) - 10/24/14
The Oregon Growth Board will hold a regular meeting on October 30, from 10:00am to 1:00pm
at:

White Stag Building
Room 152
70 NW Couch St
Portland, 97209

Meeting agenda can be downloaded here: http://www.oregongrowthboard.com/Meetings/2014/1014/1014OGBagenda.pdf

For more information on the Oregon Growth Board, visit www.oregongrowthboard.com.

The Oregon Growth Board was created in an effort to spur more economic growth in Oregon, with a focus on increasing the state's ability to grow companies from early stage to large, locally headquartered firms. An important focus is placed on leveraging state resources to improve the availability of capital for high-growth companies.
Grant application period open for federal Community Forest Program (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/24/14
The Community Forest program provides assistance grants for acquisition of private forestlands threatened with conversion to non-forest use
The Community Forest program provides assistance grants for acquisition of private forestlands threatened with conversion to non-forest use
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1072/79082/thumb_ORForestland.jpg
A federal program that provides financial assistance to local governments, Tribal governments and nonprofit entities for establishing community forests is now available. The program provides assistance grants for acquisition of private forestlands threatened with conversion to non-forest use.

Lands eligible for grants under the program must be private forest at least 5 acres in size, at least 75 percent forested, and suitable to sustain natural forest cover. The lands must not be held in trust by the United States on behalf of any Indian tribe. Passed under the 2008 Farm Bill, the Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program authorizes the U.S. Forest Service to pay up to 50 percent of the project costs to a maximum of $400,000.

The purpose of the program is to protect forestland from conversion to non-forest uses and provide community benefits. Lands must be threatened by conversion to nonforest uses, allow public access, and be offered for sale by a willing seller.

Community benefits as described under the Community Forest Program include:
* Sustainable forestry
* Recreation
* Educational and experiential learning opportunities
* Wildlife habitat
* Clean air, water, and other environmental benefits

More about the Community Forest Program
Community Forests can be owned by local governments, tribes, and qualified nonprofit entities.
All projects must complete a Community Forest Plan within 120 days after land acquisition; a draft of the plan is due at the time of application. Technical assistance from the Oregon Department of Forestry for development of the Community Forest Plan may be available in addition to the land acquisition costs of the project. Projects consisting of conservation easements are not eligible.

The program pays up to 50 percent of acquisition costs -- and requires at least a 50 percent non-federal match. Qualified non-profits and local governments apply through the Oregon Department of Forestry; Indian Tribes apply directly to the U.S. Forest Service.

Oregon framework - suggestions for applicants
Applications should include a letter from the private landowner that indicates the landowner is a voluntary, willing seller supporting the project. In addition, projects that result in one or more of the following are encouraged:
* A written and approved Oregon forest management plan - or the commitment to develop one before closing on the acquisition.
* Third party certification through the American Tree Farm System (ATFS), Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) or the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI).
* Property demonstrates effective forest stewardship and sustainable forestry as opposed to being in a degraded condition.
* Property is located within an urban-rural interface area threatened with conversion to non-forestry use.
* Land management supports implementation of the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife's
"Conservation Strategy" (see link, below).
* A strong landowner/public forestry/outdoor education component.
Applications from family forestry related non-profit organizations - with local forestland owner and community involvement, and demonstrated financial and organizational capacity to manage the property - are strongly encouraged.

A preference will be given for properties already demonstrating effective forest stewardship and sustainable forestry as opposed to properties in a degraded condition.

Application deadline
All applicants must send an email to communityforest@fs.fed.us to confirm an application has been submitted to the Oregon Department of Forestry for funding consideration.

Hard copy or electronic versions of applications need to be submitted to:
Jarrett Caston
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State Street
Salem, Oregon 97310
jcaston@odf.state.or.us
(503) 945-7382
and received no later than close of business, January 16, 2015. Prospective applicants are encouraged to contact Jarrett Caston with any questions.
For the national Request for Applications, go to:
http://www.fs.fed.us/cooperativeforestry/library/2014_app_fed_rfa.pdf

For more information about the Community Forest Program:
http://www.oregon.gov/odf/privateforests/pages/incentivescfp.aspx
For information about the Oregon Conservation Strategy: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/conservationstrategy/


Attached Media Files: The Community Forest program provides assistance grants for acquisition of private forestlands threatened with conversion to non-forest use
Open enrollment is your chance to shop around
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/24/14
As open enrollment for 2015 health insurance plans approaches, the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Insurance Division, is providing information to consumers about how to choose the plan that best meets their health and financial needs. This guide focuses on the importance of shopping during open enrollment.

The open enrollment period for people who buy their own health insurance runs from Nov. 15, 2014, through Feb. 15, 2015. This is the one time during the year when you can change plans, change insurance companies, or choose to stay with the plan you have. You can shop and access financial help during open enrollment by visiting the federal Health Insurance Marketplace at healthcare.gov.

Whether you have insurance coverage for the first time or have had an individual plan for years, there are many reasons to explore all your options during open enrollment.

* You can no longer be turned down for coverage. In the past, those with health conditions may have had limited plan choices. However, people with health conditions can no longer be turned down for coverage, thanks to the Affordable Care Act. That means all Oregonians are free to shop for health insurance without fear of rejection.

* You may qualify for financial help. Visit https://www.healthcare.gov/qualifying-for-lower-costs-chart/ to see if you might be able to get premium tax credits or lower out-of-pocket costs. You can access these savings only if you buy your plan through healthcare.gov.

* Your plan may have changed. If you currently have insurance, you will receive a letter from your insurance company about whether your current plan is changing or will be available in 2015. Consider any changes and make sure the plan still meets your needs. You have the option to choose a new plan during open enrollment.

* You may have an older plan that does not include certain benefits. If you chose to keep the plan you had before the Affordable Care Act took effect, known as grandfathered or transitional plans, you may not have access to health care services that are free under all new plans. For example, many preventive services are now covered 100 percent. During open enrollment, you could choose a newer plan that does provide this coverage.

Starting Nov. 15, 2014, Oregonians will be able to shop and compare plans and enroll in one sitting through healthcare.gov. Consumers can also enroll directly with an insurance company or agent.

For more information:
The Insurance Division has information about health insurance posted online at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/insurance/gethelp/health/Pages/health.aspx and has consumer advocates available to answer questions at 1-888-877-4894 (toll-free).
Update #3: Photos - Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 101 north of Cloverdale in Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/24/14
2014-10/1002/79056/Fitch.jpg
2014-10/1002/79056/Fitch.jpg
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Oregon State Police (OSP), with the assistance of Tillamook County Sheriff's Office and Tillamook County District Attorney's Office, are continuing the investigation into Thursday afternoon's two vehicle fatal crash that occurred on Highway 101 about three miles north of Cloverdale in Tillamook County. One driver died and the other driver was arrested. The victim's name is released in this update as well as added information related to the offending driver also being charged with Manslaughter in the Second Degree and DUII.

According to Lieutenant Justin McGladrey, on October 23, 2014 at approximately 3:07 p.m., a 1997 Ford Ranger pickup driven by CHRISTOPHER ALLEN FITCH, age 21, from Beaverton, was northbound on Highway 101 near Old Condor Bridge Road about milepost 84. As the pickup negotiated a right curve at a high rate of speed, it crossed the double solid centerline and collided nearly head-on with a southbound 2001 Ford Taurus four-door. The pickup came to rest on its right side near the center of the highway. The car came to rest off the southbound shoulder of the highway.

The Ford Taurus driver, GERALD DEE WILL, age 70, from Cloverdale, was pronounced deceased at the scene.

FITCH, who was driving on a suspended license, received minor injury and was later arrested by OSP. As part of the investigation, OSP learned FITCH was on probation for DUII out of Clackamas County and during the evening confirmed alcohol was believed to be a contributing factor. In consultation with the Tillamook County District Attorney's Office, FITCH was lodged in the Tillamook County Jail for Manslaughter in the Second Degree, DUII and and Reckless Driving.

OSP troopers from the Tillamook work site office and Newport Area Command office are continuing the investigation which will be forwarded to the District Attorney. Trooper Sarah Reding is the lead investigator.

Assistance at the scene provided by Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Nestucca Rural Fire & Rescue, Tillamook Regional Medical Center Ambulance, Tillamook County Medical Examiner, Tillamook County District Attorney's Office, and ODOT. The highway was closed in both directions for 4 hours.

Photograph Sources:
Crash Scene Photos - Oregon State Police
Fitch Photo - Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1002/79056/Fitch.jpg , 2014-10/1002/79056/102414.fatal.hwy101_mp84.1.jpg , 2014-10/1002/79056/102414.fatal.hwy101_mp84.2.jpg
10/23/14
Update: Names Released - Fatal Traffic Crash - Interstate 5 in Albany (Photo)
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/23/14
2014-10/1002/79044/102314.fatal_i5_mp237.1.jpg
2014-10/1002/79044/102314.fatal_i5_mp237.1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/1002/79044/thumb_102314.fatal_i5_mp237.1.jpg
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into the cause of Thursday morning's cross-over fatal traffic crash that occurred on Interstate 5 in the north Albany area. The names are released in this update.

On October 23, 2014 at approximately 10:39 a.m., a 1995 Honda Civic driven by AMBER NICHOLE FOREST, age 28, from, Aumsville, was northbound on Interstate 5 near milepost 237 when it traveled into the center median. The car continued across the median into the southbound lanes where it collided with a 2005 Volvo commercial truck pulling semi-trailer in the right southbound lane.

After impact, the commercial truck and trailer crossed the center median onto the northbound lanes where it collided into a concrete barrier. The truck and trailer came to rest jackknifed across the northbound lanes. The Honda came to rest in the center median.

FOREST was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The truck's driver, ARTHUR F. PEREZ, age 65, from College Place, Washington, was transported by ambulance to Albany General Hospital with minor injuries.

OSP troopers from the Albany Area Command office are investigating the crash with the assistance of a crash investigation inter-agency team comprised of members from Linn County Sheriff's Office, Albany Police Department, and Lebanon Police Department.

Additional assistance provided at the scene by Albany Fire Department, Jefferson Fire District, and ODOT.

All lanes in both directions were opened by 3:00 p.m.

Photograph - Oregon State Police

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###


Attached Media Files: 2014-10/1002/79044/102314.fatal_i5_mp237.1.jpg
OSP Seeking Information Related to Robbery, Assault Investigation - Interstate 84 east of Pendleton
Oregon State Police - Statewide - 10/23/14
Oregon State Police (OSP) is asking for the public's to identify two men suspected of robbing another man Wednesday night after he stopped to inspect his vehicle in the Deadman Pass area along Interstate 84 east of Pendleton.

On October 22, 2014 at approximately 8:35 p.m., a 34-year old Boise, Idaho man stopped his black Subaru passenger car along the westbound lanes of Interstate 84 near milepost 227 to inspect what he believed was a flat tire. While stopped and outside of his vehicle, the victim reported that a maroon 1990s Ford Mustang displaying unknown California license plate stopped behind his vehicle. The two men got out and assaulted the victim, stealing his wallet. The men ran back to their car and drove away westbound.

Both suspects were described as white males, age 35 - 40, approximately 5'10" tall and weighing about 200 pounds. One suspect was reported to have dark hair, a beard, and was wearing a red plaid flannel shirt. The second suspect was reported to have dark hair, a moustache, and was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt.

The victim received minor injuries not requiring medical treatment.

Anyone with who may have been traveling through the area at the time with information about this case is requested to call OSP dispatch at (541) 276-2121. Lead investigator is Senior Trooper Dan Chichester.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Fire season ends in northeast Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/23/14
As of 12:01 p.m. on October 23, 2014, fire season was officially terminated for forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), Northeast Oregon District. This includes private, state, county, municipal and tribal lands in seven counties: Union, Baker, Wallowa, Umatilla and small portions of Grant, Malheur and Morrow. Scattered rain showers throughout the district over the past few weeks, combined with cooler fall temperatures has reduced the fire danger.

However, John Buckman, Northeast Oregon District Forester, reminds the public to implement safe practices when using fire in the fall months.

"Fall is a good time to burn forest slash or yard debris, but please recognize that just one sunny and windy day can change conditions very quickly," he said. "Each fall we respond to escaped fires, so please continue to use fire in a responsible manner."

Technical advice for burning and smoke management can be obtained from your local ODF office.

With the termination of fire season, requirements such as providing firefighting equipment at logging sites or obtaining a burning permit for burn barrels are no longer in effect. However, termination of fire season does not relieve landowners or forest operators of lawful responsibilities concerning the safe burning of debris or slash. Windy conditions combined with warm weather could cause unpredictable fire behavior.

Specific Smoke Management/Burning Advisory Information:

- Unless you are in a rural or city fire department protection area, burn permits for burn barrels and small amounts of yard debris are not required. If you are under the protection of a rural or city fire department, please call and ask what their burning restrictions are. Burning within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requires a permit from the CTUIR. Follow all requirements within the permit.

- Burning of slash from forestry and logging activities requires a Notification of Operation/PDM from the Oregon Department of Forestry. In addition to this permit, the local Oregon Department of Forestry office must be contacted prior to ignition.

Before burning in northeast Oregon, it is important to check weather conditions related to smoke management. For smoke management forecasts call (541)963-9781 or visit the following website: www.odf.state.or.us/DIVISIONS/protection/fire_protection/Daily/neo.htm.

- Slash Burns must be registered with the local Oregon Department of Forestry office at least seven days prior to burning and burning accomplishments reported within seven days after burning.

The Northeast Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry would like to thank forest landowners, forest operators and the public for their efforts in fire prevention, detection and suppression activities this season. After back-to-back record fire seasons for the State of Oregon, the Northeast Oregon District was again able to keep acres burned below the 10-year average of 2,207 acres.

Firefighters in the district suppressed 105 fires, which burned just 1,038 acres. Additional resources such as helicopters, bulldozers and single-engine air tankers partially paid for with General Fund monies from the State of Oregon helped significantly to check fire spread quickly in a year in which there were numerous large fires burning throughout the state.

These additional resources were part of the coordinated effort employed by ODF, which also included rural fire departments, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, local contractors, landowners and a long-standing relationship with the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

For further information, contact the Oregon Department of Forestry at these local offices:

La Grande Unit (541) 963-3168
Baker City Sub-Unit (541) 523-5831
Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881
Pendleton Unit (541) 276-3491

To report a fire, call 9-1-1.

Northeast Oregon District Wildfire Blog: http://neodistrictfireblog.blogspot.com/
ODF on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ORDeptForestry
Forestry board to focus on urban forestry benefits in Nov. 5-6 Portland meeting and tour (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/23/14
Portland is the location of a Board of Forestry tour focused on urban forestry
Portland is the location of a Board of Forestry tour focused on urban forestry
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The state Board of Forestry will hold a meeting and tour Nov. 5-6 in Portland, focusing on the benefits of trees and other natural resources in cities, and joining local leaders in discussions about the board's and the Oregon Department of Forestry's current and future urban forestry work.

The board will also meet with the state Environmental Quality Commission (EQC) and host a community social, at which it will continue its tradition of honoring a community leader's contribution to natural resource conservation.

In addition, the board will receive an update from a subcommittee that has been exploring revisions to the current plan for managing state-owned forests in northwestern Oregon. Based on the subcommittee's recommendation, the board is expected to provide direction to department staff on further development of plan revisions.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee, a statutorily established advisory committee to the Board, will provide testimony on the board's deliberations. There will also be an opportunity for public comment.

All events are open to the public.

Business meeting Wednesday, Nov. 5
Setting the tone for the following day's tour, the board will join the EQC and representatives from the state Department of Environmental Quality for an overview of the two panels' positive working relationship, an update on the Department of Forestry's urban forestry program, and an exploration of the role of trees and other natural resources in managing urban storm runoff.

The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Crystal Room of the Tiffany Center, 1410 S.W. Morrison St.

A general public comment period is scheduled near the start of the meeting. Public comment on specific agenda items will be received as the board takes them up. Agenda materials are available at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/board/index.aspx

The community social, also at the Tiffany Center, will follow the meeting.

November 6 tour includes parks, Portland's Water Pollution Control Laboratory
The tour will begin with a panel discussion on a regional urban forestry planning effort, involving two states and 30 cities, that seeks to improve collaboration among government and community organizations, increase forest canopy cover and promote best natural resource management practices.

The tour will include stops at Holman and Columbia Parks and other locations, with presentations by representatives of the Portland Environmental Services Bureau, DEQ, the Oregon Environmental Council and others.

Throughout, the tour will provide insights on importance of green infrastructure--trees, open space, waterways and other natural assets--in providing environmental, economic and social benefits.

A lunch stop will feature a discussion with key urban area leaders on needs and opportunities-- today and in the future--in urban forestry and green infrastructure, and on the current and potential roles of the Board and Department of Forestry.

The day's activities begin at 8 a.m. in the Tiffany Center's Crystal Room. Members of the public are welcome, and encouraged to bring a lunch, arrange transportation if van seating is unavailable, and dress for inclement weather.

Special needs
Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF's public affairs office at least 48 hours in advance, at (503) 945-7200.

About the board
The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information on the board is available at www.oregonforestry.gov.

ODF is on Facebook and other social media sites, accessible at: www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/odfsocialmedia.aspx


Attached Media Files: Portland is the location of a Board of Forestry tour focused on urban forestry
City of Keizer Receives National Boating Access Recognition for Keizer Rapids Boat Ramp, Amenities (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 10/23/14
Mayor Lore Christopher being presented the Mid-Size Access SOBA Award from Janine Belleque, Marine Board's Interim Boating Facilities Manager
Mayor Lore Christopher being presented the Mid-Size Access SOBA Award from Janine Belleque, Marine Board's Interim Boating Facilities Manager
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2014-10/4139/79037/thumb_KeizerMayorSOBAAwd.jpg
The States Organization for Boating Access (SOBA) presented the City of Keizer a Mid-Size Access Award for the new Keizer Rapids Boating Facility on the Willamette River during their annual conference held in Arkansas during the week of October 13. Only one such award is given each year. The national award was formally presented to the City of Keizer's Mayor, Lore Christopher, during their monthly City Council meeting by Janine Belleque, the Oregon State Marine Board's interim Boating Facilities Manager.

Planning for this mid-sized boating access site began in 2003 and within that timeframe, many partnerships were established to work through the different challenges associated with the project. More than 50 individuals from city, state and federal levels, collaborated to complete property acquisitions, obtain environmental construction permits, complete design and engineering, bidding, construction and obtain funding for the Keizer Rapids boating facility. The City of Keizer's Community Development Director, Nate Brown, was instrumental in keeping everyone moving forward and responding to the challenges of completing the City's first improved boating facility.

The total cost for the project was $1,322,379, with $728,296 provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife utilizing federal Sport Fish Restoration Funds from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, $221,356 in state boater funds, and $372,727 from the City of Keizer. Federal funds are derived from federal excise taxes on fishing equipment and motorboat fuels taxes.

The Keizer Rapids recreational boating facility amenities include:
-Property acquisition;
-1,900- feet of paved access road;
-paved and curbed parking lot for 16 single car spaces and 23 vehicle/boat trailer spaces, landscaped islands, sidewalks and signage;
-261-feet for a single-lane concrete boat ramp;
-200-foot long boarding floats supported by five steel piles;
-Single stall vault toilet;
-Two vegetated stormwater treatment bio-swales;
-Bank stabilization, boat ramp protection and large woody debris habitat enhancement;
Vegetated earthen berm to create a noise buffer and visual barrier for adjacent neighbors.

The Keizer Rapids recreational boating facility provides public access to a 12.5 mile area of the Willamette River and is a designated stop on the Willamette River Water trail.

SOBA recognizes outstanding achievements in recreational boating access at the annual National Boating Access Conference. The City of Keizer deserved this national recognition for their vision, collaboration and master planning of Keizer Rapids Park that will benefit recreational boaters for decades to come.

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Attached Media Files: Mayor Lore Christopher being presented the Mid-Size Access SOBA Award from Janine Belleque, Marine Board's Interim Boating Facilities Manager , Keizer Rapids Boat Ramp in 2013 shortly after construction.